Page 1

5

Community Center Needs Analysis Final Report August 2012


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

Acknowledgements Orange Township Trustees Robert W. Quigley – Chair Deborah Taranto – Vice Chair Lisa F. Knapp

Orange Township Fiscal Officer Joel M. Spitzer

Park Board Members Leonard Fisher - Chairman Michael J. Couvreur - Vice Chair Tony Benishek – Secretary David Chambers Randee Masciola

Park Board Ad Hoc Committee Deborah Taranto Leonard Fisher David Chambers Brent Culver Mark Robertson Gail Messmer Beth Hugh Scott Overturf

i


Table of Contents CHAPTER ONE - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..................................................................... 1 1.1 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 PROJECT PROCESS ....................................................................................................................... 2

CHAPTER TWO - COMMUNITY INPUT SUMMARY ................................................... 4 2.1 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION PROCESS ...................................................................................... 4 2.2 GENERAL FINDINGS FROM FOCUS GROUPS MEETINGS ........................................ 4 2.3 SURVEY RESULTS ......................................................................................................................... 6

CHAPTER THREE - MARKET ANALYSIS...................................................................... 15 3.1 DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS .................................................................................................... 15 3.2 SPORTS AND RECREATION TRENDS ............................................................................... 25 3.3 MARKET ANALYSIS MAPPING ............................................................................................. 42 3.4 SERVICE PROVIDER ANALYSIS ........................................................................................... 44 3.5 PRICING LEVEL ANALYSIS .................................................................................................... 47

CHAPTER FOUR - CORE PROGRAM IDENTIFICATION ....................................... 52 CHAPTER FIVE - SITE SELECTION ................................................................................ 53 5.1 STEP 1: SITE CRITERIA ............................................................................................................. 53 5.2 STEP 2: SITE EVALUATION AND CRITERIA MATRIX DEVELOPMENT ............ 53 5.3 STEP 3: PRELIMINARY CONCEPT PLANS ........................................................................ 54 5.4 STEP 4: TYPICAL SITE PLAN .................................................................................................. 57

CHAPTER SIX - FACILITY BUILDING PROGRAM .................................................... 58 6.1 SPACE ALLOCATION ................................................................................................................ 58 6.2 CONCEPT VALIDATION/DEVELOPMENT..................................................................... 58 6.3 CONCEPTUAL BUILDING DESIGN ILLUSTRATION .................................................. 60

CHAPTER SEVEN - CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST ......................................... 68 7.1 CAPITAL COST DEVELOPMENT ......................................................................................... 68 7.2 OPERATIONAL PLAN ............................................................................................................... 71

ii


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

CHAPTER EIGHT - OPERATIONS COST AND STAFFING PLAN ....................... 76 8.1 COMMUNITY CENTER STAFFING ...................................................................................... 76 8.2 COMMUNITY CENTER MEMBERSHIPS AND ADMISSIONS .................................... 77 8.3 COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES CENTER PROGRAMMING ............................................... 78

CHAPTER NINE - FINANCING AND OPERATING PROFORMA ........................ 81 9.1 OPERATIONS AND FINANCIAL PLAN ASSUMPTIONS.............................................. 81 9.2 SIX (6) YEAR PRO FORMA ....................................................................................................... 83

CHAPTER TEN - CONCLUSION ....................................................................................... 88 APPENDIX ................................................................................................................................ 89 EXPENDITURES SUMMARY ......................................................................................................... 89 STATISTICALLY-VALID SURVEY RESULTS .........................................................................102

iii


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

CHAPTER ONE - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1.1 INTRODUCTION Orange Township desired to develop a Community Center Needs Analysis and Feasibility Study for the residents of Orange Township. PROS Consulting was hired to lead the process for the Township that included developing the market assessment and feasibility component. Williams Architects provided the preliminary design plans, a footprint of the proposed building and cost estimates. The EDGE Group determined locations within the Township that would be most advantages to gain community support and awareness for such a facility. ETC Institute provided a statically valid survey to determine community support for the proposed facility. The process took five months to complete, and the components of the needs assessment included the following: 

A demographic and Trend analysis of the current population, forecasted population, per capita income, age specific populations, household formations, trends analysis and the need for recreation services in Orange Township

Identification of the recreational programs and facilities that are offered to the public in the study area that included public, not-for-profit, and private suppliers

Analysis of the unmet needs in the area for recreation services

Identification of strategic partners in the study area and subgroups who would have an interest in a joint use facility such as athletic groups, healthcare organizations, educational groups and advocacy groups

Focus group meetings with key stakeholders in the Township

Creation of an organizational structure for the facility and a management plan

A statistically valid survey to determine community need and support for such a facility

Evaluation of existing programs in the region

Analysis of program needs

Identification of the facility requirements for each of the programs needed in a comprehensive building program for the entire facility by room format

Evaluation of program needs for the park, as well as the location of the facility

An operating and capital cost plan that includes an estimate of construction costs based upon the building program.

The development of operating costs for the building and how it could operate via various revenue sources

A funding strategy for the facility

Public presentations and recommendations

The entire project was managed by a Steering Committee made up of community leaders, elected officials and Township staff working directly with the Consulting Team throughout the process to determine alternatives for development of the facility, as well as how the facility could best serve the residents of the Township. 1


1.2 PROJECT PROCESS The diagram below illustrates how this planning process unfolded to produce the recommendations included in this report for the Community Center Needs Analysis:

1.2.1 CORE STRATEGIES The project was based around the following three basic core strategies: 

Objective Analysis – A project such as the Community Center Needs Analysis must be founded on an objective approach that demonstrated to all interested and affected parties that the final outcome was based on good data, sound analysis, and valid assumptions.

Market Focus – Careful consideration of the market position had to be first and foremost; a broad focus with an emphasis on staff and community input to identify opportunities in the market place desired by the community. This market focus considered available resources along with initiatives that included:

o

Defining the market of potential users, market rates, level of capacity needed, and the additional amenities required to support the existing users and potential new users. The goal is to enhance the user experience and to make the site work financially for Orange Township.

o

Marketing recommendations that are strategically developed to support public need and operational success.

Financial Sustainability and Economic Viability – The financial performance of the Community Center facility requires it to responsibly generate revenue from the facility to sufficiently support operational expenses at a responsible ratio to other realistic forms of financial support available.

2


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

1.2.2 DESIRED OUTCOMES The Community Center Needs Analysis has been developed under the following guiding principles and desired outcomes: 

Build a shared vision for a signature community center facility in Orange Township

Utilize best practice means and trends to help meet the needs of current and future residents in the Township

Focus on promoting a collaborative approach towards future development

Determine optimal staffing structure, contractual management of the facility and operational metrics to ensure maximum return on investment for the Township

Leverage the facility to create an image of the Township as the community of choice

3


CHAPTER TWO - COMMUNITY INPUT SUMMARY 2.1 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION PROCESS The foundation of the Community Center Needs Analysis was a comprehensive public participation process. It was imperative that the community engagement process included participation by users and non-users of the system. As part of the Community Center Needs Analysis, there was extensive public input and participation February-May 2012. The Consulting Team also utilized a statistically-valid survey to gauge community interest and financial feasibility of a proposed facility. As part of the involvement process, the following meetings were conducted: 

Key Leadership and Stakeholder Interviews – Over ten (10) interviews with key stakeholders were held to evaluate their vision for a Community Center. From these initial meetings the community values were established, strengths and challenges potentially facing the community center, recreation trends in the area, and existing level of services provided were evaluated.

Focus Group Meetings – Eight (8) focus groups were conducted that represented a wide range of stakeholders, community leaders, as well as users and non-users.

Statistically-valid Community Interest and Feasibility Survey – In the spring of 2012, a six-page household survey was mailed to a random sample of 1,500 households in Orange Township. Approximately three days after the surveys were mailed each household that received a survey also received an automated voice message encouraging them to complete the survey. The goal was to obtain a total of at least 400 completed surveys from Orange Township. This goal was far exceeded with a total of 559 surveys having been completed. The results of the random sample of 559 households have a 95% level of confidence with a precision of at least +/-4.2%.

2.2 GENERAL FINDINGS FROM FOCUS GROUPS MEETINGS 2.2.1 ADDING A COMMUNITY CENTER IN ORANGE TOWNSHIP Participants in the focus groups were somewhat split on the decision of adding a new community center in Orange Township. Those who were against the idea thought the market was oversaturated with facilities that offer recreation and social space. Another concern was the fear of rising taxes and if the center would be able to support itself over time. More people favored supporting the Community Center than those who did not support it. Participants that were in favor of developing a community center thought it would help identify Orange Township as a community of choice. They felt a community center would develop a sense of community and pride among the residents, and it would help attract and keep young families and businesses in the Township. The community center would also add economic value by increasing home values and increased revenues for the Township from visitors who visit the facility and spend money in the Township. 2.2.2 AMENITIES DESIRED AT THE COMMUNITY CENTER Different amenities desired included an indoor pool, large gym space, indoor walking track, racquetball court, saunas/hot tub, and a weight/fitness room. Participants would also like to see community rooms, outdoor event space, senior program spaces, child watch accommodations, and hospitality space with a kitchen. Also mentioned was the desire to see the existing and future trail path connect to the community center, making it easy for residents to get to and from the facility. 4


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

2.2.3 PROGRAMS AT THE COMMUNITY CENTER Participants felt that programming is the key to bringing the community together. Programs desired include are aquatics, sport introductory programs, youth life skills program and outdoor recreation programs, day-time programming for young mothers, and competitive youth and adult leagues. Along with sport programs, there should be a balance of art, theater, and music programs, senior center activities, social events, and family-based programs. 2.2.4 OTHER SERVICE PROVIDERS IN THE MARKET Service providers in the Township or in the area that offer similar programs are the Delaware County and Powell YMCA, the Worthington, Westerville, and Dublin Recreation Centers, Delaware County Senior Center, local schools, churches, and colleges. 2.2.5 OTHER RECREATION PROVIDERS USED FOR RECREATION Different recreation providers that meet the community’s recreation needs are the Ohio State University, Exercise Heart Facility, Soccer Complex, Sky Zone, Aquatic Adventures, Local Fitness Facilities, as well as local and state parks. 2.2.6 TOWNSHIP PROVIDING SERVICES AND FUNDING Participants believe the Township should help build the building and users should pay for programming and maintaining the facility. Participants want to see the Township build partners with local businesses to help relieve some of the pressure of increased taxes on community members. Many participants felt that the community would see the community center as an investment to them and to the Township. 2.2.7 POTENTIAL PARTNERS Several partners were mentioned to help the Township develop a Community Center. These included the Ohio State University Health System & Ohio Health System; both have community wellness oriented programs along with sports medicine programs. Other partners mentioned included the School District, large corporations, OYAA, Ohio Department of Natural Resources, and Orange Township Business Association. The Township should also look into local businesses and competitors to help expand their programming and compliment their programs and amenities. 2.2.8 POTENTIAL LOCATION OF A COMMUNITY CENTER Multiple locations were mentioned but all agreed that the community center should be centrally located in a safe and accessible location surrounded by trails and parking. The most frequently mentioned location was on Highway 23 where the new pedestrian bridge will go. Participants felt that it would complement the existing Township pool and Orange Township Library. Other possible locations mentioned were East of Highway 23 (near Olentangy High School), East of Highway 23 by the railroad tracks, and Lewis Center Road (east of Highway 23). 2.2.9 UTILIZING FEES TO COVER OPERATIONAL COSTS The participants agreed that user fees needed to cover operational costs. Membership fees should cover at least 75% of the operational costs. Tuition fees and instructional fess for training classes should also be able to support the budget. 5


2.3 SURVEY RESULTS Leisure Vision conducted a Community Interest and Feasibility Survey for Orange Township in the spring of 2012. The purpose of the survey was to help determine the feasibility of constructing a new community center to serve citizen needs in the community. The survey was designed to obtain statistically valid results from households throughout Orange Township. Leisure Vision worked extensively with Orange Township officials in the development of the survey questionnaire. This work allowed the survey to be tailored to issues of strategic importance to effectively plan the future system. In the spring of 2012, a six-page survey was mailed to a random sample of 1500 households in Orange Township. Approximately three days after the surveys were mailed each household that received a survey also received an automated voice message encouraging them to complete the survey. The goal was to obtain a total of at least 400 completed surveys from Orange Township. This goal was far exceeded with a total of 559 surveys having been completed. The results of the random sample of 559 households have a 95% level of confidence with a precision of at least +/-4.2%. 2.3.1 CURRENT USAGE OF INDOOR FACILITIES Fifty-four percent (54%) of respondent households indicated they or members of their household are currently using any indoor community, sports, fitness or aquatic facilities. Of the 54% of respondents that indicated they or other members of their household currently use any indoor community, sports, fitness or aquatic facilities, the following are the most frequently mentioned facilities households currently use: 

Private fitness clubs (64%)



Westerville Community Center (34%)

Q1. Are You or Other Members of Your Household Currently Using Any Indoor Community, Sports, Fitness or Aquatic Facilities? by percentage of respondents

Q1a. ALL the Indoor Community, Sports, Fitness, and Aquatic Facilities Respondent Household Members Currently Use by percentage of respondents who indicated they or other members of their household are currently using any indoor community, sports, fitness or aquatic facilities (multiple choices could be made)

Yes 54%

Private fitness clubs

64%

Westerville Community Center

34%

Recreation programs in schools

18%

Worthington Community Center

16%

Powell YMCA

16%

Churches

12%

Home owner association facilities

6%

Delaware YMCA

4%

Dublin Community Center

No 46%

1%

None, do not use facilities

2%

0% Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

6

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

2.3.2 HOW INDOOR FACILITIES CURRENTLY MEET HOUSEHOLD NEEDS Of the 54% of respondents that indicated they or other members of their household currently use any indoor facilities, 35% of respondents indicated that the facilities they are currently using meet all needs. The majority (64%) of respondents indicated that the facilities their households are using are meeting some needs and only 1% indicated that the facilities their household members are using “do not meet any needs”. Q1b. Which ONE Statement Best Represents How the Indoor Community, Sports, Fitness and Aquatic Facilities You Are Currently Using Meet Your Needs? by percentage of respondents who indicated they or other members of their household are currently using any indoor community, sports, fitness or aquatic facilities

Meet all needs 35%

Do not meet any needs 1%

Meet some needs 64%

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

2.3.3 PRIMARY REASONS HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS USE CURRENT INDOOR FACILITIES “Close to where I live and work” (59%) is the most frequently mentioned reason that respondent household members use their current indoor community, sports, fitness or aquatic facilities. Other frequently mentioned reasons are: facility has the amenities/services I desire (54%) and the user fees are reasonable (49%). Q1c. Which TWO Statements Best Represent the TWO Primary Reasons Respondent Household Members Use Their Current Indoor Community, Sports, Fitness or Aquatic Center by percentage of respondents who indicated they or other members of their household are currently using any indoor community, sports, fitness or aquatic facilities (multiple choices could be made)

Close to where I live and work

59%

Facility has the amenities/services I desire

54%

The user fees are reasonable

49%

It is the only facility available in the area

22%

There is a high level of customer service

No particular reason

3%

1%

0%

20%

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

7

40%

60%

80%


2.3.4 THREE COMMUNITY CENTER FEATURES HOUSEHOLDS ARE MOST LIKELY TO USE Based on the sum of their top three choices, the three community center features respondent household members would be most likely to use if included in the new community center are: weight room/cardiovascular equipment area (51%), indoor family oriented swimming center (42%) and indoor running/walking track (40%). Q3. Which THREE Community Center Features Respondent Household Members Would Be MOST LIKELY to USE if Included in the New Community Center

Q2. Approximately How Often Respondent Household Members Would Use Various Features by percentage of respondents

by percentage of respondents

Weight room/cardiovascular equipment area 38% 24% 11% 10% 17% Indoor running/walking track 32% 29% 13% 9% 18% Indoor family oriented swimming center 24% 24% 13% 13% 27% Aerobics/fitness/dance space 21% 24% 13% 13% 29% Lap lanes for exercise swimming 21% 23% 15% 12% 30% Area for swim lessons 12% 20% 11% 12% 45% 25 yard competition/fitness pool 12% 16% 11% 15% 46% Multipurpose courts for basketball/volleyball/etc. 9% 14% 11% 19% 47% Drop in child care space 11% 11% 7% 6% 66% Warm water area for therapeutic purposes 9% 12% 13% 21% 46% Racquetball/handball/wallyball courts 6% 13% 14% 15% 52% Space for teens and pre-teens 5% 12% 12% 10% 62% Batting cages 6% 11% 12% 19% 52% Preschool age programming space 5% 9% 6% 5% 75% Rock climbing wall 3% 10% 17% 23% 47% Arts and crafts rooms 2% 11% 15% 23% 50% Space for gymnastics/cheerleading practice 3%6% 7% 10% 75% Space for active senior adults 2%4% 6% 8% 80% Multipurpose space for classes/meetings/parties1% 3% 8% 42% 46% Indoor stage/performing arts 1% 3%6% 20% 71% Multipurpose hospitality space with kitchen0% 2% 4% 30% 65% Other 15% 12% 3% 2% 68%

0% Several times Per Week Less than Once/Month

20%

40%

A few times Per Month Seldom or Never

60%

80%

Weight room/cardiovascular equipment area Indoor family oriented swimming center Indoor running/walking track Aerobics/fitness/dance space Lap lanes for exercise swimming Multipurpose courts for basketball/volleyball/etc. Area for swim lessons 25 yard competition/fitness pool Warm water area for therapeutic purposes Space for active senior adults Racquetball/handball/wallyball courts Drop in child care space Batting cages Preschool age programming space Space for teens and pre-teens Rock climbing wall Multipurpose space for classes/meetings/parties Arts and crafts rooms Multipurpose hospitality space with kitchen Space for gymnastics/cheerleading practice Indoor stage/performing arts Other

100%

51% 42% 40% 23% 20% 14% 13% 11% 10% 7% 7% 6% 5% 5% 4% 4% 3% 2% 2% 2% 2% 3%

7%

0%

At least Once/Month

20% 1st Preference

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

40% 2nd Preference

60% 3rd Preference

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

2.3.5 PURPOSES BEST DESCRIBING REASONS HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS WOULD USE INDOOR AQUATIC SPACES There are two purposes that 62% of respondents indicate best describe the reasons household members would use indoor aquatic program spaces: exercise (62%) and year round recreation/leisure activities (62%). The least mentioned purpose was “competition� (5%). Q4. TWO Purposes that Best Describe the Reasons Respondent Household Members Would Use Indoor Aquatic Program Spaces by percentage of respondents (two choices could be made)

62%

Exercise

62%

Year round recreation/leisure activities

29%

Instructional classes

22%

Therapeutic purposes

Competition

5%

9%

Not provided

0%

10%

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

8

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

2.3.6 HOW OFTEN RESPONDENT HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS WOULD VISIT A NEW INDOOR COMMUNITY CENTER The majority of respondents indicated that household members would visit a new indoor community center with the recreation and aquatic features most preferred several times per week (43%). Thirtynine percent (39%) of respondents indicated that household members would visit a new community center with features most preferred at least monthly. Nineteen percent (19%) indicated less than once per month or never. Q6. Which Statement Best Represents How Often Respondent Household M embers Would Visit a New Indoor Community Center With the Recreation & Aquatic Features M ost Preferred?

Q5. Importance of Various Programming Spaces to Serve Different Groups by percentage of respondents

61%

Adults (ages 25-64 years)

26%

72%

Families

15%

50%

Grade school age children

30%

45%

Teenagers

34%

43%

Active senior adults (ages 65+)

35%

by percentage of respondents

7% 6%

Several times per week 43%

6% 7%

11%

9%

12%

9%

12%

9%

Not provided 1% Never 8%

Once per week 17% 42%

Preschool age children

31%

32%

Young Adults (18-24)

0%

20%

Very Important

39%

40%

60%

Somewhat Important

Not Important

17%

11%

19%

10%

80%

100%

A few times a month 17%

Don't Know

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

Monthly 5%

Less than once a month 9%

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

2.3.7 MAXIMUM AMOUNT RESPONDENT HOUSEHOLD WOULD BE WILLING TO PAY FOR ANNUAL FAMILY PASS Thirty-five percent (35%) of respondent households indicated that they would spend at least $300-$499 per year for an annual family pass to a new indoor community center if it had the types of program features that are most important to them. In addition, 21% of respondents indicated household members would be willing to spend at least $500-$699 per year for an annual family pass. Q7a. M AXIM UM Amount Respondent Household Would Be Willing to Pay for An ANNUAL FAM ILY (4 People) Pass to a New INDOOR Community Center If It Had the Types of Program Features That Are M ost Important To Them by percentage of respondents

$500-$699 per year 21%

$700+ per year 9%

$300-$499 per year 35%

Less than $300/year 35% Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

9


2.3.8 MAXIMUM AMOUNT RESPONDENT HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS WOULD BE WILLING TO PAY FOR ANNUAL ADULT PASS The majority of respondents (62%) indicated that the maximum amount respondent household members would be willing to spend for an annual adult pass to a new indoor community center if it had the types of program features that are most important to them was less than $250 a year. Q7b. M AXIM UM Amount Respondent Household M embers Would Be Willing to Pay for An ANNUAL ADULT Pass to a New INDOOR Community Center If It Had the Types of Program Features That Are M ost Important To Them by percentage of respondents

$250-$399 per year 30% $400-$549 per year 6% $550+ per year 2%

Less than $250/year 62%

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

2.3.9 MAXIMUM AMOUNT RESPONDENT HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS WOULD BE WILLING TO PAY FOR DAILY ADULT FEE Forty-three percent (43%) of respondents indicated that the maximum amount respondent household members would be willing to pay for a daily adult fee to a new indoor community center if it had the types of program features that are most important to them is at least $4-$5 per day. Additionally, 25% indicated that household members would be willing to spend at least $6-$7 per day. Q7c. M AXIM UM Amount Respondent Household M embers Would Be Willing to Pay for A DAILY ADULT Fee to a New INDOOR Community Center If It Had the Types of Program Features That Are M ost Important To Them by percentage of respondents

$6-$7 per day 25%

$8+ per day 9%

$4-$5 per day 43% $3 or less/day 23% Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

10


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

2.3.10 MAXIMUM AMOUNT RESPONDENT HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS WOULD BE WILLING TO PAY FOR A DAILY CHILD FEE Forty-seven percent (47%) of respondents indicated that the maximum amount respondent household members would be willing to pay for a daily child fee to a new indoor community center if it had the types of program features that are most important to them is at least $4-$5+ per day. Additionally, 53% indicated that household members would be willing to spend at least $2-$3 per day.

Q7d. M AXIM UM Amount Respondent Household M embers Would Be Willing to Pay for A DAILY CHILD Fee to a New INDOOR Community Center If It Had the Types of Program Features That Are M ost Important To Them by percentage of respondents

$4 per day 26%

$5+ per day 21%

$3 per day 28%

$2 per day 25%

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

2.3.11 SUPPORT FOR AN INDOOR COMMUNITY CENTER SERVING AS AN ANCHOR FOR TOWNSHIP CIVIC PLAZA AND COMMUNITY GATHERING PLACE Thirty-four percent (34%) of respondents were very supportive of an indoor community center serving as an anchor for a Township Civic Plaza and Community Gathering Place. Ten percent (10%) of respondents preferred a standalone location. Q8. How Supportive Would You Be Of An Indoor Community Center Serving As An Anchor for a Township Civic Plaza and Community Gathering Place OR Would You Rather It Be A Stand Alone Facility? by percentage of respondents

Very supportive 34%

Somewhat supportive 19%

Prefer StandAlone Location 10%

Not supportive 11%

Not sure 26%

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

11


2.3.12 MAXIMUM AMOUNT WILLING TO PAY IN ADDITIONAL PROPERTY TAXES TO BUILD INDOOR COMMUNITY CENTER Twenty-two percent (22%) of respondents indicated that if Orange Township developed an indoor community center that had the features they would most prefer that their household would be willing to spend at least $86-$100 in additional property taxes to build the indoor community center. It should also be noted that 33% of respondents indicated their household would be willing to pay nothing in additional property taxes. Q9. If Orange Township Developed An Indoor Community Center That Had the Features You M ost Prefer, What Is the M aximum Amount You Would Be Willing to Pay in Additional Property Taxes to Build the Indoor Community Center? by percentage of respondents

Nothing 33%

$1-$85 11%

$86-$100 22% $251+ 17%

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

$101-$200 14%

$201-$250 3%

2.3.13 HOW RESPONDENT WOULD VOTE IN FUTURE ELECTION Sixty-five percent (65%) of respondents indicated they would either vote in favor (46%) or might vote in favor (19%) of a tax increase with the dollar amount they indicated they would support if included in a future election and the funds from the tax were used to pay to construct a new indoor community center with the features their household most prefers. Q10. If a Tax Increase With the Dollar Amount You Indicated You Would Support Was Included in a Future Election and the Funds From the Tax Were to Be Used to Pay to Construct a New Indoor Community Center With the Features Your Household Most Prefers, How Would You Vote? by percentage of respondents

Vote in favor 46%

M ight vote in favor 19% Vote against 24% Not sure 11% Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

12


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

2.3.14 REASON FOR BEING UNSURE OR VOTING AGAINST A TAX INCREASE The major reason that respondents indicated they were not sure or would vote against a tax increase if included in a future election is they do not support a tax increase (60%). Q10a. What Is the Major Reason You Are Not Sure or Would Vote Against a Tax Increase? by percentage of respondents who indicated they are not sure or would vote against a tax increase

Need m ore inform ation 18% Don't support tax increase 60%

Other 22%

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

2.3.15 HOW HIGH OF A PRIORITY DEVELOPMENT OF INDOOR COMMUNITY CENTER IS COMPARED TO OTHER ISSUES Forty-three percent (43%) of respondents indicated that compared to other issues facing Orange Township, that development of an indoor community center with the features they most prefer should be either a very high priority (15%) or high priority (27%). Additionally, 26% indicated that it should be a medium priority and 29% indicated that it should be a low priority. The remaining 3% indicated “don’t know”. Q11. Compared to Other Important Issues Facing Orange Township, How High of a Priority Do You Think the Development of An INDOOR Community Center With the Features You Most Prefer Should Be? by percentage of respondents

High priority 27%

Very high priority 15%

Don't know 3%

M edium priority 26%

Low priority 29% Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

13


2.3.16 DEMOGRAPHICS OF SURVEY Q12. Demographics: Ages of People in Household

Q13. Demographics: Age of Respondents

by percentage of household occupants

by percentage of respondents

35 to 44 38%

10-14 years 11% 5-9 years 12%

15-19 years 20-24 years 7% 4%

Under 35 12%

Under 5 years 9%

25-34 years 6%

65+ years 4%

65+ 7%

55-64 years 8%

35-44 years 21%

55 to 64 14%

45 to 54 29%

45-54 years 16% Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

Q15. Demographics: Years Lived in Orange Township

Q14. Demographics: Gender

by percentage of respondents

by percentage of respondents

Male 44%

3 to 5 years 16% 6 to 10 years 34%

1 to 2 years 11%

31+ years 1% 21 to 30 years 2% 16 to 20 years 8% 11 to 15 years 28%

Female 56% Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

Q17. Demographics: Household Income

Q16. Demographics: Do You Rent or Own Your Residence

by percentage of respondents by percentage of respondents

$75,000 to $99,999 16% $50,000 to $74,999 8% $100,000 to $149,999 36%

Rent 3%

$25,000 to $49,999 6%

Own 97%

Under $25,000 1%

$150,000 and over 33%

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

Source: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute (May 2012)

14


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

CHAPTER THREE - MARKET ANALYSIS 3.1 DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS The Demographic Analysis provides an understanding of the population of Orange Township. This analysis demonstrates the overall size of total population by specific age segment, race and ethnicity, and the overall economic status and spending power of the residents through household income statistics. It is important to note that while the demographics analysis evaluates the population characteristics based on the geographic area, the Parks and Recreation Department does tend to serve an audience outside that as well. All future demographic projections are based on historical trends. All projections should be utilized with the understanding that unforeseen circumstances during or after the time of the projections could have a significant bearing on the validity of the final projections. 3.1.1 METHODOLOGY Demographic data used for the analysis was obtained from the U.S. Census Bureau Website and Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI), the largest research and development organization dedicated to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and specializing in population projections and market trends. All data was acquired in May 2012 and reflects actual numbers as reported in the 2000 Census and 2010 Census and estimates for 2015 as obtained by ESRI. Orange Township geographic boundary was utilized as the demographic analysis (Figure 1).

15


3.1.1.1 RACE AND ETHNICITY DEFINITIONS The minimum categories for data on race and ethnicity for Federal statistics, program administrative reporting, and civil rights compliance reporting are defined as below. The Census 2010 data on race are not directly comparable with data from the 2000 Census and earlier censuses; caution must be used when interpreting changes in the racial composition of the US population over time. The latest (Census 2010) definitions and nomenclature are used within this chapter of the Community Center Needs Analysis. 

American Indian – This includes a person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment

Asian – This includes a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam

Black – This includes a person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – This includes a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands

White – This includes a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa

Hispanic or Latino – This is an ethnic distinction, a subset of a race as defined by the Federal Government; this includes a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rico, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race

3.1.2 ORANGE TOWNSHIP SERVICE AREA 3.1.2.1 POPULATION Orange Township service area has grown at a rapid pace over the last few years. From 1990 to 2000, the population increased from 3,789 to 12,464. From 2000 to 2010, the population continued to increase to 23,762. Five year projections reflect a continued increase in the populace; from 2010 to 2015 it is projected the Township population will increase to 28,081 (Figure 2).

Orange Township, Total Population Trends 30,000 25,000

20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 Census 1990

Census 2000

Census 2010

16

Projection 2015


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

3.1.2.2 AGE SEGMENT Overall, the Township has a slightly skewed age segment distribution. Evaluating the distribution by age segments, Orange Township has a good mixture of youth, families and active adult populations. Currently the highest segment by population is the 35-54 with 35.54% and the lowest is the 55+ population with 14.59% thus indicating a very wide range of variation between all the age groups. Over time, there is projected to be a mild aging pattern with the 55+ population growing in number to 15.3% by 2015 and the 35-54 age group slightly reducing to 32.6%. This is similar to nationwide trends that point to a growth pattern in the 55+ age group as a result of increased life expectancies and the baby boomer population entering that age group. This would entail that as the Township keeps growing, it will have to ensure a focus on balanced recreation offerings and introduce programs and facilities with multi-generational appeal.

Orange Township, Population by Age Segment 100% 80%

55+

60%

35-54

40%

18-34

20%

< 18

0% Census 1990

< 18 18-34 35-54 55+

Census 2000

Census 2010

Projection 2015

Census Census Census Projection 1990 2000 2010 2015 29.40% 31.00% 33.66% 32.90% 26.30% 27.20% 16.21% 19.10% 30.70% 32.60% 35.54% 32.60% 13.60% 9.20% 14.59% 15.30% Figure 4 - Percentage Population by Age Segment

At the same time, it would be helpful for the Township to also provide youth centered programs as a means to attract younger families and fresh job seekers. Some programs types include youth based programming, before and after school programs as well as sports leagues and tournaments catered to them. In general, for such diverse population segments, a variety of aquatics and non-aquatics programs be it recreational, educational and fitness and wellness programs as well as special events are the most popular. Types of programs can include aquatics programs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; aquaerobics, therapeutic recreation programs, life skill programs, family activities such as biking, walking, and swimming, and general entertainment and leisure activities. 17


3.1.2.3 GENDER The gender distribution for the Township is evenly split between the genders (Figure 5). Currently, Male totals account for 49.82% of the total population. This distribution is projected to remain fairly constant throughout the next five years.

Orange Township, Population By Gender 100% 80%

49.50%

50.20%

50.18%

50.60%

60%

Female

40%

20%

50.50%

49.80%

49.82%

49.40%

Male

0%

Census 1990

Census 2000

Census 2010

Projection 2015

Recreational trends from the last few years indicate that, on average, Americans participate in a sport or recreational activity of some kind at a relatively high rate (65%). Female participation rates, however, are slightly lower than their male counterparts â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 61% of females participate at least once per year in a sport or recreational activity compared to a 69% participation rate of men. According to recreational trends research performed in the industry over the past twenty years, the top ten recreational activities for females are currently: 1. Walking 2.

Aerobics

3. General exercising 4. Biking 5. Jogging 6. Basketball 7. Lifting weights 8. Golf 9. Swimming 10. Tennis The top ten recreational activities for males are: 1. Golf 18


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

2. Basketball 3. Walking 4. Jogging 5. Biking 6. Lifting weights 7. Football 8. Hiking 9. Fishing 10. Hunting While men and women share a desire for six of the top ten recreational activities listed above, men claim to participate in their favorite activities more often than women in any ninety-day span. With more women not only comprising a larger portion of the general populace during the mature stages of the lifecycle, but also participating in recreational activities further into adulthood, a relatively new market has appeared over the last two decades. This mature female demographic is opting for less team oriented activities which dominate the female youth recreational environment, instead shifting more towards a diverse selection of individual participant activities, as evident in the top ten recreational activities mentioned above. 3.1.2.4 RACE AND ETHNICITY Racial composition of a populace provides guidance for decision making based on historical and cultural heritage. In the case of Orange Township, persons classified as white account for 83.75% of the populace; persons classified as Asian Pacific Islander make up the next largest racial category â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8.87% of the population. All other racial categories make up 7.38% of the total population (Figure 6).

Orange Township, 2010 Racial Composition White Alone

83.75%

Asian Pacific Islander Black Alone Two or More Races 8.87%

Some Other Race Alone American Indian Alone

0.13% 0.88%

1.99% 4.38%

19


A small shift, from an ethnicity standpoint, is being witnessed in those being classified as being of Hispanic / Latino origin of any race. This segment is expected to grow from 1.50% (187 individuals) in 2000 to 2.60% (617 individuals) in 2010 (Figure 7).

Orange Township, Hispanic Origin 100% 80% 60%

98.50%

97.40%

Non-Hispanic Hispanic Origin

40% 20% 0% 2000

2010

3.1.2.5 PARTICIPATION BY RACE/ETHNICITY Utilizing the Ethnicity Study performed by American Sports Data, Inc., a national leader in sports and fitness trends, participation rates among recreational and sporting activities were analyzed and applied to each race/ethnic group. The White Alone population as a whole participates in a wide range of activities, including both team and individual sports of a land and water based variety; however, the White Alone populace has an affinity for outdoor non-traditional sports. Ethnic minority groups in the United States are strongly regionalized and urbanized, with the exception of Native Americans, and these trends are projected to continue. Different ethnic groups have different needs when it comes to recreational activities. Ethnic minority groups, along with Generations X and Y, are coming in ever-greater contact with Caucasian middle-class baby-boomers with different recreational habits and preferences. This can be a sensitive subject since many baby-boomers are the last demographic to have graduated high school in segregated environments, and the generational gap magnifies numerous ideals and values differences which many baby-boomers are accustomed to. This trend is projected to increase as more baby-boomers begin to retire, and both the minority and youth populations continue to increase. Hispanic and Latino Americans have strong cultural and community traditions with an emphasis placed on the extended family, many times gathering in large recreational groups where multiple activities geared towards all age segments of the group may participate. Large group pavilions with picnicking amenities and multi-purpose fields are integral in the communal pastime shared by many Hispanics. The Black Alone population has historically been an ethnic group that participates in active team sports, most notably football, basketball, and baseball. The African-American populace exhibits a strong sense of neighborhood and local community through large special events and gatherings with extended family and friends, including family reunions. Outdoor and water based activities, such as, hiking, water skiing, rafting, and mountain biking, are not much of a factor in the participatory recreational activities. 20


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

The Asian population a very different yet distinct ethnic group compared with the three main groups in the U.S. – Caucasian, African-American, and Hispanic. The Asian population has some similarities to the Hispanic population, but many seem to shy away from traditional team sports and outdoor and water based activities. A participation index was also reviewed. An index is a gauge of likelihood that a specific ethnic group will participate in an activity as compared to the U.S. population as a whole. An index of 100 signifies that participation is on par with the general population; an index less than 100 means that the segment is less likely to participate, more than 100 signifies the group is more likely than the general public to participate. The most popular activities for those classified as White Alone in terms of total participation percentage, the percentage by which you can multiply the entire population by to arrive at activity participation of at least once in the past twelve months, are: 1. Recreational Swimming – 38.9% participation rate (38.9% of the population has participated at least once in the last year); 2. Recreational Walking – 37.0% participation rate; 3. Recreational Bicycling – 20.6% participation rate; 4. Bowling – 20.4% participation rate; 5. Treadmill Exercise – 19.1% participation rate; High participation percentages in freshwater fishing (17.3% participation rate), hiking (17.2% participation rate), and tent camping (17.2% participation rate) demonstrate the high value that the Caucasian population places on outdoor activities. Sailing (Index of 124), kayaking (Index of 121), and golf (Index of 120) are three activities that the Caucasian population is more likely to participate in than the general public. The five most popular activities for those of Hispanic / Latino descent are: 1. Recreational Swimming – 33.2% participation rate; 2. Recreational Walking – 31.2% participation rate; 3. Recreational Bicycling – 19.7% participation rate; 4. Bowling – 18.5% participation rate; 5. Running/Jogging – 18.0% participation rate; In terms of participation index, the Hispanic populace is more than twice as likely as the general population to participate in boxing (Index of 264), very likely to participate in soccer (Index of 177), and more likely to participate in paintball (Index of 155) than any other ethnic group. For comparison reasons, Hispanics are nearly twice as likely to participate in soccer as any other race. The top five recreational activities for the Asian populace in regards to participation percentages are: 1. Recreational Walking – 33.3% participation rate; 2. Recreational Swimming – 31.9% participation rate; 3. Running/Jogging – 21.6% participation rate; 4. Bowling – 20.5% participation rate; 5. Treadmill Exercise – 20.3% participation rate; 21


The Asian populace participates in multiple recreational activities at a greater rate than the general population, with lacrosse being the activity boasting the greatest index of 615. Squash (Index 0f 414), mountain/rock climbing (Index of 262), yoga/tai chi (Index 229), martial arts (227), artificial wall climbing (224), badminton (222), and rowing machine exercise (206) each represent an activity that Asian’s are more than twice as likely to participate in than the general public. Analyzing the top five activities that the Black Alone populace participates in at the greatest rate results in: 1. Recreational Walking – 26.7% participation rate; 2. Recreational Swimming – 20.2% participation rate; 3. Basketball – 19.8% participation rate; 4. Bowling – 17.5% participation rate; 5. Running/Jogging – 14.3% participation rate; The African-American population, like the Hispanic / Latino population, is more than twice as likely to participate in boxing (Index of 208). Football (Index of 199) and basketball (Index of 160) are also among the higher participated in activities among the African-American populace. 3.1.2.6 HOUSEHOLD AND INCOME The household count has changed from 4,629 as reported in Census 2000 to 8,127 in 2010. The fiveyear projections place household totals at 10,251 in 2015. Average household size is currently estimated at 2.74 persons, compared to 2.69 in year 2000. The number of families in the current year is 7,026 in the market area. Currently, 69% of the 8,556 housing units in the market area are owner occupied; 19.9% are renter occupied and 11.1% are vacant. These numbers are roughly unchanged since Census 2000. Home values statistics are: 

Median home value (2010) in the demographic area is $307,080, compared to a median home value of $157,913 for the US o

It is projected that in 2015 the median home value will increase to $355,322

Household income characteristics are higher than the national averages. Statistics are the following: 

Current median household income is $103,324 compared to $50,046 for all US households o

Median household income is projected to reach $117,384 by 2015

o

In 2000, median household income was $74,456

o

In 1990, median household income was 50,400

Current average household income is $126,414, compared to $68,259 for all US households o

Average household income is projected to reach $134,867 in 2015

o

In 2000, average household income was $88,653

o

In 1990, average household income was $54,343

Current per capita income is $45,513, compared to US per capita income of $26,059 o

The per capita income is projected to be $49,687 by 2015

o

In 2000, the per capita income was $33,240

o

In 1990, the per capita income was $18,088 22


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

Orange Township, Income Characteristics $140,000

$126,414

$134,867 $117,384

$120,000

$103,324 $88,653

$100,000 $80,000 $60,000

$74,456

Average HH Income

$54,343

$50,400

$43,513

$49,687

$33,240

$40,000

Median HH Income

Per Capita Income

$18,088 $20,000 $0 Census 1990

Census 2000

Census 2010

Projection 2015

In terms of disposable income – income available for household and personal expenditures after all applicable taxes – the target market area has an estimated average disposable income of $96,298. Average disposable income – or discretionary income available to the consumer – extrapolates to $8,025 per month for households. Average disposable income by age of householder ranks as follows: 

Age of householder 55-64 - $110,701 average of disposable income

Age of householder 45-54 - $109,366 average of disposable income

Age of householder 35-44 - $99,398 average of disposable income

Age of householder 25-34 - $83,427 average of disposable income

Age of householder 65-74 - $77,866 average of disposable income

Age of householder 75+ - $66,796 average of disposable income

Age of householder <25 - $52,380 average of disposable income

Typically, the economy’s performance has a trickle-down effect on recreation – a poor performing economy leads to less disposable income by requiring individuals and families to dedicate larger sums of money to necessities and less to discretionary items.

23


When viewed in context with average household expenditures; the disposable income available for the target area residents does not appear to be a great threat to entertainment and recreational spending. Household spending on all entertainment and recreation ranks a respectable fourth out of fourteen categories (Figure 9).

Orange Township, Average HH Expenditures by Category (2010) Computers & Accessories Vehicle Maintenance & Repairs TV/Video/Audio Education Investments Apparel & Service HH Furnishings & Equip. Travel Food Away from Home Health Care $5,823

Entertainment/Recreation Food at Home Shelter

Retail Goods $0

$5,000 $10,000 $15,000 $20,000 $25,000 $30,000 $35,000 $40,000 $45,000

24


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

3.2 SPORTS AND RECREATION TRENDS Information released by Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association (SGMA) 2010 Study of Sports, Fitness, and Recreation Participation reveals that the most popular sport and recreational activities include walking, treadmill, running/jogging, bicycling, and billiards/pool. Most of these activities appeal to both young and old alike, can be done in most environments, can be enjoyed regardless of level of skill, and have minimal economic barriers to entry. These popular activities also have appeal because of the social aspect. People enjoy walking and biking together, and although fitness activities are mainly self-directed, many can offer a degree of camaraderie. Walking has remained one of the two most participated in activities of the past decade. Walking participation, during the last year data was available (2010), reported that 114 million Americans walked at least once. From a traditional team sport standpoint, basketball ranks highest among all sports in terms of participatory base with 26.3 million persons reportedly participating in 2010. Two sports experiencing participation and growth are lacrosse and tennis – both have seen double digit growth over the past decade; lacrosse has outright exploded. Ultimately, the greatest growth of participation in recreational activities has occurred in activities that have low barriers to entry, can be undertaken within close proximity to home, and can be completed in a limited amount of time. The following Trend Graphs show the following:   

Yellow- Growth in the Activity Green- moderate decline Red- high levels of decline

25


3.2.1 TRENDING SOURCE The Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association (SGMA) Sports, Fitness & Recreational Activities Topline Participation Report 2011 was utilized to evaluate national sport and fitness participatory trends. SGMA is the number one source for sport and fitness research. The study is based on online interviews carried out in January and February 2011 from more than 38,000 individuals and households. 3.2.2 TRADITIONAL “BAT AND BALL” AND TEAM SPORTS Traditional sports, often referred to as the social glue that bonds the country, play an important role in American society. By teaching important values of teamwork and discipline while stressing physical fitness and a healthy lifestyle, sports have been the building block for many Americans. Basketball, a game originating in the U.S., is actually the most participated sport among the traditional “bat and ball” sports with more than twenty-six million (26.3 million) estimated participants. This popularity can be attributed to the ability to compete with relatively small number of participants, the limited amount of equipment needed to participate, and the limited space requirements necessary – the last of which make basketball the only traditional sport that can be played at the majority of American dwellings as a drive-way pickup game. Interestingly, Basketball participation rate increased by almost 10% from 2009 to 2010 (Figure 10). National Participatory Trends; by Activity - General Sports

2000

2007

2008

2009

2010

Baseball 15,848 16,058 15,030 13,837 14,558 Basketball 26,215 25,961 26,254 24,007 26,304 Cheerleading 2,634 3,279 3,104 3,036 3,232 Ice Hockey 2,432 1,840 1,902 2,134 2,145 Football, Touch 15,456 13,472 10,493 8,959 8,367 Football, Tackle 8,229 7,939 7,692 6,794 6,905 Gymnastics 4,876 4,066 3,883 4,021 4,815 Ruby N/A 617 690 750 1,130 Lacrosse 518 1,058 1,127 1,197 1,648 Soccer - Outdoor N/A 13,708 14,223 13,691 14,075 Soccer - Indoor N/A 4,237 4,737 4,913 4,927 Softball, Fast Pitch 2,693 2,345 2,316 2,636 2,389 Softball, Slow Pitch 13,577 9,485 9,835 8,525 8,429 Volleyball, Court N/A 6,986 8,190 7,283 7,346 Volleyball, Sand/Beach 5,248 3,878 4,171 4,476 5,028 Racquetball 4,475 4,229 4,993 4,575 4,630 Tennis 12974 16940 18558 18534 18903 NOTE: Participation figures are in 000's for the US population ages 6 and over

% Change '09-10 5.2% 9.6% 6.5% 0.5% -6.6% 1.6% 19.7% 50.7% 37.7% 2.8% 0.3% -9.4% -1.1% 0.9% 12.3% 1.2% 2.0%

% Change '08-10 -3.1% 0.2% 4.1% 12.8% -20.3% -10.2% 24.0% 63.8% 46.2% -1.0% 4.0% 3.2% -14.3% -10.3% 20.5% -7.3% 1.9%

% Change '07-10 -9.3% 1.3% -1.4% 16.6% -37.9% -13.0% 18.4% 83.1% 55.8% 2.7% 16.3% 1.9% -11.1% 5.2% 29.7% 9.5% 11.6%

% Change '00-10 -8.1% 0.3% 22.7% -11.8% -45.9% -16.1% -1.3% N/A 218.1% N/A N/A -11.3% -37.9% N/A -4.2% 3.5% 45.7%

Since 2007, lacrosse and other niche sports like rugby have seen strong growth. Based on survey findings, lacrosse is experiencing tremendous growth over the past decade (218%) and over the past year (’09-’10), lacrosse has grown 37.7%. From 2007 – 2010 rugby has grown 83.1%. Traditional youth “powerhouse” sports including outdoor soccer and baseball have both experienced declines in participation over the study period; however, the sheer number of participant (14.5 million and 14.0 million, respectively) demands the continued support of these sports. 26


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

3.2.3 AQUATIC ACTIVITY Swimming is unquestionably a lifetime sport. Participation rates in swimming have remained steady over the years, although as with most recreational activities, participatory rates have dipped slightly. However, recreational swimming is the unquestionable leader in multigenerational appeal with nearly 17 million estimated participants per year (Figure 11). National Participatory Trends; by Activity

2000

2007

2008

2009

Aquatic Exercise 9,303 9,757 9,267 8,662 Swimming (Fitness/Competition) 16,144 18,368 19,041 17,443 NOTE: Participation figures are in 000's for the US population ages 6 and over

2010 9,231 17,145

% Change '09-10 6.6% -1.7%

% Change '08-10 -0.4% -10.0%

% Change '07-10 -5.4% -6.7%

% Change '00-10 -0.8% 6.2%

Aquatic exercise has paved the way for a less stressful form of physical activity allowing similar gains and benefits to land based exercise that include aerobic fitness, resistance training, flexibility, and better balance. Doctors have recommended aquatic exercise for injury rehabilitation, mature patients, and patients with bone or joint problems due to the significant reduction of stress placed on weight-bearing joints, bones, muscles, and also the affect that the pressure of the water assists in reducing swelling of injuries. 3.2.4 FITNESS TRENDS Unlike most of the traditional sports and recreation trends, fitness trends vary at a greater rate from year to year. Multiple factors influence these shifts, including the relative infancy of the mainstream fitness industry (25-years of history versus 75 to 100+ years of some traditional sports), and the commercialism of fitness routines and products that leads to the latest, most marketed activity or supplement greatly influencing participation. Fitness trends were analyzed from two industry leading establishments â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the American Council on Exercise (ACE). The 2012 survey was completed by 2,620 health fitness professionals, including trainers, fitness instructors, program directors and other specialists. They were all certified by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). The survey asked them to rank 37 possible trends, including popular items from previous years and emerging trends as determined by the editors of ACSM's Health & Fitness Journal, where results were published.

27


The top 20 fitness trends from 2009 to 2012 are show in Figure 12 in descending order.

2009

2010

2011

2012 Prediction

Educated and experienced fitness professionals

Educated and experienced fitness professionals

Educated and experienced fitness professionals

Children & Obesity

Strength Training

Educated and experienced fitness professionals Special fitness programs for older adults

Personal Training

Children & Obesity

Strength Training

Special fitness programs for older adults

Strength Training Core Training Special fitness programs for older adults Pilates Stability ball

Personal Training Core Training Special fitness programs for older adults Functional fitness Sport-specific training

Children & Obesity Personal Training

Exercise and weight loss Children and obesity

Core Training

Personal training

Exercise and weight loss Boot Camp

Sport-specific training

Pilates

Functional fitness

Balance training

Group personal training

Physician referrals

Core training Group personal training Zumba and other dance workouts Functional fitness

Functional fitness

Outcome measurements

Yoga

Yoga

Comprehensive health programming at work

Exercise and weight loss

Worksite health promotion

Comprehensive health programming at work

Wellness coaching Worker incentive programs

Wellness coaching

Outcome measurements

Boot camp

Yoga

Group personal training

Outdoor activities

Outcome measurements

Spinning

Spinning

Reaching new markets

Spinning

Boot camp

Spinning

Physician referrals

Physician referrals

Exercise and weight loss

Stability ball

Sport-specific training Worker incentive programs Clinical integration/medical fitness

Group personal training

Balance training

Reaching new markets

Wellness coaching

Reaching new markets

Comprehensive health programming at work

Wellness Coaching

Physician referrals

28

Strength training

Sport specific training Worker incentive programs


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

Participation is greatest among persons who participate in fitness walking – 114 million (Figure 13). Then followed by treadmill exercise (53.1 million) and running/jogging (49.4 million). Although currently in the midst of an obesity epidemic, the fitness industry continues to experience steady growth combined with high retention rates. This graph shows Yellow-Slight level of decline. Green as increased level of participation. National Participatory Trends; by Activity - General Fitness

2000

2007

2008

2009

Aquatic Exercise 9,303 9,757 9,267 8,662 Aerobics (High & Low Impact) 33,174 33,684 36,440 38,954 Aerobics (Step) 10,867 8,528 10,318 10,784 Fitness Walking 90,982 108,740 111,668 110,095 Running/Jogging 31,398 41,064 41,130 43,892 Swimming (Fitness & Competition) 16,144 18,368 19,041 17,443 Pilates Training 1,556 9,192 8,886 8,653 Yoga/Tai Chi N/A N/A 21,182 23,314 Free Weights (Barbells) 24,800 25,499 26,142 27,048 Free Weights (Dumbbells) 27,470 32,371 34,391 35,744 Weight Resistant Machines 32,144 39,290 38,397 39,752 Stationary Cycling (Group) 4,709 6,314 6,693 6,831 Treadmill 37,287 50,073 49,371 51,418 Stair Climbing, Machine 15,282 13,521 14,204 13,101 Elliptical Motion Trainer 7,371 23,586 25,284 26,521 NOTE: Participation figures are in 000's for the US population ages 6 and over

2010 9,231 43,041 11,283 114,068 49,408 17,145 8,154 25,066 27,339 37,388 38,618 8,876 53,131 13,436 28,117

% Change '09-10 6.6% 10.5% 4.6% 3.6% 12.6% -1.7% -5.8% 7.5% 1.1% 4.6% -2.9% 29.9% 3.3% 2.6% 6.0%

% Change '08-10 -0.4% 18.1% 9.4% 2.1% 20.1% -10.0% -8.2% 18.3% 4.6% 8.7% 0.6% 32.6% 7.6% -5.4% 11.2%

% Change '07-10 -5.4% 27.8% 32.3% 4.9% 20.3% -6.7% -11.3% N/A 7.2% 15.5% -1.7% 40.6% 6.1% -0.6% 19.2%

% Change '00-10 -0.8% 29.7% 3.8% 25.4% 57.4% 6.2% 424.0% N/A 10.2% 36.1% 20.1% 88.5% 42.5% -12.1% 281.5%

3.2.4.1 HEALTH CLUB TRENDS According to IBISWorld’s recent report, the Gym, Health and Fitness Clubs industry has benefited significantly from marketing campaigns that target consumer trends for fighting obesity and improving health. Gym, health and fitness club membership numbers have increased over the past 10 years, rising from 36 million in 2002 to more than 50 million by 2012. This trend has resulted in soaring demand for fitness activities as the general public becomes more health-conscious and as the aging population places a greater emphasis on staying fit. According to results from the Physical Activity Council’s (PAC) annual participation study, over 20% of Americans plan to increase spending in gym memberships/fees while 67.6% will spend the same.

29


3.2.5 NATIONAL YOUTH TEAM SPORT TRENDS The following information came from the Sports Marketing Surveys, USA who is the provider of research and analysis for Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association (SGMA). The following charts depict team sport trends by age segments (Figure 14-16). Yellow- depicts high levels of increase. Red-loss of participation. 1 year 2 year Ages 6-11 Frequency 2008 2009 2010 2011 Baseball Basketball Cheerleading Field Hockey Football (Tackle) Gymnastics Ice Hockey Lacrosse Rugby Soccer (Outdoor) Softball (Fast Pitch) Track and Field Volleyball (Court) Volleyball (Sand) Wrestling Swimming on a Team

13+ times 13+ times 26+ times 8+ times 26+ times 50+ times 13+ times 13+ times 8+ times 26+ times 26+ times 26+ times 13+ times 13+ times 26+ times 50+ times

3,904 3,455 530 80 833 561 132 87 10 2,436 173 111 346 23 196

3,657 3,260 488 122 797 614 137 105 24 243 169 118 371 27 199

3,370 3,208 437 134 738 698 150 134 30 2,570 180 163 439 32 218

3,454 3,328 496 74 676 852 192 170 17 2,686 235 253 398 17 218 643

change 2.5% 3.7% 13.6% -44.8% -8.4% 22.0% 27.7% 26.9% -44.1% 4.5% 30.3% 55.4% -9.3% -47.6% -0.2%

change -5.6% 2.1% 1.6% -39.1% -15.1% 38.8% 40.3% 62.7% -31.3% 10.6% 38.8% 114.0% 7.3% -37.7% 9.6%

For children ranging from 6 to 11 years-old, track and field has grown tremendously over the past four years; within two year, track and field grew 114%. Other noticeable growth trends in team sport participation are lacrosse, ice hockey, gymnastics, and softball (fast pitch). Cheerleading has also experience a strong growth over the past year, growing by more than 13%. Field hockey, rugby, and volleyball (sand) are experiencing significant declines in participation. Within the last year, all three team sports have declined by more than 40%. For children ranging from 12-14 years-old, Field Hockey grew by 74% within a two year period but slow down greatly over the past year (1.4%). Other team sports trending strong growth are gymnastics, ice hockey, softball (fast pitch), track and field, and volleyball (sand). Lacrosse, rugby, and wrestling are showing a decline in participation. Team sports like baseball, basketball, football (tackle), soccer (outdoor), and volleyball (court) are experiencing slight decline in participation in the past 1-2 years but the number of participants are great and need continually support. Ages 12-14

Frequency

Baseball Basketball Cheerleading Field Hockey Football (Tackle) Gymnastics Ice Hockey Lacrosse Rugby Soccer (Outdoor) Softball (Fast Pitch) Track and Field Volleyball (Court) Volleyball (Sand) Wrestling Swimming on a Team

13+ times 13+ times 26+ times 8+ times 26+ times 50+ times 13+ times 13+ times 8+ times 26+ times 26+ times 26+ times 13+ times 13+ times 26+ times 50+ times

2008 1,453 3,062 431 93 1,130 270 89 146 24 1,244 314 686 1,224 135 290

2009 1,428 2,930 459 85 1,106 264 95 176 17 1,173 313 700 1,081 75 287

2010 1,577 2,934 475 145 1,138 267 73 211 22 1,103 256 740 946 41 230

2011 1,503 2,830 431 147 1,076 295 94 181 17 1,085 282 792 855 62 196 366

1 year change -4.7% -3.5% -9.2% 1.4% -5.5% 10.7% 29.0% -14.0% -22.7% -1.7% 10.2% 7.0% -9.6% 53.1% -14.6%

2 year change 5.3% -3.4% -6.1% 74.0% -2.8% 11.7% -1.1% 3.1% 0.0% -7.5% -10.1% 13.1% -20.9% -17.3% -31.7%

Figure 15 - Team Sport Trends Ages 12-1430 (Source: Sports Marketing Survey, USA)


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

For children ranging 15-18 years-old, lacrosse and ice hockey have shown strong growth trends over past 1-2 years, 22.7% and 18.1% respectively. Gymnastics has also shown a strong growth over a two year period (51.8%) but experienced a slowdown in participation over the past year. Noticeable declines in participation are in volleyball (sand) and softball (fast pitch). Volleyball (sand) has declined by more than 50% over a two year period and softball (fast pitch) declined by 25% in a two year period. Ages 15-18

Frequency

Baseball Basketball Cheerleading Field Hockey Football (Tackle) Gymnastics Ice Hockey Lacrosse Rugby Soccer (Outdoor) Softball (Fast Pitch) Track and Field Volleyball (Court) Volleyball (Sand) Wrestling Swimming on a Team

13+ times 13+ times 26+ times 8+ times 26+ times 50+ times 13+ times 13+ times 8+ times 26+ times 26+ times 26+ times 13+ times 13+ times 26+ times 50+ times

2008 1,088 2,478 488 136 1,309 250 146 192 33 1,075 275 1,025 998 998 424

2009 1,085 2,495 531 135 1,212 198 154 174 37 1,069 309 979 868 868 368

2010 1,122 2,527 561 111 1,165 283 144 176 38 953 277 944 758 758 298

2011 1,185 2,506 485 122 1,275 301 170 216 57 861 232 1,040 847 398 294 283

1 year change 5.6% -0.9% -13.6% 9.5% 9.5% 6.4% 18.1% 22.7% 4.7% -9.6% -16.3% 10.2% 11.7% -47.5% -1.2%

2 year change 9.2% 0.4% -8.7% -10.0% 5.2% 51.8% 10.1% 24.5% 52.7% -19.4% -25.0% 6.2% -2.5% -54.1% -20.1%

Figure 16 - Team Sport Trends Ages 15-18 (Source: Sports Marketing Survey, USA)

3.2.6 SPENDING LEVELS The following chart shows projected spending levels in 2012 for different categories. A majority of team sport participants plan to spend more or the same in each category. Team Sports at School Team Sports Outside of School Travel for Sports and Rec. Lessons, Instruction and Camps Gym Memberships, Fees Individual Sports Events Golf Membership, Fees Tennis Membership, Fees Winter Sports Outdoor Recreation Sports/Rec. Clothing Sports/Rec. Footwear Sports/Rec. Equipment

Spend More Spend Same Spend Less 22.8% 64.6% 12.6% 21.6% 66.3% 12.4% 22.5% 64.2% 13.3% 24.5% 62.9% 12.6% 20.7% 67.6% 11.7% 23.1% 65.6% 11.3% 15.5% 71.4% 13.7% 9.9% 77.2% 12.9% 17.6% 66.8% 15.6% 20.7% 70.1% 9.2% 16.5% 69.2% 14.3% 16.4% 70.4% 13.2% 16.0% 66.7% 17.3%

31


The following chart depicts which sports participants plan to spend more on travel. Rugby Field Hockey Gymnastics Softball (Fast Pitch) Ice Hockey Football (Tackle) Track and Field Baseball Volleyball (Court) Cheerleading Soccer (Indoor) Ultimate Frisbee Soccer (Outdoor) Basketball Volleyball (Sand/Beach) Lacrosse Paintball

More 24.4% 19.6% 19.4% 17.7% 16.7% 16.7% 15.3% 15.0% 14.7% 13.9% 13.9% 12.3% 11.8% 11.7% 10.1% 9.7% 9.7%

32

Same 51.3% 52.0% 39.9% 42.4% 40.6% 41.8% 47.4% 43.5% 43.4% 39.8% 40.0% 39.2% 40.7% 38.8% 42.0% 52.0% 40.6%

Less No Spending 8.6% 15.7% 3.0% 25.3% 5.1% 35.6% 15.9% 23.9% 10.4% 32.3% 9.0% 32.5% 10.9% 26.5% 7.7% 33.8% 9.8% 32.1% 7.2% 39.1% 10.4% 35.7% 13.7% 34.7% 8.4% 39.1% 9.4% 40.1% 11.5% 36.4% 11.2% 27.1% 13.7% 36.0%


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

3.2.7 LOCAL TRENDS ANALYSIS The following sports were further examined to evaluate how Ohio compares to the national trends in each specific sport. This information will help determine size of the market and frequency levels of users. This will help determine the type of facilities that are most needed in a region and that the region will travel to these types of facilities for their sports experiences. Ohio is included in the East North Central Region, which includes Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana and Michigan. Indexes highlighted in Red are greater than the national average and those highlighted in Blue are lower than the national average. 3.2.7.1 SOFTBALL (FAST PITCH) The following chart depicts the frequency of participation in softball (fast pitch) by region. The last column (index vs. total population) represents how each region is compared to the national level of participation. Numbers below 100 (blue) would represent a lower than average participation rate and numbers above 100 (red) would represent higher than average participation rate. The East North Central Region is above the national average in every category except for Casual Participants (1-25 times/year). Participation Index vs. Rate by Total Group Population Total Fast Pitch Softball Participants (1+ times/year) New England 94 3.9% 0.7% 81 Middle Atlantic 310 12.9% 0.8% 96 East North Central 380 15.8% 0.9% 103 West North Central 230 9.6% 1.2% 143 South Atlantic 382 15.9% 0.7% 82 East South Central 216 9.0% 1.3% 150 West South Central 250 10.4% 0.8% 92 Mountain 182 7.6% 0.9% 107 Pacific 357 14.9% 0.8% 95 Casual Fast Pitch Softball Participants (1-25 times/year) New England 42 3.4% 0.3% 71 Middle Atlantic 211 17.1% 0.5% 127 East North Central 166 13.4% 0.4% 87 West North Central 139 11.2% 0.7% 168 South Atlantic 188 15.3% 0.3% 78 East South Central 47 3.8% 0.3% 63 West South Central 122 9.9% 0.4% 87 Mountain 109 8.8% 0.5% 124 Pacific 212 17.1% 0.5% 109 Regular Fast Pitch Softball Participants (26-51 times/year) New England 52 11.1% 0.4% 231 Middle Atlantic 68 14.4% 0.2% 107 East North Central 84 17.8% 0.2% 115 West North Central 16 3.3% 0.1% 50 South Atlantic 42 9.0% 0.1% 46 East South Central 82 17.5% 0.5% 291 West South Central 19 4.0% 0.1% 36 Mountain 5 1.0% 0.0% 14 Pacific 103 21.9% 0.2% 140 Frequent Fast Pitch Softball Participants (52+ times/year) New England 4 0.6% 0.0% 12 Middle Atlantic 48 6.9% 0.1% 51 East North Central 124 17.8% 0.3% 115 West North Central 77 11.0% 0.4% 164 South Atlantic 143 20.6% 0.3% 105 East South Central 75 10.8% 0.4% 179 West South Central 102 14.7% 0.3% 130 Mountain 67 9.7% 0.3% 136 Pacific 56 8.1% 0.1% 52 * Participation figures in thousands (Source SGMA Research) Total # of Segment % Part. (000s)

33


3.2.7.2 BASEBALL The following chart depicts the frequency of participation in Baseball by region. The last column (index vs. total population) represents how each region is compared to the national level of participation. Numbers below 100 would represent a lower than average participation rate and numbers above 100 would represent higher than average participation rate. The East North Central Region is above the national average in every category. The region is second in total number of participants who play the game more than 25+ times a year which is a growing select team sport for this region of the United States. Total # of Participation Index vs. Segment Part. Rate by Total % (000s) Group Population Total Baseball Participants (1+ times/year) New England 1027 7.1% 7.5% Middle Atlantic 2294 15.8% 6.0% East North Central 2664 18.3% 6.1% West North Central 981 6.4% 4.9% South Atlantic 2351 16.1% 4.2% East South Central 935 6.4% 5.5% West South Central 1163 8.0% 3.6% Mountain 952 6.5% 4.7% Pacific 2248 15.4% 5.0% Casual Baseball Participants (1-12 times/year) New England 298 6.1% 2.2% Middle Atlantic 791 16.3% 2.1% East North Central 867 17.9% 2.0% West North Central 327 6.7% 1.7% South Atlantic 796 16.4% 1.4% East South Central 230 4.7% 1.4% West South Central 465 9.6% 1.5% Mountain 297 6.1% 1.5% Pacific 786 16.2% 1.8% Regular Baseball Participants (13-24 times/year) New England 114 4.9% 0.8% Middle Atlantic 410 17.7% 1.1% East North Central 602 26.0% 1.4% West North Central 177 7.6% 0.9% South Atlantic 295 12.7% 0.5% East South Central 110 4.7% 0.6% West South Central 102 4.4% 0.3% Mountain 204 8.8% 1.0% Pacific 303 13.1% 0.7% Frequent Baseball Participants (25+ times/year) New England 615 8.3% 4.5% Middle Atlantic 1094 14.8% 2.9% East North Central 1188 16.1% 2.7% West North Central 427 5.8% 2.2% South Atlantic 1263 17.1% 2.3% East South Central 595 8.1% 3.5% West South Central 595 8.1% 1.9% Mountain 452 6.1% 2.2% Pacific 1159 15.7% 2.6% * Participation figures in thousands (Source SGMA Research)

34

147 117 119 95 83 107 71 92 98 128 121 116 101 84 79 85 86 103 102 131 169 114 65 79 39 124 83 173 110 104 86 87 134 71 86 100


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

3.2.7.3 SOCCER OUTDOOR The following chart depicts the frequency of participation in Soccer (Outdoor) by region. The last column (index vs. total population) represents how each region is compared to the national level of participation. Numbers below 100 would represent a lower than average participation rate and numbers above 100 would represent higher than average participation rate. The East North Central Region is above the national average in every category except for frequent participants (52+ times/year). Total # of Participation Index vs. Segment Part. Rate by Total % (000s) Group Population Total Soccer (Outdoor) Participants (1+ times/year) New England 615 4.4% 4.5% Middle Atlantic 1956 13.9% 5.1% East North Central 352 16.7% 5.4% West North Central 793 5.6% 4.2% South Atlantic 2540 18.0% 4.6% East South Central 680 4.8% 4.0% West South Central 1444 10.3% 4.5% Mountain 1043 7.4% 5.2% Pacific 2653 18.8% 6.0% Casual Soccer (Outdoor) Participants (1-25 times/year) New England 366 4.9% 2.7% Middle Atlantic 1103 14.7% 2.9% East North Central 1337 17.9% 3.1% West North Central 458 6.1% 2.4% South Atlantic 1313 17.5% 2.4% East South Central 434 5.8% 2.5% West South Central 716 9.6% 2.2% Mountain 638 8.5% 3.2% Pacific 1122 15.0% 2.5% Regular Soccer (Outdoor) Participants (26-51 times/year) New England 126 3.6% 0.9% Middle Atlantic 412 11.6% 1.1% East North Central 699 19.7% 1.6% West North Central 162 4.6% 0.9% South Atlantic 599 16.9% 1.1% East South Central 147 4.1% 0.9% West South Central 356 10.0% 1.1% Mountain 255 7.2% 1.3% Pacific 788 22.2% 1.8% Frequent Soccer (Outdoor) Participants (52 times/year) New England 123 4.0% 0.9% Middle Atlantic 441 14.5% 1.2% East North Central 316 10.4% 0.7% West North Central 173 5.7% 0.9% South Atlantic 628 20.6% 1.1% East South Central 98 3.2% 0.6% West South Central 372 12.2% 1.2% Mountain 150 4.9% 0.7% Pacific 742 24.4% 1.7% * Participation figures in thousands (Source SGMA Research)

35

91 103 109 84 93 81 91 104 120 102 109 116 91 90 97 85 120 95 74 86 128 68 87 69 89 101 142 84 107 67 85 106 54 108 69 155


3.2.7.4 CHEERLEADING The following chart depicts the frequency of participation in cheerleading by region. The last column (index vs. total population) represents how each region is compared to the national level of participation. Numbers below 100 would represent a lower than average participation rate and numbers above 100 would represent higher than average participation rate. The East North Central Region is above the national average in every category which demonstrates a strong number of participants that play causal, team and competitive type of cheerleading. Total # of Participation Index vs. Segment Part. Rate by Total % (000s) Group Population Total Cheerleading Participants (1+ times/year) New England 78 2.4% 0.6% Middle Atlantic 549 17.0% 1.4% East North Central 569 17.6% 1.3% West North Central 173 5.4% 0.9% South Atlantic 728 22.5% 1.3% East South Central 254 7.9% 1.5% West South Central 366 11.3% 1.1% Mountain 200 6.2% 1.0% Pacific 316 9.8% 0.7% Casual Cheerleading Participants (1-25 times/year) New England 41 2.5% 0.3% Middle Atlantic 260 15.6% 0.7% East North Central 293 17.6% 0.7% West North Central 109 6.6% 0.6% South Atlantic 358 21.5% 0.6% East South Central 116 7.0% 70.0% West South Central 180 10.8% 0.6% Mountain 104 6.3% 0.5% Pacific 203 12.2% 0.5% Regular Cheerleading Participants (26-51 times/year) New England 16 2.8% 0.1% Middle Atlantic 115 19.8% 0.3% East North Central 93 16.0% 0.2% West North Central 13 2.2% 0.1% South Atlantic 109 18.8% 0.2% East South Central 35 6.0% 0.2% West South Central 89 15.3% 0.3% Mountain 39 6.7% 0.2% Pacific 71 12.2% 0.2% Frequent Cheerleading Participants (52+ times/year) New England 21 2.1% 0.2% Middle Atlantic 174 17.6% 0.5% East North Central 183 18.5% 0.4% West North Central 52 5.3% 0.3% South Atlantic 261 26.4% 0.5% East South Central 102 10.3% 0.6% West South Central 96 9.7% 0.3% Mountain 57 5.8% 0.3% Pacific 42 4.3% 0.1% * Participation figures in thousands (Source SGMA Research)

36

50 126 114 80 116 131 100 87 62 51 116 114 98 110 116 96 88 78 57 147 104 33 96 100 136 95 78 44 131 120 79 136 172 86 81 27


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

3.2.7.5 FOOTBALL (FLAG) The following chart depicts the frequency of participation in football (flag) by region. The last column (index vs. total population) represents how each region is compared to the national level of participation. Numbers below 100 would represent a lower than average participation rate and numbers above 100 would represent higher than average participation rate. The East North Central Region is below the national average in every category except for regular participants (13-24 times/year). Total # of Participation Index vs. Segment Part. Rate by Total % (000s) Group Population Total Football (Flag) Participants (1+ times/year) New England 226 3.3% 1.7% Middle Atlantic 821 12.1% 2.1% East North Central 959 14.2% 2.2% West North Central 400 5.9% 2.1% South Atlantic 1410 20.8% 2.5% East South Central 347 5.1% 2.0% West South Central 914 13.5% 2.9% Mountain 620 9.2% 3.1% Pacific 1071 15.8% 2.4% Casual Football (Flag) Participants (1-12 times/year) New England 171 4.6% 1.3% Middle Atlantic 439 11.9% 1.1% East North Central 510 13.8% 1.2% West North Central 255 6.9% 1.3% South Atlantic 753 20.4% 1.4% East South Central 202 5.5% 1.2% West South Central 521 14.1% 1.6% Mountain 313 8.5% 1.6% Pacific 530 14.3% 1.2% Regular Football (Flag) Participants (13-24 times/year) New England 41 3.3% 0.3% Middle Atlantic 159 13.0% 40.0% East North Central 208 17.0% 50.0% West North Central 88 7.2% 0.5% South Atlantic 274 22.3% 0.5% East South Central 56 4.6% 0.3% West South Central 80 6.5% 0.2% Mountain 137 11.2% 0.7% Pacific 183 14.9% 0.4% Frequent Football (Flag) Participants (25+ times/year) New England 13 0.7% 0.1% Middle Atlantic 223 12.1% 0.6% East North Central 241 13.1% 0.6% West North Central 57 3.1% 0.3% South Atlantic 383 20.7% 0.7% East South Central 89 4.8% 0.5% West South Central 313 17.0% 1.0% Mountain 169 9.2% 0.8% Pacific 358 19.4% 0.8% * Participation figures in thousands (Source SGMA Research)

37

70 90 92 88 107 85 120 129 101 96 88 90 103 105 91 125 119 91 70 96 110 107 115 76 58 157 95 15 89 85 46 106 80 150 129 124


3.2.7.6 LACROSSE The following chart depicts the frequency of participation in Lacrosse by region. The last column (index vs. total population) represents how each region is compared to the national level of participation. Numbers below 100 would represent a lower than average participation rate and numbers above 100 would represent higher than average participation rate. The East North Central Region is below the national average in every category. This could be low because of a lack of venues available in the region or a lack of focus from sports organizers to market and promote the sport. In any case the sport is growing in popularity for both men and women. Total # of Segment % Part. (000s)

Participation Index vs. Rate by Total Group Population

Total Lacrosse Participants (1+ times/year) New England 87 5.8% 0.6% Middle Atlantic 558 37.2% 1.4% East North Central 135 9.0% 0.3% West North Central 35 2.4% 0.2% South Atlantic 317 21.1% 0.6% East South Central 47 3.1% 0.3% West South Central 34 2.3% 0.1% Mountain 114 7.6% 0.6% Pacific 173 11.5% 0.4% Casual Lacrosse Participants (1-12 times/year) New England 48 6.9% 0.4% Middle Atlantic 196 27.9% 0.5% East North Central 52 7.4% 0.1% West North Central 26 3.7% 0.1% South Atlantic 156 22.2% 0.3% East South Central 7 1.0% 0.0% West South Central 26 3.7% 0.1% Mountain 74 10.5% 0.4% Pacific 117 16.7% 0.3% Regular Lacrosse Participants (13-24 times/year) New England 0 0.0% 0.0% Middle Atlantic 106 71.9% 0.3% East North Central 16 10.6% 0.0% West North Central 7 5.0% 0.0% South Atlantic 18 12.5% 0.0% East South Central 0 0.0% 0.0% West South Central 0 0.0% 0.0% Mountain 0 0.0% 0.0% Pacific 0 0.0% 0.0% Frequent Lacrosse Participants (25+ times/year) New England 36 5.6% 0.3% Middle Atlantic 271 41.5% 0.7% East North Central 68 10.5% 0.2% West North Central 3 0.4% 0.0% South Atlantic 140 21.4% 0.3% East South Central 38 5.8% 0.2% West South Central 8 1.2% 0.0% Mountain 38 5.8% 0.2% Pacific 51 7.8% 0.1% * Participation figures in thousands (Source SGMA Research)

38

121 275 59 35 108 52 20 107 73 143 207 48 56 114 17 32 148 106 0 532 69 75 64 0 0 0 0 116 308 68 7 110 97 10 81 50


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

3.2.7.7 RUGBY The following chart depicts the frequency of participation in rugby by region. The last column (index vs. total population) represents how each region is compared to the national level of participation. Numbers below 100 would represent a lower than average participation rate and numbers above 100 would represent higher than average participation rate. The East North Central Region is below the national average in every category except for Regular Participants (8-14 times/year) which indicates it is a growing sport at 25,000 in the East North Central area. Total # of Participat Index vs. Segment Part. ion Rate Total % (000s) by Group Population Total Rugby Participants (1+ times/year) New England 52 6.1% 0.4% 127 Middle Atlantic 197 23.2% 0.5% 172 East North Central 98 11.6% 0.2% 75 West North Central 40 4.7% 0.2% 70 South Atlantic 140 16.5% 0.3% 84 East South Central 20 2.4% 0.1% 39 West South Central 51 6.0% 0.2% 53 Mountain 56 6.6% 0.3% 93 Pacific 196 23.0% 0.4% 147 Casual Rugby Participants (1-7 times/year) New England 46 8.4% 0.3% 176 Middle Atlantic 176 32.4% 0.5% 240 East North Central 61 11.3% 0.1% 73 West North Central 12 2.3% 0.1% 34 South Atlantic 31 5.7% 0.1% 29 East South Central 9 1.7% 0.1% 28 West South Central 38 7.0% 0.1% 62 Mountain 48 8.8% 0.2% 124 Pacific 122 22.5% 0.3% 143 Regular Rugby Participants (8-14 times/year) New England 0 0.0% 0.0% 0 Middle Atlantic 15 19.2% 0.0% 142 East North Central 25 31.3% 0.1% 203 West North Central 0 0.0% 0.0% 0 South Atlantic 10 12.0% 0.0% 61 East South Central 0 0.0% 0.0% 0 West South Central 8 10.1% 0.0% 89 Mountain 0 6.6% 0.0% 93 Pacific 17 20.9% 0.0% 133 Frequent Rugby Participants (15+ times/year) New England 10 4.2% 0.1% 88 Middle Atlantic 14 6.0% 0.0% 45 East North Central 6 2.4% 0.0% 16 West North Central 27 12.0% 0.1% 180 South Atlantic 93 41.1% 0.2% 211 East South Central 11 5.0% 0.1% 83 West South Central 4 1.9% 0.0% 17 Mountain 5 2.1% 0.0% 29 Pacific 57 25.2% 0.1% 161 * Participation figures in thousands (Source SGMA Research)

39


3.2.7.8 BASKETBALL The following chart depicts the frequency of participation in basketball by region. The last column (index vs. total population) represents how each region is compared to the national level of participation. Numbers below 100 would represent a lower than average participation rate and numbers above 100 would represent higher than average participation rate. The East North Central Region is above the national average in every category which demonstrates a strong number of participants that play causal, team and tournament type of basketball. Total # of Participat Index vs. Segment Part. ion Rate Total % (000s) by Group Population Total Basketball Participants (1+ times/year) New England 1307 5.0% 9.6% Middle Atlantic 3271 12.4% 8.5% East North Central 4669 17.8% 10.7% West North Central 1454 5.5% 7.6% South Atlantic 4870 18.5% 8.8% East South Central 1695 6.4% 10.0% West South Central 2860 10.9% 8.9% Mountain 2126 8.1% 10.6% Pacific 4052 15.4% 9.1% Casual Basketball Participants (1-12 times/year) New England 385 4.5% 2.8% Middle Atlantic 1328 15.4% 3.5% East North Central 1507 17.5% 3.4% West North Central 447 5.2% 2.4% South Atlantic 1616 18.7% 2.9% East South Central 572 6.6% 3.4% West South Central 831 9.6% 2.6% Mountain 605 7.0% 3.0% Pacific 1338 15.5% 3.0% Regular Basketball Participants (13-24 times/year) New England 208 5.2% 1.5% Middle Atlantic 549 13.6% 1.4% East North Central 773 19.2% 1.8% West North Central 304 7.5% 1.6% South Atlantic 590 14.6% 1.1% East South Central 215 5.3% 1.3% West South Central 416 10.3% 1.3% Mountain 323 8.0% 1.6% Pacific 653 16.2% 1.5% Frequent Basketball Participants (25+ times/year) New England 714 5.2% 5.2% Middle Atlantic 1394 10.2% 3.6% East North Central 2389 17.5% 5.5% West North Central 703 5.2% 3.7% South Atlantic 2665 19.5% 4.8% East South Central 908 6.7% 5.3% West South Central 1613 11.8% 5.0% Mountain 1199 8.8% 6.0% Pacific 2062 15.1% 4.6% * Participation figures in thousands (Source SGMA Research)

40

104 92 115 83 95 107 96 114 98 93 114 113 77 96 110 85 99 99 108 101 125 113 75 89 91 113 103 109 76 114 77 101 111 105 124 96


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

3.2.7.9 VOLLEYBALL (COURT) The following chart depicts the frequency of participation in volleyball (court) by region. The last column (index vs. total population) represents how each region is compared to the national level of participation. Numbers below 100 would represent a lower than average participation rate and numbers above 100 would represent higher than average participation rate. The East North Central Region is above the national average in every category which demonstrates a strong number of participants over 608,000 that play team and tournament type of volleyball (court). Index vs. Total # of Participat Segment Total Part. ion Rate % Populati (000s) by Group on Total Volleyball (Court) Participants (1+ times/year) New England 211 2.9% 1.5% 60 Middle Atlantic 1128 15.4% 2.9% 114 East North Central 1439 19.6% 3.3% 127 West North Central 545 7.4% 2.9% 111 South Atlantic 1010 13.7% 1.8% 71 East South Central 330 4.5% 1.9% 75 West South Central 859 11.7% 2.7% 103 Mountain 26 9.9% 3.6% 139 Pacific 1099 15.0% 2.5% 95 Casual Volleyball (Court) Participants (1-12 times/year) New England 120 3.7% 0.9% 78 Middle Atlantic 566 17.6% 1.5% 130 East North Central 656 20.3% 1.5% 132 West North Central 189 5.9% 1.0% 88 South Atlantic 492 15.3% 0.9% 78 East South Central 92 2.9% 0.5% 48 West South Central 308 9.6% 1.0% 85 Mountain 375 11.6% 1.9% 164 Pacific 426 13.2% 1.0% 84 Regular Volleyball (Court) Participants (13-24 times/year) New England 40 3.5% 0.3% 74 Middle Atlantic 181 16.0% 0.5% 119 East North Central 175 15.5% 0.4% 101 West North Central 71 6.3% 0.4% 94 South Atlantic 98 8.7% 0.2% 45 East South Central 67 5.9% 0.4% 99 West South Central 205 18.2% 0.6% 161 Mountain 129 11.4% 0.6% 161 Pacific 162 14.3% 0.4% 91 Frequent Volleyball (Court) Participants (25+ times/year) New England 50 1.7% 0.4% 35 Middle Atlantic 380 12.7% 1.0% 94 East North Central 608 20.3% 1.4% 132 West North Central 285 9.5% 1.5% 142 South Atlantic 421 14.1% 0.8% 72 East South Central 170 5.7% 1.0% 95 West South Central 346 11.6% 1.1% 102 Mountain 222 7.4% 1.1% 104 Pacific 511 17.1% 1.1% 109 * Participation figures in thousands (Source SGMA Research)

41


3.3 MARKET ANALYSIS MAPPING The following map depicts a 10, 15 and 20 minute drive times from Orange Townshipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aquatic Center.

42


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

2000 Population 2010 Population 2016 Population 10 Minute Drive Time 48,255 73,497 82,815 15 Minute Drive Time 214,474 266,819 291,063 20 Minute Drive Time 569,657 656,279 696,256 

Within a 10 minute dive time, from 2000 to 2010 the population grew at an annual rate of 4.32%, from 48,255 to 73,497. Predictions place the 2016 population at 82,815.

Within a 15 minute drive time, from 2000 to 2010 the population grew at an annual rate of 2.21%, from 214,474 to 266,819. Predictions place the 2016 population at 291,063.

Within a 20 minute drive time, from 2000 to 2010 the population grew at an annual rate of 1.43%, from 569,657 to 656,279. Predictions place the 2016 population at 696,256.

2000 Households 2010 Households 2016 Households 10 Minute Drive Time 19,035 27,979 31,450 15 Minute Drive Time 86,926 105,751 114,830 20 Minute Drive Time 234,289 266,996 282,478 

Within a 10 minute dive time, from 2000 to 2010 total household grew at an annual rate of 3.93%, from 19,035 to 27,979. Predictions place the 2016 total households at 31,450.

Within a 15 minute drive time, from 2000 to 2010 total households grew at an annual rate of 1.98%, from 86,926 to 105,751. Predictions place the 2016 total households at 114,830.

Within a 20 minute drive time, from 2000 to 2010 total households grew at an annual rate of 1.32%, from 234,289 to 266,996. Predictions place the 2016 total households at 282,478.

43


3.4 SERVICE PROVIDER ANALYSIS As part of the Community Center Needs Analysis, competing recreation and exercise facilities were researched that were located in and around Orange Township. The following tables display the similar facilities, as well as their location, amenities, and pricing. Name

Delaware Community Center YMCA

Liberty Township/Powell YMCA

North YMCA

Address

1121 South Houk Road Delaware, OH 43015

7798 North Liberty Road Powell, OH 43065

1640 Sandalwood Place Columbus, OH 43229

Contact Information

740.203.3051

614.839.9622

614.885.4253

Distance from 1680 East Orange Road, Types of Spaces Within the Facility Lewis Center, Ohio 43035

Website

www.ymcacolumbus.org/d elaware/index.php

http://ymcacolumbus.org/li berty

http://ymcacolumbus.org/n orth

44

12.6 miles, 21 minutes

5.8 miles, 12 minutes

9.2 miles, 17 minutes

Fitness Center w/separate cardio and strength training area 3 Aerobic Rooms 2 Indoor Pools 2 Court Gymnasium Elevated Running Track Teen Center Child Watch Area Locker Rooms Family Changing Rooms Hot Tub and Sauna Climbing Wall

Aerobic studio Indoor Jogging/Walking Track Outdoor Walking Track Y Cycling Studio Indoor Pool Outdoor Pool Baby/splash pool Warm water instruction pool Basketball courts (2) Strength Equipment Cardiovascular Equipment Steam Rooms Saunas Whirlpool hot tub Climbing wall Playground Nursery/babysitting Conference Rooms Multi-purpose room OSU outpatient rehab

Indoor jogging/walking track Y Cycling Studio Indoor pool Basketball courts (2) Racquetball courts (3) Volleyball courts Strength Equipment Cardiovascular Equipment Steam Rooms Saunas Whirlpool hot tub Baseball/softball Diamonds Soccer Field Playground Picnic Shelter Child Care Nursery / babysitting Conference rooms Multi-purpose room Teen Center Outdoor Walking trail Olympic weightlifting area Wallyball

Types of Membership Individual Membership Youth - Age 15 & Under Monthly $18.90 Annual $209.70 Teen/Young Adult - Age 16-24 Monthly $26.10 Annual $292.50 Adult Monthly $40.50 Annual $464.40 Family Memberships 2 Adults + Children Monthly $67.50 Annual $788.40 1 Adult + Children Monthly $55.70 Annual $661.70 Couple Monthly $63 Annual $734.40 Program Membership Individual $27 Family $45 Individual Membership Youth - Age 15 & Under Monthly $18.90 Annual $209.70 Teen/Young Adult - Age 16-24 Monthly $26.10 Annual $292.50 Adult Monthly $40.50 Annual $464.40 Family Memberships 2 Adults + Children Monthly $67.50 Annual $788.40 1 Adult + Children Monthly $55.70 Annual $661.70 Couple Monthly $63 Annual $734.40 Program Membership Individual $27 Family $45 Individual Membership Youth - Age 15 & Under Monthly $18.90 Annual $209.70 Teen/Young Adult - Age 16-24 Monthly $26.10 Annual $292.50 Adult Monthly $40.50 Annual $464.40 Family Memberships 2 Adults + Children Monthly $67.50 Annual $788.40 1 Adult + Children Monthly $55.70 Annual $661.70 Couple Monthly $63 Annual $734.40 Program Membership Individual $27 Family $45


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

Name

Westerville Community Center

Highlands Park Aquatic Center

The Rite Bite Fitness and Nutrition Center

Elite Physique Personal Training

Address

Contact Information

Distance from 1680 East Orange Road, Types of Spaces Within the Facility Lewis Center, Ohio 43035

Website

350 N. Cleveland Ave. www.westerville.org/index Westerville, OH 614.901.6500 .aspx?page=133 43082

245 S. Spring Rd. Westerville, OH 43081

1680 East Orange Road Lewis Center, Ohio 43035

350 East Orange Road Lewis Center, OH 43035

614.901.7665

614.985.6569

740.548.3637

www.westerville.org/index .aspx?page=140

http://www.theritebite.co m/index.htm

5.6 miles, 13 minutes

Climbing Wall Gymnasium Fitness Room Track Leisure Pool Competition Pool Whirlpool Lazy River Meeting Room Multi-purpose Room Kids Play Area

12.7 miles, 19 minutes

Slide Tower Zero Entry Toddler Pool Leisure Pool Spray Ground Lazy River 8-Lane 12 Meter Pool Diving Well

3 miles, 6 minutes

http://elitephysiquesinc.co 1.1 miles, 2 minutes m/index.htm

45

Personal Training Lifestyle Coaching Group Fitness Corporate Fitness Fitness Classes Locker Rooms

Personal Training Lifestyle Coaching Group Fitness Sauna Fitness Classes Nutrition Coaching

Types of Membership Daily (Resident/Non-Resident) Senior Adult $6/9 Adult $7.50/11.25 Youth $6/9 Annual Passport (R/NR) Adult (18 – 59) R: $230/NR: $345 Young Adult (16 – 17) R: $185/NR: $277.50 Youth (3 –15) R: $165/NR: $247.50 Senior R: $185/NR: $277.50 Daily (Resident/Non-Resident) Youth/Adult $5.50/$8.25 Youth/Adult after 6 p.m. $4.00/$6.00 Season Pass (R/NR) Single Adult $75/$131.25 Single Youth $75/$131.25 Seniors $40/$70 Family of Two $120/$210 Family of Three $150/$262.50 Family of Four $170/$297.50 Family of Five $180/$315 Family of Six $190/$332.50 Family of Seven or more $200/$350 Exercise Class 10 Class Pass $75 15 Class Pass $100 Monthly Gym Membership JustRite $25 AllRite $30 MightyRite $40 One Year Gym Membership JustRite $300 AllRite $360 MightyRite $480

Group Pricing 2 people (per hour) $35 ea. 3-4 people (per hour) $25 ea. Training/Assessment Pricing Assessment $60- $130-$270 1 Hour Assessment $150 Assessment and custom stretching Program $130 Personal Training (per hour) $45$60 Assessment with Program Design for off-site training Includes: stretching, strengthening, functional program, and 90 minutes of program instruction $270


Name

Worthington Recreation Center

Dublin Recreation Center

Address

345 E. Wilson Bridge Road Worthington, OH 43085

5600 Post Road Dublin, OH 43017

Contact Information

614.436.2743

614.410.4550

Distance from 1680 East Orange Road, Types of Spaces Within the Facility Lewis Center, Ohio 43035

Website

www.worthington.org/index.as px?nid=228

www.dublin.oh.us/recreation

6.8 miles, 13 minutes

13.5 miles, 19 minutes

Anytime Fitness Gym

7557 Gooding Blvd. Delaware, OH 43015

614.441.9677

www.anytimefitness.com

1.96 miles, 3 minutes

Aspen Fitness Center

6465 Pullman Drive Lewis Center, OH 43035

740.548.7900

www.aspenfitnessclubs.com

3.36 miles, 5 minutes

Urban Active

2100 Polaris Pkwy Columbus, OH 43230

www.urbanactive.com

4.5 miles, 10 minutes

614.430.9210

46

Types of Membership

Two Gymnasiums Art Room Pottery Studio Public Meeting Rooms Pools Indoor Track Fitness Floor

Yearly (Resident/NonResident) Youth (3-13 years) $100/125 Individual $250/325 Family of 2 $410/535 Family of 3 $520/675 Family of 4 $595/775 Family of 5 $670/870 Senior Citizen (60+) $175/250 Monthly (R/NR) Individual $40/50 Senior Citizen ($30/40

Aerobic/Dance Studio Babysitting Room Classrooms Community Hall Theater Computer Room Locker Rooms Fitness Area Jogging/Walking Track Leisure Pool Multi-Purpose Pool Senior Adult Lounge Teen Lounge

Yearly (Resident/NonResident) Individual $200/580 Family of 2 $345/1020 Family of 3 $455/1355 Family of 4 $520/1530 Family of 5 $555/1655 Senior Citizen (60+) $100/195 6-Month Pass Individual $120 Household of 2 $210 Household of 3 $275 Household of 4 $310 Household of 5 $335

24-hour access 24-hour security Anywhere Club Access Private Restrooms Private Showers Tanning Personal Training HDTV Treadmills Elliptical Exercise Cycles Expresso Game Bikes Circuit Strength Equip. Free Weights Racks Plate Loaded Koko Smart Trainer Smith Machine Aerobics Spinning Large Free Weight Center Mega Cardio Center Tanning Kids Club Zumba Personal Training Chair Massages Group Fitness Group Fitness Silver Sneakers Personal Training Racquetball Tanning

Each Club Varies On Pricing Year Membership: $33/ month plus a $39 key fee for anytime access 2 Year Membership: $29/ month plus a $39 key fee for anytime access

Each Club Varies on Pricing $9.99-19.99 Sign-Up Fee $9.99-19.99/ month

Each Club Varies on Pricing $20-60/ month Offers prepaid memberships for 24, 18, and 15 months


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

3.5 PRICING LEVEL ANALYSIS The pricing level charts helps to support the level of pricing in the Market Place when determining the amount of revenue a facility can generate. The price information was analyzed in the proforma for the proposed facility in Orange Township. The following charts depict the price point that residents support in neighboring facilities. 3.5.1 DAILY RESIDENT RATES

Daily Resident Rate $9.00 $8.00 $7.00

$6.75

$7.00

$6.00 $5.00

High

$5.00

$4.00

Low

$3.00

Median Price

$2.00 $1.00 $Daily Resident Youth Daily Resident Adult Daily Resident Senior

3.5.2 DAILY NON-RESIDENT RATES

Daily Non-Resident Rate $12.00 $10.00

$9.63

$8.00 $6.00

$7.50 $6.50

High Low

$4.00

Median Price

$2.00 $Daily Non-Resident Daily Non-Resident Daily Non-Resident Youth Adult Senior

47


3.5.3 MONTHLY RESIDENT RATES

Monthly Resident Rate $50.00 $45.00 $40.00 $35.00 $30.00 $25.00 $20.00 $15.00 $10.00 $5.00 $-

$32.50

$27.75

$27.50

High Low

Median Price

Monthly Resident Monthly Resident Monthly Resident Youth Adult Senior

3.5.4 MONTHLY NON-RESIDENT RATES

Monthly Non-Resident Rate $60.00 $50.00 $40.00 $30.00

$37.50 $32.50

High $27.75

$20.00

Low Median Price

$10.00 $Monthly NonResident Youth

Monthly NonResident Adult

48

Monthly NonResident Senior


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

3.5.5 YEARLY RESIDENT RATES

Yearly Resident Rate $500.00 $450.00

$400.00 $350.00

$332.20

$300.00

$282.20

$250.00

$200.00

High Low

$196.25

Median Price

$150.00 $100.00 $50.00 $Yearly Resident Youth

Yearly Resident Adult

Yearly Resident Senior

3.5.6 YEARLY NON-RESIDENT RATES

Yearly Non-Resident Rate $700.00

$600.00 $500.00 $452.50 $400.00

High

$352.50

$329.70

$300.00

Low

Median Price

$200.00 $100.00 $Yearly NonResident Youth

Yearly NonResident Adult

49

Yearly NonResident Senior


3.5.7 FAMILY MEMBERSHIPS Adding family memberships would be beneficial for Orange Township to help support the young and growing families around the market area. Currently, the YMCA’s, Worthington and Dublin Recreation Center offer family membership by the number of individuals within each family. The Dublin Recreation Center offers the lowest rates for resident family’s but dramatically increases for non-resident families. Residents: 

Family of 2 - $345

Family of 3 - $455

Family of 4 - $520

Family of 5 - $555

Non-Residents: 

Family of 2 - $1,020

Family of 3 - $1,355

Family of 4 - $1,530

Family of 5 - $1,655

The following chart depicts the number of families within a 10, 15, and 20 minute drive time from Orange Township’s Aquatic Center.

10 Minute Drive Time 15 Minute Drive Time 20 Minute Drive Time

2010 Families 19,455 68,907 156,638

50

2016 Families 21,647 74,355 164,551


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

3.5.8 YEARLY FAMILY RESIDENT RATES

Yearly Family Resident Rate $1,000.00 $900.00 $800.00 $700.00

$665.50

$698.00

$715.50

$600.00 $500.00

$540.00

High

$400.00

Low

$300.00

Median Price

$200.00 $100.00 $-

Yearly Resident Yearly Resident Yearly Resident Yearly Resident Family of 2 Family of 3 Family of 4 Family of 5

3.5.9 YEARLY FAMILY NON-RESIDENT RATE

Yearly Family Non-Resident Rate $1,800.00 $1,600.00 $1,400.00 $1,262.50

$1,200.00

$1,152.50 $1,015.00

$1,000.00 $800.00

High $777.50

Low

$600.00

Median Price

$400.00 $200.00 $Yearly NonYearly NonYearly NonYearly NonResident Family Resident Family Resident Family Resident Family of 2 of 3 of 4 of 5

51


CHAPTER FOUR - CORE PROGRAM IDENTIFICATION Utilizing the community input, including the needs assessment from the household survey, demographic analysis, service provider analysis, and market definition, the PROS Team identified the following core program spaces for the proposed community center. This includes the key activities and programs for both adult and youth participants, as well as the potential size of the core program space. Also, the program plan identifies each of the proposed strategic partner’s roles in the execution of programs in the proposed facility. This information was presented in a visioning session with the steering committee to finalize a recommended program plan from which the concept, spatial analysis, and operational and finance plan was created. These core programs will drive the components and design of the facility including the size of each program space in the building to achieve maximum flexibility and revenue return. The outcome of this task was used to establish a concept development plan and financial performance and management alternatives. The core program for the proposed Community Center is based on the defined market and resulting components illustrated in the concept design designed by Williams Architects. General program categories supported by the market and resulting components detailed should be supported by the community based on the statistically valid survey and the public input process. Core programs and the associated potential activities that are conducive to the market and conceptualized in the facility include the following: 

Court Sports – Basketball leagues for youth and adults, volleyball leagues for youth and adults, clinics, sports camps, open pickup play as well as racquetball

Fitness programs for health/wellness, self-help-healthy living and nutrition classes, martial arts, Pilates, yoga, aerobics, and jazzercise, walking track, health fairs, youth fitness programs and cheerleading

Cardio and free weights

Aquatics – Learn-to-swim, water exercise, open swim, competitive swim, parent and child swim, private swim lessons, senior aquatic fitness programs, and lap swim

Senior programs – Senior fitness classes, water exercise, open swim, computer classes, nutrition programs, art classes, card clubs, walking programs

Life skill programs – Computer classes, adult dance, music lessons, pre-K learning, art programs

Youth programs – Spring break camp, summer break camps, winter break camps, sports camps, youth fitness programs, game room, movie nights, Birthday parties

Teen programs – Teen aerobics, teen fitness and aquatic programs, club sports,

Facility rental – Community meetings, birthday parties, hospitality type events, gymnasium rentals, catering kitchen

The facility is planned to be 60% programmed based on 105 hours a week of the building being open.

52


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

CHAPTER FIVE - SITE SELECTION The location of a community center within the Township is an important decision that requires considerable analysis. As part of the feasibility study, the team undertook a process to prioritize criteria and identify potential site locations. The following describes the site evaluation process and the preliminary results. 5.1 STEP 1: SITE CRITERIA The Consultant Team and the Steering Committee started the site selection process by evaluating a number of potential site selection criteria. The Steering Committee ranked several criteria from zero for criteria that were not important up to 5 for criteria that was very important. The result was a group of 8 priority criteria that were the most important factors in selecting a site. 5.2 STEP 2: SITE EVALUATION AND CRITERIA MATRIX DEVELOPMENT

Lewis Center Road

Shanahan/ North Road

Orange Commerce north

Orange Commerce south

Old State Road

Orange Road / Bale Kenyon

Highbanks

Glimcher

MTB

Criteria

Priority/ Weight Factor

Green Meadows

The Consultant Team and the Steering Committee evaluated a large number of undeveloped parcels in the Township. Initially, sites were selected that appeared to be of adequate size with reasonable access. These sites were placed into a matrix and evaluated against the priority site criteria from step 1. Five sites scored significantly higher than the other sites and moved forward for further study.

Site 1

Site 2

Site 3

Site 4a

Site 4b

Site 5

Site 6

Site 7

Site 8

Site 9

Adequate Site Size

4.9

10

10

10

5

8

10

10

10

9

10

Availability of Utilities

4.4

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

9

9

East of S.R. 23

4.3

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

0

10

5

Cost/Availability of Acquisition 4.2 Known Construction Cost Impacts (soils, earthwork, etc.) 4.2

8

8

8

5

5

5

8

5

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

Major Arterial Access

3.9

8

9

5

10

10

9

6

10

9

10

Pedestrian/ Bicycle Access Central to Service Area Population (5, 10, 15 minute drive time)

3.9

8

8

6

5

5

8

8

4

8

8

3.8

6

6

3

6

6

8

6

3

8

6

279.60

283.50

248.70

238.60

253.30

278.50

271.80

204.80

290.60

270.30

weighted totals

Meeting Notes: 1. Site selection criteria and weight factors were reviewed from previous meeting. 2. Eight sites or general areas were reviewed with the steering committee along with initial rankings of the sites by the consultant team. 3. After committee discussion, five sites were eliminated based on their relatively low scores (highlighted in red above). 4. Site 5: Old State Road had a high score, but was eliminated as a result of the property being currently proposed for a new use/rezoning. 5. Site 7: Highbanks generated much discussion. Most liked the idea of this site being surrounded by Metropark. However, lack of connectivity and its location on the west side of route 23 resulted in a very low score and it was eliminated from consideration. 6. Two additional sites (Glimcher and MTB) were added and scored. Both received high scores and it was agreed that these should be considered as possible sites. 7. Five sites (#1, #2, #6, #8, and #9) will move forward as potential sites. Consultant team will inquire with each owner to confirm that they are comfortable with us considering their site. 8. As the building program is refined, the remaining five sites will be further studied.

53


5.3 STEP 3: PRELIMINARY CONCEPT PLANS The five highest scoring sites were further studied along with a basic building and site program. A concept plan for each site was developed that considered building location, parking location, vehicular and pedestrian access, and area for future expansion. Land acquisition costs were also considered. Based on recent comparable land sales, it was determined that the sites would likely range in cost from $40,000 per acre to as much as $90,000 per acre. The Steering Committee determined that all of the sites had some advantages and that each was worthy of additional evaluation. It should be noted that one of the five sites (The MTB site) is located west of State Route 23. While it was determined by the Steering Committee that a site east of State Route 23 was an important site selection criteria, this site continues to be considered because of its connectivity to the future pedestrian bridge that will cross State Route 23.

54


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

55


56


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

5.4 STEP 4: TYPICAL SITE PLAN As the building program and potential floor plan was refined by the consultant team, a typical site plan was also developed to further articulate the potential vision for the community center site. While all five of the potential sites that were studied remain candidates, one site was chosen (The Green Meadows site) to further refine into a preliminary site plan. This site is the most centrally located of the five sites and has a great deal of flexibility in terms of site acreage and access. The Steering Committee recommended that a total site acreage of 30 acres was an ideal size in order to accommodate the preliminary building and site program, expansion area, and other community uses.

57


CHAPTER SIX - FACILITY BUILDING PROGRAM The conceptual facility design task validates the preliminary analysis conducted in the engineering evaluation and capital investment analysis by applying the market analysis and resulting customer base and program plan components. The Consulting Team translated the market and corresponding program derived from the community input and market assessment into a conceptual facility design including spatial relationship. This task is performed in conjunction with the program and operations tasks. This collaborative planning process where program and space are jointly formulated provides a representative model where the interrelationship of program and space and associated choices and consequences can be directly illustrated. The Consulting Team applied the professional expertise of project personnel to meet the requirements of the Township. It is important to note that financial sustainability is desired by the Township – and aspirations of responsible stewardship in administering and providing a public asset is directly related to the synergy of the business/operations model, space utilization and design alternatives, levels of service provided, and program. The space allocation process is as follows: 6.1 SPACE ALLOCATION The Consulting Team translated the program plan into a space allocation plan in unison with the minimum operating standards and feasibility alternatives and components as defined in the core programs and operation tasks. Unique space requirements necessary for safety and value of experience as well as storage needs, meeting recreational needs, and any other special space needs as stipulated by key management and staff is represented. The comprehensive building program for the facility is prepared in a room-by-room format that includes required sizes, finish materials, special equipment, HVAC and adjacencies. After meeting with the Steering Committee to vet initial concepts, the Consulting Team assimilated the feedback into the spatial concept. This information was utilized to produce a space allocation plan which depicts every space necessary to meet all of the functional needs of the studied facility. The Consulting Team met with the Steering Committee prior to finalization to receive final certification and make sure there is a thorough and complete understanding of all of their functions and space needs. 6.2 CONCEPT VALIDATION/DEVELOPMENT The Consulting Team translated the core program market and facility needs into a space allocation plan including sizing requirements and component relationships and interaction including site analysis The concepts were vetted with the Steering Committee to address facility space needs and any potential site concerns in conjunction with the management model and operational philosophies (levels of service, etc.) for optimal “go-live” operational efficiencies. This process demonstrates that the solution achieved is thorough, and will best serve the needs of the Orange Township community. 

Two (2) classroom spaces for 50 people 1,900 sq. ft. each space for computer classes, fine arts, life skill programs, which includes storage

Community hall/event space that can seat 200 with a caterer kitchen 3,200 sq. ft. for weddings, reunions, community meetings, events (hospitality / multi-use)

Administration and program contractor’s offices 1,950 sq. ft. 58


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

Child watch space 1,300 sq. ft.

Three (3) gyms 19,450 square ft. – High school courts for basketball, volleyball, indoor soccer, clinics, workshops for sports

Walking track elevated 7,400 sq. ft. for walking and running o

Laps per mile on the short course is 9.5 and 5.7 laps for the long course

Weight and fitness room 6,400 sq. ft. for free weight and cardio space

Group Exercise room 4,400 sq. ft. for zumba, platies, yoga, type classes includes storage

Racquetball two (2) courts 1,600 sq. ft.

Aquatic support space 4,500 sq. ft. for lockers, equipment, filtration

Aquatic pool zone 16,025 sq. ft. for spray features, slides, 25-yard competition pool for competitive swimming, fitness swim, free play swim, aquatic swim lessons

Two (2) Pool Party rooms 1,025 sq. ft.

Common area in the building 12,025 sq. ft. which is a balance of space for concessions, café area, mechanical, storage, wall thickness etc.

Total space: 89,000 square feet

59


6.3 CONCEPTUAL BUILDING DESIGN ILLUSTRATION The Williams Team prepared a conceptual building design illustration. This included a detailed space analysis by square footage and a detailed cost estimate for the proposed solution which addresses: 1. Site preparation and infrastructure costs 2. Building construction costs 3. Equipment costs

60


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

61


62


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

63


64


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

65


66


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

67


CHAPTER SEVEN - CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST 7.1 CAPITAL COST DEVELOPMENT The Williams Team and Edge Team prepared an estimate of construction cost based on upon the building program that includes the following, minus the cost of land: 

Cost of the building

Site improvements

Professional fees

Miscellaneous expenses

The Williams Team also identified the cost of special equipment to be placed in the building such as exercise equipment, aquatic facility, information technology, and healthcare equipment.

68


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

69


70


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

7.2 OPERATIONAL PLAN The PROS Team discussed with the Township Steering Committee an operational plan regarding how the facility would be operated and how to illustrate the relationship of all partners involved and depicting the requirements for partner inclusion. 

Organizational Assessment – The PROS Team analyzed the management practices desired by the Steering Committee and the limitations to understand the operational situation for the proposed Community Center. This analysis recognized that the Township desired the Community Center to be operated with four key staff members (Facility Manager, Program Manager, Customer Service Manager and a Financial Manager). The majority of the management will be contracted out to a community center management company. The community center management company would be responsible for hiring and paying the fulltime and part-time staff that would work in the building and work for the contracting company. The contracting company would also hire the private instructors for providing the instructional services in the building and for overseeing the operational efficiency, policy development, system and technology requirements, and marketing/communication capabilities required for a first class operation. This type of management company is difficult to find, but exists across the country (e.g. Monon Community Center – Carmel, IN). The existing Township outdoor aquatic center operates in this manner and the Township is very satisfied with its operations and management of the site.

Operational Standards – The PROS Team established the following operational standards and costs for the operating the proposed facility based on full operations. This includes hours of operation, staffing levels needed, technology requirements and customer service requirements based on established and agreed upon outcomes.

7.2.1 CORE RECREATION FACILITY STANDARDS Section 1. Staffing. The Consulting Team established the following criteria for what constitutes a core recreation facility that allows them to manage standards toward an outcome the community desires. A recreation facility is a designated site with amenities designed and developed to support specific recreation needs. The design of a recreation facility supports the outcomes desired by the Township and the market it serves, whether single use or multi-use. Recreation facilities typically have a community or regional service area, located on a major thoroughfare for ease of access. Section 2. Core Recreation Facility Criteria 

Recreation facilities are created to support a core recreation programs (e.g., aquatics, fitness, sports, etc.). The facility is planned to be open 105 hours a week.

The Community Center is designed to repay the operational costs of the facility for the Township

Partnerships can be created to maximize the experience for the users and control operational costs this will include a private management company, school district use of the building for aquatic related sports and club sports, and private fitness and life skill instructors

Recreation facilities are customer based and create a strong relationship and trust with users and families 71


Demand for facility exceeds availability and the facility is an expected to be operated in a typical traditional facility manner

The Township will need to respond to the future demographic needs of the community, as they apply to recreation program needs

7.2.2 RECREATION PROGRAM STANDARDS Section 1. Recreation program standards should be developed to support a high quality efficient recreation program in the building for the Township. The program standards are developed to support a core recreation service. The standards focus on establishing what constitutes a quality experience, operational and cost recovery goals, marketing and communication standards for users to access the program or service, and performance measures to track desired outcomes of the program and that hold the contractor accountable to those standards. Section 2. The existing core recreation services that should be provided in the facility needs to include: aquatic programs and services (e.g., swim lessons, public swim, swim team); child watch services (child watch while parents work out, some before and after school care, and summer day camps); youth and teen services; special events that bring the Township community together; senior services; cultural education; community wellness and fitness; services to people with disabilities; adult sports; and providing facilities for youth and adult sports. 7.2.3 STANDARDS OF A HIGH-QUALITY EXPERIENCE Standards 1. From these core services, the following standards should be in place to promote a highquality experience: 

Instructor or program coordinators’ qualifications are consistent with in-the-field experience in the program specialty they are responsible for

The instructor-to-participant ratios are appropriate for the participant to feel safe and attended to

The program is provided in the appropriate recreation space, designed for that program and which is safe and clean

Minimum and maximum numbers of participants are set for the program or class that will allow for a high-quality experience

Recreation equipment or supplies that are used by the participant are of high-quality, safe and appropriate for the participants to use or consume

The length of the program is commensurate with the attention capability of the participants to respond effectively and enjoy themselves in the activity

Appropriate support staff or volunteers are in place to help guide participants and support teachers or program supervisors

Staff is trained in first-aid and CPR. Volunteers are trained in first-aid and CPR when appropriate

A first-aid kit is readily available and accessible in less than a minute 72


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

Staff and volunteers are trained in customer service and diversity training to make all participants feel welcome and appreciated

Customer feedback methods are in place to seek input from participants on their expectations of the program and the results of their experience. This should include pre- and or postevaluations, focus groups or trailer calls

Pricing of services is explained to participants and/or parents on the level of investment they are making in the program and the level the Township is investing in their experience

Each instructor or program supervisor will be provided a tool box that includes their class or program roster, with phone numbers or email addresses, name tags for participants, customer evaluations for users, registration forms, a program guide, pertinent park information and emergency phone numbers, thank you cards for participants at the end of the class, and an introduction sheet of what will occur in the program or class, how it will be conducted, and what outcomes we hope to achieve

All class or program policies are available to the instructor or program supervisor to adequately explain policies to the user

Appropriate recognition and awards are given at the end of the program to participants based on outcomes achieved or skills learned

New staff, volunteers, and contract employees working with children will have background checks by the police department

Any disciplinary actions taken by an instructor or program supervisor with a program participant will be written and documented

Class, program curriculum, or work plans will be prepared by the instructor and program supervisor before the class or program begins and is signed off by the appropriate program staff within the recreation division

Staff will be dressed in the appropriate uniform that includes a name tag

Drivers that transport participants must have the appropriate license, certifications, and authorization

Equipment or program space will be inspected prior to the class or program, noted by the instructor or program supervisor, and recorded daily, weekly, and monthly

Performance measures tracked will be shared with instructors or program staff at the end of each session

Exit interviews will be conducted with part-time staff before they leave each season and noted in their file as to re-hire or not

A class or program budget will be prepared for each activity and shared with the instructor or supervisor on how class monies are spent. Final budget results will be documented at the end of the program area and shared with the supervisor or manager

All regulatory requirements for programs are completed on time and filed according to guidelines

73


Appropriate required licenses and certifications set by law will be reviewed and filed before programs begin (e.g., lifeguard certification)

7.2.4 OPERATIONAL AND COST RECOVERY GOAL STANDARDS  A pricing policy is in place, staff understand the philosophy behind it and how to communicate price to users 

A full cost of accounting is created for each class or program that accurately calculates direct and indirect costs, and cost recovery goals are established once these numbers are in place. Contract Staff will be trained on this process.

Pricing of services will be established based on cost-of-services and overlaid into programs or classes based on primetime and non-primetime rates, location, time, age segment, group, and level of exclusivity that users receive over and above use by general taxpayers. Contract Staff will be trained in setting prices.

Quarterly results of program will be posted and shared with staff on those services that are underperforming, meeting, or exceeding the recovery goals

Mini-business plans will be created for each core program service on a yearly basis that evaluate the program based on meeting the outcomes desired for participants, cost recovery, percentage of the market and business controls, cost of service, pricing strategy for the next year, and marketing strategies to be implemented. Cash collection standards and refund process standards should be incorporated. This will be the basis for budget development.

Yearly competitor and other service providers will be benchmarked, shopped, and evaluated, for changes they are making and how they compare with the Township efforts in the core services provided

Partnerships with core program services will be updated yearly, their level of contribution will be documented, and tracking performance measures will be shared with each partner

Non-core services will be evaluated yearly and reduced, eliminated, or transferred to other service providers reducing the impact on staff time

Entitled groups will be informed of the cost and services provided by the Township and written partnership agreements will be established with measurable outcomes tracked yearly. Results will be discussed at annual meetings.

Maintenance and recreation staff will discuss standards for programs taking place in recreation facilities and parks annually.

7.2.5 MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION STANDARDS  Core programs, non-core programs, and facility related services will be evaluated yearly based on their lifecycle, position in the market place, and trend data with a strategy to make changes (keep the same or eliminate) 

Core program priorities will receive the appropriate time and space in recreation facilities to keep the service strong and viable

Cost-benefit criteria will be incorporated within the core services mini-business plan annually 74


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

Program guides will dedicate space to core services as their primary target. Non-core services which could become a core service will have a marketing strategy created and tested yearly

A marketing plan will be created and updated yearly for promotion of services, pricing of services, communication and feedback from users, age segment management, lifecycle management, partnerships and sponsorships, competition assessment, facility and program positioning, and tracking the accessibility to gain access to the system. Pricing strategies for revenue centers will be developed when needed to keep them viable.

A cost of service assessment will be completed for each guide and results of participant impact and cost recovery goals will be met

The marketing division will train staff on strategies targeted to increase participation, create more revenue or change a price to meet a cost recovery goal

Marketing staff will conduct yearly service gap assessments to support community needs

The Township will develop a customer survey (mail, email or phone) every 3 years to gauge how well the system is meeting the needs of residents and what program areas need stronger support

7.2.6 PERFORMANCE MEASURES  The Private Contractor should consider developing the following performance measures to track desired outcomes and to demonstrate to key leadership in the Township the value of the investment being made in recreation programs. 

Program capacity levels met based on total availability and enrollment numbers with a target goal of 85%

Programs offered versus programs held with a target goal of 80%

Retention of participants, season pass holders and members are targeted at 75% and tracked by the class point of sale system

Cost recovery goals met at 95% for core services

Customer satisfaction levels met at 90% or greater in all services

Earned income goals met at 95% for programs

75


CHAPTER EIGHT - OPERATIONS COST AND STAFFING PLAN 8.1 COMMUNITY CENTER STAFFING Staffing the facility with revenue from yearly and monthly passes requires a delicate balancing act of resource allocation to the core areas and the bottom line. This will necessitate that the Community Center Contracting Company to have a keen understanding of all the operations and understands the value of programming the site versus maintaining the site. The staffing levels are a result of outcome expectations. Many large scale community center operations operate with staffing levels at 70% direct cost or more of the operational budget. In an effort to allow for the most flexibility in the start-up years of the Community Center, it is proposed that the staffing levels (full-time, part-time, seasonal) are contracted versus public employees. The existing Township staff is projected to account for 25% direct cost of the operational budget. It is recognized though that this level of staffing will almost certainly need to be augmented by essential staff as the Community Center operations become better understood. The facility will require a total of at least 13 full-time positions. These position categories and/or titles are subject to change as operations are further refined in the final business planning phase. These include fulltime staff of the following: 

Community Center Manager – (1) position – Township

Recreation Sports Supervisor – (1) Contracted

Aquatics Supervisor – (1) Contracted

Aquatics Coordinator – (1) Contracted

Customer Service Coordinator – Part-time staff manage the front desk but a position is needed who will oversee front office, registration, facility rentals, etc.-Township

Facility Maintenance Supervisor – (1) Township

Custodial – contracted (3)

Fitness Coordinator – (2) positions are needed due to the importance of the position and the size of the fitness component- Contracted

Senior Activities Supervisor – (1) Contracted

Camp and General Recreation Coordinator – (1) Contracted

Birthday Party and Reservation Coordinator – (1) Contracted

Special Events and Life Skills Coordinator – (1) Contracted

Facility Manager – Township

Further discussion with the Township may be needed if the balance of expectations are not met. If approved, this will require 4 full-time staff to manage a facility from the Township and 13 contracted positions based on the facility that is open seven days per week for a total of 105 hours.

76


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

A bevy of part-time contracted staff including water safety personnel and fitness personnel are included in the staffing projections. It is projected that the Community Center employees – both full- and parttime – will consume between $1.5 million and $1.7 million of the annual operational budget during the five year study period. Depending on the Community Center’s success, the most important addition to the staff composition may be in the management of the front line staff – the part-time and seasonal employees that are the face of the organization. As such, it is imperative to utilize the Customer Service Coordinator position to manage the front of the house effectively for the Township. Dedicated and enthusiastic full-time employees will successfully adapt to the ebbs and flow of a customer-centric operation on a daily basis. However, this could pose a problem for part-time and seasonal staff, many of whom are projected to work limited hours for the greatest operational flexibility. Accordingly, this balance of resources and customer service will make it critical that systems are in place to ensure that front line employees share a common and enthusiastic vision for service delivery. Utilization of fulltime, part-time and independent contractors is typically chosen by management for the flexibility they provide – a benefit that allows market factors to determine the need of instructor utilization consequently boosting the goal of fiscal sustainability. Benefits of part-time and contract instructors are: 

Ability to offer quality, diverse, and affordable programs with no startup costs to the Community Center

Specialized skill set or training with no cost to the Community Center

Typically, continuity and retention exists

Work on demand – hiring an independent contractor or part-time staff person offers flexibility to programming which keeps programs “fresh”; increases the ability to take added opportunities as they arise, and during slow periods, have greater cost control o

Classes are discontinued when minimum participation levels are not met without incurring the cost of the instructor

There are no windows on either side of the classes where an instructor is paid as is current practice in similar public managed facilities

Contractors do not require employers to withhold and pay federal, state and Social Security (FICA) taxes as they require for employees

The Community Center Manager obtains the right to terminate Independent Contractor Agreements at any time by giving written notice and contractors are not eligible for unemployment insurance benefits

Another reason for this recommendation is the drastic increase in programming planned for the Community Center. 8.2 COMMUNITY CENTER MEMBERSHIPS AND ADMISSIONS Depending on the business model the Township chooses, memberships and admissions generally account for 65% or more of all revenue generation in a community center that wishes to cover 100% of revenues. Due to the operational impact of memberships on sustainability, membership structure is vital. Based on the proforma, the membership fee is covering approximately 75% of the total revenue 77


from memberships. This is primarily due a pass rate for families and for individuals that is at the minpoint of other community centers in the region. This requires the building to be programmed at 60% to achieve the cost recovery goal desired. This limits the amount of open non-programmed activity to a walking track, cardio fitness areas, some gym free time and some open swim time. Many public facilities utilize a multi-tiered pass structure that provides access to specific areas; this access dilution effectively deteriorates the revenue generating capabilities of the operation because one feature typically outdraws and outperforms the other. It is recommended to only provide space specific passes to achieve product differentiation when a significant market threat is posed by a like service provider; a lack of a true like service provider competing for the same target market is not present in the Orange Township area within 15 minute drive time. In addition, the Community Activities Center concept design and operational model is not conducive to stand alone “silo” operations. Ultimately, the inability of most complimentary assets – i.e. indoor pool, program spaces, gymnasium – to attract a frequent user base that can consistently offset operational costs results in the necessity of shifting the burden of sustainability to the primary attraction – the fitness area. It is recommended that the membership configuration consist of three categories, each providing access to all areas of the Community Center. These categories include: 

Individual membership – $360 per year; single adult membership($30 dollars a month)

Family Membership – $540 per year ($45 per month)

Corporate Membership – $456 ($38 per month)

Three scenarios were conducted for this study – low-, mid-, and high-level membership scenarios. Based on these tiers, membership base and daily captures were projected. The following measurements were factored into membership projections: 

Based on American Sports Data, Inc.’s Health Club Trends, an average of 13.6% of populace participates in “Health Club” activities/memberships o

Equates to approximately 3,400 persons in the Orange Township Market (total population of 25,000) but in Orange Township the survey indicated that 57% of citizens belong to some membership agency would equate to a much higher pass program in fact 700 members of the Orange Township community belong to Westerville’s Community Center

8.3 COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES CENTER PROGRAMMING Operations and programs must be coordinated for seamless delivery of services; this means that the level of service provided, program, and price point must be harmonious for optimal results. Based on the program plan for the feasibility/business plan study, an aggressive program plan has been created around the following core programs: 

Preschool

Camps

Fitness-self-directed and organized

Martial Arts

Aquatics programs and open swim 78


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

Fine Arts

Gymnasium-court sports

Birthday Parties

Community Rentals

Senior Programming

Special Interest

Special Events in the Community Center

These core programs will activate the Community Center and retain “energy” in the building versus a high level of drop in usage. Activities within each core program category can and will change as the market dictates; however, the categorical offering is based on the mission, market, and assets available to administer programs and therefore will remain constant. Core program area are presented below and on the following pages. 

Preschool Programs o

Health/Wellness/Fitness o

Plan currently consists of gymnasium rentals.

Parties o

Plan currently consists of various water aerobics classes, deep water fitness, resistance training, learn to swim, swim team, high school competitions, and party rentals.

Gymnasium o

Plan currently consists of various youth camps for general summer camps, science camps and art camps.

Aquatics o

Plan currently consists of children, youth, and adult programs including Tae Kwon Do and Karate.

Camps o

Plan currently consists of prevalent programs including instructor lead strength and conditioning classes, boot camps, Martial Arts, Jazzercise, Pilates, Zumba and Yoga and Coleman Classes.

Martial Arts o

Business Plan currently consists of Early Learner programs for kids that include introductory sports, gymnastics, preschool classes and programs for kids and parents.

Plan currently consists of parities and party room rentals.

Facility Rentals o

Plan currently consists of room rentals, school lock-ins and commission revenues from caterers. 79


ď&#x201A;ˇ

Child Watch o

ď&#x201A;ˇ

Fine Arts o

ď&#x201A;ˇ

Plan currently consists of child watch while parents are using the center facilities.

Plan currently consists of media art, music and dance.

Special Interests and Special Events

O Plan currently consists of seasonal and special events.

80


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

CHAPTER NINE - FINANCING AND OPERATING PROFORMA The financial plan for the Community Center is outlined in the pro forma and various schedules presented in this chapter of the report. A list of pro forma assumptions was established in order to depict a dynamic operation in a static environment; these assumptions are presented on the following pages of this report. The validity of the pro forma and financial plan is based on these assumptions being met in their entirety. Although it is believed the information and assumptions constitute a reasonable basis for preparation of the projections, the achievements of any financial projection may be affected by fluctuating economic conditions and are dependent upon the occurrence of future events that cannot be assured. Therefore, actual results may vary from the projections and such variations could be material. These assumptions outline how the Community Center should be operated and maintained, as well as how the services should be priced. 9.1 OPERATIONS AND FINANCIAL PLAN ASSUMPTIONS The initial development of the Community Center Needs Analysis study focused on developing a clear set of assumptions. The end product focuses on determining operating costs and revenue streams of them proposed Community Center; this included developing an operational budget and a pricing strategy to best meet the outcomes desired while accounting for market factors. Schedules summarizing the expenditures and revenues, along with the notes and assumptions set forth, are integral to the analysis and conclusions stated in the financial plan. These notes and assumptions should be carefully read and considered when reviewing the schedules.

9.1.1 GENERAL ASSUMPTIONS The assumptions in this study assist in understanding how the financial plan was developed and the strategies with which the proposed Community Center will ultimately be operated. This allows for the revision of assumptions in the future while still maintaining the integrity of the plan by understanding the impact that the changes will have on the operational budget or market capture. The assumptions for the site used for the development of the financial plan are as follows: 9.1.2 CAPITAL INVESTMENT ASSUMPTIONS  Capital investment for the Community Center is based on the concept plan and components as detailed in program spaces identified to date 

Capital costs for the proposed Community Center is projected to be between $26-$29 million total costs less land costs based on 89,000 square feet of building

9.1.3 PRICING ASSUMPTIONS  Pricing is outlined for each individual program within the electronic Excel model and summarized within this report document 

Pricing is value based, meaning that pricing was determined based on typical market rates based on the assumed level of service received

Pricing comparisons to other Community Centers in the area and related type of fitness facilities were used for guidelines for developing the pricing schedule, however, the ultimate goal of value provided was utilized for developing the pro forma 81


9.1.4 GENERAL EXPENSE AND REVENUE ASSUMPTIONS  Expenses are projected to be 100% of projected costs beginning in the modeled year “Operating Year 1”; annual increases of a set percent per year each year thereafter as based on Expenditure and Revenue Growth Inputs 

Revenues are projected to be 100% of projected revenue capacity beginning in the modeled year “Operating Year 1”; annual increases of a set percent per year each year thereafter as based on Expenditure and Revenue Growth Inputs

Percentage of cost recovery is based on the assumed market participation and value/market based pricing

Operating and growth inputs are based on average increases per expenditure and revenue category; due to the volatility of the health care and energy sectors, higher growth rates were utilized for employee benefits and utilities

If a higher percentage of cost recovery is needed, operating expenses and pricing will be analyzed for potential adjustments

All projections are based on assumptions and estimates made within the electronic Excel model

Pro forma assumptions beginning in “Operating Year 1” are based on management and staff performing extensive lead-in/pre-opening marketing, promotions, and programming tailored to the customer base

Pro forma program is based on a very aggressive program offering (60% of total available space) that will require detailed scheduling to allow for successive usages on a regular basis

9.1.5 STAFFING ASSUMPTIONS  Community Center contracting staffing is a direct result of the requirement of the operating hours to be net revenue positive. It is anticipated the Community Center will be open 105 hours a week 

As the Community Center reaches operational and programmatic maturity, additional staff persons will most likely be required

9.1.6 OPERATING/GROWTH INPUT ASSUMPTIONS  Operating and growth inputs are based on average increases per expenditure and revenue category o

Revenues are projected to grow annually by an average 2.6% through growth in users and fee adjustments

o

Salaries and Benefit growth rate is calculated at 3.0% annual growth due to the potential volatility of the insurance/pension fund requirements

o

Supplies growth rate is calculated at 3% annual growth due to inflation

o

Services growth rate is calculated at an average of 3.0% annual growth due to inflation and the potential volatility of the energy sector

o

Capital expenditure and revenue categories average a growth rate of 3% 82


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

o

Electric utility cost are estimated to increase by 4% annually

o

Transfers vary with increases in revenues.

Percentage growth rate by budget category is presented on the “Inputs” tab of the electronic Excel model

9.2 SIX (6) YEAR PRO FORMA Based on all operating assumptions set forth within this report, and excluding any unforeseen circumstances, the Orange Township Community Center is projected to have a base full year of operations cost recovery of 155% (Figure 26).

Pro Forma Revenues & Expenditures ORANGE TOWNSHIP RECREATION CENTER BASELINE: REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES

SERVICE TITLE

Passes Administration Building Maintenance Building Services Recreation Programs and Passes Fitness Aquatics Gymnasium Parties Rentals Child Care Kitchen Concessions Total

SERVICE TITLE

Revenues

$3,002,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $20,220.00 $609,614.00 $255,300.00 $83,800.00 $37,500.00 $119,100.00 $22,320.00 $0.00 $45,000.00 $4,194,854.00

Revenues

Expenditures

$204,300.00 $943,958.50 $192,910.00 $220,000.00 $48,994.00 $408,690.40 $522,400.00 $63,056.00 $23,000.00 $25,785.00 $14,392.00 $2,750.00 $38,250.00 $2,708,485.90

Expenditures

Replacement Endowment

$224,140.00

$0.00

Total

$224,140.00

$0.00

83

Revenues Over (Under) Expenditures

$2,797,700.00 ($943,958.50) ($192,910.00) ($220,000.00) ($28,774.00) $200,923.60 ($267,100.00) $20,744.00 $14,500.00 $93,315.00 $7,928.00 ($2,750.00) $6,750.00 $1,486,368.10 Revenues Over (Under) Expenditures

$224,140.00 $224,140.00

Cost Recovery Percent

1469% 0% 0% 0% 41% 149% 49% 133% 163% 462% 155% 0% 118% 155% Cost Recovery Percent

N/A N/A N/A


A summary of the six-year pro forma is presented in Figure 27. The Orange Township Community Center should be able to maintain a 155% direct cost recovery. Revenues

Passes Administration Building Maintenance Building Services Recreation Programs and fitness Fitness Aquatics Gymnasium Parties Rentals Child Care Kitchen Concessions Total Expenditures

Passes Administration Building Maintenance Building Services Recreation Programs and fitness Fitness Aquatics Gymnasium Parties Rentals Child Care Kitchen Concessions Total Total Cost Recovery

1th Year

2nd Year

3rd Year

4th Year

5th Year

6th Year

$3,002,000.00 $3,092,060.00 $3,184,821.80 $3,280,366.45 $3,378,777.45 $3,480,140.77 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $20,220.00 $20,826.60 $21,451.40 $22,094.94 $22,757.79 $23,440.52 $609,614.00 $627,902.42 $646,739.49 $666,141.68 $686,125.93 $706,709.71 $255,300.00 $262,959.00 $270,847.77 $278,973.20 $287,342.40 $295,962.67 $83,800.00 $86,314.00 $88,903.42 $91,570.52 $94,317.64 $97,147.17 $37,500.00 $38,625.00 $39,783.75 $40,977.26 $42,206.58 $43,472.78 $119,100.00 $122,673.00 $126,353.19 $130,143.79 $134,048.10 $138,069.54 $22,320.00 $22,989.60 $23,679.29 $24,389.67 $25,121.36 $25,875.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $45,000.00 $46,350.00 $47,740.50 $49,172.72 $50,647.90 $52,167.33 $4,194,854.00 $4,320,699.62 $4,450,320.61 $4,583,830.23 $4,721,345.13 $4,862,985.49 1th Year

2nd Year

3rd Year

4th Year

5th Year

6th Year

$204,300.00 $204,300.00 $204,300.00 $204,300.00 $204,300.00 $204,300.00 $943,958.50 $967,587.40 $992,149.91 $1,017,683.02 $1,044,225.20 $1,071,816.44 $192,910.00 $200,421.40 $208,227.11 $216,338.71 $224,768.24 $233,528.25 $220,000.00 $228,650.00 $237,641.50 $246,988.03 $256,703.64 $266,802.96 $48,994.00 $50,669.28 $52,403.77 $54,199.61 $56,059.00 $57,984.25 $408,690.40 $424,326.14 $440,585.65 $457,493.85 $475,076.62 $493,360.90 $522,400.00 $542,847.30 $564,102.07 $586,196.29 $609,163.22 $633,037.43 $63,056.00 $65,537.20 $68,116.75 $70,798.55 $73,586.67 $76,485.33 $23,000.00 $23,920.00 $24,876.80 $25,871.87 $26,906.75 $27,983.02 $25,785.00 $26,335.00 $26,905.50 $27,497.28 $28,111.13 $28,747.90 $14,392.00 $14,957.68 $15,545.69 $16,156.91 $16,792.25 $17,452.69 $2,750.00 $2,837.50 $2,928.03 $3,021.69 $3,118.60 $3,218.88 $38,250.00 $39,780.00 $41,371.20 $43,026.05 $44,747.09 $46,536.97 $2,708,485.90 $2,792,168.90 $2,879,153.96 $2,969,571.83 $3,063,558.41 $3,161,255.02 155%

155%

84

155%

154%

154%

154%


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

9.2.1 REVENUE MODEL 9.2.1.1 ORANGE TOWNSHIP COMMUNITY CENTER REVENUE MODEL – PART 1 OF 3 DIVISION

ACCOUNT TITLE

Passes Passes Passes Passes Passes Passes Passes Passes Passes

REVENUES Monthly Passes - Family Monthly Passes - Couples Monthly Passes - Individuals Monthly Passes -Family NR Monthly Passes - Couples NR Monthly Passes - Individuals NR Punch Passes - 20 visits Daily Passes Daily Passes NR

PRICE

$45.00 $35.00 $30.00 $90.00 $70.00 $45.00 $100.00 $6.00 $7.00

UNITS

Months 12 12 12 12 12 12

Passes 3,500 1,000 500 250 200 50 100 5,000 1,000

TOTAL PASS REVENUES

DIVISION

ACCOUNT TITLE

Recreation Recreation Recreation Recreation Recreation Recreation Recreation Recreation Recreation Recreation

REVENUES Soccer Tumbling Classes Martial Arts Art Classes Performing Arts Senior Classes Summer Basketball Camps Summer Volleyball Camps Miscellaneous Revenues Contributions & Gifts

ACCOUNT TITLE

Fitness Fitness

REVENUES Personal Trainer Commissions Fitness Classes

EXPLANATION

$1,890,000.00 Fa mi l y i ncl udes up to 5 peopl e $420,000.00 $180,000.00 $270,000.00 Fa mi l y i ncl udes up to 5 peopl e $168,000.00 $27,000.00 $10,000.00 $30,000.00 $7,000.00

$3,002,000.00

PRICE

UNITS

REVENUES

EXPLANATION

Sessions Participant/Teams $27.00 $25.00 $40.00

3 3 3

40 40 24

$40.00 $145.00 $145.00

3 2 2

60 30 30

TOTAL RECREATION REVENUES AND PASSES

DIVISION

REVENUES

$20,220.00

PRICE

$100.00 $37.00

$0.00 $3,240.00 $3,000.00 $2,880.00 $0.00 $2,400.00 $4,350.00 $4,350.00 $0.00 $0.00

UNITS

Classes Participants 20 32 10

REVENUES

EXPLANATION

$2,000.00 $11,840.00 8 hrs ./da y w 10 pa rti ci pa nts /cl a s s x $68 x 32 s es s i ons /yr. (8 week s es s i ons )

Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness

Aerobics Zumbia Weight Training Pilaties Yoga Thi Chi Youth Fitness Classes Kick Boxing Classes Dance Classess Boot Camp Tak Kwon Do Fencing Classes Miscellaneous Revenues

$37.00 $37.00 $37.00 $37.00 $37.00 $37.00 $37.00 $37.00 $37.00 $37.00 $37.00 $0.00

300 170 100 150 100 100 150 90 200 150 100 -

TOTAL FITNESS REVENUES

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 -

$110,852.00 $63,048.00 $37,074.00 $55,426.00 $37,074.00 $37,074.00 $55,426.00 $33,300.00 $74,000.00 $55,426.00 $37,074.00 $0.00 $0.00

$609,614.00

85


9.2.1.2 ORANGE TOWNSHIP COMMUNITY CENTER REVENUE MODEL â&#x20AC;&#x201C; PART 2 OF 3 DIVISION

ACCOUNT TITLE

Aquatics Aquatics Aquatics Aquatics Aquatics Aquatics Aquatics Aquatics Aquatics Aquatics

REVENUES Facility Rentals - Party Room Pool Rental - Section Pool Rental - Full Aquatics Classes Aquatics II Classes Private Swim Lessons Water Fitness Classes Fitness Swim Lap Swim Swim Team Rental

PRICE

$175.00 $500.00 $1,500.00 $45.00 $45.00 $60.00 $40.00 $40.00 $3.00 $30,000.00

UNITS

Classes Participants 400 30 10 100 10 90 10 90 2 45 10 20 10 1 1,000 1 1

TOTAL AQUATICS REVENUES

DIVISION

ACCOUNT TITLE

Gymnasium Gymnasium Gymnasium Gymnasium Gymnasium Gymnasium Gymnasium Gymnasium

REVENUES Gym Rental - 2 hr. minumum Rookie Basketball Instructional Basketball Me & Mini Me Basketball Adult Contracted Basketball Youth Contracted Basketball Adult Contracted Coed Volleyball Youth Contracted Volleyball

ACCOUNT TITLE

Parties Parties

REVENUES Birthday Parties Miscellaneous Revenues

PRICE

UNITS

$250.00

Sessions Participants/Teams 140

$50.00

48

$650.00 $500.00 $650.00 $500.00

1 1 1 1

8 64 8 8

ACCOUNT TITLE

Rentals Rentals Rentals Rentals Rentals

REVENUES Community Room Rentals Facility Premium Rentals Caterer Commissions School Lock-In Miscellaneous Revenues

$70,000.00 $15,000.00 Two hour peri od $15,000.00 Threehour peri od $45,000.00 $40,500.00 $10,800.00 $18,000.00 $8,000.00 $3,000.00 $30,000.00 Hi gh School a nd Pri va te Cl ubs

REVENUES

$35,000.00 $0.00 $2,400.00 $0.00 $5,200.00 $32,000.00 $5,200.00 $4,000.00

EXPLANATION

10% of Lea gue Revenue 10% of Lea gue Revenue 10% of Lea gue Revenue 10% of Lea gue Revenue

$83,800.00

PRICE

UNITS

$150.00 $0.00

250 -

TOTAL PARTY REVENUES DIVISION

EXPLANATION

$255,300.00

TOTAL GYMNASIUM REVENUES

DIVISION

REVENUES

REVENUES

EXPLANATION

$37,500.00 2 hr. mi ni mum $0.00

$37,500.00 PRICE

UNITS

$70.00 $675.00 $500.00 $3,000.00 $0.00

400 52 52 10 -

TOTAL RENTAL REVENUES

REVENUES

$28,000.00 $35/hr w/ 2 hr. mi n $35,100.00 $225/hr w/ 3 hr. mi n $26,000.00 Ca terer commi s s i ons a re 15% $30,000.00 $0.00

$119,100.00

86

EXPLANATION


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

9.2.1.3 ORANGE TOWNSHIP COMMUNITY CENTER REVENUE MODEL – PART 2 OF 3 DIVISION

ACCOUNT TITLE

Child Care

REVENUES Child Care - Passholder

$3.00

6,480

$19,440.00 ($3/hr Pa s s hol der $4/ Non-Pa s s hol der)

Child Care

Child Care - Non-Passholder

$4.00

720

$2,880.00 ($3/hr Pa s s hol der $4/ Non-Pa s s hol der)

PRICE

UNITS

TOTAL CHILD CARE REVENUES

DIVISION

ACCOUNT TITLE

Kitchen

REVENUES Miscellaneous Revenues

ACCOUNT TITLE

Concessions

REVENUES Food/Coffee Cart

EXPLANATION

$22,320.00

PRICE

UNITS

$0.00

-

TOTAL KITCHEN REVENUES

DIVISION

REVENUES

REVENUES

EXPLANATION

$0.00

$0.00

PRICE

UNITS

$3.00

15,000

TOTAL VENDATERIA REVENUES

REVENUES

$45,000.00

$45,000.00

TOTAL REVENUES

$4,194,854.00

87

EXPLANATION


CHAPTER TEN - CONCLUSION A Community Center would be a great asset for residents of Orange Township. Based on the community input process from focus groups and the results of the community-wide statistically valid household survey, there is strong support for a facility of this type in the Township. Currently, there is a high level of Township users of membership-based recreation centers in other surrounding communities and notfor- profit facilities such as YMCAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. The key to developing this type of facility in Orange Township is the political will to do so. The Community Center Needs Analysis demonstrates that there is a need and willingness to support a facility by residents of the Township. The needs analysis demonstrates the cost to develop the facility and how to finance the operation of the facility. The Community Center will require a balance between being programmed and open facility use of activity space based on programming in the building consuming 60% of the time available. The Community Center has the capability to generate the operating revenue that the pro forma presents if the Township Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feels it is appropriate for the future. A facility based on the projected square footage has the ability to achieve 100% of its full operating costs. The residents expressed in the community-wide survey their desire for the programmed spaces outlined in the building footprint, as well as the spaces most important. The Community Center will cost approximately $26-$29 million to develop based on the current size of the spaces desired and will take two years to complete. This type of facility should last at a minimum of 50+ years with cosmetic improvements every 15 years. Correctly staffing the facility between the required Township staff and contract management staff is something the Township needs to be prepared for in the budget process. It will be important to balance the staffing to achieve a high level of customer service that will create pride in Orange Township residents. In addition, the Township and local school districts need to work together in how to serve the needs of student athletes from the high school swim teams. The Needs Analysis demonstrates that the Community Center is supported by the community in an approved bond issue and in creating revenue to offset operational costs. The key is to match Township Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expectations with community values and needs and to operate the facility within the philosophy of the Township Trustees and the expectations of the community.

88


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

APPENDIX EXPENDITURES SUMMARY 10.1.1 PASSES ACCOUNT TITLE

BUDGET

REVENUES Monthly Passes - Family Monthly Passes - Couples Monthly Passes - Individuals Monthly Passes -Family NR Monthly Passes - Couples NR Monthly Passes - Individuals NR Punch Passes - 20 visits Daily Passes Daily Passes NR

$1,890,000.00 Fa mi l y i ncl udes up to 5 peopl e $420,000.00 $180,000.00 $270,000.00 Fa mi l y i ncl udes up to 5 peopl e $168,000.00 $27,000.00 $10,000.00 $30,000.00 $7,000.00

TOTAL REVENUES

$3,002,000.00

ACCOUNT TITLE

PERSONAL SERVICES Full Time Part Time Overtime Employer's Share of FICA Employer's Share of Medicare Additional Full-Time Benefits Total

BUDGET

Personal Services

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES Consulting Fees Marketing & Promotions Other Professional Fees Postage Training Travel & Lodging Travel Per Diem Telephone Line Charges Cellular Phone Fees Printing (Not Office Supplies) Other Rental & Leases Subscriptions Organization & Membership Dues Staff Clothing Participant Clothing Internal Instruction Fees External Instructional Fees Other Fees & Licenses Refunds, Awards & Indemnities Total Other Services

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

CAPITAL OUTLAY Furniture & Fixtures Computer Equipment Software Office Equipment Total

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

Capital Outlay

TRANSFERS Replacement Endowment Fund Replacement Endowment Fund Replacement Endowment Fund Total Transfers

NET REVENUE/(LOSS) cost recovery**

EXPLANATION

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 6.36% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges $0.00 1.49% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges $0.00 32.15% of Ful l Ti me Regul a r $0.00

SUPPLIES Stationary & Printed Materials Office Supplies Safety Supplies Other Miscellaneous Total Supplies

TOTAL EXPENSES

EXPLANATION

$198,000.00 $3.00 per Pa s s - Monthl y $300.00 $3.00 per Pa s s $6,000.00 $1.00 per Pa s s - Da i l y $204,300.00

TOTAL EXPENSES $204,300.00

$2,797,700.00 1469.4%

89


10.1.2 ADMINISTRATION ACCOUNT TITLE

EXPLANATION

BUDGET

PERSONAL SERVICES Facility Manager Administrative Manager Customer Service Manager Program Manager Customer Service Staff - Part Time Overtime Employer's Share of FICA Employer's Share of Medicare Additional Full-Time Benefits Total Personal Services SUPPLIES Stationary & Printed Materials Office Supplies Safety Supplies Other Miscellaneous Total Supplies OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES Consulting Fees Medical Fees (Drug Tests) Registration System Maintenance Contract Guest Speakers Criminal Background Checks Marketing & Promotions

$60,000.00 $50,000.00 $50,000.00 $50,000.00 $46,000.00 $0.00 $16,281.60 $3,814.40 $67,515.00 $343,611.00

$10.50 per hour 6.36% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges 1.49% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges 32.15% of Ful l Ti me Regul a r

$20,000.00 Bus i nes s ca rds , s ta ti ona ry, envel opes , $15,000.00 ca rds $3,000.00 Fi rs t a i d s uppl i es for center $500.00 $38,500.00

$0.00 $300.00 $7,500.00 $200.00 $37,000.00 Incl udes funds for ma rketi ng pl a n (17,000), ma rketi ng s urveys (20,000)

$1,000.00 Al a rm moni tori ng $0.00 $0.00 $4,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $6,000.00 $1,000.00 Overa ge cha rges for us e of pers ona l cel l

Security Services Catering Services Other Professional Fees Postage Newsletter Postage Training Travel & Lodging Travel Per Diem Telephone Line Charges Cellular Phone Fees

phones

Printing (Not Office Supplies) Classified Advertising Worker's Compensation General Insurance Electricity Water & Sewer Gas Cable Service Trash Collection Software Maint. Contracts Copier Other Rental & Leases Subscriptions Organization & Membership Dues

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $175,810.00 $219,762.50 $87,905.00 $2,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $10,000.00 $360.00 Wa ter cool er $300.00 Survey monkey $1,100.00 1 di vi s i on ma na ger ($600 ea .) + 1 ma na gers ($500 ea .)

Staff Clothing Participant Clothing Internal Instruction Fees

$380.00 2 exi s ti ng FT ($190 ea .) $0.00 $2,500.00 Cus tomer s ervi ce tra i ni ng, CPR/Fi rs t

External Instructional Fees Other Fees & Licenses

$1,000.00 $2,730.00 ASCAP l i cens e for mus i c ($730), CPR/Fi rs t

Ai d/AED tra i ni ng

Ai d/AED certi fi ca ti ons ($8x250)

Refunds, Awards & Indemnities Special Projects Sales Tax Paid Total Other Services

$0.00 $1,000.00 Sta ff mora l e/i ncenti ves $0.00 $561,847.50

CAPITAL OUTLAY Furniture & Fixtures Computer Equipment Software Office Equipment Total

Capital Outlay

TOTAL EXPENSES

TOTAL EXPENSES $943,958.50

NET REVENUE/(LOSS)

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

($943,958.50)

cost recovery**

0.0%

90


Community Center Needs Analysis – Final Report

10.1.3 BUILDING MAINTENANCE PERSONAL SERVICES Maintenance Staff Part Time Overtime Employer's Share of FICA Employer's Share of Medicare Additional Full-Time Benefits Total

3 pos i ti ons

Personal Services

SUPPLIES Building Materials Repair Parts Small Tools & Minor Equip. Other Maint. Supplies Safety Supplies Other Miscellaneous Total

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$6,500.00 $6,500.00 $1,500.00 $4,500.00 $1,000.00 $500.00 $20,500.00

Supplies

OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES Contracted Services (Maintenance & Custodial)

$150,000.00

Equipment Repairs & Maint. Building Repairs & Maint.

$10,000.00

Radio Maintenance

$500.00

Other Cont. Services Equipment Maint. Contract Other Rental & Leases Organization & Membership Dues Staff Clothing Internal Instruction Fees External Instructional Fees Total Other Services

$0.00 $10,000.00 $500.00 $0.00 $660.00 $750.00 $0.00 $172,410.00

CAPITAL OUTLAY Furniture & Fixtures Office Equipment Total

Capital Outlay

TOTAL EXPENSES

TOTAL EXPENSES $192,910.00

$0.00 $0.00

NET REVENUE/(LOSS)

($192,910.00)

cost recovery**

0.0%

91

6.36% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges 1.49% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges 32.15% of Ful l Ti me Regul a r

Pa i nt, Lumber, Na i l s , Screws , Gl ues , etc… Pl umbi ng, Ha rdwa re, El ectri ca l , Li ghti ng, etc… Mi s c. a nd Speci a l ty Tool s Lubri ca nts , l i ght bul bs , etc. Sa fety Gl a s s es , Gl oves , Ha rnes s , etc…

Cons ul ta nts for bui l di ng ma na gement s ys tems Repa i rs for HVAC s ys tems , el eva tor, fl oor refi ni s hi ng, etc. Porta bl e ra di o repa i rs (dropped i n pool , etc.) Fi re, HVAC, El eva tors , Ki tchen Equi pment Tool a nd cl ea ni ng equi pment renta l s 3 FT ($140 ea .) + 3 wi nter ja ckets ($80 ea .) 3 FT ($250 ea .)


10.1.4 BUILDING SERVICES PERSONAL SERVICES Custodial Part Time Overtime Employer's Share of FICA Employer's Share of Medicare Additional Full-Time Benefits Total SUPPLIES Small Tools & Minor Equip. Other Maint. Supplies Other Miscellaneous Total

$0.00 6.36% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges $0.00 1.49% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges $0.00 32.15% of Ful l Ti me Regul a r $0.00

Personal Services

Supplies

$2,500.00 Va cuums , cl ea ni ng equi pment, a tta eachments ni ng & ja ni tori a l s uppl i es $12,000.00 Cl $500.00 $15,000.00

OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES Constracted Services Cleaning Services Staff Clothing Internal Instruction Fees External Instructional Fees Total

Other Services

TOTAL EXPENSES

TOTAL EXPENSES $220,000.00

NET REVENUE/(LOSS)

$200,000.00 $5,000.00 Annua l wi ndow cl ea ni ng

$205,000.00

($220,000.00)

cost recovery**

0.0%

92


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

10.1.5 RECREATION PROGRAMS ACCOUNT TITLE

BUDGET

REVENUES Soccer Tumbling Classes Martial Arts Art Classes Performing Arts Senior Classes Summer Basketball Camps Summer Volleyball Camps Miscellaneous Revenues Contributions & Gifts

$0.00 $3,240.00 $3,000.00 $2,880.00 $0.00 $2,400.00 $4,350.00 $4,350.00 $0.00 $0.00

TOTAL REVENUES

PERSONAL SERVICES Full Time Regular Part Time Overtime Employer's Share of FICA Employer's Share of Medicare Additional Full-Time Benefits Total SUPPLIES Office Supplies General Program Supplies Other Miscellaneous Total

$20,220.00

Personal Services

Supplies

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$12,132.00 $2,250.00 $2,500.00 $500.00

Participant Clothing Refunds, Awards & Indemnities Special Projects Sales Tax Paid Total Other Services

$0.00 $5,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $22,382.00

Capital Outlay

TRANSFERS Replacement Endowment Fund Total

Transfers

TOTAL EXPENSES

TOTAL EXPENSES

NET REVENUE/(LOSS) cost recovery**

6.36% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges 1.49% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges 32.15% of Ful l Ti me Regul a r

$10,000.00 $13,500.00 $2,500.00 $26,000.00

OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES Program Contractors Marketing & Promotions Printing (Not Office Supplies) Staff Clothing

CAPITAL OUTLAY Furniture & Fixtures Computer Equipment Software Office Equipment Total

EXPLANATION

60% of Revenues Adverti s ements 10 prog i ns tr & l ea gue l ea ds ($14 ea .) + 3 offi ca l s /s corers ($5 ea .)

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$612.00 $0.00 $612.00

$48,994.00

($28,774.00) 41.3%

93

$1.00 per Pa rti ci pa nt


10.1.6 FITNESS ACCOUNT TITLE

BUDGET

REVENUES Personal Trainer Commissions Fitness Classes Aerobics Zumbia Weight Training Pilaties Yoga Thi Chi Youth Fitness Classes Kick Boxing Classes Dance Classess Boot Camp Tak Kwon Do Fencing Classes Miscellaneous Revenues

$2,000.00 $11,840.00 $110,852.00 $63,048.00 $37,074.00 $55,426.00 $37,074.00 $37,074.00 $55,426.00 $33,300.00 $74,000.00 $55,426.00 $37,074.00 $0.00 $0.00

TOTAL REVENUES

PERSONAL SERVICES Full Time Regular Part Time Overtime Employer's Share of FICA Employer's Share of Medicare Additional Full-Time Benefits Total

$609,614.00

Personal Services

SUPPLIES Stationary & Printed Materials Office Supplies Gasoline Garage & Motor Supplies Building Materials Repair Parts Small Tools & Minor Equip. Other Maint. Supplies Linens & Towels Safety Supplies General Program Supplies Food & Beverages Retail Goods Other Miscellaneous Total Supplies OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES Program Contractors Medical Fees (Drug Tests) Registration System Maintenance Contract Guest Speakers Criminal Background Checks Marketing & Promotions Security Services Catering Services Other Professional Fees Postage Newsletter Postage Travel Fees & Expenses Training Travel & Lodging Travel & Lodging Travel Per Diem Bus Trips Field Trips Telephone Line Charges Cellular Phone Fees Printing (Not Office Supplies) Classified Advertising Equipment Maint. Contract Software Maint. Contracts Copier Other Rental & Leases Subscriptions Organization & Membership Dues Staff Clothing Participant Clothing Internal Instruction Fees External Instructional Fees Other Fees & Licenses Refunds Special Projects Sales Tax Paid Total Other Services CAPITAL Furniture & Fixtures Computer Equipment Software r Total

Capital Outlay

TRANSFERS Replacement Endowment Fund

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$365,768.40 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $3,000.00 $0.00 $10,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $1,000.00 $0.00 $2,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $5,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $386,768.40

6.36% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges 1.49% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges 32.15% of Ful l Ti me Regul a r

60% of Revenues

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$16,422.00 $0.00 $16,422.00

Transfers

TOTAL EXPENSES

TOTAL EXPENSES $408,690.40

cost recovery**

Fi tnes s Di rector

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $500.00 $0.00 $2,500.00 $0.00 $2,500.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $5,500.00

Total

NET REVENUE/(LOSS)

EXPLANATION

$200,923.60 149.2%

94

$1.00 per Pa rti ci pa nt


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

10.1.7 AQUATICS ACCOUNT TITLE

BUDGET

REVENUES Facility Rentals - Party Room Pool Rental - Section Pool Rental - Full Aquatics Classes Aquatics II Classes Private Swim Lessons Water Fitness Classes Fitness Swim Lap Swim Swim Team Rental

$70,000.00 $15,000.00 $15,000.00 $45,000.00 $40,500.00 $10,800.00 $18,000.00 $8,000.00 $3,000.00 $30,000.00

TOTAL REVENUES

PERSONAL SERVICES Aquatics Specialist Part Time Overtime Employer's Share of FICA Employer's Share of Medicare Additional Full-Time Benefits Total SUPPLIES Building Materials Repair Parts Small Tools & Minor Equip. Chemicals Other Maint. Supplies Safety Supplies General Program Supplies Total

$255,300.00

Personal Services

Supplies

OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES Program Contractors Aquatics Staff Contractors Criminal Background Checks Marketing & Promotions Security Services Printing (Not Office Supplies) Equipment Repairs & Maint. Building Repairs & Maint. Trash Collection Radio Maintenance Cleaning Services Organization & Membership Dues Staff Clothing Participant Clothing Internal Instruction Fees External Instructional Fees Other Fees & Licenses Water & Sewer Electricity & Gas Refunds, Awards & Indemnities Special Projects Sales Tax Paid Total Other Services CAPITAL OUTLAY Furniture & Fixtures Computer Equipment Software Total

Capital Outlay

TRANSFERS Replacement Endowment Fund

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$153,180.00 $258,440.00 $0.00 $2,500.00 $0.00 $1,500.00 $12,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $1,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $18,000.00 $36,000.00 $2,500.00 $0.00 $0.00 $485,120.00

6.36% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges 1.49% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges 32.15% of Ful l Ti me Regul a r

60% of Revenue

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$2,530.00 $0.00 $2,530.00

Transfers

TOTAL EXPENSES

TOTAL EXPENSES $522,400.00

cost recovery**

2 Ful l -Ti me Sta ff

$1,500.00 $2,500.00 $1,500.00 $22,000.00 $3,000.00 $4,250.00 $0.00 $34,750.00

Total

NET REVENUE/(LOSS)

EXPLANATION

($267,100.00) 48.9%

95

$1.00 per Pa rti ci pa nt


10.1.8 GYMNASIUM ACCOUNT TITLE

BUDGET

REVENUES Gym Rental - 2 hr. minumum Rookie Basketball Instructional Basketball Me & Mini Me Basketball Adult Contracted Basketball Youth Contracted Basketball Adult Contracted Coed Volleyball Youth Contracted Volleyball

TOTAL REVENUES

$35,000.00 $0.00 $2,400.00 $0.00 $5,200.00 $32,000.00 $5,200.00 $4,000.00

$83,800.00

PERSONAL SERVICES Full Time Regular Part Time Overtime Employer's Share of FICA Employer's Share of Medicare Additional Full-Time Benefits Total

Personal Services

SUPPLIES General Program Supplies Total

Supplies

OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES Program Contractors Marketing & Promotions Printing (Not Office Supplies) Other Rental & Leases Staff Clothing Refunds, Awards & Indemnities Total Other Services

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$50,280.00 $5,000.00 $2,000.00

$276.00 $0.00 $276.00

Transfers

NET REVENUE/(LOSS)

$0.00

TOTAL EXPENSES

1.49% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges 32.15% of Ful l Ti me Regul a r

60% of Revenues

$1,500.00 $1,000.00 $59,780.00

CAPITAL Furniture & Fixtures Office Equipment Capital Outlay

TOTAL EXPENSES

6.36% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges

$3,000.00 $3,000.00

TRANSFERS Replacement Endowment Fund Total

EXPLANATION

$63,056.00

$20,744.00

cost recovery**

132.9%

96

$1.00 per Pa rti ci pa nt


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

10.1.9 PARTIES REVENUES Birthday Parties

$37,500.00

TOTAL REVENUES

PERSONAL SERVICES Full Time Regular Part Time Overtime Employer's Share of FICA Employer's Share of Medicare Additional Full-Time Benefits Total SUPPLIES General Program Supplies Total

$37,500.00

Personal Services

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 6.36% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges $0.00 1.49% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges $0.00 32.15% of Ful l Ti me Regul a r $0.00

Supplies

$0.00 pl a tes , s trea mers , ba l l oons , hel i um, $0.00 decora tions

OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES Program Contractors Marketing & Promotions Catering Services Printing (Not Office Supplies) Staff Clothing Refunds, Awards & Indemnities Total Other Services

TOTAL EXPENSES

$22,500.00 60% of Revenues $500.00 Pri nt a ds (ki ds publ i ca tions ) $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $23,000.00

TOTAL EXPENSES

NET REVENUE/(LOSS)

$23,000.00

$14,500.00

cost recovery**

163.0%

97


10.1.10 RENTALS ACCOUNT TITLE

BUDGET

REVENUES Community Room Rentals Facility Premium Rentals Caterer Commissions School Lock-In Miscellaneous Revenues

$28,000.00 $35,100.00 $26,000.00 $30,000.00 $0.00

TOTAL REVENUES

PERSONAL SERVICES Full Time Regular Part Time Overtime Employer's Share of FICA Employer's Share of Medicare Additional Full-Time Benefits Total SUPPLIES Linens & Laundry Other Miscellaneous Total

$35/hr w/ 2 hr. mi n $225/hr w/ 3 hr. mi n Ca terer commi s s i ons a re 15%

$119,100.00

Personal Services

$0.00 $10,000.00 $0.00 $636.00 $149.00 $0.00 $10,785.00

$4,000.00 $1,000.00 $5,000.00

Supplies

OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES Marketing & Promotions Printing (Not Office Supplies) Other Cont. Services Organization & Membership Dues Staff Clothing Internal Instruction Fees External Instructional Fees Refunds, Awards & Indemnities Total Other Services

$2,500.00 $5,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $2,500.00 $10,000.00

CAPITAL Furniture & Fixtures Office Equipment Capital Outlay

TOTAL EXPENSES

EXPLANATION

$0.00

TOTAL EXPENSES

NET REVENUE/(LOSS)

$25,785.00

$93,315.00

cost recovery**

461.9%

98

P-T Bui l dng Renta l Sta ff (s etup/ta kedown) 6.36% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges 1.49% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges 32.15% of Ful l Ti me Regul a r


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

10.1.11 CHILD CARE ACCOUNT TITLE

BUDGET

REVENUES Child Care - Passholder Child Care - Non-Passholder

$19,440.00 ($3/hr Pa s s hol der $4/ Non-Pa s s hol der) $2,880.00 ($3/hr Pa s s hol der $4/ Non-Pa s s hol der)

TOTAL REVENUES

PERSONAL SERVICES Full Time Regular Part Time Overtime Employer's Share of FICA Employer's Share of Medicare Additional Full-Time Benefits Total SUPPLIES General Program Supplies Other Miscellaneous Total

$22,320.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 6.36% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges $0.00 1.49% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges $0.00 32.15% of Ful l Ti me Regul a r $0.00

Personal Services

$1,000.00 $0.00 $1,000.00

Supplies

OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES Program Contractors Marketing & Promotions Catering Services Printing (Not Office Supplies) Organization & Membership Dues Staff Clothing Participant Clothing Internal Instruction Fees Other Fees & Licenses Refunds, Awards & Indemnities Total Other Services

$13,392.00 60% of Revenue $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $13,392.00

CAPITAL Furniture & Fixtures Office Equipment Capital Outlay

TOTAL EXPENSES

EXPLANATION

$0.00

TOTAL EXPENSES

$14,392.00

NET REVENUE/(LOSS)

$7,928.00

cost recovery**

155%

99


10.1.12 KITCHEN ACCOUNT TITLE

BUDGET

REVENUES Miscellaneous Revenues

$0.00

TOTAL REVENUES

$0.00

PERSONAL SERVICES Full Time Regular Part Time Overtime Employer's Share of FICA Employer's Share of Medicare Additional Full-Time Benefits Total

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

SUPPLIES Repair Parts Small Tools & Minor Equip. Other Maint. Supplies Linens & Blankets Safety Supplies General Program Supplies Food & Beverages Retail Goods Other Miscellaneous Total

Personal Services

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $250.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $250.00

Supplies

OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES Marketing & Promotions Security Services Catering Services Other Professional Fees Printing (Not Office Supplies) Equipment Repairs & Maint. Cleaning Services Internal Instruction Fees External Instructional Fees Other Fees & Licenses Refunds, Awards & Indemnities Special Projects Sales Tax Paid Total Other Services

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $500.00 $1,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $1,500.00

CAPITAL OUTLAY Furniture & Fixtures Total

Capital Outlay

$1,000.00 $1,000.00

TOTAL EXPENSES

TOTAL EXPENSES

NET REVENUE/(LOSS)

$2,750.00

($2,750.00)

cost recovery**

0.0%

100

EXPLANATION

6.36% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges 1.49% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges 32.15% of Ful l Ti me Regul a r


Community Center Needs Analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Report

10.1.13 CONCESSIONS ACCOUNT TITLE

BUDGET

REVENUES Food/Coffee Cart

$45,000.00

TOTAL REVENUES

PERSONAL SERVICES Full Time Regular Part Time Overtime Employer's Share of FICA Employer's Share of Medicare Additional Full-Time Benefits Total

$45,000.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 6.36% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges $0.00 1.49% of Sa l a ri es a nd Wa ges $0.00 32.15% of Ful l Ti me Regul a r $0.00

Personal Services

SUPPLIES Food & Beverages

Total

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 Supplies

OTHER SERVICES & CHARGES Concessionaire Sales Tax Paid

Total

$0.00

$38,250.00 85% of Revenue $0.00 Conces s i ona i re pa ys $0.00 Other Services

$38,250.00

CAPITAL OUTLAY Furniture & Fixtures Kitchen Equipment Office Equipment Total

Capital Outlay

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

TOTAL EXPENSES

TOTAL EXPENSES

NET REVENUE/(LOSS)

EXPLANATION

$38,250.00

$6,750.00

cost recovery**

117.6%

101


STATISTICALLY-VALID SURVEY RESULTS See following pages for full-size charts from the survey.

102

Orange township oh community center needs assessment final report wey 2  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you