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SELECTED WORKS 2014 — 2017

MARCH I 2021 / HARVARD GSD

BRIANBOYINGLEE@GSD.HARVARD.EDU

+1 (857) 753-7182

IN-BETWEEN

| BRIAN BO YING LEE


In-between spaces are often not the main subject of architectural innovation and discourse. Yet they provide us with a mechanism that can fulfill most, if not many, of the issues arising from tension between privacy and engagement, of relationships between occupants, the public, the elements of nature, and the elements of architecture. In-between spaces can, as Perimeter Plan: Four Temperaments shows, be a mechanism for creating a public-private gradient within a building. It’s ability to transcend between what is conceptually inside and outside, and occupy the grey areas of functionality, allows it to both bridge and segregate. Such a dichotomy is expressed in Bento House and Apartment Renovation, where in-between spaces function both as social spaces and buffers for a large family living in close quarters. Where in-between spaces is usually a resultant of initial massing studies, here the reverse process is employed in Toa Payoh Court and Urban Spine. The in-between space is the catalyst for relationships between ground plane and architecture. In-between spaces are used to challenge our perception of conventional architecture, to re-think our greedy appetite for space. (MY)Cro Space is one attempt at getting more out of less by creating flexible in-between spaces. Lastly, in-between spaces are used to challenge our perception of a high-security infrastructural building. The porosity created as a result of introducing in-between spaces in the immigration offices of Woodlands North Train Station, proposes an alternative to the usually closed and isolated architecture of highsecurity installations. It is hoped that through the use of in-between spaces, we can once again reconnect with the qualities of land that give it its spirit of place — topography, landscape, connections to the surroundings, and space for the confluence of people.


01 Perimeter Plan: Four Temperaments (2017) Building and emotions p.04 02 Bento House (2016) Layering in a multi-generation home p.10 03 Toa Payoh Court (2015) Re-thinking high-rise living p.14 04 Campus Infill: Makerspace X (2017) 1 building, 4 identities p.20 05 Urban Spine (2014) Using topography to channel activity p.24 06 Apartment Renovation (2015) Cellularisation of living space p.30 07 (MY)CRO Space (2016) Multi-disciplinary design-build project p.32 08 Woodlands North Train Station (2017) Cross-border train station (currently u/c) p.36


01 PERIMETER PLAN: FOUR TEMPERAMENTS Fall 2017 // GSD Core Studio 1 // Instructor: Andrew Plumb, Aamodt Inspired by the Four Temperaments, this student dormitory employs a coherent and consistent curvilinear form along with subtle typological differences to create spaces of varying ‘personalities’. The building juxtaposed a normative outer edge against an expressive inner courtyard as a way to negotiate the city fabric while varying privacy. The ‘choleric’ spiral staircase is the driving agent behind the shape of the internal courtyard, which divides the building into three distinct wings that display dominant traits of the ‘sanguine’, ‘melancholic’ and ‘phlegmatic’ personalities. Typological differences in the in-between spaces of stairwells, atria and corridor types further drive the distinction between the extroverted and introverted wings, thereby creating spaces within the building that appeal to students of varying personality types.

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2F PLAN 1 Team Meeting Space 2 Main Staircase 3 Roof Terrace 4 Bathrooms 5 Event Space (below)

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1F PLAN 1 Lobby 2 Main Staircase 3 Event Space 4 Bathrooms 5 Secondary Entrance


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4F PLAN 1 Roof Terrace 2 Main Staircase 3 Quiet Study Room (below) 4 Bathrooms 5 Event Space (below)

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3F PLAN 1 Team Meeting Space (below) 2 Main Staircase 3 Quiet Study Room 4 Bathrooms 5 Event Space (below)

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02 BENTO HOUSE Spring 2016 // SUTD Option Studio // Instructors: Ong Ker-Shing and Joshua Comaroff, Lekker Architects The project for a multi-generational home consisting of grandparents, their two children and respective spouses, and two grandchildren called for new ways to address privacy within domestic settings. The concept was to exploit the hilly terrain by segmenting the 1000sqm volume into a series of similarly-sized buildings, which cascade down the slope and are thus deliberately misaligned in plan and section. This allows for visual and audible separation, while yet maintaining a sense of presence within the house. The in-between spaces are designed as social spaces, transitory spaces or buffer spaces depending on weather, time of day or activity. In this sense, the inbetween spaces are grey areas within the house that accommodate the constant tension between family bonding and privacy. 10


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INFILL FACADE SYSTEMS 1 Swivel timber louvres 2 Sliding timber doors 3 Sliding glass doors 4 Strip windows 5 Screens 6 Balcony extrusions 7 Parapet walls/glass railings

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CEILING INSTALLATIONS A Drop ceilings B Suspended service frames C Exposed waffle slab

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3F PLAN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

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Porch Entrance Powder Pantry Kitchen Family Dining Library Master I Master II Deck

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Bar Laundry Store Living Family I Family II Pond Pool

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03 TOA PAYOH COURT Fall 2015 // SUTD Core Studio 3 // Instructor: Pauline Ang, CPG Consultants This 24,000sqm residential project explores a compact, low-tomedium rise alternative as to conventional high-rise apartments in Singapore. In doing so, new relationships between residents and the public can be created.The building masses are a resultant of a network of narrow lanes, courtyards and plazas, and their heights step down towards the center in order to create a more intimate feel within the site. Varying degrees of porosity and permeability are created, which translate into social spaces with varying functions, all of which are geared at creating a connection between the ground plane and residents. These social spaces are activated by public amenities and commercial spaces. In addition, private roof terraces create additional social spaces for residents.

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FACADE DETAIL 1 RC Parapet, Waterproofing, Plaster and Paint 2 Cement Screed, Waterproofing, Insulation 3 Waterproofing, Cement Screed, Plaster and Paint 4 Sliding Tempered Glass Door 5 Timber Handrail and Steel Balustrades 6 Aluminium Sheet for Ledge 7 Gutter 8 Operable Timber Louvres

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Fixed Sunshading Fin Fixed Timber Panel Parquet, Cement Screed, Waterproofing Waterproofing, Cement Screed, Drop Ceiling Fixed Tempered Glass Window Concrete Drain Cement Block, Cement Screed, Earth


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1F PLAN 1 Entrance Plaza 2 Outdoor Eating Area 3 Retail Services 4 F&B 5 Bicycle Parking 6 Main Plaza 7 Elderly Care 8 Community Courtyard 9 Educational Services

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Private Businesses Childcare Void to Parking Gym Parking Access Communal Space Building Services Parking Driveway


6F PLAN 18 Studio 19 2-bedder 20 3-bedder 21 Roof Terrace 22 Communal Space

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04 CAMPUS INFILL: MAKERSPACE X Fall 2017 // GSD Core Studio 1 // Instructor: Andrew Plumb, Aamodt The intention for this four-week project is to divide two large quads into four smaller quads by striking a perpendicular extension in between two existing buildings. This perpendicular arm also stitches the two buildings together by allowing for a transition between the open-plan nature of one of the existing buildings to the cellular nature of the other. Each quad would thus have its distinct character due to the tension between horizontal and vertical elements in each face. The rigid parallel walls are rotated at the center of the building due to the agency of the public passage as required by the brief, which strikes at an oblique angle to the building. This, and the resultant atrium space, creates a public space that both unifies and differentiates public and work space in the building.

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SITE PROGRESS 1 Proposed Site Plan 2 2000s Site Plan 3 1990s Site Plan

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2F PLAN 1 Pedestrian Entrance 2 Passage 3 Office 4 Rear Court 5 Lecture Space 6 Cafe 7 Exhibition Space 8 Studio Space

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Entrance Plaza Large Robotic Arm Office Light Well Lounge Small Robotic Arm Fabrication Lab Collaboration Space


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05 URBAN SPINE Fall 2014 // SUTD Core Studio 1 // Instructor: Carlos BaĂąon, Subarquitectura This six-week project for a cultural center attempts to re-think the relationship between building and topography. Human movement from key pedestrian paths, transport nodes and surrounding developments are channeled into an urban spine. The spine is carved into the ground of a gently sloping site, flanked by buildings on both sides that are partially sunken to maintain lines of sight between street level and landscape. A 100-seat theatrette crosses the spine perpendicularly, creating a sheltered event space for the public as the main focal point. The size of this theatrette mirrors that of conserved colonial bungalows in the vicinity, while the rest of the buried buildings help to reduce the visual footprint of this development.

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LOWER LEVEL PLAN

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Cafe Reading Area Exhibition Room Shop Sheltered Venue


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Plaza Shaded Entrance Theatrette Balcony Rooftop Terrace

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06 APARTMENT RENOVATION Fall 2015 // SUTD Core Studio 3 // Instructor: Pauline Ang, CPG Consultants This short, two-week project for an apartment renovation calls for compartmentalisation of a large space as opposed to typical open-plan living space. Three existing apartments are combined into one large space for a multi-generational family, where friction between family members and contest for space is a problem. Here, privacy is gained through compartmentalisation while family unity is maintained by minimising the need for doors. Movement from the main entrance to a particular bedroom feels like an act of retreating as one is aware of the many transitions between spaces. However, as most of these spaces are not separated by physical doors, a sense of presence is still felt amongst the many family members. The numerous compartments also allow for varied functions for which family members can occupy without competition; the compartments themselves are both get-together spaces and social buffers, hence creating privacy without isolation. 30


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UPPER LEVEL PLAN 1 Reading Room 2 Television Room 3 Study 4 Bathroom 5 Bedroom 6 Master Suite 7 Outdoor Terrace

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LOWER LEVEL PLAN 8 9 10 11 12

Entrance Dining Purification Chamber Bedroom Kitchen

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07 (MY)CRO SPACE Spring and Summer 2016 // SUTD Team Capstone // Instructors: Dharmali Kusumadi and Keith Koh, Banyan Tree Holdings Ltd The driving force behind (MY)CRO Space was to maximise the number of room configurations possible in a 28sqm micro apartment. Unlike conventional micro apartments, these service apartments needed to be flexible as they catered to guests with varying lifestyles. The flexibility was created through the interplay between a movable multi-purpose unit (with a built-in desk and storage) and a sliding murphy bed. As part of the brief, the multi-disciplinary team project consisting of architecture, product development and information systems undergraduates were to build a full-scale mock-up of the apartment. The mock-up was designed to be easily dismantled, transported and re-assembled in the exhibition space. This project was awarded the Public Award during the Capstone Showcase, a testament to the design’s thoughtfulness.

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08 WOODLANDS NORTH TRAIN STATION Fall 2016 – Summer 2017 // Professional Project // Supervisor: Pauline Ang, CPG Consultants The concept for the Woodlands North cross-border train station and transport hub challenges the conventional notion of an immigration facility by creating a welcoming feel through green spaces and porosity. A large terraced public park connects the business district into the basement passenger concourse. This terraced plaza is designed with commercial spaces and pavilions dispersed amongst the various terraces. Ramps weave from side-to-side, stiching the adjacent developments to the landscaped space. For the immigration offices, pockets of lush green terraces help to break down the imposing building mass, thus creating a more friendly urban environment despite strict security guidelines. Featured here are the parts of the project where there was personal involvement and decision making in. The cross-border rail project is currently undergoing phased tenders and preliminary construction. Full completion is expected in 2026.

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BASEMENT 1 PLAN 1 Central Park 2 Basement Concourse 3 Immigration Hall 4 Arrival Hall 5 Thomson-East Coast Line Station 6 Service Areas

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PLAN OF CENTRAL PARK 1 Pedestrian Street 2 Plaza 3 Seating Area 4 Pavilion 5 Reflective Pool (rainwater collection) 6 Sheltered Arcade (underneath) 7 Future Development 8 Pick-Up/Drop-Off Plaza 9 Escalators/Lifts to Basement Concourse

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Brian Lee (b. 1992) is currently pursuing his Master in Architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. He graduated from the Singapore University of Technology and Design in 2016 with a B.SC Architecture and Sustainable Design Summa cum Laude. He has earned the university’s Undergraduate Distinguished Scholarship, Architecture Core Design Certificate of Merit, Academic Excellence Award and the Kumpulan Akitek Best Paper Award for History, Theory and Culture. He has completed internships with Singapore-based DP Architects and WOHA, and an extended stint at CPG Consultants where he was involved in concept and detailed design of a major cross-border train station and crematorium in Singapore. Brian is a passionate and highly-motivated individual who values the marriage of architectural theory with practical construction. In addition, he is commited to leading a balanced lifestyle with interests in history, current affairs, travel and outdoor adventure.

December 2017 Architecture Portfolio  

Selected Works 2014-2017 at Harvard GSD and the Singapore University of Technology and Design

December 2017 Architecture Portfolio  

Selected Works 2014-2017 at Harvard GSD and the Singapore University of Technology and Design

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