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Architecture Design Portfolio 2009-2012 The Selected Portfolio Work of Bre Howard


Divergent

2012

A Phenomenological History Meseum Location: Paris, France Professor: Tom DiSanto

3

[Re-Ligare Institute] A Center for the Body and Mind Location: Manhattan, NY Professor: Tom Fowler

15

HO:ME

2010

A Recycled Community Center Location: San Luis Obispo, CA Professor: Tom Fowler

17

Kinetic Skin A Movable Facade Professor: Tom Fowler

18

2010

2010


Cultural Center of Rambouillet

2011

A Technology Library and Theater Location: Rambouillet, France Professor: De Lascoups

19

Doppler Seat

2011

A Furniture Piece for the Vellum Competition Location: San Luis Obispo, Ca Professor: Tom DiSanto

22

Pismo Beach Affordable Housing A Community Home Location: Pismo Beach, CA Professor: Dan Panetta

23

Leger-de-Main Academy A School for Aspiring Magicians Location: San Luis Obispo, CA Professor: Troy Peters

27

2009

2009


Fall 2011 Thesis 2012 Winter 2009

Fall 2009

Winter 2010

Spring 2010

Spring 2011

DIVERGENT

3

Using phenomenological architecture as a new way to understand a historical time by showing it from the point of view of the people from that time and the importance of historical context’s influence on the way people react and think. Exterior Perspective


Site Design The composite site map attempts to show the intricacies of the site. I decided to design the building to have a green roof to continue the natural ‘strip,’ which runs through Paris. Beginning with the canal, the building works as a buffer from the man made aspects of the marina, to the median park, which runs for 1.5 miles above the canal. I also located the entrance so that it is on axis with the column, flowing over the canal path.

After experiencing a plethora of museums and being diappointed with their content and organization, I decided to design a non-traditional museum, specifically, a French Revolution Museum. I chose this time period because throughout my year long stay in Paris I was always fascinated with the July Column. I knew that it was some type of memorial to the French Revolution, but I could never get to it. It sits in the center of a very large roundabout where 12 streets converge. I felt the Column needed some support and Paris needed a museum dedicated solely to the French Revolution. I want this museum to not tell WHAT happened, but WHY it happened. I want the spaces to convey how the two main social classes lived and their mindset during the time. I also want the visitor to be emerged in the two contrasting lifestyles to better help them understand why the Revolution happened.

Site Map

Underground Map

Layered Composite Map

2


Art Storage

Below is the image used for the inspiration of the sub floor, representing the lifestyle of the peasants before the French Revolution. Their lives were difficult and set on a narrow path of survival. The spiral is meant to represent this path, a cyclical journey of working incredibly hard for little reward. In the years leading up to the Revolution, the distribution of wealth was so vast that

Winter 2010

Spring 2010

Spring 2011

Fall 2011 Thesis 2012

Spiral Form Derivation

Peasant Journey Space New Metro Exit onto Site

Winter 2009

Fall 2009

Gallery

5

Up

Metro Pedestrian Tunnel

Down

Sub-Floor

Floor 1


the peasant’s lives became increasingly difficult, represented by the downward slop. The tops of the walls are curved to obscure the source of light from view as the peasants themselves had trouble seeing the light of hope. The Journey ends with a circular skylight, illuminating the space to represent the realization that they had to revolt against their rulers. The peasant must then climb back up along his path to fight against

Floor 2

the ruler’s oppression. The image above was the inspiration for this space. It depicts a classical composition piece entitled Danse Macabre, a French translation of The Dance of Death. The meaning behind the song is that everyone, clergy, King, peasant, or slave, is united in death.

Floor 3

6


Winter 2009

Fall 2009

Winter 2010

Spring 2010

Spring 2011

Fall 2011 Thesis 2012

8

7

Form Derivation These diagrams show how the inspiration for the first floor, representing the lifestyle of the aristocrats before the French Revolution, was developed. The aristocrats lived a life of excess with little they couldn’t do or have. The free formed space is meant to represent their freedom of choice and the extreme levels at which they manipulated their surroundings. Château de Versailles, the Palace in which King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette resided in, has become a symbol of the absolute monarchy system with 2,300 rooms and 67 staircases it exudes indulgence. The gardens of Versailles are manicured to perfection and the rectangular lake actually becomes wider as it recedes to counteract visual perspective—when viewed from the Château the lake appears to be a perfect rectangle. The form was derived from a video of a classic French royalty dance, which would have been performed in Louis XVI’s court. The movements of the dancers were recorded by their relative position to their original partner. The forms generated were then intersected to represent the tight knit community of the wealthy.


8


Fall 2011 Thesis 2012 Spring 2011 Spring 2010 Winter 2010 Fall 2009 Winter 2009

9

Section Design Inspired by the landscape intervention (located on page 58), I created an ‘oculus,’ which is placed at the center of the spiral and right in front of the entrance. Placing the ten foot diameter circle in front of the entrance forces the visitors to notice it so that when they enter the spiral, visitors will know recognize where they once were. The oculus also serves to bring light into the canal and create intrigue from people traveling through the canal.


10


Fall 2011 Thesis 2012 Spring 2011 Spring 2010 Winter 2010 Fall 2009 Winter 2009

11

Integration Section Design This section demonstrates how integral the building is with the different aspects of the site. It is easy to see from the drawing how the exit stairwell can continue on the canal pathway leading guests up to the July Column. Also visible is the pedestrian metro tunnel and the newly created exit leading to the site. I also chose to create a large open space that could be used as a temporary exhibition space. This way, local visitors could come more often to see the new installations. I chose to locate it next to the exit stairwell so that visitors can get multiple perspectives on the art from the stairs.


Temporary Art Installation Space

12


Fall 2011 Thesis 2012 Spring 2011 Spring 2010 Winter 2010 Fall 2009 Winter 2009

13

Interior Perspectives The third floor gallery has a ‘garage-door’ like glass wall, which can be completely raised to create a large fluid space moving from the gallery to the terrace. The image on the right is an interior perspective of the aristocratic representative space. The lighting and material help to give a sense of what it would be like to inhabit the space.


14


Thesis 2012

Mind and Body Mind and [RE-LIGARE INSTITUTE] [RE-LIGARE INSTITUTE]

Body

Weaving Nature and Industry Weaving Nature and Industry

Fall 2011

The concept stems from and natural Theindustrial concept stems from industrial and natural textiles. While observing how nature is textiles. While observing how nature is constantly fighting with man-made objectswith and man-made objects and constantly fighting creating patterns—rusting metal, mold, creating patterns—rusting metal, mold, barnacles, water damage, ect. The [Re-Ligare barnacles, water damage, ect. The [Re-Ligare Institute] is a manifestation struggle, Institute]ofisthis a manifestation of this struggle, expressed through theexpressed use of the gardens. through the The use of the gardens. The shipping containers act as a solid, rigidact as a solid, rigid shipping containers textile that’s been naturally weathered textile that’s been and naturally weathered and eaten away, creating eaten voids away, and holes in the creating voids and holes in the industrial fabric. Within thesefabric. voids, the industrial Within these voids, the garden planes weave around spaces both garden the planes weave around the spaces both horizontally and vertically, constructing a horizontally and vertically, constructing a continuous garden from site to roof. continuous garden Steel from site to roof. Steel members that continuously connect all the members that continuously connect all the garden spaces encourage nature’s by nature’s appetite by garden spacesappetite encourage allowing foliage to grow up anfoliage appliedtosteel allowing grow up an applied steel mesh. Over time, allmesh. the garden space all willthe garden space will Over time, flow fluidly from floor wall tofrom ceiling— flowtofluidly floor to wall to ceiling— sewing the building back together—healing sewing the building back together—healing industry. industry.

Exploded Axonometric

Winter 2010

Spring 2010 Spring 2011

Retail Classrooms SRO’s Relaxation Laboratories

Winter 2009

Fall 2009

Typical Floor Plan

15

Location:New On 10th Lower Manhattan, New York LowerSite Manhattan, YorkAve, be-Site Location: On 10th Ave, between 18th and 19th street tween 18th and 19th street

Cladding: Cladding:

Typical Floor Plan

Cross Section

Cr

The building’s site location in New site York location City was in a bit a challenge passively cool andtoheat due to cool its sizeable The building’s New of York City was atobit of a challenge passively and heat flu du summer and winter. To approach these extremes, greenthese protective screen walls were established in front of highly inhabited Curved steel spa me summer and winter. To approach extremes, green protective screen walls were established in front spaces. of highly inhabited tween floors would have a steel applied allowmesh ivy applied to grow to up allow the mesh the up garden spaces. would connect theivy garden as th a tween floorsmesh would have atosteel ivy from to grow the mesh fromThis the ivy garden spaces. This wouldspaces connect ribbon throughout theribbon project. The Boston Ivy would The double as aIvy sunwould screen during summer months, its months, leaves during theits winter months throughout the project. Boston double as the a sun screen duringand thelose summer and lose leaves durin the spaces. Where thethe green screens arethe notgreen located, the are shipping containers largecontainers overhangs have and vertical fins to and emphasize thefins module of the spaces. Where screens not located, the have shipping large overhangs vertical to emphasiz er as well as provideerprotection the sun. All windows will be operable, allowing through the building.through the building. as well asfrom provide protection from the sun. All windows will beventilation operable, allowing ventilation

These voids and shapes became program These voids and shapes became program and were pushed and pulled depending on pulled depending on and were pushed and their program. The containers are also their program. The containers are also color-coded on the outside to emphasize color-coded on the outside to emphasize the shipping container and container dethemodule shipping module and define the programmaticfine areas. the programmatic areas. Retail Classrooms SRO’s Relaxation Laboratories

Retail Classrooms SRO’s Relaxation Laboratories


summer and winter. To approach these extremes, green protective screen walls were established in front of highly inhabited spaces. Curved steel members winding between floors would have a steel mesh applied to allow ivy to grow up the mesh from the garden spaces. This ivy would connect the garden spaces as a continuous green ribbon throughout the project. The Boston Ivy would double as a sun screen during the summer months, and lose its leaves during the winter months to allow sun into Site Location: On 10th Ave, bethe spaces. Where tween the 18th green screens are not located, the shipping containers have large overhangs and vertical fins to emphasize the module of the shipping containand 19th street Cross Section er as well as provide protection from the sun. All windows will be operable, allowing ventilation through the building.

Lower Manhattan, New York

Cladding:

The building’s site location in New York City was a bit of a challenge to passively cool and heat due to its sizeable fluctuation betw summer and winter. To approach these extremes, green protective screen walls were established in front of highly inhabited spaces. Curved steel members winding tween floors would have a steel mesh applied to allow ivy to grow up the mesh from the garden spaces. This ivy would connect the garden spaces as a continuous g ribbon throughout the project. The Boston Ivy would double as a sun screen during the summer months, and lose its leaves during the winter months to allow sun the spaces. Where the green screens are not located, the shipping containers have large overhangs and vertical fins to emphasize the module of the shipping cont er as well as provide protection from the sun. All windows will be operable, allowing ventilation through the building.

These voids and shapes became program and were pushed and pulled depending on their program. The containers are also color-coded on the outside to emphasize the shipping container module and define the programmatic areas. Retail Classrooms SRO’s Relaxation Laboratories

Operable Louvres to control sun Steel Members These voids and shapes became program heat and were pushed and pulled depending on gain to support vertical their program. The containers are also on the outside to emphasize gardens color-coded the shipping container module and de-

Frames to support glass

Glass Windows

fine the programmatic areas. Retail Classrooms SRO’s Relaxation Laboratories

Steel Members to support vertical gardens

Operable Louvres to control sun heat gain

Frames to support glass

Glass Windows

Steel Members to support vertical gardens

Operable Louvres to control sun heat gain

Frames to support glass

Glass Windows

Exploded Axonometric

The concept stems from industrial and natural textiles. While observing how nature is constantly fighting with man-made objects and creating patterns--rusting metal, mold, barnacles, water damage, ect. The [Re-Ligare Institute] is a manifestation of this struggle, expressed through the use of the gardens. The shipping containers act as a solid, rigid textile that’s been weathered and eaten away, creating voids and holes in the industrial fabric. Within these voids, the garden planes weave around the spaces both horizontally and vertically, constructing a continuous garden from ground to roof. Steel members that continuously connect all the garden spaces encourage nature’s appetite by allowing foliage to grow up an applied steel mesh. Over time, all the garden space flow fluidly from floor to wall to ceiling--sewing the building back together-nature healing industry.

16


HO:ME HO:ME Community Center

Thesis 2012

Community Center

A

Fall 2011

A

B

B B

Spring 2010 Spring 2011

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

A

A

Cross Section

Longitudinal Section

Winter 2010

Longitudinal Section

Street Elevation

Fall 2009 Winter 2009

17

B

Cross Section

Garden Elevation

Price Comparison

Street Elevation

Wave Wall Panel

Shadow Line Wall Panel

Wave Wall Panel

Natural Stone Wall Panel

Materials from EcoSteel

Garden Elevation

The HO:ME weekend project was developing a community center for a new development of homes made from shipping containers. The community building is built using standard construction and Price Comparison three half size shipping containers, two used for the wet areas of the community room and the apartment, and one placed on its end to create an entrance. The communal room has an open plan with a large, glass rolling door to integrate seamlessly with the patio and community garden.


Kinetic Skin Group Project The concept for this skin was industrial weaving. Rigid materials such as steel and glass, moving gracefully between each other creating a fabric of industry. Using panels of different opacity and size, light within the building varies greatly and is constantly changing since the panels move both up and down and side to side. The tracks are situated at specific angles to give the illusion of random placement, when it is actually organized. The skin would be a large scale, with the largest panel measuring 5’x7’ and the smallest 2’x2’. The depth of the skin would be about 15’.

18


PLAN R+2 R+1Plan ECH: 1/200 1/200 Second Floor PLAN ECH:

VUE INTERIEURE DE LA SALLE

Below grade Floor Plan

First FloorPLAN Plan PLAN DE REZ DE 1/200 CHAUSSE ECH: 1/200 R+1 ECH: PLAN R+3 ECH: 1/200

Site Plan PLAN DE SITUATION ECH 1/500

Thesis 2012 Winter 2009

Fall 2009

Winter 2010

Cultural Center of Rambouillet, France

PLAN DE SITUATION ECH 1/500

The city of Rambouillet is a wealthy community with a deep cultural history and small city charm, but it is lacking a gathering space, a place to experience the culture. The Cultural Center includes a theater, an auditorium, a cafe, offices, and connects to an existing media library. The theater acts as the center, focus of the complex and is surrounded by the logistics of the theater and the offices, like a ribbon. The lobby is, VUE INTERIEURE DE LA SALLE in contrast from the theater, made of glass, as it is the public area and connects to the library.

Spring 2010

Spring 2011 Fall 2011

PLANPlan R+2 ECH: ECH: 1/200 1/200 Third Floor PLAN R+3

PLAN DE REZ DE CHAUSSE ECH: 1/200

PLAN R+2 ECH: 1/200

PLAN R-1 ECH: 1/200

19 VUE INTERIEURE DE LA SALLE


MATERIAUX MATERIAUX

Exterior Perspective

Béton Béton pour pour la la salle salle de de spectacle spectacle recouvert recouvert d’une d’une résille résille métalique métalique l’exterieur àà l’exterieur

Dalle Dalle en en granite granite pour pour les les buraux buraux et et les les loges loges qui qui forment forment un un ruban ruban autou autou de de la la salle salle de de théâtre théâtre

North/South Section

North Elevation

West Elevation

VUE VUE DU DU BÂTIMENT BÂTIMENT DEPUIS DEPUIS L’INTERSECTION L’INTERSECTION ENTRE ENTRE LE LE PARC PARC ET ET LA LA RUE RUE POTOKI POTOKI

COUPE COUPE LONGITUDINALE LONGITUDINALE ECH ECH 1/200 1/200

East/West Section

COUPE COUPE TRANSVERSALE TRANSVERSALE ECH ECH 1/200 1/200

20


Thesis 2012

Detailing Metal coping Stabalization bars Angle attachment Metal facade

Double-pane glass roof Glass substucture mullions Open-web steel joist Concrete bearing

Spring 2010 Spring 2011

Fall 2011

Water recepticle

Flashing Roofing membrane Lightweight insulating concrete fill Metal roof decking Structural Beam Bearing angle bolting beam to wall

Winter 2010

30 cm poured in place concrete wall with steel rebar reinforcement Insulation 50 mm stud wall infilled with acoustic mineral wood Resilient bar and 20 mm air gap 19 mm acoustic plasterboard

Winter 2009

Fall 2009

12 mm acoustic plasterboard

Section Detail

21

Localization


Fall 2011 Thesis 2012 Spring 2011 Spring 2010 Winter 2010 Fall 2009 Winter 2009

D PPLER SEAT

The design began and developed from the metal frame. The moment we saw it on an industrial AC unit at the salvage yard, we knew how we would use it. The bright aluminum frame, once polished and restored, was reminiscent of the post-war modernism of Le Corbusier and Charles and Ray Eames. We wanted to comment on their appropriation of industrial technology and aesthetics by creating a piece reminiscent of that style, but with the additional layer of the literal repurposing of this aluminum frame, a piece made for and used in a functional capacity, now decontextualized and valued solely for its esthetic quality. The visual rhythm of the frame made the rest of the piece self evident. The pattern of the padding is a direct translation of that rhythm into a different function and material. This pattern of concentric units also informed the building process of the base, which is made up of 1/2 inch birch ply cut into circles and laminated together in a simple curve form. The final sculpted curve of the base represents the inverse of the seat, which is reflected in the material choice and finish. This concave shape flows fluidly into the convex of the seat, implying a continuous curve. Despite the differences in material, method of construction, and the finish of the three main elements of the chair, the chair as a whole achieves a unity that it is made up of concentric, circular units built up on each other.

22


Thesis 2012

Schematic Proforma for Affordable Housing Developments Exploring Affordable Housing Financing

Fall 2011

DATE:11/30/09

A. Units & Rental Income TYPES OF UNITS

Spring 2011

Gross Mo.ly Rent by Unit

2 0 4 0 0 4 0 0 2 12

Utilies Allowance

$372 $620 $744 $398 $663 $796 $478 $796 $955

Net Rent per unit $74 $74 $74 0 $90 $90 $90 $106 $106 $106

Gross Mo.ly Income by Unit

Estimated O&M Net Operating

Elevation Type allow + vacancy Mo.ly Income -10.0% Scale 1/8”=1’0” $ 596 $ (60) $ 536

$298 $546 5 $670 $308 $573 $706 $372 $690 $849

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

10

2,680 2,824 1,698

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

-

$

20 (268) $ (282) (170)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ Annual Net Income $

2,412 2,542 1,868 7,358 88,294

B. Hard Construction Costs UNITS:

Number of Units by Type

Studio (AMI+ 30%) Studio (AMI+ 50%) Studio (AMI+ 60%) 1 brm (AMI+ 30%) 1 brm (AMI+ 50%) 1 brm (AMI+ 60%) 2 brm (AMI+ 30%) 2 brm (AMI+ 50%) 2 brm (AMI+ 60%) TOTAL UNITS

A 1 COMMON AREAS:

Spring 2010 Winter 2010 Winter 2009 Fall 2009

23

Number of Units by Type

Studio (AMI+ 30%) Studio (AMI+ 50%) Studio (AMI+ 60%) 1 brm (AMI+ 30%) 1 brm (AMI+ 50%) 1 brm (AMI+ 60%) 2 brm (AMI+ 30%) 2 brm (AMI+ 50%) 2 brm (AMI+ 60%) TOTAL UNITS

2 0 4 0 0 4 0 0 2 12

Size SF in S.F. Cosntructed 452 904 450 0 425 1700 600 0 600 0 580 2320 800 0 800 0 750 1500 TOTAL SF 6,424

Size in S.F.

Community Bldg/Offices/Laundry Site Improvements:

956

Planting, Irrigation, Concrete Walkways Parking & Drives

Total cost / unit in $ $ 79,100 $ 78,750 $ 74,375 $ 99,000 $ 99,000 $ 95,700 $ 120,000 $ 120,000 $ 112,500 TOTAL COSTS

Construction Cost/SF $ 150.00

25,230 lot area

Utilities & Grade (allow 20% land cost)

Construction Cost/SF $ 175 $ 175 $ 175 $ 165 $ 165 $ 165 $ 150 $ 150 $ 150

6,753 4,619 5,650

$

3.00

$ $ $

4.00 5.50 4.50

Total cost of all units by type $ 158,200 $ $ A297,500 1 $ $ $ 382,800 $ $ $ 225,000 $ 1,063,500

Total cost Common Areas $ 143,400

Second Floor Scale 1/8”=1’0” COMMON AREA COSTS TOTAL CONSTRUCTION COST

$

75,690

$ $ $ $

27,012 25,405 25,425 296,932

$

CONTRACTOR O&P (allow 8%) CONSTRUCTION CONTINGENCY (allow 5%)

108,835 68,022 1,537,288

1

C. Land and Soft Costs

Site Issues

Design Goals The first and main focus for the project was to hide and tuck away the parking. That was accomplished by creating a skinny entrance drive with two buildings on either side, this allowed for the parking to be nestled behind the two buildings and hidden away from view from Park Ave. The second main concern was the issue of security. The resident manager needs to be able to see the length of the property from both his/her apartemnt and from the office. The apartment is located at the end of the drive to see the entrance, exit, bicycle parking, mailboxes, and also the interior street betwwen the back apartments. The office is located directly at the end of the interior street within the community building on the second floor. The office has a view down the length of the property and over the playground and barbeque areas. For the last touch of security, a 6 foot fence is surrounding the site, with pedestrian gate located next to the vehicle entrance and exits, as well as a pedestrian gate leading to the creekside path.

The most challenging issue with the site was its long, narrow shape. Making the site feel inviting upon entering, without having a parking lot in the front, was difficult to achieve with such a narrow span. Another difficulty was not being able to build over the 20 foot wide sewer easement. The location strongly dictated buildable areas.

Site Plan Scale 1/16”=1’0” 0

5

10

20

D. Permit Costs

Land Costs (Lease $1/yr)

$

-

Arch&Eng Fees (5%) Permits from D. Acct.A Legal1

$ $ $ $

68,022 48,798 25,000 50,000

$ $

19,182 211,001

Permit Fees Mechanical Permit & Inspection Fees Plumbing/Gas/Elect Permit & Inspection Fees Admin & Ministerial Fees Public Works School Fees @ $2.65/sf Grading Permit (allow) Public Facilities Fees (allow $1/SF)

First Floor Scale 1/8”=1’0” Other Fees

Misc./Contingency

N

(Allow 10% non-land)

Total

1,360,432

$ $

A $ TOTAL CONSTRUCTION COSTS

(allow)

5

0

10

Total

20

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

3,800 4,200 8,400 1,100 350 17,024 2,500 6,424

$ $

5,000 48,798

E. Construction Financing: NOTE: estimated percent of construction loan by time and rate. This sums with Total Project Cost cells. Estimate ave. % Outstanding

Const Loan Amount

Max. Construction Loan

$

1,537,288

Est'd Construction Time

50.0%

18

Est'd Construction Loan Interest Rate

N

6.50%

TOTAL CONST FINANCING

$

149,886

F. Total Project Costs ITEM Hard Costs Site/Soft Costs Subtotal Const. Loan Interest

PERCENT 87.9% 12.1% 100.0%

PER UNIT $ 128,107 $ 17,583 $ 145,691

COST $ 1,537,288 $ 211,001 $ 1,748,289 $ 149,886 TOTAL PROJECT COSTS $ Total Costs per unit $

1,898,174 158,181

G. Project Financing: Conventional Loan Allowable Conventional Mortgage Loan Monthly NOI Debt Service Coverage Ratio Sinking Fund Total Monies available for DS

$ 1.2 $ 2.5% $

Income Available for Loan Payment Permanent Loan Terms

30 year fixed rate 360

7,358 (1,226) (184) $5,948 $5,948 5.00% 0.42%

Maximum Available Loan $

interest

Parti

1,112,536

monthly interest

H. Gap Financing: LIHTC/ LI Loan/Bonds/Grants

Section A1 Total Project Costs Maximum Conventional Loan Available Scale 1/8”=1’0” 0

5

$ $

1,898,174 1,112,536

Required Gap Financing $ Required Gap Financing 20 per unit $ 10

785,638 65,470


Elevation Scale 1/8”=1’0” 0

5

0

5

010

1020

5

20

A 2

A 2

A 2

Second Floor Second Floor Scale 1/8”=1’0” Scale 1/8”=1’0”

A 2

First Floor Scale 1/8”=1’0”

0

A 2

A 2

First FloorFirst Floor Scale 1/8”=1’0” Scale 1/8”=1’0” 0

5

010

1020

5

N

20

N

5

010

5

1020

20

20

10

5

10

20

N

Section P. 2 P. 2B3 Scale 1/8”=1’0” 0

5

0

5

10

20

Second Floor Scale 1/8”=1’0”

N

First Floor Scale 1/8”=1’0”

0

Section A2Section A2 Scale 1/8”=1’0” Scale 1/8”=1’0” 0

5

360 Park Ave., Pismo Beach, CA Bre Howard Arch 351, Fall ‘09, D Panetta 360 Park Ave., Pismo Beach, CA Bre Howard Arch 351, Fall ‘09, D Panetta

A 2

1

Pismo Beach Affordable Housing Pismo Beach Affordable Housing

A 2 A 1

5

20

Elevation Scale 1/8”=1’0”

Elevation Elevation Scale 1/8”=1’0” Scale 1/8”=1’0” 0

10

10

2009 Dec 3 Dec 3 2009

20

Section B3 Scale 1/8”=1’0” 10

20

Second Floor Scale 1/8”=1’0”

Pismo Beach, a flourishing beach community, is growing more expensive, making it harder for the people who work in the city to live there as well. The site includes 12 living units, 12 parking spaces, and a community space. It was important to create a sense of community in the complex. The facades mosaic tiling, the similar architectural detailing, clustered buildings, and arched entrance gate express unity. For curb appeal, the parking lot was pushed back of the street into the middle of the site, tucked behind the first two buildings.

24


25 Winter 2009

Fall 2009 Winter 2010

Spring 2010

Spring 2011

Fall 2011 Thesis 2012


Thesis 2012

Bathroom

Leger-de-Main Academy- Second Year Leger-de-Main Academy Peters, Arch 252, Winter ‘09 Bre Howard

Elevator

Bathroom

Elevator Bathroom

eventually developed into an illusion in itself. When approaching from the left, the building is red, but when approaching Theater Bike Parking Theater Preparation

Fall 2011

First Floor Plan Scale 1/4”=1’ 0”

Elevator Office

Elevator

Office

Bathroom

Classroom

Dining

Spring 2011

A school for budding magicians in the downtown San Luis Obispo area includes a performance from the right, it is black. This gives a clue to what goes on inside and adds a bit of mystery and interest to the building. It is theater, a classroom, a magic store, and three broken up into two sections to express the entrance of the apartment as a separate entity. The side and alley faces are com apartments for the teachers and shopkeeper. The pletely different than the front because of the separation of the two spaces. The front space is used solely as a store and facade the building distinguishes the public from apartment, whereasof the back contains the theater, the classroom, offices, lounge for students and staff, and the teacher’s apartment. The distance andareas different function of the back half seemed to callout for a new façade. The facades came about the private with different facade materials, by needing light in certain places. The placement, however, looked too chaotic. In an effort to control my chaos, I brought as well as hints to the function of the function of the strong vertical lines from the front façade to the back. Using the vertical lines as a control, I was able to place the in be the interior by changing from red to black when a tween windows anywhere needed. The thin stairwell in the center is strictly circulation space and a vessel for light to stream viewer passes the building. A central hallway acts through the center of the building. as a main circulation as well as a light well. First impressions are key. That is why I focused on expressing the function of the building through the façade. The façade

Store

Living Room Kitchen

Site Plan

Scale 1/32”=1’ 0”

Bathroom Lounge Office Bathroom

Second Floor Plan Scale 1/4”=1’ 0”

Elevator Bathroom

Bedroom

Elevator

Spring 2010

Kitchen

Bathroom Bedroom

Bathroom

Open to Below Bedroom

Dining Room Bathroom Bedroom

Living Room Closet

Third Floor Plan

Winter 2010

Scale 1/4”=1’ 0”

Bathroom

Closet

Elevator

Bedroom Elevator

Bedroom

Closet Bathroom

Outdoor Terrace

Living Room Kitchen Dining

Winter 2009 Fall 2009

Closet

Facade Section Scale 1/2”=1’ 0”

Fourth Floor Plan Scale 1/4”=1’ 0”

Side Elevation Scale 1/4”=1’ 0”

Section

Scale 1/4”=1’ 0”

Back Elevation Scale 1/4”=1’ 0”

Front Elevation Scale 1/4”=1’ 0”

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Architecture Portfolio 2009-2012