Page 1

Was Brazil a "serious country" destined to be a great  power, or was it always to remain a land of the future?  There are no simple answers.  By ALEXA FUTTERWEIT The fifth largest country in the world, Brazil is the largest country in Latin America and  has territory slightly larger than that of the continental United States. With 80 percent of  its population living in cities and towns, Brazil is one of the most urbanized and  industrialized countries in Latin America.  Brazil stands out for its regional and social disparities. Brazil is noted for having one of  the most unequal income distributions of any  country. In the rural Northeast, there is  poverty similar to that found in some African  and Asian countries. Although increased  urbanization has accompanied economic  development, it also has created serious social  problems in the cities. While in many ways this diversity or heterogeneity makes it similar to other developing  countries in Latin America and elsewhere, Brazil is also unique. One of the fascinating  elements of this uniqueness is that it is different things at once, presenting different faces  or identities of a single coherent whole. Both local and foreign perceptions of Brazil tend  to exaggerate particular features, lack a balanced view, and fail to grasp how the parts of  the whole fit together. During the twentieth century, for example, the country was  considered a tropical paradise famed for its exports (coffee), music, and soccer, as well as  the nearly mythical Amazon rain forest. On a more serious level, Brazil often was  disparaged for its inability to solve basic political and economic problems, such as  consolidating democratic institutions, controlling runaway inflation, and servicing the  foreign debt. However, the nation is noted for being an emerging industrial power and for  constructing giant public works, such as the new capital city of Brasília, the Trans­ Amazonian Highway, and the world's largest hydroelectric dam (Itaipu). Brazil also  stands out for its leadership role in Latin America and the developing world. Most Brazilians saw the military regime of 1964­85 as a repressive dictatorship, although  others regarded it as having saved the country from communism. Brazilian society was  viewed as conservative and male opinionated, yet simultaneously freewheeling or even  immoral, as revealed in its Carnival festivities. In the 1980s, much of the world saw the  Amazon, the world's greatest store of biodiversity, and its native peoples as falling victim  to unparalleled destruction. 

alexa-brazil article  
alexa-brazil article  

By ALEXA FUTTERWEIT The fifth largest country in the world, Brazil is the largest country in Latin America and has territory slightly larger...

Advertisement