Page 1

NAIRB BRIAN SEMAJ

JAMES

ZIDAC CADIZ

MOC.KIFARGTEKCOP

POCKETGRAFIK.COM

UDEY.ELEKREB.LAC@ZIDAC

CADIZ@CAL.BERKELEY.EDU

4950.485.514

415.584.0594


BRIAN

BRIAN

CADIZ

CADIZ

JAMES POCKETGRAFIK.COM

CADIZ@CAL.BERKELEY.EDU

415.584.0594

JAMES POCKETGRAFIK.COM

CADIZ@CAL.BERKELEY.EDU

415.584.0594


This exercise was meant to interpret light & reflection, as seen in everyday items. Various viewpoints of an object were selected that afford the best show of reflective elements. Hand sketches were completed to isolate levels of intensity. Shades were then interpolated to extremes, and texture dictated the flow of shadows, light & meandering mirror images.

LINE+ FILL CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY POMONA ART 253A, WINTER 2001

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

10”x10” Technical Pen & Ink


8”x4” Graphite on paper

Above are early studies exploring the process of chiarascuro development. Pencil foundation drawings reveal the subtleties between shades that aid in the separation of color intensities. The use of vibrant shades of red in the subject foreground and neutral shades in background further emphasizes the differences in light and shadow on the leaf.

CHIARASCURO 10”x10” Acrylic paint

CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY POMONA ART 253A, WINTER 2001

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ


An architectural pattern was created as a basis for color theory exercises. The main architectural pattern in the foreground is painted with the same color in each study, however the background colors and smaller architectural patterns differ in each study. This exercise illustrates how the human eye can perceive color differently due to the surrounding colors.

COLOR THEORY CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY POMONA ART 253A, WINTER 2001

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

10”x10” Acrylic paint


This exercise introduced concepts of composition, repetition, order and craft in form making. Limited to a palatte of wood and plexiglass, and space constraints of an initial 2”x2” square, the program called to utilize a reiterative growth process to produce several forms. The initial form was conceived in the two dimensions and with successive generations developed into a three dimensional product. The collection of objects were then arranged to make apparent the logic to its composition and material progression.

REPETITION+ORDER CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY POMONA ENV 101, 1999

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

24”x12“x4” Basswod & Acrylic


This exercise to explored the fractal-like means of an elementary ordering system based on the repetition of shapes, forms and interactions of elements in a single occurrence, as well as in a combined occurrence. The intial shape is construted by adhering to a set of basic rules for interaction of element (line, volume and plane). In attaching several of these shapes to one another, the same rigor is applied to the whole. The resultant form becomes a manifestation of pure order.

TRANSFORMATION +GROWTH CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY POMONA ENV 101, 1999

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

14”x10”x12” Basswood


Situated in front of the historic train station, this primitive shelter will become a gateway between the past of Claremont, California and its future. Feeding off the constant commuter traffic, this shelter will be a hub for the residents of Claremont, the college students, and also for those passing through. Inspired by the Barcelona chair, its sweeping lines and simplicity lend to its functionality.

CURB +

+

+

+

CLAREMONT URBAN RENEWAL BUS SHELTER

CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY POMONA, ARC 201 FALL 2001

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

Presentation Model 24”x36”x12” Foamcore, aluminum & acrylic


Presentation Section Drawing 18”x36” Technical pen & ink/paint on mylar

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

Presentation Model 24”x36”x24” Foamcore, chipboard, wood & plexiglass


Presentation Section Drawing 18”x36” Technical pen & ink/paint on mylar

COYOTE LAKE

PALEONTOLOGY

MACHINE CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY POMONA, ARC 201 FALL 2001

In essence this anachronistic paleontology center is a machine that extracts, scrapes, and bores into the earth. Used both for gross mining and fine excavation, the form of this building is of pure function. In the distant future, modern civilization may be under several thousand feet of earth, and will need broad strokes like this to extract the remains of a once vibrant society. One can foresee excavating cities, tract homes and astrological exploration refuse. Relatively speaking, what is Paleontology but the study of precedent life forms. At some point, present day society will be a precedent of another civilization--and that is where this machine will provide the catalyst to uncover and document past life. As the machine travels, it continually displaces amounts of earth, which is deposited adjacent to the exavated site. Structures are then continually built along the length of the deposited earth, and form dormitories, offices and supporting spaces for the remote Paleontology Center. As excavation sites are continually in a working state, so too is this Paleontology center and the spaces it creates. Study Section Drawing 18”x36” Technical pen & ink/paint on paper

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ


Presentation Section Drawing 18”x36” Technical pen & ink/paint on mylar

Dormitory Conceptual Models 18”x36”x12” Chipboard, wood & plexiglass

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

Excavation Conceptual Models 18”x36”x12” Chipboard, wood & aluminum


Presentation Section Drawing 18”x36” Technical pen & ink/paint on mylar

Analysis of crane/arm range of movement

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

Conceptual Models 18”x36”x12” Chipboard, wood & plexiglass

Research Module Conceptual Models 6”x10”x8” Foamcore, found objects, chipboard


PHYSIOLOGICAL SEX HUNGER BATHE

SLEEP REST BASIC NEEDS COVER CANOPY

CLAREMONT

PERFORMING

SAFETY

PROTECTION

SECURITY

ARTSPACE

CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY POMONA ARC 202 WINTER 2001

SOCIALIZATION BOND FRIENDS

INTERACTION

ESTEEM

In finding a logic to the organization of program in a suburban performing art center, we look at performance and see that it is one of the premier facets of the human experience. Art and performance come at the very end of the progression of needs, providing that every preceeding need is met.

DISCUSSION

It is fitting then, that Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs has been used to organize the major programatic elements of this building. Seeing that acting and performance are tantamount to human realization, we deepen the theatrical element, and make it the terminating space of the subterranean structure. Likewise, shelter and food are the most basic of needs, and those are met at the street level. Interim needs are assigned to the interstitial spaces with light, volume and permeability playing a key role in the physical manifestation of remaining needs.

NOTEWORTHY PRAISE

The Claremont Performing ArtSpace is meant to be a beacon of art and expression for the small town of Claremont in Southern California. As the first of its kind, this theater will serve as a tool to performers of the city and will help them reach the self-realization through artistic expression. With hopes to draw a diverse array of performances, this theater will provide both patrons and performers with a new perspective and need for the arts in their lives.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

SELF-ACTualization

EPIPHANY

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

POTENTIAL


Presentation Model 24”x36”x12” Foamcore, chipboard, aluminum, acrylic

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ


Schematic of floorplan derived from a page of text from Maslow’s “Motivation and Personality”

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

Close-up of presentation model/ Plan study of material & border permeability

Presentation Model 24”x36”x12” Foamcore, chipboard, aluminum, acrylic


The Arts & Architecture Case Study program was initiated as an experimental venture, to explore the possibilities of new materials, young architects, and limited budgets. The use of a structural steel frame for a residential house was unheard of at a time when steel was just previously being rationed for the war effort. This newfound use hoped to usher in a new era of building technology, sleek lines, and glass curtain walls. The house’s glass enclosure system allowed its resident to look upon Los Angeles, on a parcel of land that was previously deemed unbuildable with traditional construction methods. Soon, this view alongside Case Study House #22 as photographed by Julius Schulman, would signify a new attitude and aesthetic towards post-war architecture. Schulman’s photograph cemented the ideals, hopes and dreams of a generation. The Butterfly House intervention is in ways a mechanism to question those values of the 1950s. Mobile units, all set on a steel track system provide different functions: a butterfly display greenhouse, a workspace, a garden, and a curator’s residence. Each module is independently mobile. The application of the space-age remote control aesthetic of the 1950s would allow the reconfiguration of these modules at a touch of a button. This would allow one of the modules of space to position itself adjacent to the glass living room cantilever that Shulman made so popular. Consequently, at times one’s vista may be filtered by fluttering butterflies, a serene garden, a private residence, or a utilitarian workspace. This leads the viewer then to question what constitutes a view? Is it the permanent natural landscape set around an individual, or does it become the man-made alterations which frame and direct our sight? Or does the control of one’s view ultimately fall out of the architect’s control and into the hands of a domestic housewife? The Butterfly House intervention would then purport that architecture is merely a tool that everyday people can use conveniently change their surroundings, with a touch of a button.

ARTS+ARCHITECTURE CASE STUDY22

+BUTTERFLYHOUSE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BERKELEY, ARCH 100A, SPRING 2002

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

Perspective Study 30”x42” Technical Pen & Ink on Mylar


BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

Composite Presentation Drawing 30”x42” Technical Pen & Ink on Mylar


BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

Presentation Model 18”x12”x14” Vertical wood topographic site Metal & acrylic structure

Study Model 18”x12”x14” Vertical foamcore topographic site Wood & paper structure


fall2002

Within the urban fabric, there appear to be points of hidden and apparent striation--which we can call rifts. These breaks separate items of differing consistencies, textures, viscosities and transparencies, i.e. the street from the sidewalk, the park from the house, and so on. These rifts similarly occur on larger scales, such as the city grid, and freeway networks which separate sides by virtue of speed and movement. As well this oppositional quality can be applied to our daily lives--More succinctly it can be applied to the life of a commuter. The daily ritual of travelling to and from work, the passing of time, and space are never more eloquently traversed. The break from comfort to convenience becomes materialized at the point of transition when and where an individual is boarding a ferry. Surrendering control of his destination, his privacy and his personal space, these loss of comforts becomes translated into another kind of convenience. This rift, this break in the surface, emphasizes the transition, heightens it and makes the commuter more aware of his surroundings. It simplifies between opposing sides and asks the individual to choose. This moment of choice, of sides, of separations sets the backdrop to facilitate the interface of automobile, parking space, human being, supermarket shelf, fresh produce and the diesel ferry and the bay that contains them all.

ALAMEDA FERRYTERMINAL +MARKET

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BERKELEY, ARCH 100B, FALL 2002

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

Presentation Drawings 24�x36� Electronic Print on bond


A.

B. 1

CE NVENIEN RIP OF CO

B. 2

Presentation Rift Model 22”x22”x8” Chipboard & poured wax site Paper, wood & acrylic structure

A.

Conceptual massing models 6”x8”x4” Chipboard & Wood

B1. Speed of Transition Diagram 24”x18” Electronic Print on bond B2. Rip of Convenience Diagram 24”x18” Electronic Print on bond

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ


Prompt Working within the confines of an urban city lot in the city of Berkeley, CA, this site has had an imagined tumultuous past. Previous construction of a city library was halted, at the realization of the architect’s plagiarism, leaving a field of five-story concrete columns rising from the basement level. Many years past, and the lot lay stagnant as a Berkeley environmentalism organization guerilla seeded the site with bamboo. At full maturity the bamboo forest has equaled the heights of the concrete columns. The program, to be orchestrated within pre-existing conditions above, is a city bicycle racing velodrome, dance theater, and large scale art exhibition space. Tool The bicycle brake handle is one of the most functional parts that comprise of a bicycle—it’s main function being derived from direct manipulation by the human hand. The simple act of closing a fist is then translated and multiplied by a simple lever and cable system into usable stopping power via the caliper brakes to the wheel. The brakes lever allows for a gradation of stopping power which varies directly with the applied pressure of the hand. The salient characteristics—pivot point, multiplication of force, travel distance—are then extracted through various sections cut through the brake handle at different intervals. These sections themselves become the rules and tents that guide the formation of the velodrome, and drive the decision making process. As the velodrome remains at the only feasible location due to the fixed column grid, the remainder of the program relates to the idea of pivoting movement, a concept described above and that is also synonymous with dance. With this in mind, the dance auditorium, while static, offers several engaging adjacencies to the many programatic elements provides dancers with backdrops of the bamboo forest, or conversely an open view to the surrounding urban context. Lookout points offer wanderers strategic points to overlook the velodrome races below, as well as the large exhibition art gallery at the basement level.

BERKELEY

VELODROME UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BERKELEY, ARCH 100A, SPRING 2002

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ


Presentation Perspective/Section Drawings 24”x18” Technical Pen & Ink on Mylar

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

Presentation Model 12”x10”x8” Chipboard site Wood, paper & acrylic structure


BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

Composite Presentation Drawing 30”x42” Technical Pen & Ink on Mylar


BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

Presentation Model 12”x10”x8” Chipboard site Wood, paper & acrylic structure


Construction photographs

Ogrydziak / Prillinger Architects, Sonoma Studio 5 (Adjunct to 100B Studio) The property is on 100 acres in the Sonoma mountain range that separates Sonoma and Napa counties. The property will be developed as a vineyard and country home for a family of five. The site for the sleeping cabins is on a shallow ridge facing west and has a panoramic view of the Sonoma valley and the coastal mountains. There will be four sleeping cabins with built-in bunks, each 120 sq. ft. not including outside decks. The cabins will be located with their backs against a stand of oak trees, oriented towards the expansive view west. The intent is that the cabins will be extremely transparent to the view.

Outdoor/Indoor Integration One of the chosen designs, illustrated on the opposite page, integrates a large overhanging roof as well as sliding door panels to afford an open-air sleeping, and lounging condition. With the mild summertime weather, the client wished that the architecture of the cabin to be as minimal as possible, and not interfere with the experience of being outdoors. This solution employed large eaves, as well as a large sliding door to further mesh the indoor space with the dramatic landscapes below. Built of wood, these structures are meant to be moved to other foundation setups, when more permanent structures are built on the property. A total of six cabins are planned to be built, three of which would be patterned after the present design. Zoe Prillinger, ARCH 100B Instructor at UC Berkeley, proposed this aside project during the Fall 2002 semester, and administrated the studentinvolved construction to completion. The design and implementation were expedited at the wish of the clients; fast, efficient and feasible plans were desired. In addition, material had to be of local origin. From cradle to grave, the project lasted a 3 months.

SONOMA

STUDIO-5 OGRYDZIAK / PRILLINGER ARCHITECTS FALL 2002

Personal Contribution: Schematic Design Final construction documents: Ogrydziak/Prillinger Architects Construction: Contractor + Partially student-assisted

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ


Working closely with their client’s Store Design Department, McCall Design Group looks at each tenant improvement project as a challenge to maintain the client’s signature design elements while adapting to the nuances that the jurisdiction, landlord, and scale of a particular project. Fast pace projects, which start and end in a matter of months, have allowed me to visit all parts of a retail construction project: pre-design, feasibility, design development, construction documentation, and construction administration. Architectural representation at city review boards, as well as site visits, have allowed me to engage in projects, and defend its design intent throughout all stages of the construction process. In addition, working on projects located in all major US markets, the varied exposure to jurisdictions, climates and geographies has aided in my understanding of site adaptation, and adherence to local, state and federal building codes. The following pages show a few examples among many projects I have been involved in, that typify a retail tenant improvement project.

NORTHLAKE MALL, NORTH CAROLINA

SEPHORA, INC. MCCALL DESIGN GROUP FOR SEPHORA, INC. 2003-2005

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

Construction Documentation 30”x42” Electronic Drawing


Over 50 feasibility studies were contracted in a two-year span throughout the Gap Brand store fleet. Standard procedures included code checks, space analysis, massing models merchandise allocation analysis, and historic significance research. Weekly design charettes with Gap, Inc. Store Design facilitated refinement of programatic needs, and allowed for continued dialogue with the client to receive constant brand design developments, and in turn to provide the client with relevant architectural direction.

FEASIBILITY STUDY

GAP, INC. MCCALL DESIGN GROUP FOR GAP INC. 2003-2008

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

Feasibility Study Drawing 24�x36� Electronic Drawing


Construction Progress

ON STOREFRONT CONSTRUCTION BYBY UNDER SEPARATE PERMIT LANDLORD. ONLY AWNINGS & SIGNAGE T FOR REVIEW IN THIS PERMIT APPLICATION.

Construction Documents 24”x36” Electronic Drawing

THE MARKET COMMON, MYRTLE BEACH, SOUTH CAROLINA

WILLIAMS-SONOMA, INC. MCCALL DESIGN GROUP FOR WILLIAMS-SONOMA, INC. 2006

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ


Williams-Sonoma Home Time Warner Center Columbus Circle, New York City

The client wished to introduce an existing brand into a new market--New York City. As an already existing flagship, Williams-Sonoma Grand Cuisine, was well established inside the Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle. The Williams-Sonoma Home Design Team & McCall Design Group devised a strategy to occupy a previously used (but underperforming) upper mezzanine space. This first-ever merging of brands/concepts may prove to be a more effective allocation of resources than dedicated stores alone. A phased construction became key in maintaining shopability of the first floor through the duration of construction. I executed the construction documentation and construction administration.

Scope of Work Sectional Drawings

WILLIAMS-SONOMA, INC.

HOME

GRAND+ CUISINE Construction Progress

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

MCCALL DESIGN GROUP FOR WILLIAMS-SONOMA, INC. 2008


Williams-Sonoma Home is the flagship home furnishing brand of Williams-Sonoma, Inc. These multi-story, intricately designed showrooms recreate the traditional American home through rooms of classic proportions, organized around a grand stair that is the heart of its circulation system. Room displays are determined by typical household functions such as a living room, garden, dining room and bath. Additional rooms house exclusive items such as tableware, rugs and window coverings. Due to its size and scope, there are only a few stores of this scale in the nation. Scottsdale Quarter, an emerging lifestyle center in Scottsdale Arizona is the latest in these markets to receive one. As Scottsdale Quarter is a mixed use center (retail & residential), McCall Design Group was involved early on in the coordination of the design intent of the landlord provided shell and its construction. Also as the architects of record, McCall Design Group is providing services for the tenant improvement, which is currently underway for completion in first-quarter 2009.

SCOTTSDALE QUARTER, SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA

WILLIAMS-

HOME

SONOMA

MCCALL DESIGN GROUP FOR WILLIAMS-SONOMA, INC. 2007-2008

Storefront Rendering 24�x36� Electronic Drawing

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ


Competition Prompt Ecuador gets its name from the zero–latitude line at the equator. Zero is the origin, the starting point, the initial reference. It is also equilibrium, the central position, the balance indicator. Our intention is: 1. To start out with the reality of the Galapagos (both environmental and social) as the point of reference; with no assumptions, no preconceived ideas, no intermediaries. 2. To tune in to this refl ection at its point of origin: what the relation should be between nature and human settlements; how to enhance the quality of both at the same time, in one achievable ideal. 3. To recover the position of equilibrium, the premise of sustainability, to ensure that this achievable ideal is maintained over time.

QUITO XV

PAN-AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE BIENNALE

GALAPAGOS-ZERO LATITUDE

MCCALL DESIGN GROUP SPONSORED DESIGN TEAM FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF QUITO, EQUADOR HOSTED INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

Galapagos Issues The reality of the Galapagos, a natural heritage of humanity (UNESCO – 1978), reveals serious contradictions between the need to conserve the archipelago’s unique species, the requirements of a growing population, and intensive use for domestic and foreign tourism. These contradictions are seen in the enormous concern over natural resources in terms of both investments and studies, and the lesser attention paid to the inhabitants’ problems and the spontaneous, unorganized growth of their towns. The symbolic nature of the Galapagos Islands, and the peculiar conditions that need to be met by the human settlements nestled within a territory that is dominated by protected natural areas (the National Park and Marine Reserve), oblige us to seek suitable answers to the universal question of how to organize the relations between towns and their natural surroundings. Starting at Galapagos, we seek to drive the evolution of future towns.


LOCAL POPULATION

0 / 100 4,600

LOCAL POPULATION : TOURIST POPULATION: WASTE RECYCLED: WASTE NON-RECYCLED: COLLECTION INFRASTRUCTURE:

20 / 80 6,900

4,600 PERSONS 125,000 PERSONS 0 M³/DAY 5,220 M³/DAY 0 UNITS

LOCAL POPULATION : TOURIST POPULATION: WASTE RECYCLED: WASTE NON-RECYCLED: COLLECTION INFRASTRUCTURE:

40 /60 9,200

6,900 PERSONS 150,000 PERSONS 1,600 M³/DAY 4,390 M³/DAY 36 UNITS

9,200 PERSONS LOCAL POPULATION : 175,000 PERSONS TOURIST POPULATION: WASTE RECYCLED: 4,520 M³/DAY WASTE NON-RECYCLED: 6,780 M³/DAY COLLECTION INFRASTRUCTURE: 42 UNITS

GLASS

% RECYCLED / % WASTE

sheathing graphics on vinyl skin panel perforated metal

NETWORK OF INTERFACES

$

frame metal angle assembly

+

=

0

+

=

0

ALUMINUM

PAPER PE ER ER

campaign graphics unified message

PLASTICS

0

secondary collection misc. trash

8

=

=

ORGANIC

+

OTHER RECYCLABLES

bracing braided metal wire

removable insert SITUATION

PROPOSAL

Our proposal is a restorative response to the invasive relationship between humans and their environment on the Galapagos Islands. It is a campaign of waste collection, processing, and distribution through a network of human scale interfaces. These interfaces, placed strategically throughout the island, vary in size and program as they respond to the context of the neighborhood. They are not merely waste collection sites but part of an educational process that will result in a gradual, yet steady, social transformation. These units promote a sense of responsibility for the local residents, and will change the way people think about the waste and its consequences if left neglected. With such an elevated level of awareness, the residents will embrace the concept of recycling and proper waste disposal.

primary collection recyclable materials

Our goal is to ultimately bring solid human waste down to zero, given the percentage and variety of the recycled materials expand with time. The proposed infrastructure will adapt in its size and configuration as the need fluxes with population. Our process and solution will strive to reach a new state of equilibrium by means of architecture, graphics, and education. The human influence in the Galapagos Islands has been continuous and expanding since its discovery. Although the archipelago’s governing body recognizes the importance of preserving its ecology and attempts to promote social awareness, problems caused by humans afflicting the islands’ natural environment have steadily increased. Human waste, in particular, is a problem that is grossly overlooked despite its imminent presence. While the amount of waste generated parallels the exponential human population growth, the island lacks the equipment, methods, and awareness for proper waste management. By the time the local population on San Cristobal reaches 16,000, the amount of disposed waste per day will be over 24,000 m³.

INITIATIVE PROMOTE SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY.

IMPLEMENTATION WASTE COLLECTION UNITS AS TOOLS.

GOAL REDUCTION OF WASTE PRODUCTION AS PART OF HUMAN INFLUENCE ON GALAPAGOS.

URBAN INSERTION OF WASTE COLLECTION UNITS. EDUCATION / PUBLIC AWARENESS THROUGH ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS.

CAMPAIGN PROGRAM USING ARCHITECTURE, GRAPHICS AND EDUCATION.

UNIT 1 CONIFIGURATION + MATERIAL DETAIL

ZER0 WASTE

Competition Entry Presentation Board 1 Personal Contribution: Graphic Design Diagram Development

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ


60 / 40 11,500

LOCAL POPULATION : TOURIST POPULATION: WASTE RECYCLED: WASTE NON-RECYCLED: COLLECTION INFRASTRUCTURE:

11,500 PERSONS 200,000 PERSONS 9,060 M³/DAY 6,040 M³/DAY UNITS 48

80 / 20 13,800

LOCAL POPULATION : TOURIST POPULATION: WASTE RECYCLED: WASTE NON-RECYCLED: COLLECTION INFRASTRUCTURE:

100 /0 16,100

13,800 PERSONS 225,000 PERSONS 15,520 M³/DAY 3,880 M³/DAY 54 UNITS

LOCAL POPULATION : TOURIST POPULATION: WASTE RECYCLED: WASTE NON-RECYCLED: COLLECTION INFRASTRUCTURE:

16,100 PERSONS 250,000 PERSONS 24,205 M³/DAY 0 M³/DAY 60 UNITS

SELF SERVE & ATTENDED MULTI-UNIT BULK DEPOSIT CASH REDEMPTION

sheathing graphics on vinyl skin

SELF SERVE MULTI-UNIT SORTED RECYCLABLES, ADDITIONAL UNITS ATTACHED AS REQUIRED

service counter for cash redemption weighing scale currency safe brochures

hinged panel wall evening lock-up

UNIT 2 COMBINATION + SERVICE COUNTER DETAIL

PLACEMENT

BRIAN JAMES M. CADIZ

SERVICE

SELF SERVE SINGLE UNIT UNSORTED RECYCLABLES/ MISC. TRASH

UNIT 0 SECTION

VARIOUS UNIT STREET ELEVATIONS

WASTE AND RECYCLABLE MATERIALS ARE BEING COLLECTED AND SEPARATED AT NEIGHBORHOOD INTERFACES

COLLECTED WASTE MATERIALS ARRIVE AT LOCAL MANAGEMENT PLANT

ORGANIZED WASTE MATERIALS ARE TRANSPORTED TO THE COLLECTION DESTINATION

COLLECTION UNITS

PROCESSING HUB

FINAL RECYCLING PLANT

SAN CRISTOBAL

ECUADOR

DISTRIBUTION NETWORK

Competition Entry Presentation Board 2 Personal Contribution: Graphic Design Diagram Development

Brian James Cadiz / Selected Works 2000-2009  

Selected architectural works from 2000-2009.

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