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GREATER MADISON

PAST FORWARD A reflection on the past and a vision for the future


Drinking the water of a well, one should never forget who dug it. —CHINESE PROVERB

Dedicated to those who came before us and those who will come after.

THIS BOOK WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE WITHOUT THE SUPPORT OF OUR SPONSORS (PAGE 61) AND SPECIFICALLY OUR TITLE SPONSOR

September 18, 2014


GREATER MADISON: PAST FORWARD


FOREWORD

In 1914, the newly established Madison Board of Commerce, now known as the Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce, published a slim volume to promote the city as a remarkable place to live and do business. The 68-page book showcased praise from visitors to Madison, including the poet Longfellow, and described a thriving city of intellect and industry endowed with great natural beauty. You will read many of those same quotes reprinted here in red italics, alongside new data, viewpoints and comparisons. This updated publication with its parallel texts not only gives a meaningful account of Greater Madison to outsiders, but

lends a deeper perspective to those of us already here on how truly formative those early years were. Much of this century-old narrative still holds true, thanks in no small part to the foresight of leaders who created, preserved and promoted what makes Madison uniquely Madison. Once again we find ourselves in a defining moment of time, shaping a promising future as a home of industry. Our call to action today differs in no way from the one published in 1914 – to build upon Greater Madison’s legacy and gifts for the benefit of the next 100 years.


GREATER MADISON: PAST FORWARD


I GREATER

MADISON NEXT STATION

“…people will be glad to work where they are glad to live...” More than 500,0001 people now call Greater Madison “home sweet home,” a trend that has been steadily growing since 1914, when Madison, population 30,000, became a place of national interest.2 A state capital with a worldclass university, Madison has been shaped by a balance in forces. Growing in authentic ways, industry has prospered from advantages in location, natural resources, skilled labor and work ethic. Research, global connections and talent from the university have also influenced

industry, as well as the community of people who make a living and a life in Madison. Greater Madison is a sensorial city. A place that appeals to the five senses. A place to embrace and enjoy the four seasons in a setting of natural beauty preserved for shared recreation and appreciation. One of only two North American cities built on an isthmus, Madison’s downtown is nestled between two lakes and offers up far more than an urban experience, adding fresh air and a fresh perspective.


The first to appreciate Greater Madison’s natural beauty were indigenous tribes, including the Winnebago, now known as the Ho-Chunk Nation, who lived yearround on the shores of Madison’s chain of lakes: Mendota, Monona, Waubesa, Kegonsa, and Wingra. Greater Madison has the highest concentration of Indian burial mounds in the nation, and many remain, thanks to the efforts of local historians and preservationists.3

“Madison combines to a remarkable degree the things necessary to attract people to a city, namely, a good place to do business and a fine place in which to live … Madison will progress just as fast as people learn of its great desirability as a place to call home.” —HUGH CHALMERS Over time, city leaders and planners have taken a balanced approach to development, preserving parklands and lake access for the benefit of future generations. Today, the City of Madison has 12 beaches 4 and 260 parks with 6,000 acres of green space, and more than 120 miles of scenic biking and hiking trails. 5

GREATER MADISON: PAST FORWARD

MADISON SKYLINE ACROSS LAKE MONONA

credit Richard Hurd


LAKE MENDOTA

credit Focus Photography

City planning was in its infancy at the turn of the last century, when Madison hired John Nolen, a pioneer of the City Functional movement, which advanced the idea that cities should be designed to be not just beautiful, but highly livable as well. His proposal, Madison: A Model City, submitted in March 1911, recommended

GREATER MADISON: PAST FORWARD

“housing, recreation, transportation and land-use controls.” Nolen paid particular attention to the isthmus and to how the iconic State Capitol, then under construction, could be linked with Lake Monona. One curiosity from this era: If you have ever wondered what Wisconsin, the “Golden Lady”


perched atop the Capitol dome, is pointing to, she is gesturing in the direction of what was expected to be Nolen’s Grand Mall, stretching between the Capitol and Lake Monona.

“Other things being equal, people will be glad to work where they are glad to live, and Madison can build a city of homes that has met in advance many of the municipal problems that now perplex her larger rivals.” —H.M. NIMMO While Nolen’s visionary plan was not formally adopted in its entirety, many of its elements and philosophy were carried out over the next several decades and remain in place today.6 Though Nolen’s most ambitious design element, the Grand Mall, ultimately was never realized, in its place now stands the Monona Terrace, designed by world-renowned (and at one-time local) architect Frank Lloyd Wright. This waterfront landmark is an introduction to the Madison skyline for those traveling into the city on none other than John Nolen Drive.

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It has been said that it is the men and women who make a city. To experience Greater Madison is to be the beneficiary of its hospitable, warm and welcoming nature. There is a certain charm that attracts 14 million visitors per year.7

“Never have I known so many happy people so set about with the things that make life livable, as I found in Madison.” —CHARLES T. JACKSON State Street, a pedestrian mall on the isthmus, is the heart of the city. At the top of State Street is the Capitol with its cross-shaped footprint serving as the center of government, as well as the gathering place for cultural and community events. At the bottom of State Street is the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus.

CONCERTS ON THE SQUARE

credit Zane Williams Photography

This lively street is lined with local shops and restaurants. From ethnic to farm-to-table, the award-winning chefs are inspired by local harvests that draw on the global strength of agriculture and the community’s cultural diversity. In fact, Greater Madison has found itself climbing the rankings of top food cities because of its strong local food scene.

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STATE STREET

credit Scott Templeton

The Dane County Farmers’ Market, the largest producer-only market in the country, is consistently rated among the best. Nearly 200 farmers and valueadded producers bring their goods to Capitol Square each Saturday morning to throngs of delighted shoppers during the growing and harvest seasons.

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Craft breweries, distilleries and wineries are increasing in number, in popularity, and in national prominence. These are supported by the availability of local ingredients, local expertise and residents willing to gather, savor and support them.

DANE COUNTY FARMERS’ MARKET

credit Bill Lubing


Speaking of support, few communities cheer on their college teams like Badger fans. The tradition of college football Saturdays on the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus has earned Madison recognition as one of the best college sports towns in the nation.8

“It has been often said that in no community in the world is to be found a higher grade of per capita intelligence.” Greater Madison is an educated city. Half of Dane County’s residents hold a bachelor’s degree or higher, and more than 12 percent of adults hold a graduate or professional degree, higher than both state and national levels.9 Greater Madison also has a track record of maintaining above-average ACT scores compared with the state and nation.10

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN–MADISON

credit Jeff Miller

Based on public school support, private school options, library popularity and college options, among others, the Madison region has been ranked among the best places to educate a child.11 The University of Wisconsin–Madison is a worldclass research institution, educating 48,000 students

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from more than 130 countries each year; it awards the second-highest number of doctorate degrees in the nation.12 The university connects Madison to the world, and the world to Madison, with nearly 400,000 living alumni spanning the globe. Alumni or faculty have been awarded 19 Nobel Prizes and 38 Pulitzers.13 It is among the top producers of Fortune 500 CEOs, Peace Corps and Teach for America volunteers.14 Private, technical and community colleges round out Greater Madison’s higher education offerings. Edgewood College, a private institution, offers four-year and graduate degree programs for thousands of students. Madison College, founded in 1912, provides college transfer education and training for highly skilled trades such as advanced manufacturing and health care, recently building new facilities to train more students in these burgeoning fields.

GREATER MADISON: PAST FORWARD

A strong network of schools from primary to graduate programs prepares the workforce for jobs in growing sectors of the economy. Greater Madison and its supportive residents, businesses and civic leadership have always valued education beyond the classroom, offering access to state-of-the-art libraries, art institutions, botanical gardens, natural and historical museums, and a top-rated children’s museum. The Henry Vilas Zoo, opened in 1911 with early and significant support from the Vilas family, has grown to become one of Dane County’s most popular tourist attractions. The Vilas family required that the park – and subsequently the zoo – always be admission-free. Today the zoo is one of only a few free accredited zoos in the nation. The Madison Zoological and Aquarium Society was organized in 1914, and later reorganized as


HENRY VILAS ZOO, 1918

credit Wisconsin Historical Society; WHS-59042

the Henry Vilas Park Zoological Society, which has been instrumental inproviding funding for many zoo improvements.15 Another local philanthropist and fifth-generation Madisonian, Jerry Frautschi, changed the city’s cultural landscape with the largest single gift to the arts in American

history to date – $205 million to build the Overture Center for the Arts in 2004.16 This “stunning architectural achievement” features Broadway performances and is home to 10 resident companies, including symphony and chamber orchestras, children’s theater and programming, dance troupes and multicultural exhibitions.

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Pleasant Rowland, founder of American Girl, has also been a force for cultural accessibility. Rowland, who is married to Frautschi, established the Pleasant Rowland Great Performance Fund for Theater to support professional theater in Overture Center for the Arts. Rowland also proposed the idea of “Concerts on the Square,” a summer tradition since 1984 that draws 120,000 people annually to the Capitol lawn to enjoy “donation-supported” music.17

“To build up the humanity of a community is the surest way to build up the business of a community.”

MADISON MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART

credit Byrne Chapman

These are but a few examples of Madisonians’ long-standing tradition of public-private partnerships, and the giving of their time, talent and money to better the community. Community involvement and generosity are not limited to individuals, as nearly 80 percent of businesses donated time or money to a charitable initiative in 2013, with a median charitable giving amount of $13,750.18

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Greater Madison is an idealistic city, looked to as a model of civics for more than a century, with a sense of place, community and responsibility. A scan of local shops in Madison’s many neighborhood business districts, including Williamson Street, State Street, Monroe Street and other shopping districts, shows local artisans and an emphasis on fair-trade products well supported by the community. Greater Madison is home to the largest buy-local organization in the nation on a city- and county-wide scale, furthering the sense of community and core beliefs in sustainability.19 Madison has been recognized for its leadership in sustainability and was named “America’s Greenest City,” based on air quality, number of parks per 10,000 residents, and the percentage of the population

GREATER MADISON: PAST FORWARD

that bikes, walks, carpools and takes public transportation.20 It may not be surprising then that a community with these values would have ties with some of the country’s most influential conservationists. John Muir, the famed naturalist and advocate of national parks, was a student at the University of Wisconsin. Aldo Leopold, author of The Sand County Almanac, was a University of Wisconsin–Madison professor. And Wisconsin governor and U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson was the founder of Earth Day. These individuals intrinsically understood that protecting the land means protecting the community ecosystem. In fact, Leopold’s “land ethic” expanded the definition of community to include plants, animals, soils and waters. He believed that “economic well-being could not be separated from the well-being of our environment.”21

ALDO LEOPOLD, 1904

credit Wisconsin Historical Society; WHS-93913


EAST SIDE NEIGHBORHOOD SHOPS

credit Focus Photography

“Madison–this country’s most delightful union of the life of nature and the life of knowledge.” —WILLIAM HARD

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II GREATER

MADISON HOME OF INDUSTRY

“In this city is found a harmonious development of commerce, education and government.” While many cities have envied Greater Madison’s natural beauty and resources, perhaps most enviable has been the advantageous proximity of both a renowned university and state capital. This happy combination has fostered collaborations that were simply not available to other municipalities, and which elevated Madison to national importance as an experiment in democracy during the early 20th century.

This was also about the time that the Wisconsin Idea was introduced, which described the university’s service to the state. First attributed to University of Wisconsin–Madison President Charles Van Hise in 1904, “the Wisconsin Idea is the principle that the university should improve people’s lives beyond the classroom.”22


BASCOM HALL, UW–MADISON

credit Bryce Richter

“Many a city and many a state has a state university, many another city is the seat of government, but there are but few in the borders of our great land that have them all together.” —HARRY A. WHEELER

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To Madisonians, the Wisconsin Idea was more than a principle. It has been a way of life, a spirit of community and collaboration, which lives on today, shaping economic development. Greater Madison’s economy benefits from, and is sometimes overshadowed by, an intersection of government and education; however, it is decidedly driven by the private sector. Private businesses have flourished because of the intersection of agriculture and manufacturing, health care and life sciences, and capitalism and progressivism. Companies that were in operation 100 years ago and remain today serve as a testament to these interrelationships. CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF MANUFACTURING

Greater Madison has never placed growth above all else. While continuously pushed and

proposed, the community has always been very careful about development. Around 1914, Madison leaders “agreed to attract only high-grade industries” to the area, and “rejected twenty-two of the first twenty-three industries that expressed interest in locating in Madison.”23 This selectivity, while rather uncommon and unnatural to a city looking to become “busier,” not only spared the beautiful city from undesirable crowding and effluent from factories, it also created strengths in advanced manufacturing that still benefit the economy today. Founded in 1905 by a University of Wisconsin–Madison graduate, the French Battery Company, now Rayovac under the umbrella of Spectrum Brands, moved its headquarters to Madison the following year. A UW professor of chemical engineering soon

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joined the company and invented the D cell battery for flashlights. Madison eventually became one of the largest producers of flashlight batteries in the country, and the dry cell business became the first large example of a successful

collaboration between and the university.24

industry

Spectrum Brands recently built a new headquarters in Greater Madison, showing its continued commitment to the region.

“Men of vision will make Madison famous for its business.” —BALTHASAR H. MEYER GREATER MADISON: PAST FORWARD


MADISON-KIPP CORPORATION

credit Madison-Kipp Corporation

Madison-Kipp Corporation (MKC) has been a leading American manufacturer for more than 100 years. In the early 20th century, the Forty Thousand Club, an early economic development entity in Madison, recruited the company to the area by getting citizens to buy $10,000 worth of stock. By 1917 the company became the world’s

largest manufacturer of machine lubricators, benefiting from the area’s strength in agriculture and its proximity to flourishing farm-equipment manufacturers. Today, the precision-machined aluminum die-cast company serves automotive and motorcycle producers, such as Milwaukee-based Harley-Davidson, and consumer

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lawn care and garden markets. The company has 400 skilled employees with an average tenure of more than 16.5 years.25 CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF AGRICULTURE

Greater Madison, despite its urbanization, is one of the most important areas in the nation for agriculture, a sector that extends well beyond farming. Madison is home to the world’s largest dairy-focused tradeshow, World Dairy Expo, with more than 70,000 attendees from 90 countries annually.26 Area biochemists, geneticists, horticulturalists, microbiologists, plant and animal scientists–manyofthemresearchers from the University – are driven to make food safer, more sustainable, more plentiful and more nutritious.

“Madison, the county seat of Dane County, is located in the heart of the largest dairy and agricultural region in the United States.” A $59 billion industry for Wisconsin, agriculture is the leading sector that feeds the economy.27 It imports millions in research dollars and exports millions in dairy, genetics and machinery. Industry and academic expertise

GREATER MADISON: PAST FORWARD

DANE COUNTY FARMERS’ MARKET

credit Bill Lubing


is in demand to help improve food systems, public health and economies across the globe. One local food company, Oscar Mayer, part of Kraft Foods, is a household name and $3.3 billion brand employing 1,300 people.28 The company began its ties with Madison when it purchased the Farmers’ Cooperative Packing Company, which was established in 1914. While on a visit to Madison to see relatives in 1917, Oscar G. Mayer learned of the plant and quickly arranged “the most important industrial acquisition of the decade.” By 1920 Madison’s facility was the fifth-largest packing plant in the country29 and became the company headquarters in 1957, where it remains today. Over the last century, the company and the Mayer family have been important benefactors to the community.

GREATER MADISON: PAST FORWARD

CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF HEALTH CARE

Just as Greater Madison was coming of age in the early 20th century, the concept of public health was also emerging. It was the right time in the city’s history to not only consider but also lead a new model in health care. By 1920 Madison had built eight hospitals, planting a seed with civic leaders that Madison just might become a “major hospital center. Newspaper headlines portrayed Madison as a prospective ‘world medical center.’”30 This statement proved prophetic, as Greater Madison is known today for its research and quality of care, ranking among the best cities for health care.31 The concentration of hospitals and the proximity of the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine


MERITER HOSPITAL

credit Meriter-UnityPoint Health

and Public Health, as well as the Agriculture and Life Sciences department, have led to historic medical breakthroughs, Nobel laureates, successful companies and thousands of jobs. Two hospitals, St. Mary’s and Meriter, have reached the 100-year milestone.

St. Mary’s Hospital, part of SSM Heath Care, opened its doors on September 22, 1912. The 70-bed hospital was built after the rector of St. Paul’s University Chapel persuaded the Sisters of Saint Mary, headquartered in St. Louis, to inspect a proposed site in Madison. They concluded that this site could be the Catholic hospital for a 50- to 150-mile radius.32

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ST. MARY’S HOSPITAL

credit St. Mary’s Hospital

St. Mary’s Hospital now has 440 beds and is a partner with Dean Clinic, one of the largest multispecialty group physician practices in the United States.33 Meriter Hospital, now affiliated with UnityPoint Health, was established in 1898 as Madison General Hospital and built with

GREATER MADISON: PAST FORWARD

funding from the City of Madison and local philanthropists. It became Meriter Hospital in 1987 when two of Madison’s oldest hospitals – Madison General and Methodist – merged. An award-winning hospital ranked among the top in the nation, Meriter provides coordinated care to meet the growing needs of the Greater Madison community.34


University of Wisconsin Hospital (formerly Wisconsin General Hospital) was established in 1924.35 Within UW Hospital is the notable American Family Children’s Hospital, spurred by an initial $10 million gift from American Family Insurance in 2003.36 It was ranked among the nation’s top 50 pediatric hospitals in 2014.37

“[Madison] has scenic beauty, pure water, pure air, and back of it all it has a civic and social atmosphere which is unsurpassed.” —HERBERT QUICK CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF PRINTING

As a learned community, Greater Madison has had a number of successful publishers and printers dating back more than a century, from newspapers to books. Printing continues to be a core strength in the region. The Wisconsin State Journal has been an opinion leader for the community since the 19th century, and made significant gains in influence and readership during the early 20th century. Well-respected publishers, editors and reporters brought important issues to the forefront, calling for change at times of impasse or indifference.38 Owned by Lee Enterprises, the Wisconsin State Journal is Wisconsin’s newspaper of record.

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THE DEMOCRAT PRINTING COMPANY, UNDATED

credit Wisconsin Historical Society; WHS-6359

Webcrafters, formerly known as the Democrat Printing Company, started out as a local and regional job printing house. At one time known as the “official” state printer, in 1868 they began publishing a newspaper, The Madison Democrat. Throughout its half century and more of uninterrupted publication, the Democrat was one of the city’s

GREATER MADISON: PAST FORWARD

two leading papers. The newspaper portion of the business merged into the Wisconsin State Journal in 1921. Walter Frautschi joined Democrat Printing in 1925, and he and the Frautschi family assumed ownership of the company in the 1950s, adopting the current name, Webcrafters, in 1965 to reflect a pioneering role


in the web-offset process. Webcrafters currently has customers throughout the United States, and specializes in educational and trade book manufacturing as well as catalogs.39

“I know of no place of its size in the world that can compare with Madison in the strength and many-sidedness of its appeal to men and women of intelligence, high ideals and capacity for enjoying the true, the beautiful and the good.” —CARL S. VROOMAN CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF INFRASTRUCTURE

In 1914, Madison was considered “the most important connecting point between Chicago and the “twin cities” – Minneapolis and Saint Paul,”40 and by then had already amassed an impressive infrastructure of railroads and roadways with plans to improve its rural highway system. Given its strategic central location, Greater Madison provides access to major Midwestern markets through a robust transportation network of interstates, highways,

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ALLIANT ENERGY

credit Alliant Energy

freight and transit, as well as global connectivity via Dane County Regional Airport, which is experiencing rapid growth thanks to increasing flight traffic from local high-tech companies such as Epic Systems. Greater Madison’s business community is also supported by a strong energy infrastructure with

GREATER MADISON: PAST FORWARD

dependable, affordable gas and electric services from companies that are integral to economic development in the region. Prairie du Sac Dam, built in 1914 despite setbacks from flooding and ice, helped launch Wisconsin Power and Light Company, Alliant Energy’s Wisconsin utility.


MGE

credit MGE

The Prairie du Sac Dam was one of the largest sources of electricity in the Midwest when it was built, and today it remains the largest hydroelectric facility in Wisconsin. Most notably to area residents, the construction of the dam formed Lake Wisconsin, a popular body of water for fishing and recreation.

The Prairie du Sac Dam is one of the original renewable energy generating stations in the state, and in 2014 celebrates 100 years of producing emission-free power. Alliant Energy’s corporate headquarters are in Madison, with 1.4 million customers in Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin.41

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Greater Madison has been able to count on Madison Gas and Electric’s commitment to the community for more than a century. The first energy delivered illuminated 20 gas street lamps around the Capitol in 1855. Shortly thereafter, a small electric generating plant began powering the old Hausmann Brewery. Now, MGE has ownership in four power plants, two wind farms and 20 local solar installations. It serves 141,000 electric customers and 147,000 natural gas customers. MGE is more than pipes and wires. As a community energy company, it is committed to improving our quality of life. MGE’s Green Power Tomorrow program is one of the leading renewable energy programs in the country. In addition, MGE installed one of the nation’s first networks of electric vehicle charging stations, which are powered by wind resources.42

“People who speak well of it today we expect will be able to say additional good things about it in the future. Otherwise it must become noted for having squandered its natural and human endowment.”

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HO-CHUNK GAMING MADISON

credit Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison

Ho-Chunk Nation lore says that Greater Madison is where the tribe originated, and more than half of the Ho-Chunk’s worldwide population still resides in Wisconsin. Over the past 400 years of recorded history, the Ho-Chunk Nation has held strongly to deep-rooted tradition and culture. People of the Big Voice persevered through adversity and today make their mark on the local economy with the multifaceted HoChunk Gaming Corporation.43

CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF INSURANCE & FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

The Finance, Insurance and Real Estate Industry is the secondlargest industry in the Madison region in terms of job distribution. Home to American Family Insurance, CUNA Mutual and WPS Insurance, Greater Madison is enjoying high growth in this industry.44

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HO-CHUNK TRIBE AT STAND ROCK, UNDATED

credit WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, WHS-102694


PRAIRIE DU SAC DAM, 1912

credit ALLIANT ENERGY

THE WISCONSIN STATE JOURNAL, UNDATED

credit THE WISCONSIN STATE JOURNAL ARCHIVE


GENERATORS IN POWER HOUSE, PRAIRIE DU SAC DAM, 1914

credit WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY; WHS-48502

SMART MOTOR CO., UNDATED

credit J.R. SMART


MADISON GAS AND ELECTRIC, 1938

credit MGE

MADISON CITY GAS, LIGHT AND COKE COMPANY, UNDATED

credit WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY; WHS-27958


WISCONSIN GENERAL HOSPITAL, 1949

credit THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN–MADISON ARCHIVES

FRENCH BATTERY AND CARBON COMPANY, UNDATED

credit WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY; WHS-2007


MADISON GENERAL HOSPITAL, 1903

credit MERITER–UNITYPOINT HEALTH

WISCONSIN STATE JOURNAL OFFICE, UNDATED

credit WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY; WHS-37386


WEST STATE STREET, 1910

credit WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY; WHS-54736


EAST WASHINGTON AVENUE, 1914

credit WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY; WHS-27144

DEMOLITION OF WISCONSIN STATE CAPITOL, 1913

credit WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY; WHS-4897


DEMOLITION OF WISCONSIN STATE CAPITOL, 1913

credit WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY; WHS-4899


MADISON窶適IPP CORPORATION, 1916

credit WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY; WHS-26169

CONSTRUCTION OF WISCONSIN STATE CAPITOL, 1914

credit WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY; WHS-2168


HOISTING THE STATUE “WISCONSIN,” 1914

credit WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY; WHS-9566


III GREATER

MADISON THE FUTURE CITY

“… there is no such happiness as exclusive happiness, no prosperity save mutual profit, no real progress if it be not that progress which retains the good of the old and accepts the tried of the new.” Today, cities are measured on more than scale, and Greater Madison is emerging as just the right size, composition – and, most important, density – to become the model of a successful modern economy. The value systems that are so deeply ingrained allow Greater Madison to do more than merely adapt. It allows Greater Madison to thrive in the creativity and uncertainty of innovation.

Community-driven cities and economies revere the “good of the old and the tried of the new.” In Greater Madison, large companies invest in and partner with new startups. Experienced entrepreneurs mentor students. Retirees, city officials, tech entrepreneurs, law enforcement and at-risk youth sit at the same table discussing city projects.


There is not a city in the world with the caliber of people that Greater Madison has that maintains a better sense of community. In community, Greater Madison finds connection, and in the 21st century, connection is everything. Greater Madison is and always has been a hub of connections: to the university, to the state, to the land and to one another. Therein lies its true potential. GREATER MADISON: HUB OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND BIOSCIENCES

Greater Madison is a technology hub experiencing high growth in bioscience and information technology with more than 600 companies generating $6.6 billion in annual sales and employing nearly 60,000 people.45 BIOSCIENCES

More than one-half of the UW–Madison’s $1 billion research expenditures is spent directly in life sciences. Several pioneering breakthroughs have occurred in Greater Madison, including the first human embryonic stem cells to be grown in a laboratory.46 Promega Corporation, a global company established in Greater Madison in 1978, is a well-known manufacturer of “enzymes and enzyme systems for the amplification and

GREATER MADISON: PAST FORWARD


FEYNMAN CENTER, PROMEGA CORPORATION

credit Promega Corporation

cloning of DNA, detection of gene expression, cell health or biochemical assays, and protein analysis.� Promega incorporates green practices at its Greater Madison headquarters, minimizing impact on the environment through construction, lighting and plantings.

It also hosts gardens for employees and on-site cafeterias.47 Publicly traded bioscience companies in Greater Madison include GE Healthcare, Covance, Cellular Dynamics International and Exact Sciences.

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EPIC CAMPUS

credit Tadsen Photography

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

The largest electronic medical record vendor in the world, Epic Systems, founded and headquartered in Greater Madison, is the region’s largest private-sector employer,48 rapidly approaching 8,000 employees.

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GREATER MADISON: HUB OF RESEARCH AND INNOVATION

For more than a century, Greater Madison has been making investments to strengthen connections between the university and industry to support researchers, student entrepreneurs, startups and established businesses.


In 1925 the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) was chartered to control patenting and patent income on University of Wisconsin–Madison inventions. WARF licenses the technologies for commercialization and returns the licensing income to UW–Madison to support further scientific research. Its model of technology transfer makes it one of the most successful long-term benefactors of technological innovation and public welfare in the country.49

startup companies investments.51

and

equity

In 1984, University Research Park was founded to encourage technology transfer and create an endowment for research programs. It supports early-stage and growth-oriented businesses, and is considered a national model.

“Since its founding, WARF has processed 6,000 discoveries from UW–Madison inventors, obtained 1,900 U.S. patents on these innovations and completed more than 1,600 licensing agreements with companies all over the world.”50

The main campus on Madison’s west side houses 126 companies with 3,500 employees.52 The Metro Innovation Center is located close to downtown as an incubator for tech startups. In development is the Far West second campus, Research Park Phase 2, a mixture of commercial and residential use, which will include 64 sites and 8,000 new jobs.53

WARF is unique because it is a private, nonprofit organization. This allows it to support a broad range of technology transfer activities, including entrepreneurs,

Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery (WID), a public-private partnership established in 2010, plays a key role in facilitating the technology transfer from lab to

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UNIVERSITY RESEARCH PARK

credit Focus Photography

business. The partnership creates two world-class research institutes: Morgridge Institute for Research and Wisconsin Institute for Discovery. Partners are UW–Madison alumnus and chairman emeritus of Cisco Systems John Morgridge and Tashia Morgridge, also a UW–Madison alum, the State of Wisconsin, UW–Madison and

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WARF. WID fosters powerful intersections among diverse fields and encourages new approaches to biological and medical programs.54 GREATER MADISON: ENTREPRENEURIAL HUB

Greater Madison is connecting an influx of young talent with sky’s-


the-limit opportunity and quality of life. Incubators, accelerators and makerspaces are growing in number and stature. Tech startups have begun to inhabit every building of the city’s downtown, releasing products that are used around the world.

“Entrusted to this city is a great university, full of powers, full of responsibilities, teeming with opportunities, and with a magnificent campus and buildings.” —HARRY A. WHEELER High-rise apartment buildings, co-working spaces and local offices for national brands, including Zendesk, Google, Amazon and Microsoft, are cropping up downtown and on the near east side of the isthmus. The center city is becoming even more dynamic, and so is the local economy. Greater Madison’s support networks established over the past century are an underpinning for today’s entrepreneurs. In addition to University-related resources, established industry giants such as American Family Insurance and local energy company MGE have supported startups through their venture and innovation arms.

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THE CONSTELLATION

credit Focus Photography

MGE has been a catalyst for economic growth and entrepreneurial opportunity, partnering with local organizations such as Commonwealth Development for the Madison Enterprise Center and University Research Park

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for MGE’s Innovation Center. The Innovation Center alone has helped more than 70 early-stage companies grow since 1989, and has been recently recognized as one of the top 12 business incubators in the nation by Forbes.55


State government has also supported entrepreneurial activity by enacting Act 255, Wisconsin’s angel and venture capital tax credit program, a measure incentivizing investors to support Wisconsin-based companies. With established industry, new talent and government working together, the entrepreneurial culture in Madison strengthens, excels and takes on new forms. Social entrepreneurship has emerged in Greater Madison, and entirely new models of business based around the city’s unique landscape have begun to arise. The welcoming nature of this Midwestern city translates into business as new partnerships. The friendliness that holds the door for a

stranger leads to conversations and relationships, opening other doors for collaboration. Public-private partnerships such as Make Music Madison, a day of citywide music through hundreds of concerts, brought city officials, business leaders and tech entrepreneurs together to create an event of global influence. It also generated a technology startup that powers the event in 22 cities on four continents.56 This type of business success coming from a local volunteer effort is a perfect example of Greater Madison’s unique potential and appeal. Younger generations strengthen and advance the civicmindedness deeply ingrained in Greater Madison’s culture, and shape the future of its economy.

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IV GREATER

MADISON THE FUTURE PERFECT

“Animated by a desire to make Madison a more perfect city, 1064 public spirited citizens working together, through an efficient civic and commercial organization, have resolved, … ‘to make the city as famous for its business, as the University has made it and the State famous for its interpretation of the functions of education and government.’ ” Potential. A single word with inherent connotations and contradictions. A word that is both negative and positive. Its use defines a state of imperfection, but few other words can match its capacity to motivate a desired action. A single word with the ability to conjure imagination, create belief in the future and drive innovation.

To have potential, one cannot be perfect. It is in this juxtaposition that Greater Madison finds future opportunity. A century has passed since more than 1,000 citizens banded together to form the Madison Board of Commerce. They saw Madison not as a perfect city but as a future city – a city of potential.


Greater Madison has come full circle and is once again at a similar inflection point. Everything has changed, and nothing has changed. With a density of talent, a diversity of industries, a growing number of startups, a thriving urban landscape and a high quality of life, Greater Madison teems with extraordinary potential. The preceding chapter, much like the identically titled chapter 100 years ago, outlined a forwardfocused vision for the future of a more perfect city. A place where cooperation trumps individualism; where being “merely self-satisfied” is considered insufficient. A place where prosperity

and community wealth creation is superior to wealth preservation. A place bestowed with a constellation of natural beauty, civic engagement and educational attainment, the perfect ecosystem for the alignment of progress and connectivity. A rarity among American cities, Greater Madison has the potential to be greater than the past and present. Much like the future perfect tense in language, Greater Madison’s potential relies on the past to define the future by undertaking actions that will be completed. Madison is more than a location. It is a call to action.

“In the Madison of today, just as she is, just as others have seen and admired her, every seeker of ‘A Model City’is welcome to sojourn and remain.”

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NOTES

CHAPTER 1 1. United States Census Bureau, State & County QuickFacts, Dane County, Wisconsin, 2013 population estimate, quickfacts.census.gov 2. Madison Board of Commerce, Madison, Wisconsin The Four Lake City 1914, 4 3. Mollenhoff, David V., Madison: A History of the Formative Years, 2nd ed. (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2004) 402 4. City of Madison Parks Page, cityofmadison.com/parks/ 5. Greater Madison Convention & Visitors Bureau Things To Do, visitmadison.com 6. Mollenhoff, 326-328 7. Greater Madison Convention & Visitors Bureau About Page, visitmadison.com 8. Greater Madison Convention & Visitors Bureau Media Page, visitmadison.com 9. Madison Region Economic Partnership World Class Talent Page, thrivehere.org 10. Anderson, A., “Wisconsin and Madison above average in ACT test scores for 2013 graduates,” 13 Aug. 2013. host.madison.com 11. Papalia, Alyson, “In Pictures: Top 20 Places to Educate Your Child, Forbes.com, 12 Dec. 2007. forbes.com 12. Madison Region Economic Partnership World Class Talent Page, thrivehere.org 13. Wisconsin Alumni Association Facts Page, uwalumni.com 14. University of Wisconsin–Madison News, “UW–Madison among leaders in producing CEOs,” 4 Jan. 2011. news.wisc.edu 15. Henry Vilas Zoo History Page, vilaszoo.org 16. Overture Center for the Arts History Page, overturecenter.com 17. Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra History Page, wcoconcerts.org 18. Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce, 2013 Chamber Member Economic Census, Data Analyzed by Ady Voltedge and Monalco Marketing. 19. Dane Buy Local Who We Are Page, danebuylocal.com 20. Madison Parks Foundation In the News Page, madisonparksfoundation.org 21. Aldo Leopold Foundation About Aldo Leopold The Land Ethic Page, aldoleopold.org CHAPTER 2 22. University of Wisconsin–Madison The Wisconsin Idea Page, wisconsinidea.wisc.edu 23. Mollenhoff, David V., Madison: A History of the Formative Years, 2nd ed. (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2004) 254-5. 24. Ibid., 259-260 25. Madison-Kipp Corporation 26. World Dairy Expo News & Media Page, worlddairyexpo.com 27. Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection Programs Page, datcp.wi.gov 28. Newman, Judy “Higher stakes mean innovation more important than ever at Oscar Mayer,” Wisconsin State Journal, 2 Mar 2013. host.madison.com 29. Mollenhoff, 257-258 30. Ibid., 380

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31. Greater Madison Convention & Visitors Bureau Rankings Page, visitmadison.com 32. Mollenhoff, 377-380 33. St. Mary’s Hospital About Us, Media Requests Page stmarysmadison.com 34. Meriter 35. UW Health About Us History and Innovation Page uwhealth.org 36. UW Health American Family Children’s Hospital About Us Page, uwhealthkids.org 37. UW Health American Family Children’s Hospital News & Events Page, uwhealthkids.org 38. Mollenhoff, 281-285 39. Webcrafters 40. Madison Board of Commerce, Madison, Wisconsin The Four Lake City 1914, 11 41. Alliant Energy 42. MGE 43. Ho-Chunk Nation 44. MGE Madison Economic Development Key Industries Page madisoneconomicdevelopment.com CHAPTER 3 45. MGE Madison Economic Development Home Page, madisoneconomicdevelopment.com 46. Madison Region Economic Partnership Life Sciences Page, thrivehere.org 47. Promega Corporation Company Information Page, promega.com 48. Madison Region Economic Partnership Information Technology Page, thrivehere.org 49. Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation History Page, warf.org 50. Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation Background Page, warf.org 51. Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation About Us Page, warf.org 52. University Research Park Resident Companies Page universityresearchpark.org 53. University Research Park Property URP Phase 2 Page universityresearchpark.org 54. Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery About Us Page, discovery.wisc.edu 55. University Research Park News & Events Page, universityresearchpark.org 56. Solstice

Quotations taken from the 1914 Madison Board of Commerce publication, Madison, Wisconsin The Four Lake City, are displayed in red, unless otherwise noted.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Susanna Brandon Michael Fenchel Eileen Gehring David Mollenhoff Katie Kennedy Shepherd Helen Stewart Brian Stewart Zach Brandon

‌ and the rest of the Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce Staff.

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Profile for Brian Stewart

Past Forward  

A reflection on the past and a vision for the future of Greater Madison, Wisconsin.

Past Forward  

A reflection on the past and a vision for the future of Greater Madison, Wisconsin.

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