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december 2011

this is a high quality art magazine, start to list and find out what`s going on next...

www.me.me

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M.M “Pink steam”


Honey’d sweet apples, they’re rotting away Millions of people never start in the race There’s stuff on out plates that has not been alive Someone pays full price for my cheap flight life “Sunshine, we all see the same sky” I am a man filled with longing desire The gifts of creation are ready for hire A look at a label is all I require Enough’s not enough, I never ask why “Sunshine, we all see the same sky Looking, learning, asking the same ‘why?’” Honey’d sweet apples, they’re rotting away Millions of people never start in the race There’s stuff on out plates that has not been alive Someone else pays the real price of my cheap flight life Wheel of fortune spins, But the wheels on fire come crashing on you Honey’d sweet apples, they’re rotting away “Sunshine, we all see the same sky Looking, learning, asking the same ‘why?’

Belle and Sebastian Song for sunshine album: The life pursuit 2007


KEEP CALM A N D H AV E BREAKFAST AT

T I F FAN Y` S

Hepburn became one of the most successful film actresses in the world and performed with notable leading men such as Gregory Peck, Rex Harrison, Humphrey Bogart, Gary Cooper, Cary Grant,Henry Fonda, William Holden, Burt Lancaster, Fred Astaire, James Garner, Peter O’Toole and Albert Finney. She won BAFTA Awards for her performances in The Nun’s Story (1959) and Charade(1963) and received Academy Award nominations for Sabrina (1954), The Nun’s Story (1959), Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961) and Wait Until.

contents

Scotch & Soda is developed into a well respected brand, has 100 employees and over 6000 shops in a high-end distribution network in 31 countries worldwide. To illustrate what makes the brand unique and to offer the consumer the opportunity to experience the brand to the fullest,Scotch & Soda runs successful stores in Amsterdam, Haarlem, Utrecht and has recently opened in Breda, Brisbane, Paris and Antwerp. Professional stylists are on standby to assist all clients in their shopping experience and support them in their personal wishes and requests.


Bret Easton Ellis

AMERICAN PSYCHO

My favorite paragraph in the entire book: . . .where there was nature and earth, life and water, I saw a desert landscape that was unending, resembling some sort of crater, so devoid of reason and light and spirit that the mind could not grasp it on any sort of conscious level and if you came close the mind would reel backward, unable to take it in. It was a vision so clear and real and vital to me that in its purity it was almost abstract. This was what I could understand, this was how I lived my life, what I constructed my movement around, how I dealt with the tangible.

Back to the World of worldy Air and their latest album, Love 2, with its grand tales of Armageddon and, more importantly, love. Sly sang, “Sing a simple song” and these boys know how to load them meaning. Take their lyrics. You can read what you like into them (and darn it there’s no more fun than doing so) but the truth is the voices are as much about textures and sounds as they are meaning. Just listen to Love on their latest (best?) album Love 2, in which the single word lyric (“love”, natch) is used primarily as a brass stab and keyboard motif as much as it is an actual word. As the Tom Tom Club once sang, “Words are stupid, words are fun, words can put you on the run”; or as Nicolas quips, “We can’t do complicated- sentences because otherwise we make mistakes all the time.”


The word of the editor So here it is, the second edicion of Me magazine with next expressive, direct and colourful young artist. As I said before the whole idea of Me magazine is to represent young artists through their work and stuff they like as music, books ect. I came to this idea because I wanted to see how two artists can work and share together but still stay different, trying to feel someones elses energy but still leave some of my traces. That`s how I`m making the whole design of Me magaine trying to get close to artists sensibility. So far. . . I`m a ship in your painting.

B.A

2010

“Ship�

B.A


Why am I doing this? artist: M.M

“ Light� 2009

ink and watercolour on paper

21x29


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he reason why am I painting or drawing it is because I love to do that, and the thing that I like the most in drawing is that you can express yourself in a very direct way, meantime the painting is something that you build in a totally different way, that could be reason of the material that you are using which are the colour and the area‌ you can fix it and clean it while the drawing is refind in a different way because it is a very little space between you and you`re expression. I like that it is very close and it comes directly from you. The more fluently and directly the drawing is, the better is the way to express your ideas. My work in drawing it always begins from small and direct things, and they hard can develop in something bigger. In that case it is not only the direction and purification but I also want expression and colour. That is the way when I turn the drawing into a painitng. I keep the whiteness of the paper till the end and it becomes part of the painting, its atmosphere and integrity.

M.M


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artist: M.M

“ Light� 2009

ink and watercolour on paper

21x29


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artist: M.M

“ Light� 2009

ink and watercolour on paper

21x29


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artist: M.M

“ Light� 2009

ink and watercolour on paper

21x29


artist: M.M

“ Light� 2009

ink and watercolour on paper

21x29

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KEEP CALM A N D H AV E BREAKFAST AT

T I F FAN Y` S

O O O


Oh Audre Oh Aud Oh Aud Oh Au Oh Aud


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A

udrey Hepburn (4 May 1929 – 20 January 1993) was born in Ixelles, Belgium, as Audrey Kathleen Ruston, Hepburn spent her childhood chiefly in the Netherlands, including German-occupied Arnhem, Netherlands, during the Second World War. She studied ballet in Arnhem and then moved to London in 1948, where she continued to train in ballet and worked as a photographer’s model. She appeared in several European films before starring in the 1951 Broadway play Gigi. Hepburn played the lead female role in Roman Holiday (1953), winning an Academy Award, a Golden Globe and a BAFTA for her performance. She also won a Tony Award for her performance in Ondine (1954). She was also a member of the International Best Dressed List since 1961. Hepburn became one of the most successful film actresses in the world and performed with notable leading men such as Gregory Peck, Rex Harrison, Humphrey Bogart, Gary Cooper, Cary Grant,Henry Fonda, William Holden, Burt Lancaster, Fred Astaire, James Garner, Peter O’Toole and Albert Finney. She won BAFTA Awards for her performances in The Nun’s Story (1959) and Charade(1963) and received Academy Award nominations for Sabrina (1954), The Nun’s Story (1959), Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961) and Wait Until Dark (1967). She starred as Eliza Doolittle in the film version of My Fair Lady (1964), becoming only the third actor to receive $1,000,000 for a film role. From 1968 to 1975 she took a break from film-making to spend more time with her two sons. In 1976, she starred with Sean Connery in Robin and Marian. In 1989, she made her last film appearance in Steven Spielberg’s Always. Her war-time experiences inspired her passion for humanitarian work and, although she had worked for UNICEF since the 1950s, during her later life she dedicated much of her time and energy to the organization. From 1988 until 1992, she worked in some of the most profoundly disadvantaged communities of Africa, South America and Asia. In 1992, Hepburn was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in recognition of her work as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador. In 1999, she was ranked as the third greatest female star of all time by the American Film Institute.


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Hepburn’s H o l l y G o lightly in 1961’s Breakfast at T i f f a n y ’s became an iconic character in American cinema. She called the role “the jazziest of my career”. Asked about the acting challenge of the role, she replied, “I’m an introvert. Playing the extroverted girl was the hardest thing I ever did”. In the film, she wore trendy clothing designed by herself and Givenchy, and added blonde streaks to her brown hair, a look that she would keep off-screen as well. In 1963, Hepburn starred in Charade, her first and only film with Cary Grant, who had previously withdrawn from the starring roles in Roman Holiday and Sabrina. He was sensitive as to their age difference and requested a script change so that Hepburn’s character would be the one to romantically pursue his. Released after Charade was Paris When It Sizzles, a film that paired Hepburn with William Holden, who nearly ten years before had been her leading man in Sabrina. The film, called “marshmallow-weight hokum”, was “uniformly panned”; Behind the scenes, the set was plagued with problems: Holden tried without success to rekindle a romance with the now-married actress; that, combined with his alcoholism made the situation a challenge for the production. Hepburn did not help matters: after principal photography began, she demanded the dismissal of cinematographerClaude Renoir after seeing what she felt were unflattering dailies. Superstitious, she insisted on dressing room 55 because that was her lucky number (she had dressing room 55 for Roman Holiday and Breakfast at Tiffany’s). She insisted that Givenchy, her long-time designer, be given a credit in the film for her perfume. In 1964, Hepburn starred in My Fair Lady which was said to be the most anticipated movie since Gone with the Wind. Hepburn was cast as Eliza Doolittle instead of Julie Andrews, who had originated the role on Broadway, but had no film experience as yet. The decision not to cast Andrews was made before Hepburn was chosen. Hepburn initially refused the role and asked Jack Warner to give it to Andrews, but when informed that it would either be her or Elizabeth Taylor, who was also vying for the part, she accepted the role.


My look is attainable. Women can look like Audrey Hepburn, by buyig the large sunglasses and the little sleevess dresses.

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SCOTCH & SODA AMSTERDAM COUTURE


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ince 1985 Scotch & Soda has expanded operations extensively while, with creativity and individuality as the keys to success, this Amsterdam fashion brand maintains their very own way of doing business. The light-flooded headquarters are based in the heart of Amsterdam – a renovated church houses the showroom and workshop. The mix of ancient ornaments and the stylish showroom is a perfect example of what this company stands for: fusion. It’s exactly this origin that grants Scotch & Soda a powerful position in the international fashion scene without any traditional marketing. Scotch & Soda does not believe in target groups and makes an effort in keeping things simple. They just make products they consider attractive, of good quality, contemporary, genuine and affordable. The clothes do the talking, not big-bucks advertising. Scotch & Soda wants people to love their clothes and have fun wearing them. Therefore marketing according to Scotch & Soda is defined as achieving maximum results with minimum outlay. Within their unmistakable style that could be described as vintage, varsity or fusion, Scotch & Soda tends to include a modern way of living from what is seen around. Each year Scotch & Sodaseeks out the latest trends worldwide – literally-, on the annual company outing around the world. This way Scotch & Soda is able to realize the fusion in their fashion. Variety is the spice of life. So it is all about colours, fabrics and details, both in men’s wear as well as the Scotch Shrunk kids collection and offering their clients something that fits in each individuals mode of creativity.


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Scotch & Soda is developed into a well respected brand, has 100 employees and over 6000 shops in a high-end distribution network in 31 countries worldwide. To illustrate what makes the brand unique and to offer the consumer the opportunity to experience the brand to the fullest,Scotch & Soda runs successful stores in Amsterdam, Haarlem, Utrecht and has recently opened in Breda, Brisbane, Paris and Antwerp. Professional stylists are on standby to assist all clients in their shopping experience and support them in their personal wishes and requests. These stylists share their knowledge about the specific products. The stores further underline the brands unique character with music, scent, design and light. You’re not going to forget you’ve been there. Since Scotch & Soda is eager to serve their clients all over the world in the best possible way, their web store was launched just before summer of 2009 as an extension of the website and offline stores. This fall Scotch Shrunk will be available online as well. In January 2010 Scotch & Soda will proudly introduce the first collection for women, Maison Scotch. With some 150 pieces focused on vintage washes, bohemian retro prints, handmade fine fabrics, sharp shirts, adorable t-shirts and lightweight tops and dresses, Maison Scotch will definitely have the same feel as the men’s line but with a dazzling more of sophistication and femininity.


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1. floral shirt ($ 50) 2. blue navy trausers ($ 150) 3. casual pink shoes ($ 350)

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1. cashmir dark violet sweater ($ 80) 2. beige trousers $ 150) 3. plimsolls ($ 200)

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1. comfortable gray sweatshirt: 80 $ US If you`re interesed in buying visit www.scotch-soda.com


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Salzburg


flowers M.M “Salzburg flowers” 2005

watercoulors


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ink guoache and watercolour on paper


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S

alzburg (Austro-Bavarian: Såizburg; literally: “Salt Fortress”) is the fourth-largest city in Austria and the capital of thefederal state of Salzburg. Salzburg’s “Old Town” (Altstadt) has internationally renowned baroque architecture and one of the best-preserved city centres north of the Alps. It was listeUNESCO World Heritage Site in 1997. The city is noted for its Alpine setting. Salzburg was the birthplace of 18th-century composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. In the mid-20th century, the city was the setting for parts of the American.

Antiquity to Early Modern period Traces of human settlements have been found in the area dating to the Neolithic Age. The first settlements at Salzburg were apparently begun by the Celts. Around 15 BC the separate settlements were merged into one city by the Roman Empire. At this time the city was called Juvavum and was awarded the status of a Roman municipium in 45 AD. Juvavum developed into an important town of the Roman province of Noricum. After the collapse of the Norican frontier, Juvavum declined so sharply that by the late 7th century it had become a “near ruin”. The Life of Saint Rupert credits the 8th-century saint with the city’s rebirth. When Theodo of Bavaria asked Rupert to become bishop c. 700, Rupert reconnoitered the river for the site of his basilica. Rupert chose Juvavum, ordained priests, and annexed the manor Piding. Rupert named the city “Salzburg”. He traveled to evangelise among pagans. Musical and film The Sound of Music, which features famous landmarks in Austria. The musical was a partnership between Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. The capital city of the State of Salzburg (Land Salzburg), the city has three universities. It has a large student population who add liveliness and energy to the area, and the universities provide culture to the community.


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The name Salzburg means “Salt Castle”. It derives its name from the barges’ carrying salt on the Salzach River, which were subject to a toll in the 8th century, as was customary for many communities and cities on European rivers. The Festung Hohensalzburg, the city’s fortress, was built in 1077 and expanded during the following centuries. Independence of Salzburg Independence from Bavaria was secured in the late 14th century. Salzburg was the seat of the Archbishopric of Salzburg, a prince-bishopric of the Holy Roman Empire. After World War II Salzburg became the capital city of the State of Salzburg (Land Salzburg). On January 27, 2006, the 250th anniversary of the birth of Wolfgang Mozart, all 35 churches of Salzburg rang their bells a little after 8PM (local time) to celebrate the occasion. Major celebrations took place throughout the year. The famous fountain in Mirabell Gardens. Salzburg is a tourist favourite, with the number of tourists outnumbering locals by a large margin in peak times. In the 1960s, the movie The Sound of Music was filmed in Salzburg and the state of Salzburg. The movie was based on the true story ofMaria von Trapp, a Salzburg-based nun who took up with an aristocratic family and fled the German Anschluss. Although the film is not particularly popular among Austrians, the town draws many visitors who wish to visit the filming locations, alone or on tours.

Salzburg is the setting for the Austrian crime series Stockinger. In the 2010 film Knight & Day, Salzburg serves as the backdrop for a large portion of the film.


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ink guoache and watercolour on paper


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ink guoache and watercolour on paper


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ink guoache and watercolour on paper


Bret Easton Ellis

AMERICAN PSYCHO


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N

o book since American Psycho has created as much of a scandal. And few books have been as misunderstood. In 1990, months before it was set to be released, certain violent passages were leaked to the press that, taken out of context, made the book seem like a depth-less celebration of sexual violence. Right after Simon & Schuster canceled the book, an employee of the publishing house said, “The most unfortunate thing about this whole controversy is that the book is a piece of shit. It’s hard when something like this becomes an issue of censorship, because you want to rush to its defense, but you can’t”. This quote sums up why I like American Psycho so much: it has no redeeming qualities. Ellis doesn’t provide socially redeeming qualities. There is nothing nice in the book. Nothing about any of the characters, nothing about anything -- there is no plot; characters are not developed. You could take the things that the people in the book say, and switch them around with other characters, and it wouldn’t change anything, at least as far as character development goes. Patrick Bateman literally has no personality. He’s totally blank. My favorite paragraph in the entire book: . . .where there was nature and earth, life and water, I saw a desert landscape that was unending, resembling some sort of crater, so devoid of reason and light and spirit that the mind could not grasp it on any sort of conscious level and if you came close the mind would reel backward, unable to take it in. It was a vision so clear and real and vital to me that in its purity it was almost abstract. This was what I could understand, this was how I lived my life, what I constructed my movement around, how I dealt with the tangible. This was the geography around which my reality revolved: it did not occur to me, ever, that people were good or that a man was capable of change or that the world could be a better place through one’s taking pleasure in a feeling or a look or a gesture, of receiving another person’s love or kindness. Nothing was affirmative, the term “generosity of spirit” applied to nothing, was a cliché, was some kind of bad joke. Sex is mathematics. Individuality no longer an issue. What does intelligence signify? Define reason. Desire -meaningless. Intellect is not a cure. Justice is dead. Fear, recrimination, innocence, sympathy, guilt, waste, failure, grief, were things, emotions, that no one really felt anymore. Reflection is useless, the world is senseless. Evil is its only permanence. God is not alive. Love cannot be trusted. Surface, surface, surface was all that anyone found meaning in. . . this was civilization as I saw it, colossal and jagged. . . Every bad thing said about American Psycho is an understatement, and misses the point. You, as a reader, are not supposed to like Patrick Bateman. There is absolutely nothing likable about him, or any of Ellis’ other characters for that matter. But the characters are not really the focus. A lot of critics have argued that Ellis is, in fact, a moralist writing about how sick our society is. Eileen Battersby, for instance, wrote: “Some reviewers have decided his work is pornographic. It isn’t. True, at its most violent he is raiding the world of Jacobean drama, yet Ellis’ fiction is ultimately a highly moralistic reading of a sick, vicious society” .


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Nonsense. Ellis is writing about himself, not society. He uses society as a backdrop; part of the purpose of writing for him is to find his place in society. As he once said in an interview: ``Writing is really a very selfish thing. You’re writing a book because you want to write a book and you’re interested in these characters and you’re interested in this story and you’re interested in this style and you’re basically masturbating at your desk. . .You’re pleasing yourself when you’re writing, you’re not pleasing a bunch of other people. Sure, there is a moralistic tone in his writing, but that doesn’t mean he is a moralist. That just means he enjoys writing about the bad stuff and throws in some satire for the sake of intriguing literature, and the satire makes some of the things going on in the book look disapproving. One of the refreshing things about Ellis is that he never points his finger at anyone, he just expects the reader to decide for him/herself what is wrong and right. And concerning pornographic literature, well, pornography is only that which works as pornography. Porn is in the eye of the beholder. Ellis likes making fiction out of his real life. It’s the way he prefers to deal with his life. In his earlier books, he would place the main character in a situation and environment very similar to his own. Then he would write a story about the character. The writing process would serve to help him figure out what was going on in his own life, and give him a reflection to look at for reassessing his situation. Yet he insists that he’s never written an autobiographical novel. Maybe it’s much easier for Ellis to evaluate the lives of fictional characters than real lives, so that’s his reason for infusing aspects of real life, our world, into his fictional world. Like when Patrick Bateman meets Tom Cruise. This serves to make us think of Bateman as existing in our reality. Ellis does this to help him see our reality as fiction. Time was the first to pan American Psycho. . .three months before it was even published. R.Z. Sheppard wrote in an article entitled “A Revolting Development”: “But to write superficially about superficiality and disgustingly about the disgusting and call it, as Ellis does, a challenge to his readers’ complacency does violence to his audience and to the fundamental nature of his craft.” Writing disgustingly about the disgusting and superficially about the superficial is what makes Ellis so great. His aesthetic mirrors the content. There is no contrast. The reader is forced to play a large role in processing the book.

American Psycho is a book that alienates its readers. Its objectionable content discourages one from paying the close attention to details, which is needed for a better understanding of the book.


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YOU CAN`T WHAT I saw her today at a reception A glass of wine in her hand I knew she would meet her connection At her feet was her footloose man

No, you can’t always get what you want You can’t always get what you want You can’t always get what you want And if you try sometime you find You get what you need I saw her today at the reception A glass of wine in her hand I knew she was gonna meet her connection At her feet was her footloose man You can’t always get what you want You can’t always get what you want You can’t always get what you want But if you try sometimes you might find You get what you need Oh yeah, hey hey hey, oh. . . And I went down to the demonstration To get my fair share of abuse Singing, “We’re gonna vent our frustration If we don’t we’re gonna blow a 50-amp fuse” Sing it to me now. . . You can’t always get what you want You can’t always get what you want You can’t always get what you want But if you try sometimes well you just might find You get what you need Oh baby, yeah, yeah!


I went down to the Chelsea drugstore To get your prescription filled I was standing in line with Mr. Jimmy And man, did he look pretty ill We decided that we would have a soda My favorite flavor, cherry red I sung my song to Mr. Jimmy Yeah, and he said one word to me, and that was “dead” I said to him You can’t always get what you want, no! You can’t always get what you want (tell ya baby) You can’t always get what you want (no) But if you try sometimes you just might find You get what you need Oh yes! Woo! You get what you need--yeah, oh baby! Oh yeah! I saw her today at the reception In her glass was a bleeding man She was practiced at the art of deception Well I could tell by her blood-stained hands You can’t always get what you want You can’t always get what you want You can’t always get what you want But if you try sometimes you just might find You just might find You get what you need You can’t always get what you want (no, no baby) You can’t always get what you want You can’t always get what you want But if you try sometimes you just might find You just might find You get what you need, ah yes. . .

Rolling Stones “You can always get what you want” album: Let it bleed 1969

YOU

ALLWAYS GET WANT 45


ir is two musicians (Jean-Benoît Dunckel and Nicolas Godin) who are typically French yet altogether worldly. Many of France’s best musicians have something of this, simultaneously from yet not of France. It’s an argument that could be levelled at, say, Jean-Pierre Massiera, one of France’s misunderstood geniuses, or Saintly Serge, adored and occasionally reviled, Jacques Dutronc, who in the ‘60s had a tiger (and several other wild animals) in his guitar or Marc Moulin who was so French he was actually Belgian. But back to the World of worldy Air and their latest album, Love 2, with its grand tales of Armageddon and, more importantly, love. Sly sang, “Sing a simple song” and these boys know how to load them meaning. Take their lyrics. You can read what you like into them (and darn it there’s no more fun than doing so) but the truth is the voices are as much about textures and sounds as they are meaning. Just listen to Love on their latest (best?) album Love 2, in which the single word lyric (“love”, natch) is used primarily as a brass stab and keyboard motif as much as it is an actual word. As the Tom Tom Club once sang, “Words are stupid, words are fun, words can put you on the run”; or as Nicolas quips, “We can’t do complicated sentences because otherwise we make mistakes all the time.” So what’s new in the world of Air? Well, the big news this album is they’ve dispensed with producers and, moreover, built their own studio – it’s almost entirely constructed out of analogue keyboards, as if you couldn’t tell. The results are stunning. It’s the most homogenous album they’ve made since the criminally underloved 10,000khz. Ever the conceptualists, Air wax lyrical about their new lair. “So many different aspects of the studio can suggest different things to you, the doors, the walls, the windows, the street, the architecture.” They’ve spent most of the past year locked in their newly furbished studio with drummer Joey Waronker, the first time they’ve written an album in such a ‘jam’ style, something that’s evident on rockers like Be a Bee or Do The Joy, in stark contrast to Pocket Symphony’s minimalist meditations on which drums were barely evident.


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After the last album’s speculative approach – dabbling with the delicately ornamental sounds of the east; it was inspired by Japan (the country and band) – Love 2 feels like a cleansing of the palate. “The album,” says Nicolas, “is much more energetic, live and loose.” JB adds, “Well we think it sounds fresh and we wanted everything to be fresh. We didn’t try and take a conscious direction, we just tried to produce something that was alive and had energy.” Where Love 2 is at its most strident is in the vocal tracks. This time they’ve eschewed guests and stuck to JB’s beguiling reflections and his simple but effective lyricism dealing as it perennially does with the wonderment of woman. “We always see women in a romantic and idealised way”, laughs JB. So Light Is Her Footfall is the perfect embodiment of this, as the woman in question, “an angel” receives the rapt attention of Air. The song’s title was lifted from Oscar Wilde’s The Canterville Ghost and, say the duo, is their vision of England (it’s an England few English people would recognise but is all the greater for it). Sing Sang Sung, a tune so preposterously catchy it could start a pandemic, also has echoes of England in its alliterative title (based on English grammar lessons you may not be surprised to learn). In Heaven’s Light they have produced the nearest thing to a sure-fire hit (it screams Radio 2 playlist) for years, driven by a snare-heavy attack, its chiming keyboards take you dangerously near to the sun. Unlike poor Icarus, however, we pull away just in time to save the song and, indeed, love itself. “We wanted to get the feeling of climbing higher and higher into the light but with this sort of melancholy,” asserts JB. Who would disagree? If this is the racket that Air make unbounded by outside influences, secreted away in their exclusive Parisian studio lair, then we can’t wait to hear further dispatches from Air central. “We’ve moved all of our stuff into Atlas [their studio] so now we can make the sound that we really want to make,” enthuses JB. “It’s like our starship and we are the captains of the starship and we can take it wherever we want to.” Permission to take off.


Design and editor: Brigita Antoni Artist: Marko Markovic Text is a combination of thoughts and wikipedia You can find this magazine in all libraries in Montenegro with a price of 55 eur (you can also pay in 6 months installments);


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