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VIEW, Issue 53, 2019

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Sponsored by All Ireland Institute of Hospice and Palliative Care

Funding aimed at seven key areas Corrina Grimes, from the Public Health Agency in Northern Ireland, says that the Palliative Care in Partnership programme recognises the need for a greater societal discussion about planning for care, death, dying and bereavement alliative Care is about improving the quality of life for the person with palliative care needs and improving the experience of those important to them. Building on the success of the implementation of the ‘Living Matters; Dying Matters’ Strategy, the Northern Ireland palliative care programme – Palliative Care in Partnership – brings together people with palliative care needs, those who care for them, clinicians and other health and social care professionals, service planners and providers, and the Department of Health to ensure the delivery of a whole system, holistic approach to support and care. Our aim is to ensure that ‘what matters to me’ is addressed for each person with palliative care needs, whether the need is physical, psychological, social or spiritual, or a combination of these, as is often the case. To ensure people living with a lifelimiting illness have an optimal quality of life, the Palliative Care in Partnership programme is working to raise awareness of palliative care, implement processes to ensure earlier identification of palliative care needs, and ensure that when a person is identified as having palliative care needs a keyworker is allocated to them who will help coordinate their care irrespective of where it is provided and across care boundaries. The programme also aims to promote advance care planning and supporting people to have conversations about what is important to them and their future care, as well as progress actions to improve access to generalist and specialist palliative care services. Palliative Care in Partnership also recognises the need for a greater societal discussion about planning for care, death,

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Our aim is to ensure that ‘what matters to me’ is addressed for each person with palliative care needs

focus of our future work programme.   The Palliative Care in Partnership programme has benefited from Transformation Funding from the Department of Health which has helped to continue the work to reform and improve palliative care in Northern Ireland. The funding has been allocated across seven main areas: • Earlier identification of palliative care need in primary care • Increased provision of palliative care education and training to support a range of staff across the health and social care system • Extensions of Marie Curie Rapid Response services across all areas of Northern Ireland • Improved access to out of hours specialist palliative care advice • Public engagement and awareness and promotion of advance care planning • Bereavement support

dying and bereavement and the important role of families, friends and communities in supporting those living with palliative care needs. With the Department of Health, Palliative Care in Partnership members are exploring how the concept of a public health approach to palliative care can be developed and implemented in Northern Ireland and this will be a key

• Increasing the specialist palliative care workforce. Palliative care in Northern Ireland has come a long way since 2010. Positive leadership and working in partnership have been key to the successful translation of policy into practice, ensuring more people with palliative care needs, and those important to them, have access to the support and care they need.

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VIEW - LATEST ISSUE - PALLIATIVE CARE  

Social affairs magazine

VIEW - LATEST ISSUE - PALLIATIVE CARE  

Social affairs magazine