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July 11, 2013

POLITICS » SMILE, YOU'RE ON FILE

Vol. 10 • No. 28

the illusion of privacy

Chattanooga’s Weekly Alternative

of the

S T S A E B

A G O O N A T T A CH

D L I W

MUSIC TOAD COMES TO TOWN SCREEN A BAND CALLED DEATH theater “BALCONIES”


No matter where you’re traveling, you can catch your favorite shows and full-length movies anywhere you have Internet access with EPB2Go*. Stream HBO, Cinemax, Turner, EPIX, and more. Plus, catch live news and sports from Fox, CNN and NBC Sports Live.

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2 • The Pulse • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com


THIS WEEK JUly 11-JULY 17 IN THE PULSE EDITORIAL

Editor Mike McJunkin Contributing Editors Janis Hashe • Gary Poole Contributors Rich Bailey • Rob Brezsny • Cody Maxwell T.J. Greever • John DeVore • Janis Hashe Matt Jones • Mike McJunkin • Ernie Paik Gary Poole • Alex Teach • Marc Michael Photographers Josh Lang • Star Roberts Cartoonists & Illustrators Max Cannon • E.J. Pettinger Jen Sorensen • Tom Tomorrow Interns Keeli Monroe • Carson O'Shoney Founded 2003 by Zachary Cooper & Michael Kull

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Director of Sales Mike Baskin Account Executives Amy Allara • Chee Chee Brown Jessica Gray • Rick Leavell • Jerry Ware

CONTACT

Offices 1305 Carter St.Chattanooga, TN 37402 Phone 423.265.9494 Fax 423.266.2335 Website chattanoogapulse.com Email info@chattanoogapulse.com Calendar calendar@chattanoogapulse.com THE FINE PRINT: The Pulse is published weekly by Brewer Media and is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. The Pulse covers a broad range of topics concentrating on music, the arts, entertainment, culture and local news. The Pulse is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publisher may take more than one copy per weekly issue. We’re watching. The Pulse may be distributed only by authorized distributors. © 2013 Brewer Media. All rights reserved.

BREWER MEDIA GROUP Publisher & President Jim Brewer II

harvest here restaurant week locavores rejoice P4

7734 Lee Highway • McKayBooks.com Monday-Saturday 9am-10pm • Sunday 11am-7pm

Books. Lots of books. And more. We buy, sell and trade. chattanoogapulse.com • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • The Pulse • 3


BOWL

THE

Harvested Here Week

Think Globally, Eat Locally For the third year, celebrate fruits and vegetables grown and artisan foods made within 100 miles of Chattanooga with Harvested Here Week, running July12-19 at more than 25 local restaurants. Organized, as always, by the good folks at Gaining Ground, anything in season will be featured on the menus of 212 Market, Alleia, Back Inn Cafe, Blacksmith's Bistro & Bar, Cafe on the Corner, Community Pie,

chattanooga’s weekly alternative NEWS • COMMENTARY • BULLETINS & PUSH NOTIFICATIONS AT DIAL-UP SPEED facebook/chattanoogapulsE • TWITTER @CHATTAPULSE EMAIL LOVE LETTERS, ADVICE & TRASH TALK TO INFO@CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

Easy Bistro & Bar, Elemental, Enzo's Market, Famous Nater's World Famous, Flying Squirrel, Good Dog, Lupi's, Milk & Honey, Public House, St. John's Meeting Place, St. John's, Sushi Nabe, Taco Mamacita, Terra Nostra Tapas & Wine, TerraMae Applachian Bistro, The Blue Plate, Broad Street Grille, Tony's Pasta Shop & Trattoria, Urban Stack and Whole Foods. The event’s success has meant that local farmers are increasing their yields of some foods the restaurants (and eaters) particularly favor, including tomatoes, herbs, greens and berries. Yum! Find more information about participating restaurants and

© 2013 SketchCrowd, LLC / www.sketchcrowd.com

“Just wonderin’, Captain. . . Does this make us poachers or murderers?” 4 • The Pulse • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

special menus for the week at GrowChattanooga.org or on FaceBook.com/GrowChattanooga. —Staff

Tattoo Convention

High Jinks With Ink Attention, all body modification enthusiasts: The first annual Chattanooga Tattoo Convention is almost here! The event, which is being held at the Chattanooga Convention Center, takes place July 12-14. Admission is $20 a day, or the entire weekend for $35. Kids younger than age 12 are admitted free. (It’s never too early to begin planning your first piece…after all, it will be with you forever). The convention will feature talented artists from top studios across the nation, as well as several local studios, including Rite of Passage (Market Street) and Ink Expressions (Ringgold Road). Visiting shops include Ambition Tattoo from Knoxville, Black Heart Tattoo from Ohio, Redemption Ink and Now or Never from Georgia, Electric Hand Tattoos from Nashville, Forbidden Color Tattoo from North Carolina, Capital City Tattoo from Montgomery, and dozens more. Visit chattanoogatattoo.com for the full list. In addition to all of the amazing artists, attendees will also be able to take full advantage of vendors and tattoo seminars. If you have unique ink you’d like to show off, $10 is all it takes to enter your piece into more than ten different competitions, such as Best Sleeve Arm/Leg, Best American Traditional, Best Back Piece, and Best

Color Realism to name a few. First through third place prizes will be awarded for each category. There will also be a free Tattoo of the Day contest each day of the convention. As if that isn’t enough, check out the various shows on each day of the event —including a human suspension show. For more information, visit the website listed above, or call (865) 208-1623. —Keeli Monroe

CA & NC Bat Watch

Our Furry Flying Friends Found Bats get a totally bad rap. Far from being interested in nesting in your hair or turning you into Dracula, they are a very important part of the eco-system, and one that is very much in need of protection.

Ther e’s been a lot written rec ent ly, for example, about t h e da nger to bat populations ( i n cludi n g t ho se here in Tennessee), of whitenose syndrome, which scientists are trying to discover the causes of so they can combat it. Find out firsthand about these fascinating flying mammals at the Chattanooga Arboretum & Nature Center’s Bat Watch on Friday, July 12. Bat-watchers will meet at CA&NC for an informative power point presentation about bats, then car caravan to the Nickajack Cave, home to more than 60,000 endangered bats. After a short walk to the viewing platform, watchers will observe that as the sun sets, the tiny gray bats wing their way out of the cave to feed on insects. You’ll need a flashlight and comfortable walking shoes. This is a very popular program and space is limited, so bat-ter up! Preregistration and prepayment are required. Bat Watch, 7:15 pm to 9:30 p.m. Friday, July 12. Seniors and kids (ages 4-11) $4 and adults $9 for members; seniors and kids $7 and adults $12 for nonmembers. Call 821-1160, ext. 0 to register.  —Staff


LIST

THE

pulse » PICKS

• A curated weekly selection of picks from the Chattanooga Live and Arts & Entertainment calendars by Pulse staffers.

Photo by Star Roberts

THU07.11 MUSIC & GAMING Chattanooga Symphony Orchestra: Video Games Live! • Geek out with an immersive concert event featuring music from the most popular video games of all time. 7:30 p.m. • Memorial Auditorium, 399 McCallie Ave. (423) 757-5156. chattanoogasymphony.org

GALLERY SHOWING Iconic Chattanooga • Local artists and photographers gather together with all original works featuring Chattanooga's iconic images. 4 - 7 p.m. • Reflections Gallery, 6922 Lee Hwy. (423) 892-3072. reflectionsgallerytn.com

» pulse PICK of the nest

FRI07.12

SAT07.13

MUSIC

MUSIC

Toad the Wet Sprocket, Lee DeWyze

Spand-XXX

Cuteness Overload

• Read the Music feature to learn exactly why you need to be at this show. 9p.m. • Track 29, 1400 Market St. (423) 266-4323 track29.co

• How can you not love a band with such a great name? 8 p.m. • T-Bones, 1419 Chestnut St. (423) 266-4240. tboneschattanooga.com

THEATRE

FILM FUN

“Legally Blonde”

Movies in the Park

• The musical-from-the-film. Still legal. Still blonde. 8 p.m. • Chattanooga Theatre Centre, 400 River St. (423) 267-8538 theatrecentre.com

• "A misplaced worker from the North Pole heads to New York to find his true identity." 9 p.m. • Coolidge Park, 150 River St. (423) 693-1355

RAW

Aviculturist Loribeth Aldrich is an expectant mother. Or, more precisely, an expectant penguin keeper, as the Tennessee Aquarium is home to not only the adorable macaroni penguin chick pictured above, but five more soon-tohatch penguin eggs. Penguins Rock Daily viewings. Tennessee Aquarium Ocean Journey, 1 Broad St. (800) 262-0695. tnaqua.com

LIVE MUSIC & DJs EVERY WEEKEND FRI & SAT• JULY 12/13 PISTOL TOWN $1 beer 10-11pm LIVE MUSIC STARTS @ 10:30pm FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHTS DJ REGGIE REG 2nd Floor 9:30pm-3am FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHTS

PARTY, REDEFINED.

TWO FLOORS • ONE BIG PARTY • LIVE MUSIC • DANCING • 409 MARKET ST • 423.756.1919 open 7 days a week » full menu until 2am » 21+ » smoking allowed chattanoogapulse.com • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • The Pulse • 5


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POLITICS

Janis Hashe

Lessons from a Lifetime of ‘Smile, You’re On File’ T

hough by nature an incurable optimist, it’s with a cynical smile that I observe the hand wringing and outcry over the Edward Snowden revelations that—gasp—our government is spying on us. As breaking news, that is right up there with Washington crossing the Delaware.

Anyone who’s paid any attention to the events of the last 50 years knows that J. Edgar Hoover spied on pretty much everyone, mostly (though not always) with the full cooperation of the various presidents he served under. And where were all these outraged people when the “Patriot Act” was being pushed through Congress, granting various agencies permission to tap phones and read emails? (May I also point out that anyone who is on Facebook lives in Fantasyland if you think that you have any privacy left?) During the years right after 9/11, I was making nearly daily personal calls to London. We would often hear odds clickings and other noises during these calls—more than the usual long-distance static. “Hi, Dick, how’s the family?” I would sometimes interrupt my conversation to inquire, on the assumption that Dick Cheney’s minions were very likely listening in. As someone who has been involved in what used to be referred to as “the counterculture” since I was 14, I am way used to being spied on. In my early youth, as an organizer of the “Ms. California Counter Pageant,” a successful attempt to persuade my home town of Santa Cruz to boot the utterly sexist Miss California Pageant out of its smug annual visit, we looked up from the march and saw the cameras poking out of office blinds above the street. Later, the local alt-weekly ran a picture of a telephoto lens at one of those windows, fully justifying any paranoia we may have felt. After a lifetime of marches, battles with huge corporations, and generally engaging in “subversive activities,” including working for this publication, I am well aware I have an extensive file somewhere in FBI archives.

’Hi, Dick, how’s the family?’ I would sometimes interrupt my conversation to inquire, on the assumption that Dick Cheney’s minions were very likely listening in.

be turned around on the American people and no American would have any privacy left.’” Ellsberg points out that that time is now here. Yet I continue to be amazed at the people who, apparently, simply do not care. I do. I acknowledge that steps must be taken to ensure that nations are "safe.” There actually are people, groups and countries that are constantly planning attacks of one kind or another. And as far as Edward Snowden himself is concerned, I am very much on the fence about the way in which he released his information and the way he’s conducted himself since. But—Americans have been sliding down a slippery slope of giving up privacy rights

for so many years that way too many of us simply assume we don’t have the right to have those rights. Who has the right to collect this information and why? With whom are they sharing it? What type of activity inspires extended information collection? These are questions we have the right to ask, and the right to say no to if the answers are vague or dismissive. If you have ever signed an “activist” petition, been in a civil-rights march or engaged in environmental activism, you, like me, are probably on file. Find out what’s in it by going to getmyfile.com and print out letters requesting—nay, demanding—your files. I’ll be right there with you.

But so, it’s entirely possible, do you. A petition just started by Daniel Ellsberg (and no, I am not explaining who he is), states: “In 1975, Senator Frank Church, who led a committee charged with investigating and making public the abuses of American intelligence agencies, spoke of the National Security Agency in these terms: "’I know the capacity that is there to make tyranny total in America, and we must see to it that this agency and all agencies that possess this technology operate within the law and under proper supervision, so that we never cross over that abyss. That is the abyss from which there is no return.’ “The dangerous prospect of which he warned was that America's intelligencegathering capability—which is today beyond any comparison with what existed in his pre-digital era—‘at any time could chattanoogapulse.com • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • The Pulse • 7


Beasts of the

Chattanooga Wild Exotic pets abound, but have special needs

By Carson O'Shoney • Photos by Josh Lang Are you a unique snowflake who needs an equally unique pet to fit your personality? Is a dog or a cat too “normal” for you? Then you might want to look into owning an exotic pet. In all shapes and sizes, from fairly common birds and gerbils to more extravagant creatures like Degus, Uromastyx and Bearded Dragons—there’s something out there for everyone. They’re more in demand now than ever before—but for your sake, and the sake of the animal you choose,

8 • The Pulse • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

be sure you know what you are getting yourself into. I talked to a few local exotic pet owners to find out what drew them towards exotics, what life is like with them and what they like most about them. For Kris Van Dyke, owning a pig named Bootleg is basically like having a child. “It’s amazing how much we miss that pig when we’re gone…we really love her,” said Van Dyke. “If you’re thinking about having a

kid and you’re on the fence to know whether you could take care of them or not, get a pig— it really is the closest thing to having a child that I could imagine.” UTC student Megan Jackson owns an albino hedgehog named Rosie, and says she loves her individuality. “She has a really big personality for a small animal. She runs around and likes to cuddle, and aside from the spikes, she’s really sweet.” Snake owner Juney Shober thought snakes


were interesting and wanted to branch out. “I have always been fascinated with the way [snakes] move and interact with the world, probably because it is so different from the way we do. I have and have had cats and dogs my whole life, so I decided to try something new.” Shober adds, “[My snake] is fascinating to watch…[and] I realize I may be alone on this, but I think he is cute!” While owning a less than ordinary pet can be fun, it comes with its own set of challenges. Dr. Shannon Dawkins, a veterinarian, operator of Claws & Paws Mobile Veterinary Service, and exotic pet owner herself, explains, “The husbandry and nutrition in exotics is a lot different than for a dog and a cat.” For example, rather than just simply buying a bag of cat or dog food at a grocery store, getting the proper nutrition for an exotic requires an effort. Many exotics need a variety of foods for their proper diet. “With most exotics—my birds for instance—there are some pelleted diets out there but they need to be supplemented with a lot of fresh food,” said Dawkins. “It can take a lot of effort, especially with reptiles that eat vegetables and insects. They need diversity with their insects, not just crickets, and then they need diversity in their vegetables as well, and that’s a lot of work to do every single day.” Keeping exotics in the proper enclosures and conditions can be a challenge as well. “Most reptiles, as heterotherms, need more heat during the day than the average furry creature, so they sometimes require ultraviolet light sources,” said Dr. Chris Keller of the Chattanooga Aquarium. “Each individual species of reptile requires some knowledge of their natural history in the wild and some guidance with their captive husbandry. In other words, you need to know where they come from and what it’s like there before you make that jump to purchasing an animal.” Added Dr. Dawkins, “If [the temperature] or humidity is off, you can start to see fungal infections, bacterial infections—they’re predisposed to those because of incorrect temperature and humidity. I see things like pathologic fractures in reptiles because they’re not actually getting true sunlight, and then they’re not getting an artificial UVB light to allow them to

“ She runs around and likes to

comfortable treating their health issues.” If you’re serious about wanting to own an exotic pet, Dr. Keller says, “Be sure that you have the financial resources to not just purchase the animal, but also to provide for all their extensive needs.” He also warns against just accepting what your local pet store might tell you. “Pet stores are often guilty of simply selling the animals and not truly caring about their welfare once they go to their new homes. They also sell a lot of equipment and supplies that are not needed or incorrect for that animal.  Remember the salespeople are not necessarily trained or experienced.” Dr. Dawkins expands that to information you might find on the Internet. “In this modern world,

to take into consideration, owning an exotic can be challenging and time-consuming. So is it worth it? Absolutely, says Kris Van Dyke. “We love that pig like a child, and we’re not that way with our other animals,” he says. “Out of all the pets I’ve had in my entire life, [Bootleg] is by far my favorite.” Megan Jackson agrees, saying she will seek out another exotic for her next pet. “They’re fun, and I like having something different.” Dr. Keller adds, “Some of them are extremely interesting and it can be a fun challenge to make sure that they thrive in your care.” Just make sure that before you bring home that pig, snake, macaw or anything else you fall in love with, that you’re prepared to be a good pet parent to the exotic you’re adopting.

cuddle, and aside from the spikes, she’s really sweet. store the calcium and vitamin D. It’s something that could be prevented with paying attention to the details of these animal’s needs.” Juney Shober explains his method for managing humidity: “I just use a little spray bottle, but some people use humidifiers for more exotic snakes. For temperature, I have an under-tank heating pad and a heat lamp.” The correct temperature is not the only requirement that needs to be met in the housing of an exotic. Having enough space for the animal can also be problematic for potential owners. “Particularly for your larger reptiles and birds—they really need a lot of space,” said Dr. Dawkins. “We have a macaw, and her cage is larger than the couch in the living room. We happen to have a big living room, but previously when we lived in an apartment, we didn’t have a couch because we had parrots.” Some pets can grow beyond what some owners might expect, so Dr. Dawkins recommends doing your research. “Some of these reptiles get bigger and bigger .You start off and you think, ‘Oh, it’s

this little six-inch thing.’ Well, if you have it around long enough, it’s going to outgrow that little cage you have.” Time can also be a major factor for pet owners. Dr. Dawkins says potential owners should consider that “some animals, like birds, really require you to be home a certain amount because they like a lot of interaction, whereas some of the reptiles are totally fine if you work a 14-hour shift. On the other hand, some birds live about 10 years, but if you get into big parrots, we’re talking 50 to 80 years. So you might need to think about long-term time as well.” Yet another challenge for exotic pet owners can be finding a veterinarian with the proper training to care for these animals. Dr. Dawkins explains, “A lot of vets haven’t been trained on them so understandably they don’t feel comfortable seeing them.” Dr. Dawkins will see almost anything that isn’t venomous. “[Exotics] are different, and some drugs you cannot use in them, so sometimes it can be difficult to find someone

we always go straight to the Internet because Google has all the answers, and there’s some good information out there. But there’s also some information that’s not correct, and the person reading may believe something that is incorrect, unfortunately.” With the long list of things you need

chattanoogapulse.com • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • The Pulse • 9


TJ GREEVER

Not In The Hole Anymore

Toad the Wet Sprocket emerges with new energy, new album

T he beast that is rock-n-roll music is notorious for chewing its clientele up and spitting them out in the gutter with a heavy drug problem, no money to show for it, and a trail of broken relationships behind them. Toad the Wet Sprocket made it out alive, and are back in full swing with new approach to their music, a record of new material due out in September (their first since 1997), and a full tour schedule, which will bring them to Chattanooga at Track 29 on Friday, July 12. Longevity in any industry is tough, especially long-term commercial success. From 1989 to 1998, Toad the Wet Sprocket amassed five studio records with five major radio hits. Their music has been featured on many movie soundtracks, television shows, and college-to-main-stream radio around the globe. Yet all this was just a rock-n-roll fantasy for a couple of kids from Santa Barbara, California who, in 1986, swiped their name from a 1975 Monty Python comedy skit, “Rock Notes,” about a fictional rock band. (There was an extend-

honest music

ed skit about the fictional band Toad the Wet Sprocket later on “Rutland Weekend Television.”) As they say, life imitates art. It sure did for these young dudes with a far-out band name. I was able to catch up with front man Glen Phillips at his Santa Barbara abode to talk about TTWS’s new album, all his creative outlets, and the circus of mayhem that is Toad the Wet Sprocket. Phillips was gearing up for Toad’s tour that kicks off here at Track 29 and takes them on through the end of August. When he answered the phone, I could already tell this guy is a genuine dude. He had a light-hearted, laid-back swagger that was inviting. We shared a couple of random laughs and felt the vibe out. “Everything’s cool, everything’s all right, guy.” What sparked the creative juices in TTWS to cut a new record

after 16 years? “We were having fun again,” Phillips said. No, but really? “The chemistry was right for the first time in years.” Phillips said that the release of their “Greatest Hits” album in 2011 really got them back into the studio. “We finally got to release our versions of our early songs, not Sony’s version,” he told me. Columbia Records now owns the masters of all TTWS’s early recordings. That was the band’s way of getting back some of their music’s licensing and publishing. However, they were recently able to get the rights to the songs off their first two records, which they are planning to re-master and rerelease on their own record label, Abe’s Records, sometime after “New Constellation” drops later this year. How have you guys approached writing the new songs on “New Constellation?” I asked. “Well, when I was writing songs for “Bread and Circus,” I was only 16, so I wrote like a 16 year old,” Phillips explained. He went on to note that guitarist Todd Nichols and bassist Dead Din-

ning have been co-writing songs in Nashville over the years under the name Lapdog. One of these songs, “See You Again,” will appear re-vamped and revised on “New Constellation” as “I’ll Bet On You.” Phillips said that this added a deeper dynamic to the group. TTWS also worked with some songwriters outside of the band for an even bigger dynamic. You can hear the title track of the album, which is also the first single off “New Constellation,” on the band’s website toadthewetsprocket.com. We moved into how the band was able to keep it together for the new album and tour with the original line up after all the ups and downs of a 26-year career. “Part of why we had to break up was we didn’t allow ourselves to go and have other creative outlets,” Phillips said. He added, “Nobody wants to pay to see a band that doesn’t want to be there. That’s not fair.” Yet TTWS members have had their own projects after the big split in 1998. Phillips has released three solo records and two

EP’s and has toured extensively in support of his music. He also has several other projects, such as The Mutual Admiration Society, a group with members of Nickel Creek, Works Progress Administration, Plover featuring Garrison Star, and his psychedelic rock band Remote Tree Children. I asked Phillips about what to expect at a TTWS show. “A circus of mayhem,” he said, laughing. “We feel more like the people in the audience than other rock bands. We’re just straightforward rock-n-roll.” TTWS have triumphed over their ups and downs interpersonally and as a group and are riding a high that has led them to their first new record in many years, a full tour schedule, and a new appreciation for their music. So, my friends, get on down to Track 29 this Friday and get your toad wet! Toad the Wet Sprocket 9 p.m., Friday, July 12 Track 29, 1400 Market St. (423) 266-4323 track29.co

local and regional shows

Joey Green Band with Rob Nance and Dead Freight [$5] Repeat Repeat and Jetsam in the Noose [$3] American Honey [$3] Summer More Than Others with Oak Creek [$5]

Wed, July 10 Thu, July 11 Wed, July 17 Thu, July 18

Sundays: Live Trivia 4-6pm followed by Live Music July 14: Annabelles Curse [Free] July 21 - Pints For Autism Benefit Show [$5 donation]

10 • The Pulse • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

9pm 9pm 9pm 9pm

Full food menu serving lunch and dinner. 11am-2am, 7 days a week. 35 Patten Parkway * 423.468.4192 thehonestpint.com * Facebook.com/thehonestpint


Between the Sleeves

record reviews • ernie paik

A Tale of Two Albums Julia Kent's haunting "Character" and Majestic's gentle "The Majestic 12 Years"

Julia Kent Character (Leaf)

Y

ou are most certainly welcome to psychoanalyze this: a few songs regularly, uncontrollably and inexplicably play in this writer’s head, including “No Easy Way Down,” “Macarena” and the string quartet track “Lux Aeterna” by Clint Mansell, better known as the ominous theme from the film Requiem for a Dream. This last track is perhaps like a daily warning to be careful or else one might lose a limb, be carnally humiliated or unwittingly get electro-shock therapy. It is this track that immediately comes to mind when listening to the album Character by Julia Kent, also known as a former member of Rasputina and a cellist for Antony and the Johnsons. The general mood of the album is a haunting and foreboding one, simultaneously somber and tense; more often than not, it doesn’t steal the listener’s attention, but in-

Majestic The Majestic 12 Years 1994-1998 (Shelflife)

stead it broods and lurks in the shadows. The album’s methodology includes simple patterns and loops of plucked and bowed notes, with nothing that is particularly technically challenging; this writer wishes it had more moments that were striking, but as-is, it could serve has good soundtrack music. On the first half, “Flicker” provides stringtone meshes accompanied by a faint drum machine and piano flourishes, while “Tourbillon” (which is French for “whirlwind”) hints at a revelatory conclusion while ramping upwards but doesn’t quite carry out its promise. Fortunately, the second half gets more interesting, with tracks including “Kingdom,” with a two-chord minimalism that evokes a horror film score with ghostly, atmospheric wisps, and perhaps the album’s finest track, “Nina and Oscar,” with

guitar harmonics and a string ensemble to lightly suggest the fog of mystery. This writer isn’t quite sure of Kent’s intentions on Character, but much of it— while well recorded yet not too stimulating—is like a suspense film without a shocking payoff.

T

his compilation of the underground pop band Majestic 12—later renamed as Majestic after singer Jana Wittren departed for The Arrogants—stirs up a ’90s-indie-pop nostalgia for this writer, who recollects that time when the standard price for a 7-inch single was just $3. He clearly recalls being charmed by Majestic 12, watching the group’s low-budget video “Nothing on TV” on a VHS video compilation he ordered by sending a check through the mail—yes, children, this is what we had to do back then. Nowadays, guitarist/singer Scott Schultz is best

known as a co-founder of the children’s TV show Yo Gabba Gabba!, and the collection at hand won’t offer many clues regarding Schultz’s aesthetic for that show. Majestic 12 had a dreamy sophistication, with dual vocals from Wittren and Schultz, both of whom rarely raised their voices louder than a reserved, wistful delivery. The songs are earnest and gentle—bringing to mind the British label Sarah Records— although tracks like “Closer,” which features meatier-thanusual rock outbursts, demonstrate that mannerly doesn’t mean wimpy. The Majestic 12 Years 19941998 compiles the seven tracks from three vinyl singles and adds six unreleased songs, and casual listeners would do just fine with the highlights, of which there are several, including “Lost and Found,” which is the epitome of the group’s admiration for the band Galaxie 500 (note: there’s also a track named “Galaxie”) with a rhythm section that could have come straight from On Fire, tender guitar strumming with a tremolo effect and a guitar solo from the Dean Wareham stylebook. But the obvious song to fall in love to is “Nothing on TV,” with alternating girl/boy vocals, brush-struck drums, and an unabashed romanticism with the heartmelting whisper of “I’ll meet you halfway there.” This music has held up fine over 15 years, and the collection is the perfect length; the band had gone just as far as it could likely go with its bag of ideas under the Majestic 12 name. chattanoogapulse.com • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • The Pulse • 11


Chattanooga Live

CHATTANOOGA

Thu 07.11

LIVE MUSIC

JULY

11 FRI THE BEATERS 9p 12 SAT THE AVERAGE 10p 13 LUELLA AND THE SUN THU 9:30p 18 FRI FLY BY RADIO 10p 19 SOUL RECORDS REVIEW THU 9:30p ONE BAD ASS FUNK AND SOUL REVIEW

CLASSIC '60s ROCK AND ROLL

with DOWNSTREAM and DEEP SLEEZE with AMBER FULTS

FEMALE FRONTED ROCK AND ROLL

7.20 BOOMBOX 7.25 DAVID RYAN HARRIS 7.26 JORDAN HALLQUIST & THE OUTFIT ALL SHOWS 21+ UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED • NON-SMOKING VENUE

221 MARKET STREET

HOT MUSIC • FINE BEER • GREAT FOOD BUY TICKETS ONLINE • RHYTHM-BREWS.COM

BACKYLAERD GRIL

ROCKIN’ IN FRONT, SMOKIN’ OUT BACK

NO SMOKING • ID REQUIRED • $5 COVER BAND NIGHTS LIVE MUSIC 7:30-11 P.M. • DRINK SPECIALS • BIKES WELCOME! Friday July 12 Saturday July 13

Paul Smith

8:00pm - 11:00pm

Marshal Law

9:00pm Midnight

and The Sky High Band

E $11.95 RIB EY E IV DINNER ON LTS! MUSIC NIGH 4021 HIXSON PIKE “WE SMOKE IN OUR BACKYARD”

BETWEEN ACCESS ROAD & ASHLAND TERRACE

423.486.1369 • BACKYARDGRILLECHATTANOOGA.COM

Shark Week 6 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org Scenic City Roots, Strung Like A Horse, Cereus Bright, HoneyHoney, Michael Cleveland and Flamekeeper 7 p.m. Track 29, 1400 Market St. (423) 266-4323, track29.co 2nd Quarter Open Mic Winners Competition 7 p.m. The Camp House, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081, thecamphouse.com Queen Lightning 7 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956, sugarsribs.com Chattanooga Symphony Orchestra: Video Games Live! 7:30 p.m. Memorial Auditorium, 399 McCallie Ave. (423) 757-5156, chattanoogasymphony.org Codey Bearden 9 p.m. Trackside Tavern, Dalton Depot, 110 Depot Street, Dalton, GA. (706) 226-3160, thedaltondepot.net Ashley and the X’s, Mathien 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400, jjbohemia.com Open Mic with Hap Henninger 9 p.m. The Office, 901 Carter St. (inside Days Inn). (423) 634-9191, facebook.com/ theoffice.chatt Repeat Repeat, Jetsam in the Noose 9 p.m. The Honest Pint, 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192, thehonestpint.com G.E.D. Soul Records Review, AJ & the Giggawatts, DeRobert & the Half Truths, The Coolin’ System 9:30 p.m. Rhythm &

12 • The Pulse • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

MUSIC CALENDAR Brews, 221 Market St. rhythm-brews.com

Fri 07.12 Dresden, Distance From Home, Bullet Under the Bridge, The Good Ole Boys, Bad Luck, So It Goes 7 p.m. Warehouse Cleveland, 260 2nd Street NE, Cleveland. warehousevenue.com Birds with Fleas 7 p.m. Nightfall Music Series, River City Stage at Miller Plaza, 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com. David Allen and the 90 Proof Band 7 p.m. Acoustic Café, 61 RBC Drive, Ringgold, Ga. (706) 965-2065, ringgoldacoustic.com The Watkins Family 7:30 p.m. Ringgold Depot, 155 Depot St. Ringgold, GA. (706) 935-3061. cityofringgold.com Wheeler Brothers 8 p.m. Nightfall Music Series, River City Stage at Miller Plaza, 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com. Pioneer Chick’n Stand 8 p.m. Pokey’s Sports Bar, 918 Sahara Drive, Cleveland. (423) 476-6059. Gabriel Newell, By Order of the Queen 8 p.m. The Camp House, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081, thecamphouse.com Paul Smith and The Sky High Band 8 p.m. Backyard Grille, 4021 Hixson Pike. (423) 486-1369, backyardgrillechattanooga. com DJ Bree-Z 9 p.m. Bart’s Lakeshore, 5600 Lakeshore Dr. (423) 870-0777, bartslakeshore.com. Jordan Hallquist 9 p.m. The Office, 901 Carter St. (inside Days Inn). (423) 634-9191, facebook.com/ theoffice.chatt Toad the Wet Sprocket,

Lee DeWyze 9 p.m. Track 29, 1400 Market St. (423) 266-4323, track29.co The Beaters 9 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. rhythm-brews.com Fallacy 9 p.m. SkyZoo, 5709 Lee Hwy. (423) 468-4533, skyzoochattanooga.com Common Ground 9 p.m. Jack A’s Chop Shop Saloon, 742 Ashland Terrace. (423) 713-8739, jackaschopshopsaloon.com Husky Burnette 9 p.m. Southern Brew and Cue, 5017 Rossville Blvd. (423) 867-9402, facebook.com/ brewandcuechatt Soul Survivor 9:30 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956, sugarsribs.com Dr. Vibe 9:30 p.m. McHale’s Brewhouse, 724 Ashland Terrace. (423) 877-2124, mchalesbrewhouse.com Pistol Town 10 p.m. Raw, 409 Market St. (423) 756-1919, facebook. com/raw.chattanooga Queen Lightning 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar, 5751 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-9878, budssportsbar.com Channing Wilson 10 p.m. T-Bones, 1419 Chestnut St. (423) 266-4240, tboneschattanooga.com

Sat 07.13 Magical Moose 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Chattanooga Incline Railway, 3917 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 821-4224, ridetheincline.com Mawre & Co. 12:30 p.m. Chattanooga River Market, Tennessee Aquarium Plaza, 1 Broad St. (423) 402-9960,

chattanoogarivermarket.com The HooDoo Saints 7 p.m. Acoustic Café, 61 RBC Drive, Ringgold, Ga. (706) 965-2065, ringgoldacoustic.com River City Sessions 7 p.m. The Camp House, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081, thecamphouse.com Jeff Talmadge 8 p.m. Charles and Myrtle’s Coffeehouse, 105 McBrien Rd. (423) 892-4960, christunity.org Marshall Law 8 p.m. The Backyard Grille, 4021 Hixson Pike. (423) 486-1369, backyardgrillechattanooga. com Pistol Town 8 p.m. Raw, 409 Market St. (423) 756-1919. facebook. com/raw.chattanooga Spand-XXX 8 p.m. T-Bones, 1419 Chestnut St. (423) 266-4240, tboneschattanooga.com Hazmat, Red State, Submit to Suffering 8 p.m. Ziggy’s Underground Music, 607 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 265-8711 Old Crow Medicine Show, Dale Watson 9 p.m. Track 29, 1400 Market St. (423) 266-4323, track29.co Stallion 9 p.m. SkyZoo, 5709 Lee Hwy. (423) 468-4533, skyzoochattanooga.com Husky Burnette 9 p.m. Jack A’s Chop Shop Saloon, 742 Ashland Terrace. (423) 713-8739, jackaschopshopsaloon.com Megan Jean and the KFB 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400, jjsbohemia.com Marshal Law 9 p.m. Backyard Grille, 4021 Hixson Pike. (423) 486-1369, backyardgrillechattanooga. com Alex Hall 9 p.m. Dalton Depot, 110


voodoo americana

901 Carter St (Inside Days Inn) 423-634-9191

Who's Megan Jean And What's A KFB? Megan Jean and the KFB arrange a demented blend of Americana, punk, dance, and the avant-garde that has been earning them a dedicated following all over America. They have been described as being similar to a metal band if it was in 1927 and they had just finished an all-night dance party with the Devil Herself. Calling the road home on a "never-ending tour," this transient duo has taken DIY lifestyle and transformed it into a kind of voodoo that unites scenes, fans, bands, clubs and musical styles — all without the help of a label and fueled by sheer guts and know-how. As for what "KFB" stands for, it's fairly simple: Klay Family Band. So now you know.

Thursday, July 11: 9pm Open Mic with Hap Henninger Friday, July 12: 9pm Jordan Hallquist Saturday, July 13: 10pm Hap Henninger Tuesday, July 16: 7pm

Server/Hotel Appreciation Night $5 Pitchers $2 Wells $1.50 Domestics ●

Megan Jean and the KFB Saturday, July 13, 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400, jjsbohemia.com

Depot Street, Dalton, GA. (706) 226-3160, thedaltondepot.net Soul Survivor 9:30 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 5088956, sugarsribs.com Stoneline Band 9:30 p.m. McHale’s Brewhouse, 724 Ashland Terrace. (423) 877-2124, mchalesbrewhouse.com The Average, Downstream, Deep Sleeze 10 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. rhythm-brews.com Hap Henninger 10 p.m. The Office, 901 Carter St. (inside Days Inn). (423) 634-9191, facebook.com/theoffice.chatt Rag Doll 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar, 5751 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-9878, budssportsbar.com

Sun 07.14 Jeff Talmadge 12:30 p.m. Chattanooga Market, First Tennessee

All shows are free with dinner or 2 drinks! Stop by & check out our daily specials! Happy Hour: Mon-Fri: 4-7pm $1 10oz drafts, $3 32oz drafts, $2 Wells, $1.50 Domestics, Free Appetizers

Pavilion, 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com. Angela Easterling and Brandon Turner 2 p.m. Chattanooga Market, First Tennessee Pavilion, 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com. Open Improvisational Jam 3 p.m. Barking Legs Theater, 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347, barkinglegs.org Chattanooga Traditional Irish Music Session 5 p.m. Moccasin Bend Brewing Company, 4015 Tennessee Ave. (423) 821-6392, bendbrewingbeer.com Altars, Set Free 7 p.m. Warehouse Cleveland, 260 2nd Street NE, Cleveland. warehousevenue.com Annabelle’s Curse 8 p.m. The Honest Pint, 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192, thehonestpint.com 423 Bass Love 9 p.m. SkyZoo, 5709 Lee Hwy. (423) 468-4533, skyzoochattanooga.com

Mon 07.15 Monday Nite Big Band 7 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202, (423) 499-5055, thepalmsathamilton.com

Tue 07.16 Old Rusty Mandolin 7 p.m. The Camp House, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081, thecamphouse.com Tim Starnes & Friends 7 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956, sugarsribs.com

Wed 07.17 Tim & Reece 7 p.m. Jack A’s Chop Shop Saloon, 742 Ashland Terrace. (423) 713-8739, jackaschopshopsaloon.com Rabbit and the Hare 7 p.m. Acoustic Café, 61 RBC Drive, Ringgold,

Ga. (706) 965-2065, ringgoldacoustic.com Dan Sheffield 7 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956, sugarsribs.com Chris Schlarb’s Psychic Temple, Aaron Roche 8 p.m. Barking Legs Theater, 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347, barkinglegs.org Richie, Bohannons, Gold Plated Gold 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400, jjsbohemia.com Chris & Greg 9 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar, 5751 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-9878, budssportsbar.com 2nFro & Frenz 9:30 p.m. Pokey’s Sports Bar, 918 Sahara Drive, Cleveland. (423) 476-6059.

Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@ chattanoogapulse.com.

Facebook.com/theoffice.chatt

Hot Music • Hot Times • Hot Food

Smoke Free • 742 Ashland Terrace

12 Common Ground SAT Jul 13 Huskey Burnette WeD Jul 17 Tim & Reece FRI Jul

HAPPY HOUR

3P-7P • MON-FRI BIKE NIGHT EVERY

WEDNESDAY

(423) 710-8739

jackaschopshopsaloon.com

chattanoogapulse.com • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • The Pulse • 13


WEDNESDAYS

Arts

MONSTER View from the “Balconies” Janis Hashe

DRUMMIES ONLY $1

$3 craft Draft Beer

DAILY DRINK SPECIALS

“Balconies,” 7:30 Thursdays-Sundays, also 2 p.m. Sundays, July 11-21. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga stage, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (inside Eastgate Town Center). More information: facebook.com/ balconiesplay. Reservations: artful.ly.store/ events/1429 or (423) 503-8503.

mith’s Black s D owntown

809 Market street (423) 702-5461 Find us on the web

blacksmithsgastropub.com

14 • The Pulse • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

It was while Vicki Mangieri was working as a tour guide for a senior cruise ship company that she first got the idea for her play. “We were docked next to an all-balcony-cabins ship, and I started thinking, ‘What’s going on in those cabins?’” she said. The concept percolated around in her mind for some years before taking shape. “I was an English major in school, and I’d always thought I’d write a book. But then I got active in theatre in Chattanooga, and realized that I could write a play,” Mangieri said. The first part of what would become “Balconies” was written in two or three weeks. “Then it sat around for a couple of years, even though I had written it all in my head.” But she didn’t forget about it, and kept returning to the idea. The full-length play, which traces the stories of the occupants of three balcony cabins on a cruise ship, eventually took shape based on stories from Mangieri’s own life, combined with stories she’d heard from other people, “tweaked for the stage,” she said. Mangieri had performed in a production of “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” with Bruce Shaw, who was looking to create a new production company,

Vicki Mangieri’s new play is no “Love Boat”

Shaw’Nuff Productions. “I let Bruce read the first draft of the play, and he told me there was definitely something there,” Mangieri said. Last November, the pair did a staged reading of the play, took notes, and solicited feedback from the audience, which was enthusiastic. “It’s had three or so minor rewrites since that reading,” she said. “All the feedback was positive, and we were happy to find that the storylines really hooked people. I’m writing about issues that resonate with many people.” Shaw agreed to produce the play for Mangieri as the first outing of Shaw’Nuff Productions. The Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga space in Eastgate Town Center was booked for weeks in July when ETC was dark. Then came the difficulties of casting. “It was not my first choice to be in the show as a performer,” Mangieri said. “I did not want people thinking that it was simply a vanity production.” But eventually she did take a role to round out a cast that also includes Bonnie Stoloff, Denise Frye, Nancy Brame, Marcus Ellsworth, Steven Berryman, Elaine Manieri, Tracy Anderson and Shaw. “We weren’t sure we could get it cast at one point,” Mangieri said, acknowledging that casting a show during the summer presents problems. “But the cast is now really excited about being in an original production. If I get it published, they’ll be mentioned as the ‘original cast.’” The minimalist set will depict the three balconies, and there are no scene changes. That has also presented a challenge, she said. “There are limited playing areas, so we’ve had to be creative in keeping the action lively in a confined space.” For four of the characters, which form one group, “Balconies” is a memory play, as they tell their stories in retrospect. But the other two groups are interacting in “real time,” and provide most of the comic relief, Mangieri explained. “Balconies” discusses issues including cancer and aging and features a gay couple in one of the cabins. “The stories affect so many different people in so many different groups that we think it will appeal to a wide audience,” Mangieri said. “A lot of people will recognize themselves or someone they know in parts of it.”


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25 W 20th Street – (423) 521-4555 www.choochoodogcamp.com . chattanoogapulse.com • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • The Pulse • 15


atop Lookout Mountain

Arts & Entertainment Thu 07.11

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“Natural Collections” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org “Shanequa Gay: The Fair Game Project” 10 a.m. -5 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-8658, bessiesmithcc.org AVA All-Member Salon Show 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave, (423) 265-4282, avarts.org Rock City Raptors 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Rock City, 1400 Patten Rd., Lookout Mtn, Ga. seerockcity.com Ooltewah Farmer’s Market 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. Ooltewah Nursery & Landscape Co. Inc. ,5829 Main St. (423) 238-9775. ooltewahnursery.com Iconic Chattanooga 4 - 7 p.m. Reflections Gallery, 6922 Lee Hwy. (423) 892-3072, reflectionsgallerytn.com Introduction to Performing Magic, Night One 6 - 7:30 p.m. UTC Continuing Education, EMCS 240. (423) 425-4344, utc.edu/ContinuingEducation “Mystery at the Redneck Italian Wedding” 7 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com “Balconies” 7:30 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 503-8503 Painting Workshop: “Lonely Tree” 7-10 p.m. Artsy-U, 5084 S. Terrace, East Ridge. (423) 321-2317,

16 • The Pulse • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

EVENTS CALENDAR

artsychattanooga.com The Midnight Swinger 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233, thecomedycatch.com The CSO Presents: Video Games Live! 7:30 p.m. Memorial Auditorium, 399 McCallie Ave. (423) 757-5156, chattanoogasymphony.org

Fri 07.12 “Thenwedieatron” - The Art Bike! 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Chattanooga Public Library, 1001 Broad St. (423) 757-5310, lib.chattanooga.gov “Natural Collections” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org “Shanequa Gay: The Fair Game Project” 10 a.m. -5 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-8658, bessiesmithcc.org Fresh on Fridays, featuring Piano Man 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Center Park, 728 Market Square. facebook.com/ centerparkchattanooga AVA All-Member Salon Show 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4282, avarts.org Painting Workshop: “Daytime-Dragon Flowers” 2-4:30 Artsy-U, 5084 S. Terrace, East Ridge. (423) 321-2317, artsychattanooga.com The Story of Yoga with Ramesh Bjonnes 6-8 p.m. Clearspring Yoga, 17 North Market St.

clearspringyoga.com “Mystery at the Nightmare Office Party” 7 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St., (423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com Painting Workshop: “Flip Flop Beach” 7-10 p.m. Artsy-U, 5084 S. Terrace, East Ridge. (423) 321-2317, artsychattanooga.com Bat Watch 7:15 p.m. Chattanooga Arboretum and Nature Center, 400 Garden Rd. (423) 821-1160, chattanoogaanc.org “Balconies” 7:30 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 503-8503 The Midnight Swinger 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233, thecomedycatch.com USA Dance Ballroom Dance Party 7:30 - 11:30 p.m. Allemande Hall, 7400 Standifer Gap Rd. (423) 899-9913, allemandehall.com “Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson” 8 p.m. Circle Theater, Chattanooga Theatre Centre, 400 River St. (423) 267-8538, theatrecentre.com “Legally Blonde” 8 p.m. Main Theater, Chattanooga Theatre Centre, 400 River St. (423) 267-8538, theatrecentre.com Stand-Up Comedy with Dave Landrau 9:30 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com The Midnight Swinger 9:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233, thecomedycatch.com

Sat 07.13

The Story of Yoga with Ramesh Bjonnes 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Clearspring Yoga, 17 North Market St. clearspringyoga.com “Natural Collections” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com Dippin’ at the Pond 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Chattanooga Arboretum and Nature Center, 400 Garden Rd. (423) 821-1160, chattanoogaanc.org “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave., (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org AVA All-Member Salon Show 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4282, avarts.org “Shanequa Gay: The Fair Game Project” Noon -4 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-8658, bessiesmithcc.org Bike Safety 12:30 p.m. Westside Community Center, 1201 Poplar Ave. “The Well Ran Dry: Memoirs of a Motherless Child” Book Signing & Meet the Author 1-3 p.m. Barnes & Noble, 2230 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 899-9970. “Mystery of Flight 138” 5:30 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com Blue Moon Wine Cruise with Panoram Imports 6-8:30 p.m. Blue Moon Cruises, 301 Riverfront Parkway. (888) 993-2583, bluemooncruises.org Uptown Art! Grand Opening 6-10 p.m. 2 Cherokee Blvd., Suite 100. (404) 915-6593, uptownart.com Painting Workshop:


Arts & Entertainment “Blue Peacock” 7-10 p.m. Artsy-U, 5084 S. Terrace, East Ridge. (423) 321-2317, artsychattanooga.com The Midnight Swinger 7 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233, thecomedycatch.com “Balconies” 7:30 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 503-8503 Superhero Smash! Swing Dancing 7-11 p.m. Eastgate Town Center, 5600 E. Brainerd Rd. (423) 855-5570, eastgatecomplex.com “Mystery of the Facebook Fugitive” 8 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com “Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson” 8 p.m. Circle Theater, Chattanooga Theatre Centre, 400 River St. (423) 267-8538, theatrecentre.com “Legally Blonde” 8 p.m. Main Theater, Chattanooga Theatre Centre, 400 River St. (423) 267-8538, theatrecentre.com Movies in the Park 9 p.m. Coolidge Park, 150 River St. (423) 693-1355 The Midnight Swinger 9:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233, thecomedycatch.com Stand-Up Comedy with Dave Landrau 10:30 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com

Sun 07.14 Magic Tree House traveling exhibit 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Creative Discovery Museum,

EVENTS CALENDAR

321 Chestnut St. (423) 756-2738, cdmfun.org Ice Cream Social 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Chattanooga Market, First Tennessee Pavilion, 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” Noon - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org “Natural Collections” 1 p.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com “Balconies” 2, 7:30 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 503-8503 Open Improv Jam 3 - 5 p.m. Barking Legs Theater, 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347, barkinglegs.org Painting Workshop: “3 Daisies” 7-10 p.m. Artsy-U, 5084 S. Terrace, East Ridge. (423) 321-2317, artsychattanooga.com The Midnight Swinger 9:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233, thecomedycatch.com

Mon 07.15 “Natural Collections” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com Magic Tree House traveling exhibit 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Creative Discovery Museum, 321 Chestnut St. (423) 756-2738, cdmfun.org “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968,

huntermuseum.org Meet the Author: Mary Alice Monroe 5 - 7 p.m. Chattanooga Public Library, 1001 Broad St. (423) 757-5310, lib. chattanooga.gov Summer POV Film Series: “Ping Pong” 6:30-7:30 p.m. Downtown YMCA, 301 W. 6th St. Film Screening: “Going Home - The ‘Lost Town’ of Caney Creek” 6:30 - 9 p.m. Heritage House, 1428 Jenkins Rd.

Tue 07.16 “Natural Collections” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com Magic Tree House traveling exhibit 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Creative Discovery Museum, 321 Chestnut St. (423) 756-2738, cdmfun.org “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org “Shanequa Gay: The Fair Game Project” 10 a.m. -5 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-8658, bessiesmithcc.org AVA All-Member Salon Show 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4282, avarts.org Painting with Puppets! 2-4:30 p.m. Artsy-U, 5084 S. Terrace, East Ridge. (423) 321-2317, artsychattanooga.com Painting Workshop: “Wine Glasses” 7-9 p.m. Artsy-U, 5084 S. Terrace, East Ridge. (423) 321-2317, artsychattanooga.com Tuesday Night Trivia 7-9 p.m. Acoustic Café

Ringgold, 61 RBC Dr., Ringgold, GA. (706) 965-2065 Chattanooga’s Ballroom Dance Club Presents: Shall We Dance? 7:30 - 10:30 p.m. Allemande Hall, 7400 Standifer Gap Rd. (423) 899-9913 Chris Schlarb 8 p.m. Barking Legs Theater, 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347, barkinglegs.org

Wed 07.17 “Natural Collections” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com Magic Tree House traveling exhibit 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Creative Discovery Museum, 321 Chestnut St. (423) 756-2738, cdmfun.org “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org “Shanequa Gay: The Fair Game Project” 10 a.m. -5 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-8658, bessiesmithcc.org AVA All-Member Salon Show 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave, (423) 265-4282, avarts.org Painting Workshop: “Daytime - Blue Peacock” 2-4:30 p.m. Artsy-U, 5084 S. Terrace, East Ridge. (423) 321-2317, artsychattanooga.com Learn to Line Dance! 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. Allemande Hall, 7400 Standifer Gap Rd. (423) 899-9913, allemandehall.com

Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@ chattanoogapulse.com.

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chattanoogapulse.com • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • The Pulse • 17


Screen

john devore

Back From the Dead “

MES Presents: "A Band Called Death" with special musical guests Eight Knives Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. $7, 8:30 PM, July 30 (423) 624-5347 barkinglegs.org

L ast year’s Academy Award-winning documentary, “Searching for Sugarman,” tells the best kind of story—one where an artist receives deserved recognition after years of obscurity. It assures us that true talent doesn’t always go unrewarded, and sometimes a small work of art becomes a profound symbol in the lives of others. Art doesn’t belong to the artist, but to the audience, and the audience will keep things alive far longer than one might expect. In similar fashion, “A Band Called Death” tells the story of a family rock band that didn’t make it and went their separate ways until someone found a copy of a longforgotten album and introduced it to a new generation. A story of family and failure, of music and mania, “A Band Called Death” is a film that reminds us that the past is closer than expected and that our parents were once a lot more interesting. It’s the story of three brothers, bound together in music, inscribed

It’s the story of three brothers, bound together in music, inscribed forever in a spiral groove of vinyl, waiting to be found.

forever in a spiral groove of vinyl, waiting to be found. There are likely a lot of dust-covered master tapes buried in attics across the country. Most of them should probably stay there. When I was 17 or 18, my high school rock band recorded ten original songs in a basement and had the audacity to charge people for the result. The songs were miserable, and hopefully my children will never be subjected to them. The children of Bobby and Dannis Hackney had a different experience. I’m sure they never considered their parents to be innovators. But in the ’70s, a few years before

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The Ramones, Bobby and Dannis, along with their brother David, started a strippeddown rock and roll band in the middle of the Detroit R&B scene. Dubbed “protopunk,” Death was inspired by Alice Cooper and The Who. The boys didn’t possess the angry, confrontational stage presence that pervades most punk rock music. While their lyrics had a certain anti-establishment tone to them, the band itself just wanted to play loud rock and roll for whoever would listen. Their name proved to be a sticking point, one that kept them from a record contract, and kept them from achieving even a modest amount of success. The group split up and lived their lives. Lead guitarist David passed away in 2000 from lung cancer, still believing that his music would someday find an audience. Enter the label-obsessed world of the vinyl record col-

lector. For collectors, the more obscure the label, the better the find. It doesn’t get much more obscure than Tryangle, the self-founded label of Death that dropped a 500-copy single

ties, Bobby Hackney Jr. heard his father’s voice singing. The family connection between father and son is where the documentary really shines. The first part of the film lags

hoping to drum up radio airplay. One of these singles found its way into the hands of a collector, who passed it around to other collectors, and before long the music began making appearances at underground parties. At one of these par-

a little, simply because there is little documentation of Death’s early existence. With only two surviving members, it’s harder to get a full account of events and decisions, because Bobby and Dannis are forced to speak for their brother. But the re-

emergence of the music due to the love and devotion of two talented sons makes the film a rewarding experience. Part of the appeal of time travel is the chance to see the past unfiltered. When Marty McFly travels back to 1955 to experience his parents without the pretense of authority, we can identify with the character because we are so curious about our own ancestry. Different versions of us exist at many points in time, but those people seem mysterious and unreachable. Doc Brown may use a flux capacitor and a DeLorean to physically break down those barriers, but the past is still accessible in other ways, ways that don’t require 1.21 jigawatts and a Mr. Fusion. Sometimes the past is stored safely in a dimly lit attic in Detroit. “A Band Called Death” shows the audience the importance of coincidence, history, and family. chattanoogapulse.com • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • The Pulse • 19


Free Will Astrology

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): When the comic book hero Superman first appeared on the scene in 1938, he had the power to jump over tall buildings, but he couldn’t fly. By 1941, he was hovering in mid-air, and sometimes moving around while floating. Eventually, he attained the ability to soar long distances, even between stars. Your own destiny may have parallels to Superman’s in the coming months, Cancerian. It’s possible you will graduate, metaphorically speaking, from taking big leaps to hovering in mid-air. And if you work your butt off to increase your skill, you might progress to the next level—the equivalent of full-out flight—by March 2014. LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): “It’s never too late to become what you might have been,” said novelist George Eliot. I’d like you to keep that thought in mind throughout the rest of 2013 and beyond, Leo. I trust you will allow its sly encouragement to work its way down into your darkest depths, where it will revive your discouraged hopes and wake up your sleeping powers. Here are the potential facts as I see them: In the next ten months, you will be in prime time to reclaim the momentum you lost once upon a time… to dive back into a beloved project you gave up on…and maybe even resuscitate a dream that made your eyes shine when you were younger and more innocent.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): When I

first arrived in Santa Cruz some years back, I helped start a New Wave-punk band called Mystery Spot. Our first drummer was a guy named Lucky Lehrer. After a few months, our manager decided Lucky wasn’t good enough and kicked him out of the band. Lucky took it hard, but didn’t give up. He joined the seminal punk band the Circle Jerks, and went on to have a long and successful career. I suspect, Virgo, that in the next ten to twelve months you will have a chance to achieve the beginning of some Lucky Lehrer-type redemption. In what area of your life would you like to experience it?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Accord-

ing to my reading of the astrological omens, the next 12 months will be a time when you will have more power than usual to turn your dreams into realities. You’ll have extra skill at translating your ideals into practical action. To help make sure you capitalize on this potential, I suggest you adopt this Latin phrase as your motto: a posse ad esse. It means “from being possible to being actual.” So why not simply make your motto “from being possible to being actual”? Why bother with the Latin version? Because I think your motto should be exotic and mysterious—a kind of magical incantation.

20 • The Pulse • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

rob brezsny

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 2010, two economics professors from Harvard wrote a paper that became a crucial piece of evidence for the global austerity movement. Politicians used it to justify their assertion that the best way to cure our long-running financial ills is for governments to spend less money. Oddly, no one actually studied the paper to see if it was based on accurate data until April 2013. Then Thomas Herndon, a 28-year-old Ph.D. student at the University of Massachusetts, dived in and discovered fundamental mistakes that largely discredited the professors’ conclusions. I believe you have a similar mojo going for you, Scorpio. Through clear thinking and honest inquiry, you have the power to get at truths everyone else has missed.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Breakthrough will probably not arrive wrapped in sweetness and a warm glow, nor is it likely to be catalyzed by a handsome prince or pretty princess. No, Sagittarius. When the breakthrough barges into your life, it may be a bit dingy and dank, and it may be triggered by questionable decisions or weird karma. So in other words, the breakthrough may have resemblances to a breakdown, at least in the beginning. This would actually be a good omen -- a sign that your deliverance is nothing like you imagined it would be, and probably much more interesting.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In a wheat field, a rose is a weed—even if that rose is voluptuous and vibrant. I want you to promise me that you will work hard to avoid a fate like that in the coming months, Capricorn. Everything depends on you being in the right place at the right time. It’s your sacred duty to identify the contexts in which you can thrive and then put yourself in those contexts. Please note: The ambiance that’s most likely to bring out the best in you is not necessarily located in a high-status situation where everyone’s ambition is amped to the max. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Is your soul feeling parched? In your inner world, are you experiencing the equivalent of a drought? If so, maybe you will consider performing a magic ritual that could help get you on track for a cure. Try this: Go outside when it’s raining or misting. If your area is going through a dry spell, find a waterfall or high-spouting fountain and put yourself in close proximity. Then stand with your legs apart and spread your arms upwards in a gesture of welcome. Turn your face toward the heavens, open up your mouth, and drink in the wetness for as long as it takes for your soul to be hydrated again. (In an emergency, frolicking under a sprinkler might also work.)

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Igor Stravinsky was a 20th-century composer who experimented with many styles of music, including the avantgarde work “The Rite of Spring.” “My music is best understood by children and animals,” he said. In my vision of your ideal life, Pisces, that will also be true about you in the coming week: You will be best understood by children and animals. Why? Because I think you will achieve your highest potential if you’re as wild and free as you dare. You will be fueled by spontaneity and innocence, and care little about what people think of you. Play a lot, Pisces! Be amazingly, blazingly uninhibited. ARIES

(March 21-April 19): The Space Needle is a tourist attraction in Seattle. It’s taller than the Washington Monument but shorter than the Eiffel Tower. Near the top of the structure is a circular restaurant that rotates slowly, making one complete turn every 47 minutes. The motor that moves this 125-ton mass is small: only 1.5 horsepower. In the coming days, Aries, I foresee you having a metaphorically similar ability. You will be able to wield a great deal of force with a seemingly small and compact “engine.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “How

many years can some people exist before they’re allowed to be free?” asked Bob Dylan in one of his most famous songs, written in 1962. “The answer is blowin’ in the wind,” he concluded. Many people hailed the tune as a civil rights anthem. Thirteen years later, a hippie cowboy named Jerry Jeff Walker released “Pissing in the Wind,” a rowdy song that included the line, “The answer is pissing in the wind.” It was decidedly less serious than the tune it paid homage to, with Walker suggesting that certain events in his life resembled the act described in the title. “Makin’ the same mistakes, we swore we’d never make again,” he crooned. All of this is my way of letting you know, Taurus, that you’re at a fork. In one direction is a profound, even noble, “blowin’ in the wind” experience. In the other, it would be like “pissing in the wind.” Which do you prefer? It’s up to you.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The Italian artist Duccio di Buoninsegna painted his Madonna and Child sometime around the year 1300. It’s a compact piece of art—just eleven inches high and eight inches wide. Nevertheless, New York’s Metropolitan Museum paid $45 million for the pleasure of owning it. I propose that we choose this diminutive treasure as your lucky symbol for the next eight to ten months, Gemini. May it inspire you as you work hard to create a small thing of great value.


Jonesin’ Crossword

matt jones

SAVE THE DATE JULY 18, 2013

MOBILIZE. ENGAGE. CONNECT. with the Millennial generation

JOIN THE

CONVERSATION

viewing party FR E E! +Thursday, July 18

“Hunt and Peck”--keys are the key. Across 1 Guards check them 8 Air gun pellets 11 Sent to the canvas 14 He played strong, silent roles 15 Comedy club laugh 16 Engage in mimicry 17 Precious coin? 19 Soak up the sun 20 2012 British Open winner Ernie 21 First name in 1990s daytime TV 22 One way to answer a question 24 California volcanic peak 26 It comes before E 28 “I Lost It at the Movies” author Pauline 30 “The Far Side” organism 33 Thinking clearly 36 Judge’s affirmations 39 Bump into 40 Each, pricewise 41 Maker of Musk cologne and perfume

42 Oozy cheese 43 3-time WSOP champ Ungar 44 More like kitten videos 45 Early synthetic fiber 46 Pays tribute to 48 Polaris, e.g. 50 Get flinchy 53 Printer’s measurements 57 Sean of “Will & Grace” 59 “Jurassic Park” inhabitants, for short 61 Charter ___ (tree on Connecticut’s state quarter) 62 Gig gear 63 Celebrants “in the house” 66 Michelle Obama, ___ Robinson 67 Pre-kiss statement 68 Hard to catch 69 Channel with the U.S. remake of “The Chase” 70 Eating LOLcat syllable 71 Like the four theme entries in this

puzzle, as it were Down 1 Apply force 2 “Little Rascals” girl 3 Green vegetable 4 Play the part 5 “What’s wrong with the first one?” work 6 Time of origin 7 Dines late 8 Former child actress Amanda 9 Hot dog holder 10 Stadium filmers 11 “Firework” singer 12 Australian gem 13 Say it didn’t happen 18 Muslim holiday 23 Gold, to Mexicans 25 Pass over 27 Jessica of the PTL Club scandal 29 Bandit’s take 31 Scott who plays Bob Loblaw 32 Last word in sermons 33 Tongue-___ (scold) 34 “If it were ___ me...”

35 Local lockup 37 Abbr. for Monopoly properties 38 Does some paving 41 No more than 42 Shakespeare, with “the” 44 Glover who was banned from Letterman’s show 45 Lift, like a glass 47 Come up short 49 Like some paper towels 51 AOL giveaway of the past 52 Battleship success 54 Sun helmets 55 Make equal parts, maybe 56 Sport with clay pigeons 57 Display in a gallery 58 Home of Iowa State 60 Russian refusal 64 “Without further ___...” 65 Sugar suffix

Copyright © 2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords. For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+ to call. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle No. 0631

8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. - Day Portion 6:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. - Speakers +The 4th Floor, The Public Library Downtown Chattanooga +Register online: www.themillennialimpact.com/register +Call for more info: 423.648.1762

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chattanoogapulse.com • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • The Pulse • 21


On the Beat

alex teach

The Hurt Locker A

few Saturdays ago in our fair town, a cop had his jaw broken in a fight. By “fight,” I mean the other guy swung at him unprovoked, knocked him to the ground, and continued to press the advantage of the sucker punch, beating his face in such a way that he loosened the teeth beneath it. This happens far less frequently than you’d assume, but that’s far too many times for me.

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Wed, July 24 • 7:15 PM vs. Jackson Generals

Thu, July 25 • 7:15 PM vs. Jackson Generals Soddy Daisy Night

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Sat, July 27 • 7:15 PM vs. Jackson Generals Used Car Night

What brought this on? The bad guy had been seen with a wanted man, and the cop asked where the wanted individual was. That’s it. So full of fight was this young man, an hour later he had to be restrained in the hospital gurney he was lying on after beating his head against the protective screen in the patrol car on his way to jail for felony assault and three other charges, not including violation of probation. Did I mention he was on probation…? (And by the way, before you begin to conspire, the inside of the patrol car is recorded on video. Apparently on a “roll,” he did his head-beating completely on his own.) On the bright side, it takes your mind off the guy that tried to run one of us over that same night, along with the cop we thought was shot on Fagan Street the weekend before in which shots were fired around the time he fell during a foot pursuit…a truly bad coincidence.  All that said? While I believe we finally have the support of City Hall in Chattanooga, that doesn't mean our customers are going any easier on us. And when I say this, do you know what comes to mind first? It’s not the underlying causation of these spikes in violent crime and direct violence against cops in particular. Nor do I ponder the child-rearing factors, or the socio-economic ones, or any other 50-cent bywords you’ll hear during the next election cycle or Rotary Club speech to make people feel better

22 • The Pulse • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

Meanwhile, jaws are getting broken and our customers are shooting one another in broad daylight on fields next to schools and with uniformed cops in their presence.

about their animalistic sackof-turds relatives and spouses that may or may not be a part of this problem. No. What comes to mind first is the immediate response I tend to hear in which, no matter how ludicrous, someone makes it the officer’s ("police's") fault these things happened.

"It's because he was rude to him…It's because in 1968 such and such happened… Jeremiah was just mad because he couldn't get to a job fair…it's racist to NOT let us hit police…it's because, it’s because..."  Let me help you out here: It's because there is NO punishment for committing crime, and it's easier for small groups of people to make the Cops the bad guys and justify criminal actions while the Bad Guys make mincemeat out of the large groups of people remaining silent because they're afraid to call a criminal a damn criminal and DEMAND they be stopped. This is happening as much out of fear of the criminals as out of fear of being labeled something crude by those small groups of loud people. There are two outcomes here: The cops will get the hint and quit trying. Or we will have to start punishing the bad guys with the support of the people.  Meanwhile, jaws are getting broken and our customers are shooting one another in broad daylight on fields next to schools and with uniformed cops in their presence. When it’s that brazen, kind words, support groups, and “additional legislation” just may not get the job done, dear readers. Ever “reason” with a three year old—or a huge drunk off his psychotropic meds? Aggressive crime requires aggressive policing, and society at some point is going to have to make the choice as to whether the cops can

meet force with force, or if they should just keep their heads low like the rest of the low-income residents where the worst of this is happening (almost exclusively) to avoid lawsuits or being labeled ugly indefensible words…not to mention occupying emergency rooms. I’m not asking for a blessing. I’m just asking you to think. Let crime flare up like a wild fire until it runs out of fuel and go back and literally pick up the bodies…or treat criminals like criminals instead of a protected class of victims. Like police work, crime is a full-contact sport; shit will happen and it will be scrutinized, but we need your support—or you need to let us just go home and quit getting hurt. Here are some theories to consider: • A six-foot-tall, 180-pound 16 year old with a gun is not a “child.” • A group of youths wearing like-colored clothing on a street corner making exchanges through passing vehicle windows are not “at risk of being misjudged.” • And a guy that loses the fight when he takes on a cop or cops…is not a “victim.” He just lost, that’s all. These are “criminals.” Once we pick up on that line of thinking again as a society, then we can work on making jail actual punishment, instead of a hotel with free college benefits. Just points to consider, but I’ll tell you a secret before I finish: Your cops will never quit trying…but we sure need some incentive to keep pressing this fight. For a fight is very literally what it is, and we should all be sick of it.


ATLANTA / ALPHARETTA, GA

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chattanoogapulse.com • july 11-JULY 17, 2013 • The Pulse • 23



The Pulse 10.28 » July 11, 2013