Issuu on Google+

Affect of WWII on Minorities in America


African Americans Since the end of slavery eighty years before the war, African Americans were faced with racism. During WWII, African Americans were faced with one of two likely lives. Either fight in the armed forces overseas or deal with job loss and discrimination inside the U.S. borders. Figure 1B

Many industries did not want to hire African Americans because they believed that whites were better at working. As a result, many families did not many enough money to live like we do today so they were hungry and living in poor houses.


Because most of the African American population was living poorly during WWII, many were fighting to improve their life. The Double V Campaign was a major civil rights movement, published through a newspaper, the Pittsburgh Courier. It promoted that all races be treated equally in America.

Other

organizations

such

as

the

National

Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) aimed for the same goals of the Double V Campaign. All of these groups, teaming together became very powerful and the fight to erase racism in the U.S. gained a massive amount of support. Figure 2B


Mexicans During the war, a large amount of men and women volunteered

Figure 3B

to fight in the army. As a result, most of the farmers were gone and the crops left to die. To prevent

a

decrease

in

food

production, President Roosevelt created the Bracero Agreement, which

allowed

thousands

of

Mexicans to farm on American plantations for more money than they were getting in Mexico. For

a

Native Americans long time Native

Americans had been forced Figure 4B

to live on reservations and work very small pay jobs. The WWII, allowed Native Americans to fight in the army,

which

led

to

an

increase in income. This also led to better lives for them because they now had more money to spend.


Page 3