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Brian portfolio Peterson


RÉSUMÉ

Work Experience

higher education

// 5/13  –  9/13

// class of 2014

Meyers + Associates Architecture Columbus, OH Architectural Intern: Assisted in design and documentation of commercial and multi-family residential projects, designed and managed entry to international competition

The Ohio State University Columbus, OH Masters of Architecture

// 8/12  – 05/14

The Ohio State University Columbus, OH Graduate Teaching Assistant: Architectural History, Graphic Representation, Construction, and Systems courses

// class of 2011

University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH Bachelor of Science in Architecture Minor in Sustainability // summer 2010

Danish Institute for Study Abroad Copenhagen, Denmark Architecture & Design Study Abroad Program

// 6/12  –  8/12

BHDP Architecture Cincinnati, OH Architectural Intern: Member of retail project team, assisting in all phases of design and documentation of multiple projects including custom retail prototypes // 1/11  –  9/11

Earl Swensson Associates Nashville, TN Architectural Intern: Member of healthcare project team, creating presentation materials for multiple healthcare facilities, ranging from rendered floor plans to architectural models. In-depth use of Revit and Photoshop // 6/09  –  6/10

Charles Vincent George Architects Naperville, IL Architectural Intern: Assisted in all phases of design and construction administration on a range of residential and commercial projects

Technical Skills // Computer

Revit, AutoCAD, SketchUp, Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Rhino, Vray, Grasshopper, Maya, 3D Studio Max // Hand

Architectural Drafting, Freehand Drawing, Modelmaking, Various Media Activities // Academic

Possible Mediums Conference 2013, Figural Structures Workshop 2013, Baumer Scholar, Cincinnatus Scholar, Former AIAS Executive Board, Dean’s List // Competitive

PLAYScapes International Design Competition 2013, FIVE Design Challenge 2011 (Finalist), Fargo Urban Infill Competition 2010


contents

Academic // SPRING 2014

On Edge

6

// Fall 2013

Patterning Cuteness

8

// fall 2013

Figuring Volume

12

// spring 2013

Hexacorallia 14 // Fall 2012

Ann Arbor Arts Academy

18 

// winter 2012

World Expo 2012 Pavilion

22

// Fall 2010

Fargo Urban Infill Competition

24

Professional // Summer 2013

Meyers + Associates

26

// Summer 2012

BHDP 30 // WINTER & Summer 2011

Earl Swensson Associates

32

// Summer, WINTER & SPRING 2010

CVG Architects

34

Visual Work // 2012 & 2013

Installations & Workshops

36


academic

ON EDGE // SPRING 2014

Professors Stephen Turk & Jeffrey Kipnis Individual Project

This late entry to the Keelung Harbor Service Building competition (won by Neil M. Denari Architects in 2014) seeks to embody my exit review research into the interactions of smooth and crystalline forms. The competition called for an iconic building to house a port terminal and office spaces, a dual program requirement that was the ideal framework for the formal contrast. The two geometries serve different programs and create different environments. Both are similar languages that find their differentiation in the techniques used to architecturalize the forms, including fenestration, panelization, structure and site strategy. The project starts with a smooth form housing the port terminal which is then intersected by an aggregation of crystalline forms containing the office spaces. The smooth form incorporates flowing open spaces, concealed structure, cutout fenestration, and a smooth continuous finish, while the crystalline forms collide and intersect, creating fragmented spaced within more of an exposed structure. Those surfaces are broken up into faceted metal panels or faceted glazing systems. The interaction of flowing site surfaces, smooth form, and crystalline aggregation serves the disparate programs and enhances the atmospheric effects of each.

6


7


PATTERNING CUTENESS // fall 2013

Professor Lisa Tilder Group Project

The studio began with each group theorizing trajectories of Post-Radical-PostModernism. Settling on exploring the role of cuteness in architecture and what factors create “cuteness,” iconic works of architecture were transformed into abstracted caricatures. Characteristics of cuteness were identified and used to develop the characters through a variety of material techniques. The characters were placed into a suburban neighborhood all at a similar scale to create a uniform context for analysis. The resulting architecture creates a “cutopia”, where each model uses a unique combination of characteristics to achieve cuteness. An accompanying movie serves as a narrative that represents the projection of cuteness in architecture towards a future where it can be located in any context at any scale, playing off its surroundings to heighten its effect.

// fig 1.1

Architecturalizing the characters

8


// fig 1.2

Neighborhood model 48” × 96” // various media

9


// fig 1.3

Unfolded “Punt� character pattern

// fig 1.4

Neighborhood characters: (a) Inky (b) Pilla Savoye (c) Punt (d) Ito

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// fig 1.5

Model views

// fig 1.6

Unfolded “Ito� character pattern

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FIGURING VOLUME // fall 2013

Professor Kristy Balliet Individual Project

The seminar explored the similarities and differences between the terms “space” and “void,” and where volume fits into the lexicon. The goal was to design provocative, volume-oriented architectural interiors. The figural volume of the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C. is actually the space within and beneath its concrete donut massing. In an effort to exaggerate the volume’s effects of compress and release, the volume was enclosed and the lower portion expanded horizontally outwards, constrained by the pylons. The “arms” of the resulting volume extend different amounts, responding to the site and accessibility to the building. The volume pulls both outwards and upwards at the same time, anchored by the central ring.

12

// fig 2.2

Transformed volume


// fig 2.1

Interior volumetric rendering

// fig 2.3

Original volume

13


hExacorallia // spring 2013

Professor Justin Diles Partner Project

Hexacorallia is an addition to Eero Saarinen’s TWA Flight Center at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York on the scale of JetBlue’s newly opened terminal on the same site. Beginning with a series of transformations on a sphere, a catalogue of primitive forms was generated at varying scales and proportions, which was then combined to create a “field object,” emphasizing formal intersections and the voids created. Named after its resemblance to the subclass of corals exhibiting six-fold symmetry, Hexacorallia uses its large central spaces with smaller auxiliary protrusions to support program and create intersections between the forms. The interior spaces become a series of connections and arrival spaces pulling passengers through the terminal, with ancillary program and circulation located within the form’s poché. The extending, limb-like nature of the forms allows for a variety of intersection conditions and the potential for further additions. NEW YORK, NY:

14


// fig 3.1

JFK Terminal 5 site plan

15


// fig 3.2

Final section model 24” × 36” × 15” // bristol paper over chipboard structure

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// fig 3.3

Departures level plan

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ANN ARBOR ARTS ACADEMY // fall 2012

Professors Rob Livesey and Bart Overly Partner Project

The Ann Arbor Arts Academy combines studio spaces, apartments, and cultural spaces centered around an elevated semi-public plaza that invites the community to enter into the environment of the art school. The design is driven by the concept of an architectural promenade through the program strata, facilitated by an integrated stair that maintains its visibility from the exterior. The glazed north faรงades take on a faceted form, varying in transparency relative to the program within, while the main stair projects from the massing in crystalline figures. The project culminated in a set of construction documents incorporating structural, mechanical, and sustainable design considerations. ann arbor, mi:

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// fig 4.1

Liberty Street rendering

// fig 4.2

Concept diagrams

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// fig 4.3

Program axonometric

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4 A3

L Studio L Studio

840 SF

M Studio

M Studio

639 SF

655 SF

L Studio

L Studio

646 SF

710 SF

M Studio L Studio

L Studio

635 SF

790 SF

697 SF

728 SF

M Studio 468 SF

Cafe 2830 SF

L Studio 687 SF

Lobby 3 A3

Reception

L Studio

Gallery

561 SF

Waiting

2463 SF

Vestibule

Secretary Bldg. Srv. 21 SF

153 SF

L Studio 586 SF

Bldg. Srv. 107 SF

Bathroom

Bathroom

Storage

Office

122 SF

127 SF

123 SF

154 SF

Projection Room 322 SF

153 SF

Bathroom

Bathroom

336 SF

268 SF

Auditorium

Director 286 SF

2380 SF

Conference

Asst Director

338 SF

254 SF

// fig 4.4

Main level floorplan

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WORLD EXPO 2012 PAVILION // WINTER 2012

Professor Stephen Turk Individual Project

The criteria of the World Expo 2012 called for a main gallery space celebrating the history of art with supporting pavilions highlighting emergent technologies. The context-driven solution of the pavilion responds to the expo’s circulatory grid, Dubai’s city grid, and the nearby coastline. Through choreographed large-scale interactions and circulation patterns, the smaller pavilions direct visitors to a central sunken courtyard with access to the main gallery. Carefully curated openings in the surfaces create distinct environments within the spaces, directing circulation and creating focal points.

DUBAI, UAE:

// fig 5.1

Process diagram sequence

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// fig 5.2

Final model 18” × 24” // baltic birch plywood

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[AIR]GO, FARGO // FALL 2010

Professor Udo Greinacher Group Project

The challenge of the international design competition was to transform the site into an integrated multi-functional design of “live, work, and play” while responding to the context of the city. FARGO, ND:

[Air]go, Fargo addresses the lack of a local marketplace and the need for constructed shelter against the harsh weather conditions. The design is based around a sequence of small buildings with a central marketplace, all covered by a dynamic tensioned roof. The fabric structure serves as a focal point in the city as well as a figural “blanket” to protect visitors from the elements.

// fig 6.1

Process diagram sequence

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25


professional

MEYERS + ASSOCIATES // sUmmer 2013

Columbus, OH

A large portion of my time at Meyers + Associates was spent on an international competition to design a place for play in an overlooked part of the city. In conjunction with producing presentation packages and construction documents for numerous other projects, the internship afforded me the opportunity to coordinate and design the competition entry with a fellow intern. Our entry, FLEXpark, is a haven from busy urban life, but also a vantage point to view the ever-changing activity of the city. It provides an escape for both children and adults through a range of multi-functional areas. The elevated roofscape and protected areas below adapt their functions to the season, allowing for year-round use. As a place for its inhabitants to gather, relax, watch, and break from the norm, it acts as a much-needed relief from the endless pattern of structures and parking lots: the playscape as urban oasis.

26


// fig 7.1

Summer/Winter rendering

// fig 7.2

Longitudinal section

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// fig 7.3

Experiential vignettes

Destination: the project focuses on the space between a pair of parking lots fronting high street, the main axis of downtown columbus

Duality I:

Duality II:

Dynamic:

the playscape provides amenities for both children and adults, allowing a variety of people to be drawn to and use the site.

in addition, the space can be used year-round, providing a place of play and gathering in all seasons

the site’s dynamic slope not only facilitates the slide and tubing run on the roofscape, but also separates the different programmatic elements both above and below

ng w. lo

y w. ga

north

n re ild ults d A

high st

y e. ga

Ch

ng e. lo

south

// fig 7.4

Concept diagrams

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BHDP // sUmmer 2012

Cincinnati, OH

I spent my three-month internship at BHDP Architecture as a member of the retail team, working on a range of projects. I was introduced to the principles of store planning, as our team reworked layouts for a retailer’s major overhaul. I traveled with a survey team to document an existing department store, assisting with the on-site documentation and the coordination of materials upon our return. I was integrally involved in the creation of a design development drawing set for a custom salon concept, working with customized fixtures in Revit, coordination with multiple clients, adaptations for differing locations and restrictions, material testing and specifications.

30

// fig 8.1

Salon fixtures


// fig 8.2

Floorplans with custom fixtures

31


EARL SWENSSON ASSOCIATES // winter, summer 2011

Nashville, TN

My six months in Nashville were spent on an array of different projects. I worked daily in Revit on a variety of healthcare projects, from hospitals to assisted living communities. I was able to help create a detailed physical model of a concert hall design for Belmont University, as well as history displays for the firm’s 50th anniversary celebration, complete with 3D-printed models of hallmark projects. I was also involved in a pro-bono, after-hours project for a non-profit green business hub. We charetted the design, met with clients, and produced a promotional booklet with presentation drawings and renderings.

// fig 9.1

Completed project

ROOF OF A.C.C. BUILDING BELOW

1 ISOL.

ANTE.

2 ISOL.

N.S.

ELEC. COMM. ANTE.

3

4

5

N.S.

R.T. CONSULT

N.S.

N.S.

MEDS. SOILED NOUR. UTILITY

7

N.S.

8

9 10

N.S.

STAFF LOUNGE

CLEAN SUPPLY

11

N.S.

CLEAN MEDS. STORAGE SUPPLY NOUR.

INTENSIVE CARE BEDS (24) N.S. N.S. N.S.

N.S.

24 23 ISOL. ISOL.

6

WAIT.

22

21 20

19 18

N.S.

17

16

12 13

N.S.

WOMEN’S PAVILION PARKING GARAGE

N.S. N.S.

15 14

SERV. ELEV.

32

// fig 9.3

Programming floorplan


// fig 9.2

Presentation model

33


CVG ARCHITECTS // sUmmer, WINTER & SPRING 2010

Naperville, IL

During my nine months at CVG Architects, I was responsible for solving design issues, drafting updated plans, and hand-rendering the exterior and interior elevations of a lakehouse. Being involved in the design process from the beginning of the schematic design phase through the completion of construction documents gave me a stronger understanding of the entire architectural process.

// fig 10.1

Completed lakehouse

34


// fig 10.2

Hand-rendered elevations

35


Graduate Workshops & Installations

the city as an aggregated figure workshop

// fig 11.1

Final model

// FALL 2013

Professor Peter Trummer Institute of Urban Design, Innsbruck

The workshop explored a new model of the city as an aggregated object, in which each building performs as the ground for the next, appearing both autonomous and heteronomous at the same time.

// fig 11.2

Aggregated ground study

36


possible mediums conference // spring 2013

Workshop Leader Ellie Abrons The Ohio State University, University of Michigan, University of Illinois at Chicago, University of Kentucky

// fig 12.1

Interior view

Ellie Abrons (ea-do.com) led a three-day exploration of the experiential possibilities of the model. The final model created an occupation of space through a visual, rather than physical means, within an environment of strange materiality and novel perception.

// fig 12.2

Final model with viewports

37


buttons & balustrades installation // fig 13.1

// FALL 2012

Seminar Professor Stephen Turk The Ohio State University

Buttons & Balustrades is the culmination of a seminar exploring faciality, facades, and the thresholds of recognition. Silhouettes of over one hundred iconic works of architecture were taken and either extruded or revolved to create a field of objects, milled in foam (large scale) or 3D-printed on a gameboard controlled by the visitors (small scale).

38

// fig 13.2

Installation in Knowlton Hall

Portion of installation catalog


figural structures workshop // SPRING 2013

Klaus Bollinger & Clemens Preisinger Bollinger + Grohmann Engineers

// fig 14.1

Individual structural model

Using the advanced structural analysis software karamba3d, the workshop created intricate figural structures through parametric geometric modeling, finite element calculations, and optimization algorithms. Final structural scenarios were constructed and assembled large-scale from digitallyfabricated cardboard cells.

// fig 14.2

Figural structures installation

39


Printed in Ohio, USA. Š 2014 Many thanks to my family, friends, colleagues, teachers, and mentors who have helped me to where I am today. Special thanks to Lucie Pognonec for her generous time and graphic guidance. See more examples and images of my work online at cargocollective.com/brianpeterson.


bapeterson21@gmail.com 630 229 3805 540 Harley Dr. Apt 2 Columbus, OH 43202

© 2014

Graduate Portfolio  

Architectural Portfolio comprised of work from MArch at Ohio...