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ANNUAL MUSUEM HOP • ARTIST GAY ARTHUR • 9TH STREET STOMPERS

VOL. 16, ISSUE 33 • AUGUST 15, 2019

THE FIGHTING LADY AND THE IRON MAIDEN: MCKENZIE AND HILL THE STORY ABOUT A POLICE EXPERIMENT THAT WENT HORRIBLY RIGHT

CHATTANOOGA'S WEEKLY ALTERNATIVE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE VOLUME 16, ISSUE 33 • AUGUST 15, 2019 BREWER MEDIA GROUP Publisher James Brewer, Sr. FOUNDED 2003 BY ZACHARY COOPER & MICHAEL KULL

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Gary Poole gary@chattanoogapulse.com Assistant Editor Jenn Webster City Editor Alex Curry Music Editor Marc T. Michael Film Editor John DeVore Contributors Rob Brezsny Steven W. Disbrow Matt Jones Tony Mraz Ernie Paik Rick Pimental-Habib Alex Teach Michael Thomas Brandon Watson Cartoonists Jen Sorenson • Tom Tomorrow

ADVERTISING Director of Sales Mike Baskin mike@brewermediagroup.com Account Executives Rick Leavell • Cindee McBride Libby Phillips • Lisa Roche John Rodriguez • Danielle Swindell

CONTACT Offices 1305 Carter St. Chattanooga, TN 37402 Phone 423.265.9494 Email info@chattanoogapulse.com Website chattanoogapulse.com Facebook @chattanoogapulse THE FINE PRINT: The Pulse is published weekly by Brewer Media and is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. The Pulse covers a broad range of topics concentrating on music, the arts, entertainment, culture and local news. The Pulse is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publisher may take more than one copy per weekly issue. The Pulse may be distributed only by authorized distributors. Contents Copyright © 2019 by Brewer Media. All rights reserved.

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The Fighting Lady And The Iron Maiden Chattanooga’s first female police officer was Patricia Underwood Williams. She was recruited to the CPD after graduating Knoxville College in 1971. Officer Williams would serve thirteen months in the youth crimes division of the CPD before resigning to work with the criminal rehabilitation system.

GREAT MUSEUM HOP

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OLD-SCHOOL PROWESS

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Museums have been an integral part of cultural preservation for quite some time. In fact, the first known museum was devoted to Mesopotamian antiquities and dates back to 530 BCE.

Chattanooga’s favorite modern vintage band is set to release their first full-length album this week, eleven tracks of beloved standards, unique arrangements, and hot originals.

ARTHUR TACKLES TIME

Gay Arthur’s latest series examines change and the effects of time with still life and landscape compositions, creatively preserving and celebrating the past.

TELLING SCARY STORIES

It wasn’t too long ago, a little less than a year in fact, that the Frightening Ass Film Fest hosted a documentary on the “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark” book series.

5 CONSIDER THIS

12 ARTS CALENDAR

19 MUSIC REVIEWS

9 JUST A THEORY

15 JONESIN' CROSSWORD

21 NEW IN THEATERS

16 MUSIC CALENDAR

22 ON THE BEAT

11 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

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CITY LIFE · BETWEEN THE BRIDGES

Chattanooga’s Great Museum Hop

Cons ider This w ith Dr. Rick

Seven museums in two days for just $25! By Alex Curry Pulse City Editor

“Situations today may not be my way. People today may not behave the way I would like them to. In fact, nothing may be going right. Yet, I will be stable and calm today. My state of mind does not depend on people and situations.” — BK Shivani Often easier said than done, but the truth is that nothing is worth your peace. Not an annoying person, a frustrating experience or a debilitating situation. The philosopher Osho puts it like this: “Don’t seek, don’t search, don’t ask, don’t knock, don’t demand…relax. If you relax, it comes.” And “The Minimalists” say, “Let it go. Change the channel. Turn it off. Unsubscribe. Unfriend. Unfollow. Mute. Block. Walk away. Breathe.” Consider this: No amount of busy-ness, dissatisfaction, revenge or regret will save you from unhappiness. Your inner demons— known and unknown—can’t help. Only selflove and good decisions will rescue you.

Museums are one of our true treasures and hopefully act as a way to learn from our past and better our world for the continuation of humanity.”

— Rick Pimental-Habib, Ph.D.

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USEUMS HAVE BEEN AN INTEGRAL PART OF cultural preservation for quite some time. In fact, the first known museum was devoted to Mesopotamian antiquities and dates back to 530 BCE and is located in modern-day Iraq. This is obviously a debated point of view, but a historical argument is beyond the scope of today’s article. Museums provide a powerful way to protect our arts, anthropology, natural and technological sciences, animals, aquatic and plant life, and just about any of earth’s achievements, natural and of humankind. There are more than 55,000 museums spread across 202 countries on our planet. In fact, there are more museums than both Starbucks and McDonald’s in the United States. Museums are one of our true treasures and hopefully act as a way to learn from our past and better our world for the continuation of humanity. The concept of a museum is incredibly important to what defines

our existence and the ethos that reaches beyond our everyday needs. This is something more and should be cherished. On Thursday and Friday, Chattanooga will celebrate the third annual Museum Hop. Seven of our wonderful museums will be available for Museum Hop ticket holders. An individual ticket is $25 or $50 for a family of four. And even better, the first 100 people will get a t-shirt with their ticket. Use this opportunity to explore some educational opportunities for you and your family. The International Towing and Recovery Hall of


EDITOONS

Songbirds Guitar Musuem

Fame and Museum, the Coker Car Museum, the Charles H. Coolidge Medal of Honor Heritage Center, the Songbirds Guitar Museum, the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum, the 6th Cavalry Museum, and the Houston Museum of Decorative Arts will all be available for exploration from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on both days. If you know your history, then you would know where you are coming from. Amy Autenreith, the manager of the Houston Museum of Decorative Arts, shares the Bob Marley lyrics as we discuss the importance of museums in our society. “We are the keepers of art and history,” she goes on with a powerful cadence built around her love and involvement with these institutions. “We have visitors from all over the country and the world, but we don’t see a lot of locals visiting our museums. What stands in the way for locals?” How often do we visit these organizations in our own hometown? It isn’t something I had considered, but it does seem to be true. Museums seem to be a vacation activity, yet so much

history is right here at our fingertips, and it is a shame to pass up the opportunity. Museum Hop is a wonderful way to end that trend and spend some time supporting our local arts and history community. “All of these museums have education and outreach programs. The history here is astounding. We use this opportunity to dispel some old myths about museums. We aren’t dusty old places. You may find a new interest and learn something about yourself.” Explore giant locomotives, Ford Model T’s, a rare vintage guitar collection, a priceless Victorian glass collection, the history of the Civil War, an amazing private car and motorcycle collection, and the history of the Towing and Recovery industry. And that’s just the start. Visit eventbrite.com and search for Musuem Hop to buy your tickets. If you have trouble online, call any of the participating museums for help. Passports will be provided. Each museum will stamp your passport, so be sure to visit all seven to complete your trip around Chattanooga. CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • AUGUST 15, 2019 • THE PULSE • 5


COVER STORY

The Fighting Lady And The Iron Maiden: McKenzie and Hill The story about a police experiment that went horribly right

Melinda Bryan (l), Helen Hill (r)

By Brandon Watson Pulse contributor

Melinda Bryan and Helen Cooper, now in their seventies, recall a time when they were subjects of a great experiment.”

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HATTANOOGA’S FIRST FEMALE POLICE OFFICER WAS Patricia Underwood Williams. She was recruited to the CPD after graduating Knoxville College in 1971. Officer Williams would serve thirteen months in the youth crimes division of the CPD before resigning to work with the criminal rehabilitation system.

Yet, hot on her heels were two women who didn’t just walk the path Williams started—they bulldozed a four-lane highway for future generations of law enforcement officers. Melinda Bryan and Helen Cooper, now in their seventies, recall a time when they were subjects of a great experiment. THE FIGHTING LADY: MELINDA MCKENZIE (BRYAN) Melinda Bryan has a pleasant de-

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meanor of any loving mother who enjoys Southern breezes and strong coffee. But there’s something keen to her awareness, an active observance of everything. It’s a supernatural aspect of being around people who have been there and done that. It’s not long until Melinda’s commanding presence changes her from motherly figure to a fierce mother wolf. “I was ten years old when I said I’d become a cop when I grew up; my mother wasn’t impressed,” Melinda says.

Melinda attributes much of her inspiration and encouragement to her father. Boyd M. McKenzie was at the Battle of Midway. He survived the bombing of the USS Yorktown in 1942. Lt. Cmdr. McKenzie helped members of the Yorktown escape and assisted with sealing off holes to delay her inevitable fate. The Yorktown stubbornly stayed afloat long after her fatal attack and became the stuff of legends. “He was a gentleman and a gentle soul.” Melinda tears up. “He passed in ‘76 but I remember it like it was yesterday. I was a daddy’s girl. He always insisted that women should know everything a man should know,” she says. Boyd McKenzie would muster out of service to become a sworn deputy of Los Angeles before moving his family back to Blount County to take care of ailing relatives. Melinda would grow up to get married and divorced very young, eventually landing a job at the CPD as a records clerk late in ‘69. She built connections with the patrolmen and detectives, eventually taking advantage of free courses at Cleveland State. While earning an associate degree in criminal justice, she decided she was going to be in uniform and on the streets. “Several officers encouraged me. They seen something in me and supported me. When Helen and I started


Officer Patricia Williams

the academy, the instructors were determined to make us street ready,” Melinda says. The real hurdles starting her career existed among city bureaucrats and the community. In what Melinda calls “the uniform debacle”, the city leadership were stalled on deciding which uniform was appropriate for patrolwomen. “They couldn’t figure out if they wanted us wearing skirts or the standard issue,” Melinda explains. “The city didn’t have uniforms that fit us. I sure as hell wasn’t going to wear a skirt, so I modified the men’s uniform on my own. I’d say the community reaction towards Helen and I was seventy percent against and thirty percent for. One time a woman I was dealing with wanted a ‘real cop and not a meter maid’. My Sergeant drove up and told her ‘You got a cop!’ and then drove away. We were such a novelty that we were accused of all sort of evils. I think the community was trying to get rid of us from the beginning.” As novelty worn off, Melinda would advance her career by attending training courses with the FBI for homicide investigations in Quantico and sex

Sergeant Melinda Bryan, circa '80s

I’d say the community reaction towards Helen and I was seventy percent against and thirty percent for. One time a woman I was dealing with wanted a ‘real cop and not a meter maid’.”

crimes with the TBI in Nashville. For her, going outside the city to learn how others investigated crimes was an eye opener. “I’d brought back so much knowledge, I realized we needed to update our investigation techniques,” she says. “The way rape cases were handled back then was very ignorant. So, I decided to get permission to put together rape kits like other departments I’d learned about. My boss said as long as it didn’t cost the department money it was fine. So, with items donated from local businesses and old shoe boxes I put them together on my own. “I wasn’t out to save the world. If I managed to save just one person in my career, then I did my job. I’ve this philosophy that if you treat people with respect and dignity then you will get

that in return. Years ago, a young man approached me and said that I’d dealt with him and his buddies on a burglary call. He said the way I’d treated them inspired him to turn his life around for the better. I can’t remember his name, but he remembered me. That was it, he was my save.” THE IRON MAIDEN: HELEN HILL (COOPER) Helen resonates much of the same energy as Melinda, a warm kindness mixed with that otherworldly edge. She has a home with a beautiful garden far from the hustle of town, with two majestic stone lions keeping watch. This is a woman who has stared down evil without flinching. You can feel it in her gaze. Sitting across from her, I feel myself being analyzed, dissected, and

filed. I definitely wouldn’t want to tango with her in an interrogation room. Helen grew up the oldest of eight on the wild side of Trenton, GA. Being the daughter of a traveling iron worker forced Helen to grow up fast in order to help her mother raise seven children. “I remember there was always a baby to take care of and we lived far away from civilization. We were always out in the woods,” she says. Helen left town at nineteen, but soon returned with a baby of her own and eventually found seasonal work at Hamilton Distributors on McCallie Ave. Hamilton Distributors was an Amazon Fulfillment Center before the internet. It was here that Helen met Officer Lee J. Hicks on guard duty because of the expensive jewelry at the location. “I was looking for full-time work and Hicks offers me a job in the records department and I fell in love with record-keeping,” Helen says. “Uniform Crime Reports was only a five-yearold department when I started. Sometimes arrest records were written on the back of matchbooks so trying to dig back further than five years would be futile. But the records department

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COVER STORY

Helen Hill (l), Melinda Bryan (r)

got to know every detective and news personality on the beat, and you knew everything going on in the city. I even had our frequent customers' arrest jackets memorized.” Helen was so good at keeping and classifying records that she created a how-to guide for supervisors to start classifying their own reports. This guide would be reproduced by Helen at the request of her bosses. Helen also took courses at Cleveland State with Melinda and the two decided to become patrol officers soon after completing college. Helen laughs, “They had no idea what to do with us, from the uniforms to our duty pistols. We were only allowed to have these dainty .38 Chief Specials because it was believed we couldn’t handle larger calibers. We’d eventually prove that idea wrong, damn it!” After academy, Helen and Melinda were assigned a daytime beat with male ride-along partners. As Helen tells it, she and Melinda hated being on day shift and once they caught on that the dispatchers were screening service calls, they both decided to 8 • THE PULSE • AUGUST 15, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

My entire career was a highlight, and looking back I wouldn’t change a thing. Police work is about accepting all aspects of it, the good, the bad, and the ugly.”

move from patrol to dispatch. Helen would fall under the training of a legendary figure named James F. Tucker, better known as “Mother Tucker”. “Mother Tucker got that name because he mothered the officers. This man could map and orient you to a mailbox anywhere in the city. My time in records set me up for success because to be effective you had to know where everything was.” But the streets called to Helen and on a fateful night she asked the Chief of Police to get her back on patrol—

but this time on night shift. To her surprise, her request was immediately granted. Helen would go on to work in several departments, eventually becoming the first female officer of the CPD to graduate the FBI National Academy at Quantico in 1984. “I loved the training,” she says. “I worked with some of the biggest personalities in law enforcement. I ran the ‘yellow brick road’ several times. My entire career was a highlight, and looking back I wouldn’t change a thing. Police work is about accepting all aspects of it, the good, the bad, and the ugly. If you have any doubts about doing what is required, then it’s not for you.” The women still meet to keep their pistol qualifications up to date and to enjoy well-earned peace and quiet after three decades of police work. Though they maintain a humility about their contributions, there’s a spark in their eyes when recalling the horrors and heartbreaks that came with a life in uniform. I don’t doubt that, if given the chance, these legends would get back out there to show the world how it’s done.


COLUMN · JUST A THEORY

Giant Parrots And Very Old Galaxies Time for another Research Roundup on all things science

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T’S THAT TIME AGAIN! TIME TO LOOK at as many different “little” science stories as we can…that’s right, it’s our Research Roundup for Summer 2019! ASTEROIDS! EVERYWHERE!

Steven W. Disbrow Pulse columnist

Speaking of Jupiter, the Great Red Spot, which has been studied since 1830 (and was probably first seen in the 1600’s), is shrinking.”

Steven W. Disbrow is the proprietor of “Improv Chattanooga” on the South Side of town. He also creates e-commerce systems and reads comic books when he’s not on stage acting like a fool.

Last week, something huge hit Jupiter and caused an explosion so big it was caught by an amateur astronomer here on Earth. In fact, the flash of the impact was as big as the Earth! Of course, Jupiter itself is so insanely big that the explosion was little more than a blip in the planet’s atmosphere. Still, it’s nice that Jupiter is there to sweep up so many of these huge rocks for us. But, of course, it can’t get them all; just ask the dinosaurs! One rock that Jupiter missed (or, one rock that missed Jupiter, depending on how you look at it), also swung past Earth this past weekend. This rock, known by the very sexy name “2006 QQ23”, came within about four million miles of the Earth. It’s about the same size as the Eiffel Tower, and calculations suggest that it would have hit us with about 500 times the force of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. Not big enough to end us as a species, but it would definitely set us back a bit. If it seems like you’re hearing about near-misses by asteroids more often these days, you aren’t wrong. But, hopefully, this is because we’re finally taking the threat seriously, and seeing more of what’s out there, rather than just because there are more and more of the things coming our way. GREAT RED NOT Speaking of Jupiter, the Great Red Spot, which has been studied since 1830 (and was probably first seen in

the 1600’s), is shrinking. When it was first observed and identified as a single, ongoing storm, it was big enough to fit almost three Earths into. Today however, it’s down to a mere 1.5 Earths. And, just this year, bits of it have been observed “flaking off” at the edges of the storm and dissipating into the other clouds of Jupiter. Interestingly, we’ve seen other, smaller red spots form on Jupiter. Typically, these start as white spots that turn red over time. In any case, it’s doubtful that there will ever be a storm as famous as the Great Red Spot, so, if you haven’t seen it yet with your own eyes, I’d advise that you get to a telescope and check it out for yourself as soon as you can. There’s no telling how much longer it will be around. MORE GALAXIES! According to a study published last week in the journal Nature, a group of scientists recently found and documented thirty-nine new galaxies. “Thirty-nine galaxies? There are billions of galaxies out there, what’s the big deal with thirtynine more?” you ask. Well, you are correct. There are billions upon billions of galaxies out there. (But just one you, so take care of yourself, okay?) These galaxies, however, are old. Really, really old. They hail from the first two billion years of the existence of the universe. They are so old that, thanks to the expansion of the universe, their light is red-shifted beyond the spectrum of visible light. So, the scientists had to use

The Great Red Spot, NASA

a special instrument, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), which is built specifically to “see” light beyond the visible spectrum. Once they found them, the scientists were surprised to see how massive the galaxies were. After all, these were from the very early universe, and they expected any galaxies they found to be smaller and less massive. So, that means that they have to rethink the current models of how the universe evolved, and that’s actually pretty exciting! AND NOW FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT... Researchers in New Zealand announced that they discovered the skeleton of a huge parrot. How big? About four feet tall! That’s a really big bird, and like the Spanish Inquisition, finding it was completely unexpected. In fact, it was so unexpected that they gave it the scientific name Heracles inexpectatus. If you’re headed to New Zealand on vacation however, don’t worry. This particular parrot species has ceased to be. It’s run down the curtain and joined the Choir Invisible. If it hadn’t been fossilized, it would have been pushing up the daisies. This is an ex-parrot.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Gay Arthur Lovingly Tackles Time

Her still lifes and landscapes grace In-Town Gallery By Tony Mraz Pulse contributor

I started painting articles that aren’t needed anymore, old typewriters, antique toys, things that are made of fabric that we grew up with that we don’t see anymore.”

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NE DOESN’T HAVE TO LOOK FAR IN CHATTANOOGA to find quality realist oil paintings, as is evidenced by some prolific work at In-Town Gallery. Gay Arthur’s latest series examines change and the effects of time with still life and landscape compositions, creatively preserving and celebrating the past.

A sensitive yet rough use of texture and light/shadow causes her work to have an organic painterly quality, while an acute attention to detail creates a nearly photographic level of realism. Arthur waited to follow her dream of painting full time until she could retire from her career. She then went back to school, and graduated from UTC’s art department in 2003. “I was a late bloomer,” she tells us. “I didn’t go back to school until 1999, after being a dental hygienist for 35 years.” She has always been artistic and enjoyed art. “I wanted to pursue it,” she says, “to take a four-year program that would build upon itself. I didn’t just want to take an adult class here and there— I wanted a degree in art, a concentration.”

“Over the years,” she continues, “I did take an isolated ceramics, watercolor, or drawing class—I took art classes throughout my adult life but I had never done oil painting until UTC, where I earned my bachelor’s in painting and drawing.” She has worked as a full-time artist since school, though she still occasionally temps as a hygienist. Her first show was at Gold Leaf Design in 2004, and she became a member of In-Town Gallery in 2007, where, in addition to exhibiting her paintings, she hangs new art and does design work. Her art is displayed there year round, with new pieces being added at least every six months. Arthur is also represented by JumpstART Artist Services, a creative agency that places art at various locations

THU8.15

FRI8.16

SAT8.17

Beautiful Insanity

Improv “Movie” Night

The Tempest

Over the course of three days a group of local poets will work their way through a variety of intriguing topics. 6 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. stonecupcafe.com

The merry maniacs test their improv chops by taking on classic movie monsters and the films that made them famous. 8 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. improvchattanooga.com

Shakespeare's classic play comes to life in the great outdoors free of charge with a talented cast from Back Alley. 7:30 p.m. Miller Park 910 Market St. millerparkmarket.com

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

around town, such as law offices, city buildings, and the Chamber of Commerce. When she was at school at UTC, in her senior year, the University was tearing down an old house and church to build what is now the engineering building. “I thought it was such a shame,” she says, “because it was a beautiful old home—there were many who lived in it, and it had such history.” “So, I took some pictures of it—it was across the street from the Fine Arts Building. That is how I got started with my nostalgia.” Arthur saw in the newspaper that Wheland Foundry and U.S. Pipe were going to be demolished. She got permission to go on the grounds, wearing a hard hat and safety gear, and documented the decaying property with her digital camera. These images became source material for her next series of paintings. “I became enthralled with the lines and angles and peeling paint and rust. So I painted those for a few years. I started painting articles that aren’t needed anymore, old typewriters, antique toys, things that are made of fabric that we grew up with that we don’t see anymore. I like to call it pre-

serving the past in paint.” She painted a series in Italy, Spain, and Portugal, and one from a volunteer job in Peru. She does local landscapes of pleasing views of Greenway Farms, pet portraits, house portraits, and takes commissioned work. “People choose the scene they want, and size of the painting. If someone is moving away, they sometimes want a picture of their old house.” All of her paintings are done with oil on canvas. A lot of the work is very textural—she uses a palette knife extensively for mixing and for applying color to canvas. Her process involves lots of rubbing and scraping, and she uses many unconventional tools for mark-making—knives, spoons, forks, and even dog collars. Arthur’s most recent series is entitled “The Fabric of Our Lives”. For this body of work, she used reference photos of clothing and fabric in a variety of situations—an American flag being folded by Marines, an old sewing machine, or clothing drying on a clothesline. She is currently working on a series of negative space reversals, where the subject of the painting is the space surrounding an object—and is also available for commissions.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Moray eels have two sets of jaws. The front set does their chewing. The second set, normally located behind the first, can be launched forward to snag prey they want to eat. In invoking this aggressive strategy to serve as a metaphor for you in the coming weeks, I want to suggest that you be very dynamic and enterprising as you go after what you want and need. Don’t be rude and invasive, of course, but consider the possibility of being audacious and zealous.

activist Bette Lord. That’s not entirely true. For example, skilled and meticulous gardeners can compel tulip and hyacinth bulbs to flower before they would naturally be able to. But as a metaphor, Lord’s insight is largely accurate. And I think you’ll be wise to keep it in mind during the coming weeks. So my advice is: don’t try to make people and processes ripen before they are ready. But here’s a caveat: you might have modest success working to render them a bit more ready.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): It’s relatively rare, but now and then people receive money or gifts from donors they don’t know. Relatives they’ve never met may bequeath them diamond tiaras or alpaca farms or bundles of cash. I don’t think that’s exactly what will occur for you in the coming weeks, but I do suspect that you’ll garner blessings or help from unexpected sources. To help ensure the best possible versions of these acts of grace, I suggest that you be as generous as possible in the kindness and attention you offer. Remember this verse from the Bible: “Do not forget to show hospitality to strangers, for by so doing some people have shown hospitality to angels without knowing it.”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “For though we often need to be restored to the small, concrete, limited, and certain, we as often need to be reminded of the large, vague, unlimited, unknown.” Poet A. R. Ammons formulated that shiny burst of wisdom, and now I’m passing it on to you. As I think you know, you tend to have more skill at and a greater inclination toward the small, concrete, limited, and certain. That’s why, in my opinion, it’s rejuvenating for you to periodically exult in and explore what’s large, vague, unlimited, unknown. Now is one of those times.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libraborn Ronald McNair was an African American who grew up in a racist town in South Carolina in the 1950s. The bigotry cramped his freedom, but he rebelled. When he was nine years old, he refused to leave a segregated library, which prompted authorities to summon the police. Years later, McNair earned a PhD in Physics from MIT and became renowned for his research on laser physics. Eventually, NASA chose him to be an astronaut from a pool of 10,000 candidates. That library in South Carolina? It’s now named after him. I suspect that you, too, will soon receive some vindication, Libra: a reward or blessing or consecration that will reconfigure your past. SCORPIO (Oct. 3-Nov. 21): Scorpio author Zadie Smith wrote, “In the end, your past is not my past and your truth is not my truth and your solution—is not my solution.” I think it will be perfectly fine if sometime soon you speak those words to a person you care about. In delivering such a message, you won’t be angry or dismissive. Rather, you will be establishing good boundaries between you and your ally; you will be acknowledging the fact that the two of you are different people with different approaches to life. And I bet that will ultimately make you closer. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Nothing fruitful ever comes when plants are forced to flower in the wrong season,” wrote author and

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Look into my eyes. Kiss me, and you will see how important I am.” Poet Sylvia Plath wrote that, and now, in accordance with astrological omens, I’m authorizing you to say something similar to anyone who is interested in you but would benefit from gazing more deeply into your soul and entering into a more profound relationship with your mysteries. In other words, you have cosmic permission to be more forthcoming in showing people your beauty and value. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In his "Anti-Memoirs", author André Malraux quotes a tough-minded priest who served in the French Resistance during World War II. He spent his adult life hearing his parishioners’ confessions. “The fundamental fact is that there’s no such thing as a grown-up person,” the priest declared. Even if that’s mostly true, Pisces, my sense is that it is less true about you right now than it has ever been. In the past months, you have been doing good work to become more of a fully realized version of yourself. I expect that the deepening and maturation process is reaching a culmination. Don’t underestimate your success! Celebrate it! ARIES (March 21-April 19): How did sound technicians create the signature roar of the fictional monster Godzilla? They slathered pine-tar resin on a leather glove and stroked it against the strings of a double bass. How about the famous howl of the fictional character Tarzan? Sonic artists blended a hyena’s screech played backwards, a dog’s growl, a soprano singer’s fluttered intonation

slowed down, and an actor’s yell. Karen O, lead singer of the band Yeah Yeah Yeahs, periodically unleashes very long screams that may make the hair stand up on the back of her listeners’ necks. In accordance with astrological omens, I’d love to see you experiment with creating your own personal Yowl or Laugh or Whisper of Power in the coming weeks: a unique sound that would boost your wild confidence and help give you full access to your primal lust for life. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “If your dreams do not scare you, they are not big enough,” said Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, ex-President of Liberia. In accordance with astrological imperatives, I propose that we make that your watchword for the foreseeable future. From what I can tell, you’re due to upgrade your long-term goals. You have the courage and vision necessary to dare yourself toward an even more fulfilling destiny than you’ve been willing or ready to imagine up until now. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): How did our ancestors ever figure out that the calendula flower can be used as healing medicine for irritated and inflamed skin? It must have been a very long process of trial and error. (Or did the plant somehow “communicate” to indigenous herbalists, informing them of its use?) In any case, this curative herb is only one of hundreds of plants that people somehow came to adjudge as having healing properties. “Miraculous” is not too strong a word to describe such discoveries. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, Gemini, you now have the patience and perspicacity to engage in a comparable process: to find useful resources through experiment and close observation—with a hardy assist from your intuition. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Today the city of Timbuktu in Mali is poor and in the throes of desertification. But from the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries, it was one of the great cultural centers of the world. Its libraries filled up with thousands of influential books, which remained intact until fairly recently. In 2012, Al-Qaeda jihadists conceived a plan to destroy the vast trove of learning and scholarship. One man foiled them. Abba al-Hadi, an illiterate guard who had worked at one of the libraries, smuggled out many of the books in empty rice sacks. By the time the jihadists started burning, most of the treasure had been relocated. I don’t think the problem in your sphere is anywhere near as dire as this, Cancerian. But I do hope you will be proactive about saving and preserving valuable resources before they’re at risk of being diluted, compromised, or neglected.

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • AUGUST 15, 2019 • THE PULSE • 11


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR THURSDAY8.15 Third Annual Museum Hop 10 a.m. Chattanooga Area tvrail.com/events-exhibits Samuel Fuller’s “Pickup On South Street” 2, 7 p.m. Heritage House Arts & Civic Center 1428 Jenkins Rd. (423) 855-9474 chattanooga.gov Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 5 p.m. Hutton & Smith Brewing Co. 431 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 760-3600 huttonandsmithbrewing.com Summer Sike Film Series 5 p.m. The Crash Pad 29 Johnson St. (423) 648-8393 crashpadchattanooga.com Alley Hour 5:30 p.m. Cooper’s Alley 10 E. 7th St. Paint Like An Impressionist: Portraiture 6 p.m. The Hunter Museum of American Art 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968 huntermuseum.org Beautiful Insanity 6 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. (423) 521-3977 stonecupcafe.com Rod Man 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com The Tempest 7:30 p.m. Back Alley @ The Mars Theater 117 N. Chattanooga St. LaFayette, GA (706) 996-8350 bapshows.com Alcoholics Not Anonymous Comedy Open Mic 8 p.m.

12 • THE PULSE • AUGUST 15, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 682-8200 chattanoogabarley.com Country Line Dancing Class 8 p.m. Westbound Bar 24 Station St. (423) 498-3069 westboundbar.com African American Family Film Series 8:30 p.m. Miller Park 910 Market St. millerparkmarket.com

FRIDAY8.16 Third Annual Museum Hop 10 a.m. Chattanooga Area tvrail.com/events-exhibits Mixed Media Workshops with Jacquie Leavitt 3:30 p.m. Reflections Gallery 1635 Rossville Ave. (423) 892-3072 reflectionsgallerytn.com Beautiful Insanity 6 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. (423) 521-3977 stonecupcafe.com David Markovich 7 p.m. Frequency Arts 516 Tremont St. facebook.com/frequencyarts Rod Man 7:30, 9:45 The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com The Tempest 7:30 p.m. Chatsworth City Park Amphitheater 400 N. 2nd Ave. Chatsworth, GA (706) 996-8350 bapshows.com Improv “Movie” Night 8 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

Video Game Night 8 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. (423) 521-3977 stonecupcafe.com Ruby Falls Lantern Tours 8:30 p.m. Ruby Falls 1720 S. Scenic Hwy. (423) 821-2544 rubyfalls.com Good, Old-Fashioned Improv Show 10 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Presley Onassis 11 p.m. The Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 803-6578 chattpalace.com

SATURDAY8.17 WOW Walk 10 a.m. Blue Goose Hollow Park 898 W. 9th Ave. Chattanooga River Market 10 a.m. Tennessee Aquarium Plaza 1 Broad St. publicmarkets.us Soap Making 101 1 p.m. The Chattery at Chattanooga WorkSpace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Beautiful Insanity 2, 4:30, 6 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. (423) 521-3977 stonecupcafe.com Scribez! Poetic Open Mic 6 p.m. The Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 803-6578 chattpalace.com Unmasked Fashion Experience 6 p.m. Chattanooga Convention Center

1150 Carter St. (423) 756-0001 Bobby Stone Film Series presents “The Apartment” 7 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com Rod Man 7:30, 9:45 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com The Tempest 7:30 p.m. Miller Park 910 Market St. millerparkmarket.com Your Stories 8 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Improv vs Stand Up 10 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SUNDAY8.18 Collegedale Market 11 a.m. Collegedale Commons 4950 Swinyar Dr. collegedalemarket.com Chattanooga Market 12:30 p.m. The Chattanooga Market 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com Artful Yoga 1:30 p.m. The Hunter Museum of American Art 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968 huntermuseum.org Bobby Stone Film Series presents “Do The Right Thing” 2, 6 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com Grindsploitation Spotlight:


Bobby Stone Film Series presents “Do The Right Thing” “Cat Sick Blues” 6 p.m. The Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 803-6578 chattpalace.com Rod Man 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com

MONDAY8.19 Summer Belly Dance Session 5:45 p.m. Movement Arts Collective 3813 Dayton Blvd. (423) 401-8115 movementartscollective.com Beginner Tarot 6 p.m. The Chattery at Chattanooga WorkSpace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Joggers & Lagers 6 p.m. Chattanooga Brewing Co. 1804 Chestnut St. (423) 702-9958 chattabrew.com Screening of “The Intruder” 7 p.m. Heritage House Arts & Civic Center 1428 Jenkins Rd. (423) 855-9474 chattanooga.gov

Paper Making 7 p.m. Frequency Arts 516 Tremont St. facebook.com/frequencyarts River City Dance Club 7:45 p.m. Peace Strength Yoga 3800 St. Elmo Ave. (813) 731-9581 rivercitydanceclub.com Comedy Open Mic Night 9 p.m. The Honest Pint 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192 thehonestpint.com

TUESDAY8.20 Chess K-night 5 p.m. Mad Priest Coffee Roasters 1900 Broad St. (423) 393-3834 madpriestcoffee.com Tuesday Night Chess Club 6 p.m. Downtown Library 1001 Broad St. (423) 643-7700 chattilibrary.com Free Comedy Night 6:30 p.m. The Moxy 1220 King St. (423) 664-1180 moxy-hotels.marriott.com Paths to Pints along the Riverwalk 6:30 p.m.

The Tap House 3800 St. Elmo Ave. taphousechatt.com Painting like the Old Masters (Glazing I) 7 p.m. Frequency Arts 516 Tremont St. facebook.com/frequencyarts Open Mic Comedy 7 p.m. Common General 3800 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 521-0065 Poetry, Pups & Pints 7:30 p.m. Stone Cup Café 208 Frazier Ave. (423) 521-3977 stonecupcafe.com Comedy Show wtih Kenny Deforest 8 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400 jjsbohemia.com

WEDNESDAY8.21 Main Street Market 4 p.m. 522 W. Main St. mainstfarmersmarket.com Beginner Handlettering 6 p.m. The Chattery at Chattanooga WorkSpace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com

Artsperiences! 6 p.m. Mad Knight Brewing Company 4015 Tennessee Ave. (423) 825-6504 madknightbrewing.com Pom-Pom Wall Hanging 6 p.m. The Chattery at Chattanooga WorkSpace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Drawing Light and Shadow 7 p.m. Frequency Arts 516 Tremont St. facebook.com/frequencyarts Improv Open House 7 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 7:30 p.m. The Bitter Alibi 825 Houston St. (423) 362-5070 thebitteralibi.com Free Kittens Comedy Show 8 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. w jjsbohemia.com Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • AUGUST 15, 2019 • THE PULSE • 13


THE MUSIC SCENE

500 Miles South And 100 Years Ago The Stompers exhibit old-school prowess Mythical Motors Revs It Up Get your power pop and funky punk fix on this Saturday at The Spot! Hometown favorites Mythical Motors will be performing with St. Louis indie power pop group Frankie Valet at The Spot of Chattanooga, located at 1800 E. Main this Saturday. Motors and Valet will be joined by the always popular Mixed Signals along with Sammy David for a four-banger evening of the best garage band aesthetic tunes in the city. The show kicks off at 8:30 p.m., so come treat yourself to a jam-packed night of all things vintage-indie-alt from an era when college radio was high water mark of fresh, innovative music! — Marc T. Michael

C

HATTANOOGA’S FAVORITE MODERN VINTAGE BAND IS SET TO RELEASE THEIR first full-length album this week, eleven tracks of beloved standards, unique arrangements, and hot originals. The trio of Skip Frontz Jr. (string bass,) Lon Eldridge (guitar and vocals,) and Sampire (drums) is one of the deadliest combinations of talent around. By Marc T. Michael

Pulse Music Editor

The best of the best always make it sound easy, but the only thing easy about this music is the way it makes your spirit feel when you hear it.”

There’s no margin for error in a three-piece; each member has to be at the top of their game, always. The Stompers are the epitome of that kind of organic precision and flow, playing off of and supporting one another as though they were born to it. The best of the best always make it sound easy, but the only thing easy about this music is the way it makes your spirit feel when you hear it. “Chattanooga Blues” is an original tune dedicated to Bessie Smith. A musical tour of the early days of the city, it’s a history lesson delivered with such a light touch you don’t even realize that’s what it is until you’ve heard it a couple of times. The only thing as masterful as El-

dridge’s finger-tangling guitar work is everything else. The bass line of Frontz and the careful, tasteful percussion by Sampire are ear candy. Taken as a whole, it’s an outstanding track on an outstanding album. “St. Johns Infirmary Blues” is one of the most beloved standards of any genre. It is beyond the scope of this review to list the greats who have covered it. It is a litmus test of sorts; if you can play it and make it your own, you’ve made your bones. Your band gets to feast in jazzy blues Valhalla. It goes without saying then, that the Stompers own it. The interplay between Skip and Lon, the impeccable slide work…their version contains the kind of magic that can transport you

THU8.15

FRI8.16

SAT8.17

Mike McDade Benefit Concert

Priscilla Block

Roger Alan Wade

An up-and-coming artist from Raleigh, Priscilla has been winning over audiences and has a very bright musical future. 8:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com

If you ever needed a reason to head to Brainerd on a Saturday night, here's a very good one. 8 p.m. Mayo’s Bar and Grill 3820 Brainerd Rd. mayosbarandgrill.com

A who's-who of local talent gather to help out one of the nicest guys in the scene. 8 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co

14 • THE PULSE • AUGUST 15, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM


JONESIN' CROSSWORD

500 miles further south and a hundred years ago. “Ragtime Monkey” was written by friends of the band. A jaunty tale of a monkey and a Victrola, the band delivers it with a toe-tapping ease that is surely putting a smile on the face of Leon Redbone in that great Speakeasy in the sky. “Country Gentleman” is another original, a true story in which “the names have been changed to protect the ignorant.” The titular hero’s exploits with doom-saying preachers and adoring ladies make him the great granddaddy of the rock star mythos, slipping easily through life on his own terms and having a hell of time doing it. “Some of These Days” is one of three tracks that features special guest guitarist Tyler Martelli. Speaking frankly, if I had the sort of high-grade bootleghooch-in-a-bottle this band does, I’d be mighty protective of it and I reckon they are. Martelli complements the band perfectly as the temporary quartet delivers yet another classic upbeat tune of a long gone era. A rock band or a country act doesn’t necessarily have to be masterful; many

are far from it. It’s perfectly acceptable to be “good enough” in those genres. The style of music encompassed by the Stompers (jazz/swing/blues) doesn’t work that way. It’s a zero sum game in which you either bring it all, or don’t bother. Over the years I have reviewed more local bands than I can easily recall, with some showing great potential, others demonstrating exceptional talent, and a very select few being genuinely “the best”. The Stompers are undeniably in this last category. One may assume that there are other acts with a similar style that may be as good, but there’s damn sure none better and the proof is in the hearing. 9th Street Stompers…LIVE! is available this Thursday at loneldridge. com/music in digital format. Physical copies will be available anywhere Lon or the Stompers are playing. With so much real talent and gorgeous music being produced locally, it’s impossible to label any single work as “best of the year”, but I can say without hesitation that THIS album is easily one of the year’s ten best and a strong contender for that number one spot.

“Cutting Through”—it takes the right tool. ACROSS 1 Georgia, once 4 Spotify release, maybe 9 Powerful influence 14 Whitman of “Good Girls” 15 Way more than one, in prefixes 16 Calf roper’s rope 17 Tahiti, par exemple 18 Arctic, e.g. 19 Out-and-out 20 Wrapped-up A-shaped beam in the garage? 23 1976 Wimbledon winner 24 Day-to-day grind 28 Tramp’s companion 29 OshKosh _ _ _ (clothing brand) 32 Nerve cell impulse transmitter 33 Bucking animal, informally 34 Bothered 35 Your average places to create wooden boards?

40 City in 7-Down 41 Video chat problem 42 Suffix for gazillion 43 It’s fed at a curb 44 “The Nanny” portrayer Drescher 48 Enters, as a bar code 50 Solitary 51 High-achieving $10 bills? 55 Seiji with 2019’s “The Tokyo Gala Concert (Live)” 58 Not after 59 Kit _ _ _ (candy bar) 60 All over the interwebs 61 Housing contract 62 Previously, on Shakespeare’s stage 63 Slack-jawed 64 Poly follower 65 Lincoln’s son DOWN 1 Robert who created Triumph the Insult Comic Dog 2 It may be on the tip of your tongue

3 Shortened, as a sail 4 “It’s _ _ _ Unusual Day” 5 Enforcer Brasi of “The Godfather” 6 Spent frivolously 7 Bryce Canyon locale 8 A to A without any sharps or flats, e.g. 9 Pizza option 10 Reading group? 11 Porridge tidbit 12 Off-roading truck, briefly 13 “_ _ _ Baby” (1981 Toni Morrison novel) 21 Endeavor 22 “Go team!” 25 Jump in an ice rink 26 Frosty the Snowman’s eyes 27 Head experts? 29 Maidenform purchase 30 “Do unto others ...” principle 31 Beginning 33 _ _ _-country (genre including Florida Georgia Line)

34 Comedian Schumer 35 Univ. application figures 36 Trump son played by Alex Moffat on “SNL” 37 Writer/ director Ephron 38 Fair tradeoff 39 Part of WWI 43 “Paper Planes” rapper 44 Target of some shots 45 Harden or Westbrook, e.g. 46 Turkish capital 47 Placed one within another 49 Like old donuts 50 Better trained 52 “Yoshi’s Island” platform 53 Elephantlike machine seen in “The Empire Strikes Back” 54 Sagacious 55 Anatomical eggs 56 Change direction 57 Parseghian of Notre Dame fame

Copyright © 2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords. For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents perminute. Must be 18+ to call. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle No. 949 CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • AUGUST 15, 2019 • THE PULSE • 15


LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR THURSDAY8.15 James Crumble Trio 6 p.m. St. John’s Meeting Place 1278 Market St. stjohnsrestaurant.com Danimal & Friends 6 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Thursday Night Jazz 6 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Open Mic Thursday 6 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. stonecupcafe.com Megan Howard 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Jack Endelouz 7 p.m. Charlie’s BBQ & Bakery 2309 E. Main St. (423) 541-1500 Webb Barringer Band 7 p.m. Edley’s Bar-B-Que 205 Manufacturers Rd. edleysbbq.com Max Helgemo, Margot & TTH, Spencer Thomas Smith 7 p.m. Plus Coffee 3800 St. Elmo Ave. pluscoffee.co Uptown Big Band 7 p.m. The Honest Pint 35 Patten Pkwy. thehonestpint.com Toby Hewitt 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Open Mic Night 7 p.m. Gate 11 Distillery 1400 Market St. gate11distillery.com Tyler Martelli 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar

16 • THE PULSE • AUGUST 15, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com The Landon Fitzpatrick Band 7:30 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com Basil and Company 7:30 p.m. Cambridge Square 9453 Bradmore Ln. cambridgesquaretn.com Jesse Jungkurth & Friends 7:30 p.m. Mexi-Wing VII 5773 Brainerd Rd. (423) 296-1073 Mike McDade Benefit Concert 8 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co Mark Andrew 8 p.m. The Social 1110 Market St. publichousechattanooga.com Open Mic Night with Jonathan Wimpee 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Dallas Walker

9 p.m. Westbound Bar 24 Station St. westboundbar.com The Lix, The No Good Deeds 9 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Oweda, The Racks, Elijah Jones and the Tenderness 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

FRIDAY8.16 Summer Music Weekends 8:30 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. seerockcity.com Mark Andrew 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com An Evening With Joe Robinson 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St.

LIVE MUSIC SPOTLIGHT

You might expect a band called Yarn to spin a yarn or two, and this fun folky band does just that. Yarn weaves roots music idioms into a fresh sound that turns on hipsters and fans of alt country music alike with technically

impressive song-crafting and universal tales from the road of life. Yarn Friday, 8 p.m. Miller Plaza 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com

songbirdsguitars.co Yarn, Josh Driver Band 7 p.m. Miller Plaza 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com Juju Gordon 7 p.m. Virgola Wine Bar 608 Georgia Ave. chattanoogawinebar.com At Odds With The Knight, Keeping Composure, Clockwise 7 p.m. Music Box @ Ziggy’s 607 Cherokee Blvd. ziggysbarandgrill.net Zech Dallas 7:30 p.m. Cambridge Square 9453 Bradmore Ln. cambridgesquaretn.com Webb Barringer 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Art of the Groove with Tryezz 8 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com Priscilla Block 8:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com Camille Rae & Travis Bowlin 9 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com Barron Wilson 9 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com Rubik’s Groove 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co Legacy 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com Dead Rider, Monomath 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd.


jjsbohemia.com David Ingle 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Dead End Friends 9:30 p.m. The Brew & Cue 5017 Rossville Blvd. (423) 867-9402 Rowdy Henson 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

SATURDAY8.17 Summer Music Weekends 8:30 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. seerockcity.com Jeff Miller 12:30 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium Plaza 1 Broad St. publicmarkets.us Priscila & Little RicKee 2 p.m. Scottie’s On The River 491 Riverfront Pkwy. scottiesontheriver.net Sounds of Melange 6 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Lew Card 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com The Hi-Jivers 7 p.m. Ross’s Landing 201 Riverfront Pkwy. riverfrontnights.com The Other Brothers 7 p.m. Edley’s Bar-B-Que 205 Manufacturers Rd. edleysbbq.com The Fa-Sho-Show 7 p.m. SPOT Arts Venue 3210 Brainerd Rd. spotvenue.co Rick Stone 7 p.m.

Slick’s Burgers 309 E. Main St. slicksburgers.com Sistren 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co The Briars 7 p.m. Charles & Myrtle’s Coffeehouse 105 McBrien Rd. christunity.org Trevor Clark and the Current Situation 7 p.m. Hutton & Smith Brewing Co. 431 E. MLK Blvd. huttonandsmithbrewing.com Flattop Boxers 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Worlds Collide 7:30 p.m. Cambridge Square 9453 Bradmore Ln. cambridgesquaretn.com Skip Frontz Jr & his Left Handed Luckies 7:30 p.m. Gate 11 Distillery 1400 Market St. gate11distillery.com 50th Anniversary Tribute to Woodstock 8 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co Roger Alan Wade 8 p.m. Mayo’s Bar and Grill 3820 Brainerd Rd. mayosbarandgrill.com John Marsh 8 p.m. The Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Ariel Omarzu 8:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com Frankie Valet, Mixed Signals, Sammy David, Mythical Motors 8:30 p.m. The Spot of Chattanooga 1800 E. Main St.

facebook.com/1800EMain Voodoo Slim 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com Westfall Band 9 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Austin Zachary 9 p.m. Sky Zoo 5709 Lee Hwy. (423) 521-2966 Caramore, Terminal Overdrive 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com David Ingle 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Dead End Friends 9:30 p.m. The Brew & Cue 5017 Rossville Blvd. (423) 867-9402 Wasted Riffs 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

SUNDAY8.18 Summer Music Weekends 8:30 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. seerockcity.com Mark Andrew 11 a.m. The Edwin Hotel 102 Walnut St. theedwinhotel.com Carl Pemberton 11 a.m. Westin Chattanooga 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Lon Eldridge Noon 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com Jeff Miller

12:30 a.m. The Chattanooga Market 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com Scenic City Sound 12:30 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium Plaza 1 Broad St. publicmarkets.us Danimal and Friends 12:30 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com James Hatem 1:30 p.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com Jimmy Dormire 2 p.m. The Chattanooga Market 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com The Other Brothers 2 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Bluegrass Jam 4 p.m. Fiddlers Anonymous 2248 Dayton Blvd. (423) 994-7497 Open Mic with Jeff Daniels 6 p.m. Long Haul Saloon 2536 Cummings Hwy. (423) 822-9775 Hello Atlantic, Keeping Composure 7 p.m. The Spot of Chattanooga 1800 E. Main St. facebook.com/1800EMain

MONDAY8.19 Open Air with Jessica Nunn 6 p.m. The Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Blues Night Open Jam 7 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co Monday Nite Big Band 7 p.m. The Coconut Room CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • AUGUST 15, 2019 • THE PULSE • 17


LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Open Mic Night 7 p.m. Fiddler’s Anonymous 2248 Dayton Blvd. (423) 994-7497 Very Open Mic with Shawnessey Cargile 8 p.m. The Well 1800 Rossville Blvd. #8 wellonthesouthside.com

TUESDAY8.20 Webb Barringer 6 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com Acoustic Bohemian Night 6:30 p.m. Mexi-Wing 9 6925 Shallowford Rd. (423) 468-3366 Danimal 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Space Jam Open Mic with Xll Olympians 7 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com Stellar’s Jay 7 p.m. Charlie’s BBQ & Bakery 2309 E. Main St. (423) 541-1500 Tre Powell 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Pickin’ N Pints 7:30 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Live Jam Session with Freddy Mc & Friends 8 p.m. Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Open Mic with Mike McDade 8 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com

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WEDNESDAY8.21 Rosalie 6 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com Erik Kirkendoll 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Papa Sway 7 p.m. River Drifters 1925 Suck Creek Rd. riverdrifterschatt.com Mark Andrew 7 p.m. Charlie’s BBQ & Bakery 2309 E. Main St. (423) 541-1500 Jesse James Jungkurth 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Dexter Bell 7 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Open Mic & Jam Night 7 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com John Carrol 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Priscilla & Little Rickee 8 p.m. Las Margaritas 1101 Hixson Pike (423) 756-3332 Terry Parker of TNT 8 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Zach Dallas 9 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Map these locations on chattanoogapulse. com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com


ERNIE PAIK’S RECORD REVIEWS

Derya Yildirim & Grup Simsek, Sandro Mussida

Derya Yildirim & Grup Simsek Kar Yagar (Bongo Joe/Catapulte)

T

Sandro Mussida EEEOOOSSS (Soave)

his writer remembers when the west African guitarist Bombino made an album in 2013 with the Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach, and he thought, “Well okay, I guess Tuareg guitar rock has officially arrived.” But in retrospect, this is a problematic statement—one based on a viewpoint centered on western-world culture involving some western-world ambassador (Auerbach) and the implied, flawed view that it had to be “discovered” when it was there all along. Actually, the cultural exchange is much more complex, spanning centuries and continents, to end up with the popular rock-music idiom.

One could simply shrug and say, “Well, it sounds good to me; isn’t that enough?” These complicated thoughts come to mind when regarding the emergence of bands that evoke the classic era of Turkish psychedelic rock that started in the late ‘60s and thrived in the ‘70s. It seems like this style is due to have its “moment” with western-world audiences, and the new, debut album Kar Yağar from Derya Yildirim & Grup Şimşek could help lead the way. Vocalist and bağlama (a Turkish lute) player Derya Yildirim steers the ensemble, composed of musicians from various European countries,

through folk music traditions, guided by her own Turkish roots; these songs—a variety of originals and folk song arrangements—have numerous psychedelic flourishes, from wah-wah and tremolo guitar to sick distortion effects to envelope-treated keyboard/synth parts. The band’s take on rock is largely reverent, going from earnest and somber balladry (“Seni Hala”) and poetry recitations (“Çocuklar 2”) to slowburn tracks (“Üç Kız Bir Ana”), sing-songy, catchy numbers (“Oy Oy Emine”), and heavy psychedelia. Perhaps unexpectedly, a highlight of the album is the oddball “Hekimoğlu” which has a mystical mood with gongs and metallic percussion from Greta Eacott and expressive, ardent vocals from Yildirim—tracks like this one that don’t simply check off touchstones will help transcend the perceived novelty of re-visiting Turkish psychedelic rock in a modern, cosmopolitan group.

S

inging or playing out of tune is an unforgivable, cardinal sin in professional

music scenarios, but there’s another way that a supposedly wayward musician can look at such a situation—maybe everyone else is just out of tune, and I’m the one that’s in tune. You might also have some contrary opinions about the veracity of the Apollo 11 moon landing and find yourself using the phrase, “Wake up, sheeple!” frequently on Internet forums. On the oddly captivating new album EEEOOOSSS from the Italian-born, London-based cellist Sandro Mussida, each of the three musicians plays in their own different tuning on purpose. Warning: heavy music nerd content ahead. Electric guitarist Alessandra Novaga, who uses an E-bow to vibrate her strings without plucking them, uses the “Renold-I” tuning, developed by Maria Renold, based on the Pythagorean Temperament where the intervals between notes are based on a 3:2 ratio. Edgardo Barlassina’s bass clarinet is played using the Hypodorian mode from ancient Greece, evoking the aulos, a double-reed instrument from

that time period, and Mussida, on cello, explains that he uses an intonation on a scale “obtained from the exact relations observed in the partial harmonics of the second octave.” What this means for the casual listener is that a pitch played by different musicians may not be the exact same frequency. In a way, the three pieces of EEEOOOSSS are experimental works, since parameters are set up, and the result is how things play out in that situation and how frequencies that may or may not match with each other interact in interesting ways. In addition to the three performers, there’s actually a fourth force at work, which is the room in which the album was recorded, which imparts its distinct acoustic qualities that should not be overlooked. For all the math and music theory involved, EEEOOOSSS is actually a gorgeous abstract, semi-ambient album, with methodically played tones and moments that can be soothing and celestial, although by definition, it is almost always literally unharmonious.

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FILM & TELEVISION

Scary Stories Less Frightening Than Real Life Introducing young audiences to horror genre

Nine Lives, Nine Deaths What’s the first thing you think of when you hear the word “grindsploitation”? If you’re like me, you think of campy lowbudget horror filmmaking with a decidedly dark comedic twist and as much over-thetop imagery as the film budget will allow. And if you’re also like me and love a good, campy grindsploitation flick, you’re going to want to head over to The Palace Theater this Sunday to catch Cat Sick Blues, another sick, twisted, horrific, and black comedy feature film. The Australian horror film centers on Ted, a man who suffers a mental breakdown when his beloved cat dies. Having several cats of my own, I can empathize with his sadness...though definitely not with how he reacts to the loss. Ted believes that the only way to bring back his pet is taking the lives of nine humans. So Ted dons vicious deadly cat claw gloves and a creepy cat mask, and goes on a murderous rampage. As the butchery escalates, a twisted romance blossoms between Ted and Claire, a young woman who has also recently lost her cat. Yep. Grindsploitation at its finest, folks. The film screens this Sunday at 6 p.m. at The Palace Theater at 818 Georgia Ave. For more info about tickets, head over to their website at chattpalace.com or catch them on Facebook. — Michael Thomas

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, Lionsgate

By John DeVore Pulse Film Editor

We need scary stories. We need to tell them in the dark. What’s happening in the light right now is beyond understanding.”

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I

T WASN’T TOO LONG AGO, A LITTLE LESS THAN A year in fact, that the Frightening Ass Film Fest hosted a documentary on the “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark” book series. It was right around the time the president scheduled his visit to Chattanooga, and to me, there was simply nothing scarier than that. Of course, the insanity has ramped up considerably since then, with the release of the seemingly ineffective Mueller Report, chants of “send her back” aimed at congresswomen of color who are American citizens, two mass shootings, one of which was explicitly influenced by the xenophobic rhetoric of the man holding the highest political office in the country. Then, just this weekend, we saw the suicide of a rich white pedophile

in prison, which caused the Commander in Chief to tweet out a conspiracy theory accusing the Clintons of staging a murder. At this juncture, a murderous scarecrow or a decapitated head falling out of a chimney is positively quaint. We need scary stories. We need to tell them in the dark. What’s happening in the light right now is beyond understanding. Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark the film has been in the works since


2013. Directed by André Øvredal and based on a screen story by Guillermo del Toro, Scary Stories does a decent job of adapting what was essentially a collection of folk tales. It creates a new narrative, using the stories as influences and illustrations as guides, to offer younger audiences a nice, introductory horror film that’s nowhere near as terrifying as watching the news. The story is set in 1968, which is a great change of pace from the current crop of films chockfull of eighties nostalgia. Our protagonists are Stella, Auggie, and Chuck, a group of outsiders who have a beef with local bully Tommy. They play a prank on Tommy on Halloween, which causes him to wreck his car. The group seeks refuge in a nearby drive-in and pile into the car of Ramon, a young drifter trying to remain unnoticed. After Tommy has been effectively dispatched, they all decide to visit a house that’s said to be haunted. The house belonged to the Bellows family, who settled there and opened a successful paper mill. It’s said the youngest daughter Sarah was crazy and locked away from the outside world, but she would whisper scary stories to children of the town from inside the

The screenplay has to include many of the most recognizable stories from the book series and, in general, it weaves them together in a comprehensible fashion.” walls, and those children would go on to die. Stella discovers a book in a hidden room, written in red ink, and surmises that it must have belonged to the witch in the walls. She takes to book with her when they leave, only to learn that the stories are still being written and the characters include her and her friends. The film has a decent premise overall. The screenplay has to include many of the most recognizable stories from the book series and, in general, it weaves them together in a comprehensible fashion. Still, Scary Stories leans fairly heavily on jump scares and loud noises to get the point across. In a lot of movies, this might seem cheap and easy. It feels that way here, too, but if you are familiar with the books, you know that many of them end with a jump scare (assuming the stories are being read

aloud—“The Big Toe” ends by the reader shouting “You’ve Got It!”). It’s important to remember that Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark is a collection for children, a stepping stone to darker, more gruesome things. The film plays well to that audience. Still, those of use familiar with the books know that the stories weren’t the scary part. It was the illustrations by Stephen Gammell. His creations are on display in the film through monsters created by the book, but I feel like the production design might have leaned more heavily on the atmosphere Gammell created in the books. Other than the monsters, everything in the film seems pretty boilerplate. I would have enjoyed seeing more of Gammell’s ink dripping through the frames of the film. As it is, though, Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark is entertaining enough, particularly for its audience.

✴ NEW IN THEATERS ✴

The Angry Birds Movie 2 The flightless birds and scheming green pigs take their feud to the next level. Yes, they made another one. No, we don't know why, either. Director: Thurop Van Orman Stars: Jason Sudeikis, Josh Gad, Leslie Jones

Good Boys Three sixth grade boys ditch school and embark on an epic journey while carrying accidentally stolen drugs, being hunted by teenage girls, and trying to make their way home in time for a long-awaited party. Director: Gene Stupnitsky Stars: Jacob Tremblay, Keith L. Williams, Brady Noon, Molly Gordon

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • AUGUST 15, 2019 • THE PULSE • 21


COLUMN · ON THE BEAT

Officer Alex vs The Arachnids In which a righteous house party ends in spiderwebs

C Alex Teach

Pulse columnist

I had the advantage of being too pissed off at the number of twigs finding their way down my back from my shirt collar and the cobwebs I could never truly finish wiping off of my face to be afraid.”

When officer Alexander D. Teach is not patrolling our fair city on the heels of the criminal element, he spends his spare time volunteering for the Boehm Birth Defects Center.

OBWEBS IN MY FACE. THAT’S what I remember most about my run through a cedar tree forest in the greater Shallowford Road area in the dead of a moonless night. Now, of course, I was looking at it in broad daylight. It was not the denselypacked, undeveloped area that it had been—it was now a large assisted-living community. The smell of tapioca pudding and asphalt had replaced the mix of pine and cedar, and of course, the body odor of the man I found hiding there, having fled what was otherwise a righteous house party. It was the odor that caught him, by the way. It was stupid to go in after him in the first place, I suppose, but young cops are sight-hounds by nature and that rabbit isn’t going to chase itself. I have no idea how far in I was other than the fact that my appreciation for streetlights and the moon could not have been greater at that moment (there being neither present), but I had the advantage of being too pissed off at the number of twigs finding their way down my back from my shirt collar and the cobwebs I could never truly finish wiping off of my face to be afraid. Nope, it was just anger I was feeling when the wind blew in the right direction (for me, not him) and I narrowed my search to an area to my right, a search completed by my boot making distinct contact with something that was “human-ey”. Hard and crackly became tough with a hint of squishiness. (His simultaneous gasp upon said contact was similar to mine, but for two very different reasons.) I reached down and found he was lying face down, which allowed me to both hold him in place by his neck (gently,

22 • THE PULSE • AUGUST 15, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

Photo: Michael Podger

mind you) and to do a quick pat down of his waistline and ankles for weapons with my knee firmly (but lovingly) placed in the small of his back, before finally dragging backwards at an angle by the back of his shirt collar. I did this intentionally for two reasons: One: I was still alone and in a place where backup could not find me without a helicopter and searchlight so I needed to keep him off balance, and two: it allowed me to continue wiping the cobwebs off my face. They were really starting to freak me out. A lot. “Hey man you can’t—” “Shut up.” “But you can’t—” “SHUT UP.” It actually went on like this for some time until we finally made it out of the field of arachnophobic horrors and dispatch and a few co-workers could stop being mildly concerned. O’Hare got to me first. “You ok man? What the hell?” “Can’t talk,” I said. “Freaking out. Spiderwebs.” I said this, but for some reason I didn’t want to let go of the gentleman at the end of my left arm, who was still

kept facing the woods. Subdued shock maybe? I didn’t care. “Hey will somebody—” he got out before we both replied in unison, “SHUT UP.” “Need a towel. Need to take off uniform. NEED TO NOW.” I began walking towards his car to stuff this guy inside of it and then make my dream of disrobing and shaking the tinderbox out of my shirt a reality when my partner said the one thing that could snap me out of my burgeoning horror: “Hey, isn’t that Sarge’s kid?” I stopped, and replied with the one thing I could say in response: “Umm... WHICH Sarge?” “Sorenson’s, I think,” he said. I paused, rolling the thought in my head around a moment, and reached a quick decision as was the theme of the night. “Hell with him. Uniform coming off.” We called his ol’ man as a courtesy and I was never sure if he was cited for underage drinking or not (as I said, it was a righteous house party), but I knew one thing: That uniform came OFF. Nothing to look forward to now but lunch. Hold the cobwebs though.


CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • AUGUST 15, 2019 • THE PULSE • 23


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The Pulse 16.33 » August 15, 2019  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative

The Pulse 16.33 » August 15, 2019  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative