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Bridgette Mekkelsen Design Portfolio


Table of Contents

University of Pittsburgh 1-6 Sustainable Design Studio 7-8 Approaches to the Built Environment 9-11 Architecture: Image, Text and Theory Final Project Book Exerpts The Walsh Group 12 Revit Wall Details

13 14-15 16-17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Valencia College Map Diagram for Ft. Pulaski Site Final Models for Ft. Pulaski Site Digital Renderings for Ft. Pulaski Site Charcoal on Watercolor Paper Sketches Perspective Drawings and Diagrams Buddhist Tea Ceremony Model and Plexiglass Diagram Villa Savoye Bok Tower Light Study The Art of Dance and Movement Model

24 Conclusion

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Bamboo Expansion Unit Steps Passive Design Strategy Sections Materials and Sustainability Studio The University of Pittsburgh These expansion units represent the second step of an incremental housing project in Kathmandu, Nepal. These units use local bamboo which can be harvested by the residents of the housing complex. The section diagrams involved using the Sefaira plug-in for SketchUp and finding the most applicable passive design strategies based on directionality. Edits were then made in Photoshop to create graphics for said passive design strategies.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Materials and Sustainability Studio Collaborative Work with Whole Studio The University of Pittsburgh This collaborative effort e entailed using Sefaira to get all the geographical weather information for the site of Kathmandu, Nepal. The data includes yearly averages of temperature, humidity, precipitation,wind speed, cloud coverage, daylight, and sun paths. Additionally, it was helpful to create a psychometric chart located at the bottom right of this page. This chart overlays the temperature and humidity and which passive design strategies were most applicable for our site.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Materials and Sustainability Studio Case Study for Passive Design Strategies The University of Pittsburgh This exercise developed understanding of a 200 square foot living space, what necessary household areas can fit into these spaces, and what amounts of daylighting and ventilation were required for different types of spaces. Each “block� represents 200 square feet, and the dark and light boxes represent phase one and phase two (expansion unit) respectively. In addition to applying action words to manipulate the space alloted, this exercise developed a skill in realizing the limitations of both building materials (masonry and bamboo).

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Materials and Sustainability Studio Case Study for Passive Design Strategies The University of Pittsburgh This is a continuation of the exercise from the previous page. The process developed my understanding of passive strategies and implemented those most advantageous and mentioned in the psychometric evaluation provided by Sefaira.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Incremental Housing Site Diagram Materials and Sustainability Studio Collaborative Work with Group The University of Pittsburgh This digital representation of the entire incremental housing complex was created in SketchUp. The project educated me on the necessities of building for a community, communit and not only their economic limitations, but their geographical and social requirements.

Incremental Housing Plans and Sections Materials and Sustainability Studio Collaborative Work with Group The University of Pittsburgh These two proposed plans include three units and two units from left to right respectively. The plan to the left for each residential type shows phase one of the incremental housing project. It would be built by a construction team and will be made of masonry units. and the plan to the right of it represents the expansion unit which will be made of local bamboo and built by the residents.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Materials and Sustainability Studio Final Model 7.5’ x 3’ Collaborative Work with Two Group Members The University of Pittsburgh The project concluded with a large final model which sat near a river bed in Kathmandu, Nepal. Wood is representative of phase one which consists of masonry. masonr White board and 3/32� wooden sticks are representative of the bamboo expansion units. As this was the largest final model I had participated in creating to date, I developed immense respect for my group members and our collaborative effort. This project taught me the value of compromise and working towards a common goal.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Anne Lindberg’s shift lense uses cotton thread and staples to evoke wordless emotion. I photographed this installation to use as inspiration for a collaborative installation in The University of Pittsburgh’s Frick Fine Arts Building. The whole group spent some time in the room this installation filled. I felt a deep connection with this piece and yet, as it was described, could not place an actual word on the emotion I was feeling. The piece was stunning because the sun was just starting to set as we entered the space.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Approaches to the Built Environment The Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil Installation in Frick Fine Arts Building Collaborative Work with Four Group Members The University of Pittsburgh This art installation required several weeks of group planning, including choosing how to best represent the art installation at The Mattress Factory that stimulated us all the most. After careful consideration, Anne Lindberg’s shift lense provided us with the inspiration we needed. Our installation was located in the southern section of the corridor, providing us with a direct line of sight to the Cathedral of Learning. Opposing this building is a painting of the biblical story of Adam and Eve. This project strives to evoke wordless emotion from the viewer as they are faced with the choice of viewing one of these focal points, while indirectly viewing the other. The duality between the mind and the spirit forces the participant to make a subconscious choice between the two focal points.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Architecture Image, Text and Theory Final Project: Analysis of Currumbin Ecovillage The University of Pittsburgh The next three pages include excerpts from my final project for a course entitled Architecture Image, Text and Theory. I presented a PechaKucha style presentation a month before the submittal of this final project which was bound into a booklet form. These pages show insight on the topic I choose to research, that being the Currumbin Ecovillage in Queensland, Australia. After starting to research sustainable communities, I found there were large areas of land inhabited by many like-minded people with a passion for the environment. I started to analyze why these people felt so passionate, what made them push themselves to this level of environmental stewardship. I applied hedonistic theory to start understanding the mindset of those who inhabit the Ecovillage at Currumbin. Additionally, several case studies provided specific residences in the village and some aspects of their planning process, in addition to day-to-day life in Currumbin.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Architecture Image, Text and Theory Final Project: Analysis of Currumbin Ecovillage The University of Pittsburgh This two-page spread analyzed the residency of Bede Durbidge, which implemented the necessity of family living alongside styles of New Urbanism. I constructed these pages using and enhancing graphic design skills in addition to gaining knowledge about residential planning, merging the necessity to fulfill environmental requirements along with the owner’s requirements.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Architecture Image, Text and Theory Final Project: Analysis of Currumbin Ecovillage The University of Pittsburgh This two-page spread analyzed the case study of the Tallowood Treehouse, a personal favorite in the ecovillage. The layout allows the reader to visualize the emotions evoked by this residency, along with placing the readers on pages immersed in trees, similar to the landscape surrounding the Tallowood Treehouse. I have been inspired by this home and strive to design residencies in respect to the careful and conscious planning of the designers at symbiosphere.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Wall Details in Revit Made during Internship at The Walsh Group These wall details involved taking the construction documents from the Sharepoint site, and analyzing what materials were used, and the scale they were drawn at. After this information was retrieved, I started building a model in Revit. After the project was rendered, I opened up the file in Photoshop and InDesign in order to create the labels and fine-tune the graphics. This was a great exercise which taught me extreme proficiency within the program, along with allowing the marketing team to use these renderings for a future proposal to the same client.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Map Diagram of Ft. Pulaski Savannah, GA Valencia College After visiting the site of Fort Pulaski in Savannah, Georgia, I started to become curious about how weather patterns, proximity to the center of the city, and the history of Savannah, Georgia could all play a role in implementing a monastery on the site of an abandoned fort. This abstract diagram allowed me to process my thoughts using overlays of hand drawings and paintings, as well as elements within Photoshop and maps. The diagram is representational of my early thoughts going into the benefits and restrictions of the site and how I planned to deal with said benefits and restrictions moving forward into the building process.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Final Model for Ft. Pulaski Site Monastery Concept Design Valencia College The final model included spaces for living quarters, which were perched above a grouping of trees on the site. The model flows in procession of the typical day of a monk, as there is a deeply rooted importance in repetition of their days of work. A long corridor then leads to an altar where their morning mass would take place, with a large aperture facing the east, in order to illuminate the area of prayer during the early morning hours. Outside

Bridgette Mekkelsen

of this altar is a large garden, which is partially encased in a glass wall to evoke surreal emotion. A typical day includes going to get a meal, therefore it felt necessary to place the cafeteria in the center of the complex.


Final Model for Ft. Pulaski Site Monastery Concept Design Valencia College As monks spend a great amount of time in their studies, the model includes steps leading directly down into an underground library. Below this library is an underground safe room, which was not a required system, but rather one that made sense after analyzing the weather patterns of Savannah Georgia. The wood is representational of the terrain and site, while the white board is representational of the masonry building and complex. The project involved digging into the terrain and creating a connection between the built environment and nature.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Digital Rendering and Plan for Ft. Pulaski Site Monastery Concept Design Valencia College These digital renderings taught me about using textures and creating my own lighting and shading within Photoshop in order to create a better concept of space. The small detail rendering below shows the prayer space, and the aforementioned rising of the sun in the east intruding into the prayer space. These renderings taught me how to merge line drawings from AutoCAD into Photoshop and how to better analyze my thought process using this method of digital rendering.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Light Experiment Valencia College These “light boxes” were an exercise in evaluating how space interacts with light, understanding the direction of light, and how to manipulate said light in terms of diminishing it or enhancing it. They were approximately 12” x 12” and were made from wood sticks and bristol paper.

Digital Rendering Valencia College This rendering shows the living quarters of the monastery and analyzes the procession and elevation of said living quarters. This final product also plays with the manipulation of light.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Section Cuts, Plan, and Site Plan Charcoal on Watercolor Paper Valencia College These drawings were a final product analyzing the use of light within a space intended for a purification process, specifically a baptism. They were located on the site of Bok Tower in Lake Wales, Florida. This historic landmark is home to a huge art deco tower and the baptismal pond is surrounded by many trees and a dense natural landscape, which was necessary to consider when deciding how the space should be lit.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Pencil and Watercolor Perspective Drawing Plexiglass Diagram Valencia College These pencil and watercolor on watercolor paper drawings show the multiple steps taken during the Buddhist tea ceremony we attended as a class at a Buddhist temple in Orlando, Florida. The section drawing shows the procession throughout the ceremony and the final level reaches the enlightenment that is felt at the end of the ceremon The plexiglass diagram is representational of the tea ceremony. The necessary steps outlined by the ceremony. tea masters taught us the importance of the ritual, in addition to the purification process and the path to tranquility.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Plexiglass Diagram Buddhist Tea Ceremony Model Valencia College This plexiglass diagram was the final version of an abstract representation of the tea ceremony. The final model analyzes

Bridgette Mekkelsen

the emotions felt throughout the ceremony and the procession towards enlightenment. The wood represents the concrete transition between these steps, while the glass encasement is representative of looking for something more, human beings, and their inert nature to strive for more beyond the now.


Villa Savoye Model Ink on Mylar Drawing Valencia College This wooden model is a to-scale representation of Le Corbusier’s Corbusie Villa Savoye. The drawing provided practice in using ink on mylar, a traditional architectural practice. This drawing and model represented Corbusier’s “Five Points of New Architecture”, an introduction to the modernist movement.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


Bok Tower Light Study Process Model Valencia College This process model provided a beginning of understanding the concept of manipulating light within a space. Chipboard is representational of the terrain and bristol paper is representational of building material. The project taught me how to project light from one entrance into a space.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


The Art of Dance and Movement Final Model Valencia College This model played with the idea of two objects or materials reacting to each other, othe combining and being their own entities at the same time, similar to a dance between two partners. The layered chipboard represents the intertwining of these two entities. The white board represents the first dance partner and the wood represents the second dance partner. partne This was a good lesson in understanding a balance between materials and starting to comprehend what materials work best in certain conditions.

Bridgette Mekkelsen


In summation, this concludes Bridgette Mekkelsen’s architectural design portfolio and collection of creative works. Moving forward into a career in architecture, this scope of work will continue to be enhanced and refined. The impeccable beauty of sustainable architecture will remain in the foreground. There will be a steady focus and growing emphasis on creating and imagining exquisite additions to the built environment that compliment the natural world. When building, impact is inevitable, yet this impact can bring positive experiences to the world and humanity. Newton’s Third Law rings true, as “actioni contrariam semper et æqualem esse reactionem”. I will always choose actions conscious of their repercussions, and I will devote my life to bettering the built environment so the future will see growth and positive change is possible.

Bridgette mekkelsen architecture portfolio  

Architectural designs and innovations created by Bridgette Mekkelsen

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