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WORLD REFUGEE DAY • MATT MOVIN MUSIC • MOON OVER BUFFALO

VOL. 16, ISSUE 25 • JUNE 20, 2019

Farmers Markets Are Blooming

from melons to chow chow, there’s something for everyone By Jessie Gantt-Temple

CHATTANOOGA'S WEEKLY ALTERNATIVE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE VOLUME 16, ISSUE 25 • JUNE 20, 2019

BREWER MEDIA GROUP Publisher James Brewer, Sr. FOUNDED 2003 BY ZACHARY COOPER & MICHAEL KULL

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Gary Poole gary@chattanoogapulse.com Assistant Editor Jenn Webster City Editor Alex Curry Music Editor Marc T. Michael Film Editor John DeVore Contributors Rob Brezsny • Steven W. Disbrow Jessie Gantt-Temple • Matt Jones Ernie Paik • Rick Pimental-Habib Michael Thomas • Brandon Watson Addie Whitlow Editorial Interns Kelsey Fox • Ensley McFarland Cartoonists Jen Sorenson • Tom Tomorrow

ADVERTISING Director of Sales Mike Baskin mike@brewermediagroup.com Account Executives Rick Leavell • Cindee McBride Libby Phillips • Lisa Roche John Rodriguez • Danielle Swindell

CONTACT Offices 1305 Carter St. Chattanooga, TN 37402 Phone 423.265.9494 Email info@chattanoogapulse.com Website chattanoogapulse.com Facebook @chattanoogapulse THE FINE PRINT: The Pulse is published weekly by Brewer Media and is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. The Pulse covers a broad range of topics concentrating on music, the arts, entertainment, culture and local news. The Pulse is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publisher may take more than one copy per weekly issue. The Pulse may be distributed only by authorized distributors. Contents Copyright © 2019 by Brewer Media. All rights reserved.

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Farmers Markets Are Blooming The farmers-market market is inundated. In my research, I found almost twenty active farmers markets; more are popping up as quickly as this season’s crops. According to the Farmers Markets Coalition, the number of markets have more than doubled over the past decade.

A NEW LIFE STARTS HERE

10

DRIVEN TO SUCCEED

36

Some words mean very little. A passing idea with no real grit or concept. The word “refugee” is not one of those words. It is a heavy word in any connotation.

The last time we checked in on Matthew Long, he was performing as “Matt Solo”, garnering popular and critical acclaim with a series of underground mix tape releases.

9 JUST A THEORY

FIVE DOORS SLAMMING

Finding steady work and spending time with your family, while still living out your dream of becoming an actor, sounds challenging, even in today’s society. But In 1953 New York?

TIRED LATE NIGHT GENRE

I like movies and television a lot. I’m not terribly interested in genre—whenever anyone asks what kind of movies I like, I generally respond by saying “good ones.”

32 MUSIC CALENDAR

38 GAME ON!

12 ARTS CALENDAR

35 MUSIC REVIEWS

39 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

13 SUMMER DINING GUIDE

37 NEW IN THEATERS

39 JONESIN' CROSSWORD

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CITY LIFE · BETWEEN THE BRIDGES

A New Life Starts Here

Cons ider This w ith Dr. Rick “We cannot force someone to hear a message they are not ready to receive, but we must never underestimate the power of planting a seed.” —whisper.com When a person’s belief is challenged by new or opposing information, it creates a great deal of inner conflict. In order to avoid the confusion, anxiety, and turmoil that come from questioning themselves, they dig their heels in deeper. This state of angst is called “cognitive dissonance.” National Gay Pride month offers myriad examples that challenge some people’s ways of thinking: “All people should be treated equally, regardless of who they are or who they love.” —Rev. Dr. Durrell Watkins “Jesus regularly ate dinner with thieves and whores and you’re telling me it’s against your religion to bake a cake for a gay person?” —George Carlin “If Liza can marry two gay men, why can’t I marry one?” —unknown Lastly, consider this: “Be a rainbow in someone else’s cloud.” —Maya Angelou

Helping to turn exile into opportunity By Alex Curry Pulse City Editor

Bridge Refugee Services provides refugees with the ability to have a fair shot at integrating into the Chattanooga community.”

— Rick Pimental-Habib, Ph.D.

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S

OME WORDS MEAN VERY LITTLE. A PASSING idea with no real grit or concept. The word “refugee” is not one of those words. It is a heavy word in any connotation. The idea is uncomfortable because the very concept comes from a place of extreme discomfort.

It is a word of loss, abandonment, hardship, and often gut-wrenching disregard for humanity. Some people are terrified of the word. Others become angered and disheartened. And then there are the people who live it, every day, by no choice of their own. As it is notoriously confused with other words, let’s take a moment to look at its root. By definition, a refugee is a person who has been forced to leave their country in order to escape war, persecution, or natural disaster. These individuals are displaced and disenfranchised by the dehumanizing decisions of others, often those that were initially tasked with ensuring their wellbeing. The upside of this conversation comes when we

look at the support that refugees receive when they arrive in Chattanooga. “Our mission is to provide opportunities for refugees to rebuild their lives after suffering persecution, so that they become productive, contributing members of the community,” says Marina Peshterianu, associate director of Bridge Refugee Services. It’s a clear and straightforward mission statement. Bridge Refugee Services provides refugees with the ability to have a fair shot at integrating into the Chattanooga community. “Usually in our first conversation with them, they ask when they can start working and when their children can go to school,” she ex-


EDITOONS

plains. “They are chasing a life that they always wanted and they want to make up for lost years. They are very motivated.” Bridge Refugee Services will celebrate the 19th annual World Refugee Day this Thursday evening at Camp House in Chattanooga. “We have a lot of responsibility to educate the community about refugees,” says Marina. “Fear is based on not knowing. If we can learn more, we can deal with fear. World refugee day is a big part of that.” Tickets will be available at the door. International food and artwork will be available as well as information about getting involved. It will be a fantastic chance to meet new Chattanoogans and offer a warm welcome. There are sixty-five million displaced people in the world. The average refugee will stay in a refugee camp for a staggering twenty years. Take a moment to immerse your mind into these facts. Imagine the exhausting turmoil of fleeing your home, leaving all of your worldly possessions and almost everyone you have ever know or even met. You have no home, no base or

foundation. Familiarity is only a memory. You have walked hundreds of miles. You have been shot at, pushed over, and neglected. You are hungry and cold. Your feet are on fire. And finally, you have arrived in your new home. Marina’s smiling face greets you when she picks you up at the airport and gives you a chance. The ability to live again. Many refugees are not so lucky. The few that make it here, we can embrace. Bridge Refugee Services aids approximately one hundred refugee resettlements a year. They provide housing, guidance, transportation, and just about anything else that people need in order to help them resettle in their new community. Visit bridgerefugees.org for more information on how you can make a difference in the lives of people that could really use your help. “Many skill sets are transferable to what we need,” continues Marina. “We can find ways for you to help. Everyone brings value.” While financial donations are always welcome and helpful, volunteering your time is a fantastic way to help. CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 20, 2019 • THE PULSE • 5


COVER STORY

Farmers Markets Are Blooming From melons to chow chow, there’s something for everyone

By Jessie Gantt-Temple Pulse contributor

Some folks only want to get their weekly grocery shopping done. Some want to browse local goods made with love, whether digestible or fashionable creations.”

T

HE FARMERS-MARKET MARKET IS INUNDATED. IN my research, I found almost twenty active farmers markets; more are popping up as quickly as this season’s crops. According to the Farmers Markets Coalition, the number of markets has more than doubled over the past decade. I am a first generation farmer who is finding her way between Green Acres and Roseanne. Growing up, I was allowed to drink soda for breakfast only if it was fruit flavored like grape or orange because then, it had fruit in it. But nowadays, I am discovering a healthy balance of slow food for a fast-moving gal’s never-home-on-the-range lifestyle. Incorporating farmers markets is key to getting away from processed bags of tricks and bottles of sugar water. THE WAY WE WERE The Curb Market was not the first farmers market in Chattanooga but it was extremely successful and lasted al-

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most fifty years. The Curb Market started in 1957 and was around until the late 1990’s. The products there were organic before organic was a thing. The police department now occupies the space on 11th St. where The Curb Market was located, but the memories of that market still hold place in the hearts of generations. Those who remember The Curb Market describe it as a wonderful place to get local produce from trusted farmers as well as learn and make friends. Some folks mentioned the regularly occurring characters like Bill Hales from Howard Woods Produce, also known as the “Banana Man”.

Roy Jones of Jones Farm, known to many as the “Strawberry Man” at the Main St. Farmers Market, worked the Curb Market when he was fourteen years old and used to sell melons, corn, and berries. “Farmers would arrive at three in the morning, sleep in their truck, and then start selling when the people showed up,” he recalled fondly. Different people want different things from a farmers market. Some folks only want to get their weekly grocery shopping done. Some want to browse local goods made with love, whether digestible or fashionable creations. There are so many great markets around here that I couldn’t cover them all. I would not be doing my job if I didn’t mention the area’s oldest active farmers market, Sunday Chattanooga Market at First Tennessee Pavilion, which is also the largest market. However, it is a different experience than the smaller food-


based markets, and I want to take this opportunity to highlight the small but mighty. TAKING STOCK OF SMALLER MARKETS The Main St. Farmers Market (MSFM) celebrated their tenth year last week and, although they have changed locations, their mission remains strong: “to inspire healthy, environmentally responsible lifestyles by fostering relationships within the local food community.” With almost thirty vendors and no craft vendors, the MSFM is ideal for someone looking to get all their grocery shopping done. Eggs, beef, pork, chicken, rabbit, goat or cow cheese, goat or cow milk, coffee, kombucha, herbs, mushrooms, veggies, and fruits are all available. All the vendors are inspected by a board of directors who ensure high quality, sustainable product is being created in an environmentally friendly way and coming directly from the vendor. A decade ago, Bill and Miriam Keener of Sequatchie Cove Farm started the MSFM with Trae Moore in the Niedlov’s parking lot. “There had been many markets before that came and went, but this was going to be a farmer-run market and it was going to last,” Miriam said as she explained how the MSFM grew from their CSA, which stands for community supported agriculture and is a program that connects farmers and customers. A new relationship that has grown outside the lot of the MSFM is with their Chestnut St. neighbor, Chattanooga Brewing Company, which has started “MSFM Monthly Features”. This month, try the cheese plate made with a variety of cheeses from Sequatchie Cove Creamery and topped with Spring Creek Veggies microgreens. Chattanooga Brewing also shows their love to fellow MSFM supporters

by giving a free pint to every customer every Wednesday. Simply show your purchase to the MSFM info booth and receive a beer ticket, then show that ticket to the folks at Chattanooga Brewing and your drink is on them. This offer is only valid on Wednesdays after the MSFM opens at 4 o’clock. Just as farmers work in seasons, the MSFM hosts four annual events; the next one is August 7th for National Farmers Market Week. There will be live music, a kids’ booth, food trucks, a massage therapist, and other surprises. If you’re interested in becoming a vendor or sponsor, playing music, or volunteering at any of the Main St. Farmers Markets, email mainstfarmersmarket@gmail.com This year, the St. Albans Hixson Market celebrates their ninth season on a nicely shaded, grassy knoll. Setting up on Saturdays from 9:30 a.m. to noon,

their vendors offer grass-fed beef and pork, eggs, local honey, various fruits and vegetables, herb plants, microgreens, spice rubs, barbecue sauce, and canned goods like jellies and chow chow. Unlike Main St. Farmers Market, St. Albans allows craft vendors. Market manager since its inception, Dee Clark said, “Over the years we have had handmade baskets, wood pens, cutting boards, and right now we have stained glass and hand-carved cooking utensils.” They also welcome nonprofits and have partnered with Hixson High School FFA and a local pet rescue in the past. On the last Saturday of every month, St. Albans hosts a free pancake breakfast and, on the first Saturday of the month, a Hamilton County Master Gardener leads a garden talk. This

Companies like nurseries and hardware stores have been smart to capitalize on the trend of farmers markets.”

garden talk coincides with their revamped community garden co-op program. On the first Saturday of the month, the co-op members get a free Master Gardener lesson, then work the gardens together to reap the rewards of teamwork. To inquire about the community garden co-op, email stalbans.hixson@ gmail.com and to inquire about being a vendor, email stalbansmarket@ gmail.com Companies like nurseries and hardware stores have been smart to capitalize on the trend of farmers markets and provide their outdoor-oriented customers with an all-encompassing agricultural experience. The Ooltewah Nursery has hosted the Ooltewah Farmers Market since 2013 and provides farm fresh goodies to an area that has almost a dozen fast food restaurants in less than three miles. The Oakbrook Market is a brandnew market hosted by True Value Hardware and is conveniently located just north of the Georgia line, on East Brainerd Road in Ooltewah. Barnyard Feed & Seed in Flintstone has also grown themselves a farmers market

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COVER STORY

Farmers Markets TUESDAY Lookout Farmers Market at East Brainerd, 4–7 p.m. Oakbrook Farmers Market, 3–6 p.m. Lookout Farmers Market at Hixson CHI Memorial (3rd Tues.), 11 a.m.–1 p.m. WEDNESDAY Lookout Farmers Market at Red Bank, 4­–7 p.m. Main St. Farmers Market, 4–6 p.m. Lookout Farmers Market at Downtown CHI Memorial Hospital, 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Collegedale Market, 4–6 p.m. THURSDAY Signal Mtn. Farmers Market, 3:30–6:30 p.m. Ooltewah Farmers Market, 3–6 p.m. Miller Park Farmers Market, 11 a.m.–2 p.m. Lookout Farmers Market at Chattanooga Choo Choo (1st Thurs.), 6–9 p.m. FRIDAY Chattanooga Market at Erlanger, 10:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. SATURDAY Chattanooga River Market, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. St. Alban’s Hixson Market, 9:30 a.m.– 12:30 p.m. Brainerd Farmers Market, 10 a.m.–noon Barnyard Market, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. West Village Market, 10 a.m.–1 p.m. SUNDAY Collegedale Market, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Chattanooga Market, 11 a.m.–4 p.m.

on-site to offer fresh produce that their clientele is craving. GOING THE DISTANCE Like customers, farmers markets have different needs. What is considered local to one may not be local to others. Some markets allow regional vendors from up to 250 miles away and other markets want to remain as local as possible, so they cap vendors at 100 miles. I joke that I consider local to be when I know whose hair is in it. Not to say that there is hair in my purchases but if there was, I would be okay because I know exactly who it came from. With that being said, you have to figure out how far you are willing to travel to access local products and support small businesses. I am really trying to not purchase things at the store but this is a challenge. Like, where do I get my peanut butter and limes from? I realized that if I missed my weekly farmers market then I had to find other ways to get my soaps, milk, and coffee and I learned what I can live without. Making the consistent effort to attend my weekly market has taken about six months and two times of running out of coffee. Never again. Attending farmers markets is not

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an easy lifestyle change for the customer and it is not an easy gig for the vendors either. Customers accustomed to round-the-clock instant gratification through their window or app have to make a commitment to get out and support local. Location and hours of markets are not always convenient to your routine, so then how does one still support local? You can find a CSA and sign up for a farm’s weekly or biweekly offerings. Another way is to shop for people in your circle; I have a friend who attends a market I have to miss each week and, with

some simple guidelines like “nothing spicy”, I give her $15 to get me a few things. Last week, she surprised me with a Brainerd Farmers Market t-shirt. Weather will dampen any market-goer’s experience but, according to the Farmers Market Coalition, vendors depend on the market for 25 percent of their income and therefore will set up during inclement weather. The nastiest days are the most important ones to do your due diligence to support those who have braved the not-so-ideal weather to provide you with a more ideal, less processed life.


COLUMN · JUST A THEORY

Fifty Years of Luna(cy) Celebrating the ongoing legacy of the moon landing

A

Steven W. Disbrow Pulse columnist

In those 50 years, a lot has changed, but we still owe a lot of our current technology to the breakneck pace of innovation that was spurred on by the Space Race.”

Steven W. Disbrow is the proprietor of “Improv Chattanooga” on the South Side of town. He also creates e-commerce systems and reads comic books when he’s not on stage acting like a fool.

BOUT A MONTH FROM NOW, we’ll celebrate the 50th anniversary of humanity’s first landing on the moon: July 20, 1969. (Fun fact, the moon’s proper name is actually “Luna”, and it’s the root word for things like “lunatic”, “lunacy”, and “lunch”. Okay, I made that last one up…but people used to really believe the full moon would drive people mad.) The moon landing, and space program in general, had a profound effect on me as a child. Honestly, I thought that, by now, we’d have colonies on the moon and Mars, and maybe even cloud cities above Venus…but other priorities, like killing each other in vast quantities and wrecking the atmosphere, seem to have gotten in the way. Oh well, at least we had “Vines” for a short, glorious time. But, I digress. In those 50 years, a lot has changed, but we still owe a lot of our current technology to the breakneck pace of innovation that was spurred on by the Space Race between us and those pesky Russians. So, I thought it would be neat to take a look back at some of the tech that was used to get us to the moon, and how it’s helped create the world we live in today.

article, before editing, was just over 4K in length, and I’m going to save it onto a device with about a trillion characters of free space. So, yeah, computers have come a very long way.

COMPUTERS

The Saturn V rocket that took us to the moon was, and still is, the biggest, most powerful rocket ever built. (And, I don’t think anyone has plans to build anything bigger in the near future.) But, while today’s rockets may lack the sheer power of the Saturn V, they make up for it in other tricks. Today we have rockets that can land themselves and be refurbished and reused. This drives down the cost of subsequent launches and is bringing “cheap” access to space closer to real-

There were a few computers involved in the Apollo program, but we’ll focus on the one that actually got them to the moon: the Avionics Computer. This beast weighed 70 lbs., took up a cubic foot of space and had 4K (about 4,000 characters) of RAM. For comparison, your phone probably has 64GB (about 64 billion characters) of RAM, and it’s much smaller and lighter. For another point of comparison, this

ELECTRONICS Launching things into space isn’t easy. Especially if those things are heavy. So, another consequence of the Apollo program was the drive to make things smaller. It’s easy to draw a direct line from the computers of Apollo to an iPhone, but that same drive also gave us things like smaller switches, transistors, circuit boards, and memory chips. The smaller and lighter something is, the easier it is to get it off the planet, but small form factor also helps in the creation of consumer products like TV’s, radios, automobiles…pretty much anything you can imagine. All of these things benefitted from the drive to miniaturize basically everything used in the space program. ROCKETS

ity. And, while we might not be putting humans on any big rocks, we have gotten really good at throwing robots at things and landing them there. Mars is currently crawling with robots—several are in orbit around it, a few are driving across it, and at least one is standing very still, listening for Mars-quakes. Heck, we’ve landed a robot on Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, landed on one comet, and thrown a refrigerator-sized brick at another one. Unfortunately, one thing seems to have been lost in these last 50 years, and that’s our sense of adventure. In the years immediately following that first landing, every kid wanted to be an astronaut, to get out there and explore. Now, it’s rare to hear a kid talk about wanting to explore anything beyond the bounds of their day-to-day existence. This, to me, is a very sad thing. So, if you were around for the Apollo missions, maybe take some time to talk to the kids in your life. Tell them how exciting it was to actually live through that, and how, for a time, it seemed like we could do anything and go anywhere. Who knows, maybe you’ll be the one to inspire the first person to walk on Mars!

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

The Sounds Of Five Doors Slamming TRP brings a madcap farce to the Depot

In Support Of Pride Month Improv Chattanooga is well-known in the area for attracting some of the best improvisors in the Southeast. Its main goal is to turn Chattanooga into a huge improv destination, similar to New York or Chicago. They welcome people of all experience levels, whether it’s your first time trying improv or it’s something you’ve been passionate about for a long time. Their beginner classes are unique in that they last for eight weeks, with your final class being a showcase for your friends and family to come out and see what you’ve learned. In addition to all of this, Improv Chattanooga commonly holds shows four shows a week. As most of you know, June is Pride Month and Improv Chattanooga is honoring it with their first ever Is This Thing Out event. Is This Thing Out is billed as an allinclusive night full of comedy and entertainment. Comedians from Atlanta, South Carolina, and North Carolina will perform. Chattanooga drag queen Purrahna Rivers will be there, too. The show starts at 6 p.m. this Saturday and the doors will open at 5:30. Tickets cost $8 in advance, $10 at the door. The best part about this event is a portion of every ticket purchased benefits Chattanooga Pride. Don’t miss this opportunity to support our local pride community and hear the best improv in our area. — Ensley McFarland

By Addie Whitlow Pulse contributor

This is like a play within a play within a play. It’s two aging actors, Charlotte and George, who do repertoire, which is two plays in one.”

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B

EING A TRAVELLING ACTOR IN 1953 NEW YORK was no easy task, I imagine. Finding steady work and spending time with your family, while still living out your dream of becoming an actor, sounds challenging, even in today’s society. It may have been no easy task for George Hay, but he makes it look hilarious in The Ringgold Playhouse’s production of “Moon Over Buffalo”, which will be performed at the Ringgold Depot beginning Thursday. “Moon Over Buffalo”, written by Ken Ludwig in 1995, is a farcical comedy set in Buffalo, New York in 1953. It tells the story of travelling actor George Hay and his wife Charlotte, and the struggles they face while trying to figure out where they want their acting careers to take them. The Ringgold Playhouse’s pro-

duction is directed by Kimberly Tyner Jones and features a cast of eight. “So this is like a play within a play within a play. It’s two aging actors, Charlotte and George, who do repertoire, which is two plays in one. They’re doing ‘Cyrano de Bergerac’ and ‘Private Lives’. But what they really want to do is be Hollywood stars,” explained Jones. “They find out that Ronald Colman, who is a Hollywood star, has broken his leg, and he can no longer do the film Twilight of the Scarlet Pimpernel. And Frank Capra, who is the


director, is coming to see them,” Jones said. “In the meantime, there are other things that go on; mistaken identity, there’s infidelity, there’s drunkenness, wrong costumes, everything that can go wrong does go wrong in this show. It’s probably one of the funniest shows I’ve ever seen.” The cast started rehearsals about six weeks ago, and Jones said they’ve been incredibly dedicated to their roles while also being hilarious to work with. This is Jones’ third show with The Ringgold Playhouse; she’s acted and directed at the Depot, the Colonnade Center, and the Tivoli, in addition to her past experience living in South Georgia. Jones has also directed “Lend Me a Tenor”, another Ken Ludwig comedy, so she’s quite familiar with his work. “There’s a lot of physical comedy. There’s a lot of misunderstandings and costume mistakes and running in and out of doors. The thing with a farce is that there’s a lot of opening and slamming of doors. We have five. So people are going in and coming out, slamming doors dramatically,” Jones said. Jones believes it’s important to allow her cast, once they’ve established their characters, to make suggestions about things they think their characters might do on stage. If they feel their character should be standing at a certain location or displaying a cer-

The thing with a farce is that there’s a lot of opening and slamming of doors. We have five. ”

tain emotion, Jones encourages her cast to voice their opinions. “The way I feel, an actor who gets into his or her character owns that character and knows that character. Even better than the director. I mean, I know that play backwards and forwards, and I can visualize everything I want to happen in my head,” Jones said. “I’ve been an actor most of my life, and coming from that end to directing, it sort of gives me a unique perspective rather than those who only direct.” The set itself is another interesting aspect of “Moon Over Buffalo”, as the set is actually the green room at the Depot. Jones explained that the green room is typically where the cast hangs out before a show, where they can rehearse their lines or simply relax. It’s the room between the stage that has access to other parts of the venue. And, because the show is being performed at the Depot, which is a historic location, they’re limited on ways they can modify the set. “In this production, because there’s three different shows, two within the other one, the ‘Cyrano’ scene is go-

ing to take place in front of the curtain, on the proscenium and on the floor, and for ‘Private Lives’, we’ve built platforms that are actually going to roll out to the middle to present our balcony. Then we just roll them back, and they’ll be part of the set,” Jones explained. “And that’s the beauty of theater, getting creative. If we were in, say the Colonnade or the Theatre Centre, they have that extra wing space; they can roll in their different set pieces with plenty of room. But we don’t have that, so we have to get a little more creative.” “Moon Over Buffalo” is going to be performed at the historic Ringgold Depot beginning Thursday at 7:30 p.m. and will run June 21–22 and 27–29, with an additional 2 p.m. matinee show on June 29. Tickets are available online or at the door. If you’ve ever wanted a chance to experience the hilarious comedy of Ken Ludwig on stage, complete with mistaken identities, disastrous performances, slamming doors, and more, then you definitely don’t want to miss The Ringgold Playhouse’s production of “Moon Over Buffalo”.

THU6.20

FRI6.21

SAT6.22

Urinetown

See How They Run

Finding Neverland

A dystopian future in which private toilets have become obsolete after a series of extreme droughts. 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org

A vicar named Lionel Toop has settled down with his American wife, a former actress named Penelope. 8 p.m. The Mars Theater 117 N. Chattanooga St. bapshows.com

A charming account of a period in the life of author J.M. Barrie, creator of the classic children's fable "Peter Pan". 2, 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. tivolichattanooga.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 20, 2019 • THE PULSE • 11


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR THURSDAY6.20 Let’s Roam Chattanooga 9 a.m. The Hunter Museum of American Art 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968 huntermuseum.org Beginner Wheel 1 p.m. Scenic City Clay Arts 301 E. 11th St. (423) 883-1758 sceniccityclayarts.org Urban Farmers Market and Marketplace 3 p.m. Miller Park 910 Market St. millerparkmarket.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 5 p.m. Hutton & Smith Brewing Co. 431 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 760-3600 huttonandsmithbrewing.com Alley Hour 5:30 p.m. Cooper’s Alley 10 E. 7th St. Planted in Chattanooga 6 p.m. Hart Gallery 110 E. Main St. (423) 521-4707 hartgallerytn.com World Refugee Day 6 p.m. The Camp House 149 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 702-8081 thecamphouse.com The Third Wife 7 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 803-6578 chattpalace.com DJ Lewis and Friends 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Moon Over Buffalo 7:30 p.m. The Ringgold Playhouse 155 Depot St. (706) 935-3061

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cityofringgoldga.gov Urinetown 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347 barkinglegs.org Alcoholics Not Anonymous Comedy Open Mic 8 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 682-8200 chattanoogabarley.com Country Line Dancing Class 8 p.m. Westbound Bar 24 Station St. (423) 498-3069 westboundbar.com African American Family Film Series 8:30 p.m. Miller Park 910 Market St. millerparkmarket.com

FRIDAY6.21 Let’s Roam Chattanooga 9 a.m. The Hunter Museum of American Art 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968 huntermuseum.org Beginner Ukulele Workshop 1 p.m. The Camp House 149 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 702-8081 thecamphouse.com Intro to Banjo Class 1 p.m. Fiddlers Anonymous 2248 Dayton Blvd. (423) 994-7497 bapshows.com The Third Wife 4 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 803-6578 chattpalace.com Harmonica Workshop 4 p.m. The Camp House 149 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 702-8081 thecamphouse.com You Me Us Exhibition

6 p.m. AVA Gallery 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4282 avarts.org Finding Neverland 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com DJ Lewis and Friends 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Urinetown 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347 barkinglegs.org Moon Over Buffalo 7:30 p.m. The Ringgold Playhouse 155 Depot St. (706) 935-3061 cityofringgoldga.gov See How They Run 8 p.m. Back Alley @ The Mars Theater 117 N. Chattanooga St. LaFayette, GA (706) 996-8350 bapshows.com Improv “Movie” Night: Sword and Sorcery Movie 8 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Video Game Night 8 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. (423) 521-3977 stonecupcafe.com Ruby Falls Lantern Tours 8:30 p.m. Ruby Falls 1720 S. Scenic Hwy. (423) 821-2544 rubyfalls.com Cut Throat Comedy’s Summer Solstice Soiree 9 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 803-6578 chattpalace.com

Good, Old-Fashioned Improv Show 10 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SATURDAY6.22 Chattanooga River Market 10 a.m. Tennessee Aquarium Plaza 1 Broad St. publicmarkets.us Silk and Shades 10 a.m. Chattanooga Public Library 1001 Broad St. (423) 643-7700 chattlibrary.org Introduction to Gateless Writing 10 a.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Glackens & Renoir Exhibition Opening 10 a.m. The Hunter Museum of American Art 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968 huntermuseum.org Photography Hike 11 a.m. Reflection Riding Arboretum 400 Garden Rd. (423) 821-1160 reflectionriding.org iPhoneography: Editing Photos 11 a.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Hutton & Smith Four Year Anniversary Bash Noon Hutton & Smith Brewing Co. 431 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 760-3600 huttonandsmithbrewing.com Mixed Media Art Journaling 1 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750


CHOW SUMMER 2019

CHATTANOOGA’S PREMIER

RESTAURANT GUIDE courtesy of

The Chattanooga Pulse


14 • THE PULSE • JUNE 20, 2019 • SUMMER RESTAURANT GUIDE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM


BREWER MEDIA GROUP Publisher James Brewer, Sr.

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Gary Poole gary@chattanoogapulse.com Assistant Editor Jenn Webster Contributors Kelsey Fox Kelly Lockhart Ensley McFarland

ADVERTISING Director of Sales Mike Baskin mike@brewermediagroup.com Account Executives Rick Leavell • Cindee McBride Libby Phillips • Lisa Roche John Rodriguez • Danielle Swindell

CONTACT Offices 1305 Carter St. Chattanooga, TN 37402 Phone 423.265.9494 Email info@chattanoogapulse.com Website chattanoogapulse.com Facebook @chattanoogapulse THE FINE PRINT Chattanooga Chow is published biannually by The Pulse and Brewer Media. Chattanooga Chow is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. Chattanooga Chow is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publishers may take more than one copy per weekly issue, please. © 2019 Brewer Media

CHATTANOOGA'S WEEKLY ALTERNATIVE

Summer 2019 Dining Guide Southside Social ............................................. 16

Mike's Tavern ................................................. 25

The Ice Cream Show ....................................... 17

Lupi's Pizza Pies ............................................. 26

Barley Chattanooha ....................................... 18

The Tap House ............................................... 27

THE PULSE • SUMMER RESTAURANT GUIDE • JUNE 20, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • 15


CHOW SUMMER 2019

Southside Social

S

outhside Social general manager Joshua Lang tells me there are people in Chattanooga who have never visited the establishment. Never? That’s like being a Chattanooga native who’s never crossed the Walnut Street Bridge. Just…no. The Southside Social is classically Chattanooga and classically Gen X, a fascinating combination that blends conversation, zany fun, and a laidback attitude epitomized by The Big Lebowski’s The Dude (the Southside’s patron saint, if you’re wondering). What can you find at the Southside Social? Bowling, of course! Also ping pong, cornhole, darts, giant Jenga, monthly trivia nights—the list goes on. You can bring your kids, or you can bring your ladies, or you can bring your plaid-shirted bros. The happy sound of conversation— the off-beat, slacker hospitality of the place—will take you in and make you feel as much at home as if that fat 16 • THE PULSE • JUNE 20, 2019 • SUMMER RESTAURANT GUIDE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

leather sofa was your own. Southside Social has a renowned menu consisting of cooked-to-order dishes made of fresh, mostly local, ingredients, such as savory sandwiches mounted on Niedlov’s bread. There’s meat smoked on-site, including brisket, wings, and pork butts. With an extensive cocktail list and 6 local beers on tap, there’s something delicious for everyone. There’s also a restroom (okay, two restrooms) that will prove you’re a vampire. (Trust me. You’re a vampire.) If this isn’t enough, Lang tells me, there’s more fun in the works. Karaoke nights just started at the Southside Social, every Wednesday if you want to try your pipes. And there are new, lunchtime hours in the works—think fast sandwiches, a cold beer or soda, and free parking, all a short drive from TVA, Unum, or wherever you work downtown. Follow the Southside Social on their website at thesouthsidesocial.com


CHOW SUMMER 2019

The Ice Cream Show

H

ot summer days are upon us and there’s nothing like ice cream, yogurt, or iced coffee to help make it through the sweat. The Ice Cream Show is the perfect place to go if you’re craving something sweet and cold! They just celebrated ten years of being open, selling everyone’s favorite summer treats! Whether it’s ice cream, tea, coffee, or a smoothie, The Ice Cream Show has every flavor you can imagine. With around 17,000 different ice cream possibilities, you can create the ultimate blended ice cream in one of their homemade waffle cones, which are made fresh every day. And if you get lucky, you may actually get to watch them be made! “We don’t have just ice cream, but yogurt too; sugar free and dairy free,” says owner Lynda Curtis. You choose which option you want, then choose

from their 40 different fresh ingredients to go into the ice cream. Then they mix it all together for your own magical creation. They also have new flavors of teas and smoothies. Purple Fog is a new tea that has lavender in it, as well as their new Ironman smoothie. Not to mention, they have gourmet ice coffees roasted from the Seattle area. Once you have whatever creation you’ve decided on, you can enjoy it even more at their tables outside where you can see The Hunter Museum of American Art and the Walnut Street Walking Bridge. It’s also nice to walk along the bridge, looking out at the beautiful view of the Tennessee River, while having the amazing ice cream melt in your mouth! I don’t know about you, but I scream for ice cream! THE PULSE • SUMMER RESTAURANT GUIDE • JUNE 20, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • 17


CHOW SUMMER 2019

Barley Chattanooga I

f you’re looking for the best taproom and bottle shop in Chattanooga, look no further. Barley is perfectly located on the corner of East MLK Blvd. with just the right amount of space for you to sit outside and embrace the warm weather. It’s a newer addition to downtown Chattanooga, opening in 2017, but it has quickly made a name for itself. Barley’s owner, Cameron, focuses on making sure everyone who walks in the door can find something they enjoy drinking. He fosters to a laid-back atmosphere in order to remain one of the easiest places in the area for people to

sit back on a cozy couch, relax, and drink a cold beer. In a sea of new breweries in the downtown area, Barley stands out because it offers 64 beers on tap. The draft beer is mostly local to the Chattanooga area and the state, but does include some of the more widely known breweries. If beer isn’t for you, you’re in luck because they have newly implemented their draft cocktail list. These cocktails are classic favorites such as gin and tonic, Moscow mule, and even an Old Fashioned. Barley prides itself on offering options for every distinctive person that walks through their doors.

If that didn’t impress you enough, Barley has a bottle shop located in their middle room. All of the packaged beer has been hand-picked to include just about any beer or sour your heart desires. This gives you the rare option to drop by for a drink and head home with a six pack of your new favorite

18 • THE PULSE • JUNE 20, 2019 • SUMMER RESTAURANT GUIDE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

beer. Barley is the perfect place for people of every type. It would be easy to hang out all day, decompress, play board games, and listen to live music. The atmosphere and seemingly endless drink selections make Barley the next place you should stop by on any afternoon.


Chattanooga Restaurant Guide 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 485-3050 1885grill.com 2503 Station Grill 2503 Westside Dr. (423) 485-3873 2503stationgrill.com 2 Sons Kitchen & Market 422 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 661-8709 2 Squares a Day 3399 Amnicola Hwy. (423) 697-7595 3rd Deck Burger Bar 201 Riverfront Pkwy., Pier 2 (423) 266-4488 chattanoogariverboat.com Abuelo’s Mexican Food Embassy 2102 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 855-7400 abuelos.com Acropolis Mediterranean Grill 2213 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 899-5341 acropolisgrill.com Adelle’s 400 E. Main St. (423) 531-2222 adellescreperie.com Aji Peruvian Restaurant 5035 Ooltewah Ringgold Rd. (423) 396-3919 ajiperuvianrestaurant.com AJ’s Sports Bar & Grill 6238 Bonny Oaks Dr. (423) 485-9080 ajssportsbarandgrill.com Alex’s Thai Food & Sushi Bistro 26 E Main St. (423) 803-0999 Alimentari (423) 498-3190 801 Chestnut St. alimentarichattanooga.com Alleia 25 E. Main St. (423) 305-6990 alleiarestaurant.com American Draft 1400 Market St. (423) 498-4001 choochoo.com American Wings 2316 E. 3rd St. (423) 803-3919 Amigo Mexican Restaurant

We strive to make our listings accurate, but things change. We recommend you call in advance or visit websites before visiting any restaurant.

5450 Hwy. 153 (423) 875-8049 5794 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-5435 1906 Dayton Blvd. (423) 870-9928 3805 Ringgold Rd. (423) 624-4345 amigorestaurantonline.com Ankar’s Downtown 510 Broad St. (423) 266-0017 Ankar’s Hoagies 5018 Hixson Pike (423) 876-7158 4764 Hwy. 58 (423) 894-3808 5966 Brainerd Rd. (423) 899-3074 ankarshoagiesonline.com Aretha Frankensteins 518 Tremont St. (423) 265-7685 arethas.com Armando’s 8018 E. Brainerd Rd. (423) 899-3705 1814 E. Main St. (423) 629-9218 4767 Hwy. 58 (423) 894-1413 7330 Hixson Pike (423) 842-0479 7032 Lee Hwy. (423) 855-0772 1105 Lafayette Rd. (706) 861-2252 5700 Ringgold Rd. (423) 867-5950 Asia Buffet 6901 Lee Hwy., Ste. 112 (423) 499-8865 Asia Cafe 5210 Brainerd Rd. (423) 899-8888 asiacafebrainerd.com Asian Flavor 4839 Hwy. 58 (423) 894-6776 asainflavorchattanooga.com Aubrey’s 496 Northgate Mall Dr. (423) 541-2985

aubreysrestaurants.com Ayala Mexican 1832 Taft Hwy. (423) 886-0063 Back Inn Café 412 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033 bluffviewartdistrict.com Bad Daddy’s Burger Bar 1924 Gunbarrel Rd. #104 (423) 475-5948 baddaddysburgerbar.com Bantam & Biddy 728 Market St. (423) 498-4367 bantamandbiddy.com Bar Louie 2100 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 855-4155 barlouieamerica.com Basecamp Bar & Restaurant 346 Frazier Ave. (423) 803-5251 basecampcha.com Bea’s Restaurant 4500 Dodds Ave. (423) 867-3618 pulleybones.com Beast + Barrel 16 Frazier Ave. (423) 805-4599 beastandbarrel.com Beef O’Brady’s 5958 Snow Hill Rd. #100 (423) 910-0261 ooltewahbeefobradys.com Bela Lisboa 417 Frazier Ave. (423) 682-8365 belalisboa.com Best China 4340 Ringgold Rd. (423) 698-0067 Biba’s Italian Restaurant 5918 Hixson Pike (423) 843-0001 bibasitalian.com Big Chill & Grill 103 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 267-2445 bigchillandgrill.com Big Jeff’s BBQ

4272 Bonny Oaks Dr. (423) 771-7814 Big River Grille & Brewing Works 222 Broad St. (423) 267-2739 2020 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 553-7723 bigrivergrille.com Big Rock Grill 1400 Patten Rd. (706) 820-2531 Big Table 118 Cross St. (423) 634-0772 bigtable.net Blue Orleans Seafood Restaurant 1463 Market St. (423) 757-0088 blueorleansdowntown.com Blue Plate 191 Chestnut St. (423) 648-6767 theblueplate.info Bluegrass Grill 55 E. Main St. (423) 752-4020 bluegrassgrillchattanooga.com Boathouse Rotisserie & Raw Bar 1459 Riverside Dr. (423) 622-0122 boathousechattanooga.com Boccaccia Restaurant 3077 S. Broad St. (423) 266-2930 boccacciarestaurant.com Bone’s Smokehouse 7601 E. Brainerd Rd. (423) 710-3382 Bonefish Grille 2115 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 892-3175 bonefishgrill.com Brewhaus 224 Frazier Ave. (423) 531-8490 brewhausbar.com Bridgeman’s Chophouse 107 W. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-4121 bridgemanschophouse.com

Broad Street Grille 1201 Broad St. (423) 424-3700 chattanooganhotel.com Brown Bag 1924 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 413-3383 brownbagnow.com Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-9878 budssportsbar.com Buffalo Wild Wings 120 Market St. (423) 634-0468 5744 Hwy. 153 (423) 877-3338 buffalowildwings.com Buffet King 5230 Hwy. 153 (423) 877-8816 C & W Cafe 1501 E. 23rd St. (423) 624-6431 Café & Toast 3536 Cummings Hwy. (423) 803-0493 cafetoastus.com Café Lemont 801 Dodds Ave. (423) 629-1388 Café on the Corner 826 Scenic Hwy. (423) 825-5005 cafeonthecornerlookoutmountain.com Canyon Grill 28 Scenic Hwy. #189 (706) 398-9510 canyongrill.com Carnitas Carmelitas 2604 Amnicola Hwy. (423) 201-4841 Carrabba’s Italian Grill 2040 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 894-9970 carrabbas.com Cashew 149A River St. (423) 355-5486 cashewchattanooga.com Champy’s Famous Fried Chicken

526 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 752-9198 6925 Lee Hwy. (423) 803-2800 champyschicken.com Chao’s Mongolian Grill 5726 Brainerd Rd. (423) 553-1128 Charley’s Philly Steaks 2100 Hamilton Place Blvd., Ste. 309 (423) 894-0454 charleys.com Charlie’s BBQ & Bakery 2309 E. Main St. (423) 541-1500 Charlie’s Restaurant & Lounge 8504 Dayton Pike (423) 842-9744 charliesrestaurantlounge.com Chatt Smoke House 416 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 468-4978 chatt-smokehouse.com Chattanooga Barley & Bottleshop 235 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 682-8200 chattanoogabarley.com Chattanooga Billiard Club 725 Cherry St. (423) 267-7740 110 Jordan Dr. (423) 499-3883 cbcburns.com Chattanooga Brewing Co. 1804 Chestnut St. (423) 702-9958 chattabrew.com Chattanooga Salad Company 7425 Commons Blvd. (423) 551-5105 Chattanooga Wing Factory 2109 McCallie Ave. (423) 697-9878 chattwingfact.com Chatter Box Cafe 1817 Market St. (423) 504-8927 Cheesecake Factory 2084 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 499-4447 thecheesecakefactory.com Cheese Dip 6312 Bonny Oaks Dr. (423) 803-4348 ilovecheesedip.com Chef Lin Buffet 5084 South Terrace

THE PULSE • SUMMER RESTAURANT GUIDE • JUNE 20, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • 19


(423) 510-1998 cheflinbuffet.com Chicken Salad Chick 629 Market St., Ste. 101 (423) 668-0098 chickensaladchick.com 1820 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 468-3729 chickensaladchick.com Chicken-w-Bones 6227 Lee Hwy. (423) 305-0742 chicken-w-bones.com China Cafeteria 511 Market St. (423) 265-1522 China Gourmet 321 Browns Ferry Rd., Ste. B (423) 821-8500 chinagourmetchattanooga.com China House 7601 E. Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-8670 China Moon 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 893-8088 chinamoontn.net China Rose 9203 Lee Hwy. (423) 238-1268 gochinese.com Choo Choo Bar-B-Que 6410 Hixson Pike (423) 843-9554 3957 Ringgold Rd. (423) 629-1313 7910 E. Brainerd Rd. (423) 553-8888 900 Appling St. (423) 622-1802 Chop House 2011 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 892-1222 thechophouse.com Chopstix 6903 Lee Hwy. (423) 305-0537 noogachopstix.com Chubby’s Barbeque 3801 Rossville Blvd. (423) 867-4422 Chuy’s 2271 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 710-3007 chuys.com Citron Et Sel 212 W. 8th St. (423) 498-5802 citronetsel.com City Café Diner 901 Carter St. (423) 634-9191 7641 Lee Hwy. (423) 485-8222 citycafemenu.com Community Pie 850 Market St.

20 • THE PULSE • JUNE 20, 2019 • SUMMER RESTAURANT GUIDE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

(423) 486-1743 communitypie.com Conga Latin Food 26 E. Main St. (423) 201-4806 Couch’s Barbecue 8307 Old Lee Hwy. (423) 238-4801 Countryside Café 8223 Mahan Gap Rd. (423) 344-8646 countrysidecafe.net Coyote Jack’s 1400 Cowart St. (423) 668-6807 coyotejackssaloon.com Crab Trap 2122 Dodds Ave. (423) 322-0729 Crust Pizza 3211 Broad St. (423) 756-4040 100 Signal Mtn. Rd. (423) 710-3780 crustpizza.com Daved’s Deli 7639 Middle Valley Rd. (423) 842-9088 Davis Wayne's Food Spirit Soul 9454 Bradmore Ln. (423) 269-8969 Drake’s 7338 McCutcheon Rd. (423) 702-5722 drakescomeplay.com Diamond Billiard Club 3600 Hixson Pk. (423) 877-5882 diamondbilliardclub.com Dida’s Pizza 2020 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 643-2200 cidaspizza.com Dipped Fresh 221 River St. (423) 490-9334 dippedfresh.com Dish T’Pass 302 W. 6th St. (423) 309-5353 dishtpass.com Dixie BBQ 1530 W. Boy Scout Rd. (423) 842-4025 Doc Holidays 742 Ashland Ter. (423) 305-1494 docholidaysbarandgrill.com Dockside Café 8411 Harrison Bay Rd. (423) 344-9998 dockside-cafe.com Dominica’s Caribbean Kitchen 5450 Hwy. 153 (423) 475-6916 dominicaskitchen.com

Don Juan Tienda Mexicana 6005 Ringgold Rd. (423) 892-5222 Dorado Cuisine & Spirits 801 Pine St. (423) 531-4653 Dos Amigos 3208 Amnicola Hwy. (423) 495-1802 Dos Bros 2100 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 803-4000 5591 Hwy 153 Ste. 160 (423) 498-2040 4450 Frontage Rd. NW (423) 464-5196 1700 Broad St. (423) 498-5600 Dosa Hut 6940 Lee Hwy. (423) 648-5069 Dub’s Place 4408 Dayton Blvd. (423) 875-3151 Easy Bistro & Bar 203 Broad St. (423) 266-1121 easybistro.com Eatz Cafe 1301 Riverfront Dr. (423) 313-6326 Edley’s BBQ 205 Manufacturer’s Rd. (423) 498-2772 edleysbbq.com El Arca de Noe 3027 Dayton Blvd. (423) 760-3809 El Cortes Mexican Restaurant 9203 Lee Hwy. (423) 238-6655 EL Gallo Giro Restaurant 4700 Rossville Blvd. (423) 805-4760 El Meson Restaurante Mexicano 248 Northgate Mall Dr. (423) 710-1201 elmesonrestaurant.com El Metate 5922 Hixson Pike (423) 842-1400 9332 Dayton Pike (423) 332-3190 1238 Taft Hwy. (423) 886-0054 El Monterrey 531 Signal Mountain Rd. (423) 266-6420 elmonterrey.us Embargo 62 301 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 551-4786 embargo62bar.com Epicurean Restaurant 1042 Graysville Rd. (423) 893-9381


4301 Ringgold Rd. (423) 622-4139 theepicureanrestaurant.com Fazoli’s 2332 Shallowford Village Dr. (423) 499-5155 fazolis.com FEED Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. (423) 708-8500 feedtableandtavern.com Fernando’s 5308 Ringgold Rd. (423) 668-8670 fernandoseastride.com Fiamma Pizza Company 405 N. Market St. (423) 713-7742 Fiesta Mexicana 4021 Hixson Pk. (423) 877-2879 chattanooga.fiestamexonline.com Figgy’s Sandwich Shop 619 Chestnut St. (423) 266-8675 Firebirds Wood Fired Grill 2107 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 308-1090 firebirdsrestaurants.com Firebox Grill 7025 Shallowford Rd. (423) 899-7733 thefireboxgrill.com Firehouse Subs 3849 Dayton Blvd. Ste. 101 423) 877-2345 6025 E. Brainerd Rd. Ste. 110 (423) 893-3473 1820 Gunbarrel Rd. Ste. 700 (423) 475-5491 5546 Hwy. 153 (423) 803-5999 6408 Ringgold Rd. (423) 531-8081 firehousesubs.com Fireside Grille 3018 Cummings Hwy. (423) 821-9898 First Watch 1825 Gunbarrel Rd. #100 (423) 362-5951 300 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 763-1800 5207 Hwy. 153 Ste. 101 (423) 498-9955 firstwatch.com Fit + Meals 6231 Perimeter Dr., Ste. 213 fitplusmeals.com Five Guys Burgers & Fries 124 Stuart Rd. (423) 476-4878 401 Broad St.

(423) 531-8267 2020 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 664-3500 5110 Hixson Pike (423) 870-7772 fiveguys.com Flatiron Deli 706 Walnut St. (423) 266-2620 flatiron-deli.com Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. (423) 602-5980 flyingsquirrelbar.com Freddrick’s 1207 Dodds Ave. (423) 710-1868 Food Works 205 Manufacturers Rd. (423) 752-7487 foodworksrestaurant.com Forbidden City 2273 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 305-1087 forbiddencitytn.com Formosa Restaurant 5425 Hwy. 153 (423) 875-6953 formosarestaurant.com Fortune House Restaurant 1238 Taft Hwy. (423) 517-8999 Fresh Pot Cafe 5425 Hwy. 153 (423) 805-3773 Frothy Monkey 1400 Market St. (423) 680-6343 frothymonkey.com Fuji Japanese Steak & Sushi 2207 Overnite Dr. (423) 892-2899 5437 Hwy. 153 (423) 531-3183 fujisteakchattanooga.com G’s Detroit Sausages 611 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 803-2717 chattanoogadetroitsausage.com Genji Sushi Bar 301 Manufacturers Rd. (423) 702-7300 genjiweb.com Glen Gene Deli 5748 Hwy. 153 (423) 877-9997 glengene.com Golden Big Bowl 5517 Brainerd Rd. (423) 498-1243 golden-big-bowl.business.site Gondolier Pizza 6901 Lee Hwy. (423) 899-8100 Good Dog 34 Frazier Ave.

(423) 475-6175 eatatgooddog.com Grand China 3815 Dayton Blvd. (423) 870-0503 Greek Plate Gyro’s 14 W. Kent St. (423) 541-1800 Greg’s Sandwich Works 6337 E. Brainerd Rd. (423) 551-8634 gregssandwichworks.com Griffin Footlong Hot Dogs 847 E. Main St. (423) 265-5280 Haiku Hibachi 5318 Ringgold Rd. (423) 855-8750 Hair of the Dog Pub 334 Market St. (423) 265-4615 hairofthedogpub.net Hana Steak & Sushi 2200 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 855-8204 hanachattanooga.com Heaven & Ale 304 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 602-8286 heavenandalebrewing.com Heavenly Wings 5231 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-9949 chattanoogawings.com Hennen’s Restaurant 193 Chestnut St. (423) 634-5160 hennens.net Herman’s Soul Food 3821 Brainerd Rd. (423) 624-5715 hermanssoulfood.com Hibachi & Wings 6933 Lee Hwy. (423) 305-1231 hibachiandwings.com Hibachi Express 7401 E. Brainerd Rd. #100 (423) 508-8033 hibachiexpresschattanooga.com Hibachi Express & Juice Bar 4511 Hwy. 58 (423) 682-8260 hibachiexpressandjuicebar.com Hickory Pit BBQ 5611 Ringgold Rd. (423) 894-1217 hickorypitbarbecue.com Highway 58 BBQ 4921 Hwy. 58 (423) 894-3019 HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. (423) 362-8335 hificlydeschattanooga.com Hillbilly Willy’s Bar-B-Q 115 Browns Ferry Rd. (423) 821-2272 THE PULSE • SUMMER RESTAURANT GUIDE • JUNE 20, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • 21


hillbillywillys.com Hungry House 4457 Hwy. 58 (423) 899-4507 Homefolks Restaurant 8981 Dayton Pike (423) 332-5724 Home Slice Pizza 2000 E. 23rd St. (423) 531-3500 homeslicechatt.com Honest Pint 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192 thehonestpint.com Hong Kong Chinese Restaurant 8652 E. Brainerd Rd. (423) 899-4878 Hooters 5912 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-8668 hooters.com Hour Place 960 E. 3rd St. (423) 756-4687 Hummingbird Pastaria 720 Mississippi Ave. (423) 886-1900 hummingbirdpastaria.com Hunan Wok 2201 E. 23rd St. (423) 624-6200 Ice Cream Show 105 Walnut St. (423) 702-5173 theicecreamshow.com Ichiban Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar 5621 Brainerd Rd. (423) 892-0404 5035 Hixson Pike (423) 875-047 5425 Hwy. 153 (423) 875-0404 yourichiban.com IL Primo 1100 Hixson Pike (423) 602-5555

22 • THE PULSE • JUNE 20, 2019 • SUMMER RESTAURANT GUIDE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

737 McCallie Ave. (423) 468-177 primochattanooga.com Imperial Garden Restaurant 2288 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 499-9333 India Mahal Restaurant 5970 E. Brainerd Rd. (423) 510-9651 Innside Restaurant 800 Chestnut St. (423) 266-7687 J Alexander’s 2215 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 855-5559 jalexanders.com J. Gumbo’s 5123 Hixson Pike (423) 760-3995 jgumbos.com Jack Brown’s Beer & Burger Joint 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 682-8198 Jack’s 3530 Cummings Hwy. (423) 821-6888 eatatjacks.com James County Cattle Co. 2553 Lifestyle Way (423) 899-9111 jamescountycattle.com Jason’s Deli 2115 Gunbarrel Rd., #14 (423) 296-1096 jasonsdeli.com Jefferson’s 618 Georgia Ave. (423) 710-1560 jeffersonsrestaurant.com Jersey Mike’s 5510 Hwy. 153 (423) 321-8145 2260 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 286-5133 5975 Elementary Way (423) 521-5292 jerseymikes.com

Jet’s Pizza 3600 Hixson Pike (423) 757-1616 jetspizza.com Jim ‘N Nick’s Bar-B-Q 2040 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 680-6706 jimnnicks.com Kabob-ster 1408 Gunbarrel Rd., #111 (423) 475-5370 kabob-ster.com Kacey Home Cooking 6921 Lee Hwy. (423) 490-0896 kaceyhomecooking.com Karl’s Family Restaurant 5100 Hixson Pike (423) 875-5506 Kenny’s Southside Sandwiches 1251 Market St. (423) 498-5888 kennyssandwiches.com King’s Delight 1900 Dodson Ave. (423) 622-1896 Kumo Hibachi & Sushi 6025 E. Brainerd Rd. (423) 468-3385 kumochattanooga.com La Altena 8644 E. Brainerd Rd. (423) 893-9047 314 W. Main St. (423) 266-7595 615 Commercial Ln. (423) 877-1477 La Cabriole 1341 Burgess Rd. (423) 821-0350 lacabrioleusa.com Lakeshore Grille 5600 Lake Resort Terrace (423) 710-2057 lakeshoregrille.com Las Margaritas 1101 Hixson Pike (423) 756-3332


4604 Skyview Dr. (423) 892-3065 Leapin Leprechaun 100 Market St. (423) 777-9097 theleprechaunpub.com Lillie Mae’s Place 4712 Dayton Blvd. (423) 875-8999 Little Tokyo Express 4516 Hixson Pike (423) 874-0500 Local 191 191 Chestnut St. (423) 648-6767 local191.com Logan’s Roadhouse 3592 Cummings Hwy. (423) 821-2948 504A Northgate Mall Dr. (423) 875-4443 logansroadhouse.com Lois’s Lounge & Restaurant 3013 Dodson Ave. (423) 698-4982 Longhorn Steakhouse 5771 Brainerd Rd. (423) 490-0573 5583 Hwy. 153 (423) 870-2722 longhornsteakhouse.com Los 3 Amigos 3536 Cummings Hwy. (423) 521-7676 Los Potros 5611 Ringgold Rd. (423) 296-2229 lospotrosrestaurant.com Lucky’s Bar & Grill 2536 Cummings Hwy. (423) 825-5145 Lupi’s Pizza Pies 406A Broad St. (423) 266-5874 2382 N. Ocoee St. (423) 476-9464 5506 Hixson Pike (423) 847-3700

1414 Jenkins Rd. (423) 855-4104 9453 Bradmore Ln. (423) 602-7499 lupi.com Mad Philly 5959 Shallowford Rd. (423) 531-9449 Main Street Meats 217 E. Main St. (423) 602-9568 mainstreetmeatschatt.com Maple Street Biscuit Co. 407 Broad St. (423) 362-5380 2114 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 713-9368 maplestreetbiscuits.com Marsha’s Backstreet Café 5036 Brainerd Rd. (423) 485-7911 Mayan Kitchen 507 Broad St. (423) 682-7835 mayankitchen.com Mayo’s Bar and Grill 3820 Brainerd Rd. (423) 624-0034 McAlister’s Deli 2288 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 510-8299 541 Signal Mountain Rd. (423) 265-2003 mcalistersdeli.com Mean Mug 114 W. Main St. (423) 825-4206 205 Manufacturer’s Rd. (423) 498-1157 meanmugcoffee.com Mellow Mushroom 205 Broad St. (423) 266-5564 2318 Lifestyle Way (423) 468-3737 mellowmushroom.com Memo’s Grill 430 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 267-7283

Merv’s Burgers 8968 Dayton Pike (423) 451-3033 33 Legion St. (706) 952-2202 713 Mountain Creek Rd. (423) 877-0221 Mexiville 809 Market St. (423) 805-7444 103 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 498-5375 mexivilletn.com Mexi-Wing VII 5773 Brainerd Rd. (423) 296-1073 mexi-wingchattanooga.com Mexi-Wing IX 6925 Shallowford Rd. (423) 468-3366 Mike’s Hole in the Wall 535 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 475-5259 mikesholeinthewall.com Mike's Smokehouse 3147 Broad St. (423) 668-8341 mikessmokehouse.com Mike's Tavern 5211 Hwy 153, St. 103 (423) 541-3615 mikestaverntn.com Milk and Honey 135 N. Market St. (423) 521-3123 milkandhoneychattanooga.com Mimi’s Deli 5023 Hixson Pike (423) 877-8700 Mindy B’s Deli 828 Georgia Ave. (423) 521-7932 mindybsdeli.com Mission BBQ 1926 Gunbarrel Rd. #108 (423) 933-3098 mission-bbq.com Moe’s Southwest Grill 1820 Gunbarrel Rd.

(423) 553-6930 5510 Hwy. 153 (423) 875-8757 moeschattanooga.com Mojo Burrito 3950 Tennessee Ave. (423) 822-6656 1800 Dayton Blvd. (423) 870-6656 9447 Bradmore Ln. (423) 531-6656 mojoburrito.com Molcajete Mexican Restaurant 6231 Perimeter Dr. #127 (423) 760-8200 molcajeterestauranttn.com Moss Place II 711 Tunnel Blvd. (423) 493-9006 mossplace2.com Mountain City Club 729 Chestnut St. (423) 756-5584 mountaincityclub.org Mr. T’s Pizza & Ice Cream 3924 Tennessee Ave. (423) 821-5084 mrtspizza.com Mrs. B’s Reggae Cafe 3103 Broad St. (423) 702-5808 mrsbsreggaecafe.com Naked River Brewing Co. 1791 Reggie White Blvd. (423) 541-1131 nakedriverbrewing.com New China Buffet & Grill 3536 Cummings Hwy. (423) 821-6988 531 Signal Mountain Rd. (423) 756-8788 newchinabuffechattanooga.com New China Restaurant 3710 Ringgold Rd. (423) 495-1818 1900 Broad St. (423) 267-5941 New York Pizza Dept.

5731 Hwy. 153 (423) 531-8830 indoughwecrust.com Nick’s Deli & Marketplace 5149 Hixson Pike (423) 877-5818 Niedlov’s Breadworks 215 E. Main St. (423) 756-0303 niedlovs.com Nikki’s Drive Inn 899 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 265-9015 Noodles & Pho 5450 Hwy. 153 (423) 531-3462 Nooga-Q Smokehouse & Grille 301 Signal Mtn. Rd. (423) 752-1935 nooga-q.com Nourishpoint 1308 Hanover St. (423) 498-2900 1819 Broad St. (423) 284-3374 nourishpoint.com Old Chicago Pizza & Taproom 250 Northgate Mall Dr. (423) 877-3450 2006 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 352-9095 oldchicago.com Old Gilman Grille 216 W. 8th St. (423) 269-7449 oldgilmangrill.com Olive Garden 2200 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 899-7707 5525 Hwy. 153 (423) 877-7704 olivegarden.com Outback Steakhouse 501 Northgate Mall Dr. (423) 870-0980 2120 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 899-2600

outback.com Panera Bread 417 Market St. (423) 266-2253 620 Northgate Mall Dr. (423) 877-0223 1810 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 899-2253 panerabread.com Parkway Pourhouse 801 Riverfront Pkwy. (423) 498-5300 parkwaypourhouse.com Penn Station East Coast Subs 5241 Hwy. 153 (423) 485-3536 penn-station.com P.F. Chang’s 2110 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 242-0045 pfchangs.com Pickle Barrel 1012 Market St. (423) 266-1103 picklebarreltn.com Pizza Brothers 501 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 269-7900 Pizzeria Cortile 4400 Dayton Blvd. (423) 682-8278 pizzeriacortile.com Poblano’s Mexican Cuisine 551 River St. (423) 490-7911 poblanoschattanooga.com Portobello’s Italian Restaurant and Pizzaria 4976 Hwy. 58 (423) 499-6001 portobelloschattanooga.com Portofino Italian Restaurant 6407 Ringgold Rd. (423) 499-9696 portofinoschatt.com Provino’s Italian

THE PULSE • SUMMER RESTAURANT GUIDE • JUNE 20, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • 23


Restaurant 5084 S. Terrace (423) 899-2559 provinos.com Public House 1110 Market St. (423) 266-3366 publichousechattanooga.com Puckett’s Grocery & Restaurant 1041 W. Aquarium Way #110 (423) 708-8505 puckettsgro.com Purple Daisy Picnic Cafe 4001 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 822-6477 purpledaisycafe.com Rafael’s Italian Restaurant 3877 Hixson Pike (423) 508-8561 9607 Dayton Pike (423) 332-4559 orderrafaelsitalian.com Rain Thai Bistro 6933 Lee Hwy. (423) 386-5586 rainthaibistro.com Red Lobster 2131 Northgate Mall Dr. (423) 870-2371 2200 Bams Dr. (423) 490-3488 redlobster.com Red Robin 2100 Hamilton Pl. Blvd. (423) 296-2520 redrobin.com Rib and Loin 5946 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-6465 5435 Hwy. 153 (423) 877-7675 ribandloin.com Rice Box 3600 Hixson Pike, #104 (423) 305-0855 riceboxchattanooga.com Ricko’s Pizzeria and Italian Cuisine 10330 Dayton Pike (423) 682-8050 River Street Deli 151 River St. (423) 756-3354 riverstreet-deli.com Riverside Catfish House 18039 Hwy. 41 (423) 821-9214 Rob’s Restaurant & Lounge 5308 Dayton Blvd. (423) 875-6164 Rodizio Grill 439 Broad St. (423) 777-4999 2100 Hamilton Pl. Blvd. (423) 498-3999 rodiziogrill.com

Ruby Tuesday 5595 Hwy. 153 (423) 875-2480 rubytuesday.com Rumors 3884 Hixson Pike (423) 870-3003 Ruth’s Chris Steak House 2321 Lifestyle Way (423) 602-5900 ruthschris.net Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina 2115 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 894-7144 252 Northgate Mall Dr. (423) 661-8600 9032 Old Lee Hwy. (423) 910-5167 salsaritas.com Sawasdee Thai Restaurant 4008 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 822-9001 Scottie’s Diner 8855 Dayton Pike (423) 498-1659 Scottie’s on the River 495 Riverfront Pkwy. (423) 269-7487 scottiesontheriver.net Sekisui 1120 Houston St. (423) 267-4600 sekisuiusa.com Seoul: Korean and Vietnamese Cuisine 6231 Perimeter Dr. (423) 855-9113 Shane’s Rib Shack 9448 Bradnmore Ln., #108 (423) 591-7427 shanesribshack.com Shogun Japanese Steak & Sushi 1806 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 296-6500 shogunchattanooga.com Shuford’s BBQ 11320 Dayton Pike (423) 451-7102 Shuford’s Smokehouse 3224 Dayton Blvd. (423) 267-0080 shufordsbbq.com Sidetrack Restaurant 3514 Hixson Pike (423) 414-2690 sidetrackhere.com Silhouette’s Bikini Sports Bar & Grill 1401 E. 23rd St. (423) 622-6734 Sing It or Wing It 410 Market St. (423) 757-9464 singitorwingitchattanooga.com

Sitar Indian Cuisine 200 Market St. (423) 894-9696 sitarchattanooga.com Sky Zoo 5709 Lee Hwy. (423) 521-2966 chattazooga.com Slick’s Burgers 309 E. Main St. (423) 760-4878 Sluggo’s North Vegetarian Cafe 505 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 752-5224 Smokey Bones Bar & Fire Grill 2225 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 893-7850 smokeybones.com Sofa King Juicy Burger 1743 Dayton Blvd. (423) 490-7632 sofakingjuicyburger.com Solarium Cafe 122 E. 10th St. (423) 710-2925 solariumcafe.com Southern Burger Co. 9453 Bradmore Ln. #101 (423) 825-4919 southernburgerco.com Southern Star 1300 Broad St. (423) 267-8899 1238 Taft Highway (423) 886-7004 southernstarrestaurant.com Southern Traditions Restaurant 3224 Dayton Blvd. (423) 877-9295 Southside Pizza 612 E. Main St. (423) 498-2193 Southside Saloon and Bistro 1301 Chestnut St. (423) 757-4730 southsidesaloonandbistro.com Southside Social 1818 Chestnut St. (423) 708-3280 thesouthsidesocial.com State of Confusion 301 E. Main St. (423) 760-3473 soconfusion.com Steamboat Super Sandwiches 5950 Shallowford Rd. (423) 499-6355 812 Broad St. (423) 756-8388 Sticky Fingers 2031 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 899-7427 420 Broad St.

(423) 265-7427 stickyfingers.com St. Elmo Deli & Grill 3931 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 825-5555 elmodeli.com St. John’s Meeting Place 1274 Market St. (423) 266-4571 stjohnsrestaurant.com St. John’s Restaurant 1278 Market St. (423) 266-4400 stjohnsrestaurant.com Stir 1444 Market St. (423) 531-7847 stirchattanooga.com Sugar’s Ribs 2450 15th Ave. (423) 826-1199 sugarsribs.com Sushi Nabe 110 River St. (423) 634-0171 sushinabe.com Sweet Basil Thai Cuisine 5845 Brainerd Rd. (423) 485-8836 sweetbasilthaicuisine.com Tacos El Cunao 5813 Lee Hwy. Ste. 4 (423) 244-0281 Taco Mamacita 109 N. Market St. (423) 648-6262 tacomamacita.com Taco Roc 6960 Lee Hwy. (423) 653-1001 Taco Mac 423 Market St. (423) 267-8226 tmacrestaurants.com Taconooga 207 A Frazier Ave. (423) 757-5550 8174 E. Brainerd Rd. (423) 475-6192 taconooga.com Taco Town 4812 Hixson Pike (423) 870-0909 TakoYaki 172 Old Mouse Creek Rd. (423) 728-3010 gotakoyaki.com Taqueria Jalisco 1634 Rossville Ave. (423) 509-3430 850 Market St. (423) 362-8056 Taziki’s Mediterranean Cafe 432 Market St. (423) 779-3100 2020 Gunbarrel Rd., #120 (423) 443-4479

24 • THE PULSE • JUNE 20, 2019 • SUMMER RESTAURANT GUIDE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

tazikiscafe.com Terminal Brewhouse 1464 Market St. (423) 752-8090 terminalbrewhouse.com Texas Roadhouse 7035 Amin Dr. (423) 899-8293 5632 Hwy. 153 (423) 680-6388 texasroadhouse.com Thai Smile 219 Market St. (423) 266-2333 thaismile-restaurant.com The Bitter Alibi 825 Houston St. (423) 362-5070 thebitteralibi.com The Brew Market & Beer Garden 1510 Riverside Dr. (423) 648-2739 brewmarketchatt.com The Curry Pot 6940 Lee Hwy. (423) 648-5069 currypotcuisine.com The Daily Ration 1220 Dartmouth St. (423) 355-5372 thedailyrationchattanooga.com The Foundry 1201 Broad St. (423) 424-3775 chattanooganhotel.com The Hot Chocolatier 1437 Market St. (423) 266-3066 thehotchocolatier.com The Long Horn Restaurant 129 N. Market St. (423) 265-2354 The Social 1110 Market St. (423) 266-3366 publichousechattanooga.com The Tap House 3800 St. elmo Ave. #114 (423) 682-8234 taphousechatt.com Tony’s Pasta Shop & Trattoria 212 High St. (423) 265-5033 bluffviewartdistrict.com Totto Sushi Bar & Grill 330 Frazier Ave. #124 (423) 508-8898 tottonooga.com Touchdown Wings 4921 Brainerd Rd. (423) 508-8682 touchdownwings.com Trailhead Juice 3211 Broad St. (423) 803-6211 trailheadjuice.com

Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike (423) 266-1996 tremonttavern.com Tupelo Honey 1110 Market St. (423) 779-0400 tupelohoneycafe.com Two Ten Jack 1110 Market St. (423) 551-8799 twotenjack.com Typhoon Of Tokyo 3953 Dayton Blvd. (423) 875-6142 Uncle Larry's Restaurant 736 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 757-5894 unclelarrysrestaurant.com Universal Joint 532 Lookout St. (423) 468-3725 ujchattanooga.com Urban Stack Burger Lounge 12 W. 13th St. (423) 475-5350 urbanstack.com Vibrant Meals 601 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 301-5622 myvibrantmeals.com Vine St. Market 1313 Hanover St. (423) 266-8463 vinestreetmarket.com Wally’s Restaurant 1600 McCallie Ave. (423) 698-4643 6521 Ringgold Rd. (423) 899-6151 wallysrest.com Walt’s Karaoke Café 6238 Bonny Oaks Dr. (423) 485-9080 waltskaraoke.com Whitebird 102 Walnut St. (423) 713-5900 whitebirdchattanooga.com Willie’s Deli 7701 Lee Hwy. (423) 336-8008 Wimpie’s Country Restaurant 9826 Dayton Pike (423) 332-6201 Wine Down Bar 9431 Bradmore Ln., #109 (423) 531-9463 windedownbar.com Yellow Deli 737 McCallie Ave. (423) 468-177 yellowdeli.com Zarzour’s Cafe 1627 Rossville Ave. (423) 266-0424


CHOW SUMMER 2019

Mike's Tavern

T

he fourth installment in the local Mike’s brand of restaurants around Chattanooga is now open, a casual eatery found in Hixson called Mike’s Tavern. Much like all of the restaurants within the Mike’s brand, this one is unique from the rest, offering a diverse menu with everything from tradition tavern fare to comfort food with a Southern twist. Despite only being open since April, Mike’s Tavern has received rave reviews from many and it is easy to see why. Along with the great menu the restaurant boasts an impressive full bar with daily cocktail and beer specials; and with twenty beers on tap and even more by the bottle or can, there are always options for everyone. Kane Weathers, the general manager of Mike’s Tavern, hopes the restaurant will provide a distinctive, local experience that most people in Hixson would typically have to drive downtown to get. “Being a local group we

want to take care of the communities we are located in and offer food, service, and atmosphere that the corporate stores can’t provide.” Part of this initiative can be seen through Mike’s Tavern offering weekend brunch, an option that can be hard to find in the area surrounding the restaurant. To make this brunch even more deliciously distinct, come and try your hand at mixology at the “Bloody Mary Bar” where you can build your own tasty drink with a variety of mixes, spices, sauces, fruits, and vegetables available at your fingertips. If you’re too bogged down with work for weekend brunch, stop by Mike’s Tavern for workday lunch specials, with a different dish featured Monday through Friday, always under $10 and always sure to send you back to work happy. Mike’s Tavern is located at the corner of Hwy. 153 and Hamill Rd., and is open daily from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. For updated beer lists and specials, check out mikestaverntn.com THE PULSE • SUMMER RESTAURANT GUIDE • JUNE 20, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • 25


CHOW SUMMER 2019

Lupi's Pizza Pies

L

upi’s Pizza Pies has been a staple in the Chattanooga restaurant scene since it opened its doors twenty-three years ago. The idea for Lupi’s came when the owner, Dorris, recognized that there wasn’t a local spot selling pizza by the slice. But Dorris created much more than your typical pizza chain—she built a space focused on food that is delicious, environmentally friendly, and good for you. One of the most enticing aspects of Lupi’s is that it’s farm to table. Their land, Flying Turtle Farm, is located in Cloudland, Georgia, a short forty-fiveminute drive from Lupi’s downtown location. Flying Turtle Farm focuses on bringing the highest quality organic meats, vegetables, and even flowers to their store locations. In their off season, Lupi’s still brings meat in from their farm, but focuses on receiving fresh ingredients, like cheese and honey, from other local farms. Summer is their peak season as they grow and distribute cucumbers, toma-

26 • THE PULSE • JUNE 20, 2019 • SUMMER RESTAURANT GUIDE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

toes, fresh basil, zucchini, and oregano, just to name a few. Additionally, Lupi’s employees have the opportunity to work on the farm as much or as little as they would like. Dorris implemented this to allow everyone to take a break from the bustle of Chattanooga city life and get their hands in the dirt. Dorris believes that Lupi’s should have a positive impact on the environment and the health of their customers. Lupi’s has been recognized the past ten consecutive years for having the best pizza in the area. Since its original opening in downtown they have opened four more locations throughout the greater Chattanooga area, ranging from Ooltewah and Cleveland to Brainerd and Hixson. And if you can’t catch them there, Lupi’s is at The Chattanooga Market every Sunday afternoon. Don’t miss your opportunity to eat the highest quality and freshest pizza in the Chattanooga area!


CHOW SUMMER 2019

The Tap House

W

hen you hear about a bar that has thirty beers on draft, you might assume the place to be a stuffy sports bar, but The Tap House is here to change that. The Tap House is quickly becoming a staple of the Chattanooga restaurant scene, with a rotating line of great beers, local brews, and a cozy, rustic atmosphere to enjoy them all. The Tap House, located in St. Elmo, is immediately a welcoming sight as soon as you walk in the door. The restaurant, with its brick walls and quaint string lights, offers a relaxed atmosphere to grab a drink and settle in. In the corner of the large, open room is a cozy set of chairs and a couch with multiple board games for patrons to play, all while enjoying refreshing beer flights and small plates. But if you are looking for more than just a quick drink, The Tap House holds weekly events Monday through Friday, with unique things to do like vinyl nights every Monday, in which cus-

tomers can play vinyls in the bar and even get $1 off a pint for bringing in their own records to play. Or, if you prefer live music, The Tap House hosts shows every Friday and doesn’t charge a cover. While making your way through their diverse beer options, don’t forget to try some of the food, too. The Tap House offers pub staples like cheese plates, various chips-and-dip options, and Rueben sandwiches. But if you are looking more for comfort food, they offer that too with choices such as a classic PB&J sandwich or a gourmet grilled cheese. With options for everyone, The Tap House is a great place to bring friends and family and enjoy some brews, or even bring your dog and enjoy the front porch which offers great views of Lookout Mountain. For more information on the rotating tap list and hours of operation, visit taphousechatt.com THE PULSE • SUMMER RESTAURANT GUIDE • JUNE 20, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • 27


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR chattanoogaworkspace.com Finding Neverland 2, 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com The Third Wife 4 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 803-6578 chattpalace.com Chattanooga Roller Girls 5 p.m., 7 p.m. Chattanooga Convention Center 1150 Carter St. (423) 756-0001 Is This Thing OUT? 6:30 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com DJ Lewis and Friends 7:30, 9:45 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Urinetown 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347 barkinglegs.org Moon Over Buffalo 7:30 p.m. The Ringgold Playhouse 155 Depot St. (706) 935-3061 cityofringgoldga.gov See How They Run 8 p.m. Back Alley @ The Mars Theater 117 N. Chattanooga St. LaFayette, GA (706) 996-8350 bapshows.com Your Stories 8 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Miss Southern Country 9 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 803-6578

chattpalace.com Whose Line Chattanooga 10 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SUNDAY6.23 Let’s Roam Chattanooga 9 a.m. The Hunter Museum of American Art 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968 huntermuseum.org Surface Design Workshop 9 a.m. Scenic City Clay Arts 301 E. 11th St. (423) 883-1758 sceniccityclayarts.com Chattanooga Market 12:30 p.m. The Chattanooga Market 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com Photographing Ceramics 2 p.m. Scenic City Clay Arts 301 E. 11th St. (423) 883-1758 sceniccityclayarts.com See How They Run 3 p.m. Back Alley @ The Mars Theater 117 N. Chattanooga St. LaFayette, GA (706) 996-8350 bapshows.com The Third Wife 4 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 803-6578 chattpalace.com DJ Lewis and Friends 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com

MONDAY6.24 Big Birdie Golf Tournament 1 p.m. The Lookout Mountain Club 1201 Fleetwood Dr.

(706) 820-1551 lookoutmountain.club Summer Belly Dance Session 5:45 p.m. Movement Arts Collective 3813 Dayton Blvd. (423) 401-8115 movementartscollective.com Joggers & Lagers 6 p.m. Chattanooga Brewing Co. 1804 Chestnut St. chattabrew.com Wine Glass Painting 7 p.m. Virgola Italian Wine & Oyster Bar 608 Georgia Ave. (423) 771-7773 chattanoogawinebar.com River City Dance Club 7:45 p.m. Peace Strength Yoga 3800 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 708-2779 peacestrengthyoga.com

TUESDAY6.25 Wake Up & Run 6 a.m. Fleet Feet Sports 307 Manufacturers Rd. (423) 771-7996 fleetfeetchattanooga.com Soap Making 101 10:30 a.m. Pins & Needles Quilt Shop 6503 Hixson Pk. (423)668-8734 pinsandneedlequiltshop.com Chess K-night 5 p.m. Mad Priest Coffee Roasters 1900 Broad St. (423) 393-3834 madpriestcoffee.com Block Print Tote Bag 6 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Critique Workshop 6 p.m. AVA Gallery 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4282 avarts.org Tuesday Night Chess Club 6 p.m. Downtown Library

1001 Broad St. (423) 643-7700 chattilibrary.com Paths to Pints 6:30 p.m. The Tap House 3800 St. Elmo Ave. taphousechatt.com Extended Cavern Experience 8 p.m. Ruby Falls 1720 S. Scenic Hwy. (423) 821-2544 Comedy Tap Takeover 8 p.m. Hutton & Smith Brewing Co. 431 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 760-3600 huttonandsmithbrewing.com Megan Massacre Tattoo Pop Up 8:30 p.m. The Moxy 1220 King St. (423) 664-1180 moxy-hotels.marriott.com

WEDNESDAY6.26 Chuck Frye Art Exhibit Noon CHI Memorial Hospital 2525 De Sales Ave. (423) 495-2525 www.memorial.org Main Street Market 4 p.m. 522 W. Main St. mainstfarmersmarket.com An Evening with Tom Graves 6 p.m. Star Line Books 1467 Market St. (423) 777-5629 starlinebooks.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 7:30 p.m. The Bitter Alibi 825 Houston St. (423) 362-5070 thebitteralibi.com Film Night 8 p.m. Cooper’s Alley 10 E. 7th St. Open Mice Comedy 8 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 20, 2019 • THE PULSE • 29


THE MUSIC SCENE

Driven To Succeed Artistry plus integrity wins the musical day

The Minds Behind The Melodies Have you ever wondered where songwriters got the inspiration for their songs? Puckett’s is hosting a new type of live music experience this weekend titled “Songs & Stories”, showcasing original songs and the ideas that brought those songs to life. Featuring local songwriters Anthony Quails, Cody James Harris, Katrina Barclay, and Mike Crowder, this event is being put on by the Chattanooga Songwriter’s Association and is sure to be a hit. Expect each of the four songwriters to deliver an incredibly soulful show, with each individual bringing their own panache to the stage. Both Quails and Harris showcase a hearty Americana and folk style with catchy guitar riffs and thoughtful lyrics, which is sure to play well with Barclay’s ability to pair beautiful lyrics with alternative blues, as well as Crowder’s stunning knack for R&B. All these artists are veterans to their craft and sure to have some great insight as to how they wrote their songs. This is certainly an event you won’t want to miss, especially since Puckett’s is providing an intimate, “in the round” stage where concert goers will be level with the artists. As if you needed another reason to go, this is a free event starting at 7 p.m. on Thursday at Puckett’s Restaurant and Grocery at 2 W. Aquarium Way. For more information, visit puckettsgro.com — Kelsey Fox

By Marc T. Michael Pulse Music Editor

Matt Solo became Matt Movin, an apt change of name given that his career has been on an upwards trajectory.”

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HE LAST TIME WE CHECKED IN ON MATTHEW Long, he was performing as “Matt Solo”, garnering popular and critical acclaim with a series of underground mix tape releases, as well as the album Prodigy. Those efforts brought him to the attention of Universal subsidiary Whirl Records, who swiftly offered him a recording contract. After “making his bones,” he terminated the contract in late 2015, amicably, and set out to found his own label, R.T.A. (Round Table Affiliation). Matt Solo became Matt Movin, an apt change of name given that his career has been on an upwards trajectory since he first made the conscious decision to pursue a career in music. Movin’, indeed. To understand why, you first need to understand a

truism of the industry. There are, from one point of view, two types of musicians: the performer and the artist. For the first type of musician, genre or musical style is a conscious choice, a vehicle for showcasing their talent. Too often they are derided for being “inauthentic”, usually by the amateur crowd, and this is an unfair accusation, an “apples and oranges” comparison. Nobody accuses their favorite actor of being


A difficult and troubled childhood, run ins with the law, incarceration, and two neardeath experiences (a shooting and a stabbing respectively) are the building blocks of his art.” “fake” when they take on a role. So, too, some musicians are more concerned with entertaining a crowd than with making a personal statement. Today they might be playing country music, tomorrow it’s blues, the day after, R&B. The point is, they choose the music and there is nothing inherently wrong with that approach. The second type of musician, the artist, plays what they play because of their personal experience. Every trial and tribulation from the cradle to the grave is poured out on the stage and in the studio. The music chooses them and this is generally seen as carrying more gravitas. Perhaps it does, but it also carries a greater risk, or at least longer odds of success, because if a career in music is the end goal, it very well may be that for the artist, nobody is buying what they’re trying to sell. That division may seem gross and imprecise. After all, performers are practicing art and artists are performing, but it comes down to the basic point of where your music comes from, and in any case, either path requires talent. Without talent, all the artistic integrity in the world and a baloney sandwich leaves you with a baloney sandwich. Movin unquestionably falls into the latter

category, the artist; even a brief glance at his personal history confirms that his music is informed entirely by his experience. A difficult and troubled childhood, run ins with the law, incarceration, and two near-death experiences (a shooting and a stabbing respectively) are the building blocks of his art. Combine that authenticity of experience with formidable talent on the mic and in the booth, as well as a savvy business sense whose roots are in the survival skills necessary for growing up hard, and there is no mystery at all behind Movin’s success. Driven to succeed, gifted with natural talent, and informed by genuine struggle and perseverance, his honesty is resonant. His music is an anthem to everyone who comes from the places he has been, and a startling but compelling look into those places for the people who do not. His latest single, “Two”, available through his website, has hit 60,000 streams in short order. The album Basic Instincts is freshly available and on track to be another critical and commercial success. The upcoming album, Here Now, doesn’t have a release date yet, but you can keep track of that, and all things “Matt Movin,” at mattmovin.com

Shiver Me Timbers! Pirate Party Is Back

It’s time to dig out your peg legs, hook hands, and laptops with Pirate Bay login credentials and head to the Stone Cup on Frazier Avenue this Saturday, June 22nd for Pirate Party 5 with your scurvy pals, Opposite Box! The boys in the band will be bringing two sets of their brilliantly entertaining acid funk rock and sense of humor to the Stone Cup’s outside stage at 11:30 p.m. until the port authority comes to drive them away. Think it’ll rain? No worries,

as the party will just move inside, safe from the elements and closer to the rum. Opposite Box has long held the reputation as one of Chattanooga’s best live acts and what better way to celebrate the midsummer solstice than with this rowdy band of irrepressible musicians? There is a cover of $10, but it gets knocked down to a measly fiver if you come dressed in pirate gear! This is an 18+ show. Eye patches not required, unless you’re Madonna. — MTM

THU6.20

FRI6.21

SAT6.22

Puddles Pity Party

Jessy Wilson

Summerween

A giant clown with an amazing voice, as seen on "America's Got Talent" and YouTube. 8 p.m. Walker Theatre 399 McCallie Ave. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com

The Grammy-nominated songwriter and vocalist presents a mix of soul, hip-hop, and roots music in a free concert. 7 p.m. Miller Plaza 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com

Evening of bizarre with Cut Throat Freak Show and Society of the Blind Eye, hosted by Pinkie, The Princess of Pain. 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 20, 2019 • THE PULSE • 31


LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR THURSDAY6.20 James Crumble Trio 6 p.m. St. John’s Meeting Place 1278 Market St. stjohnsrestaurant.com Danimal & Friends 6 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Open Mic Thursday 6 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. stonecupcafe.com Thursday Night Jazz 6 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Thursday Night Jazz 6 p.m. Meeting Place 1274 Market St. stjohnsmeetingplace.com Papa Sway 6 p.m. Poblano’s 551 River St. poblanosnooga.com Amber Fults 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Bluegrass and Country Jam 6:30 p.m. Graze Nazarene Church 6310 Dayton Blvd. (423) 842-5919 Bluegrass Thursdays 6:30 p.m. Whole Foods 301 Manufacturers Rd. (423) 702-7300 Gretchen Peters 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co A Night Of Songs & Stories with Katrina Barclay, Anthony Quails, Cody James Harris, Mike Crowder 7 p.m. Puckett’s Grocery & Restaurant 2 Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com Toby Hewitt

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7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Uptown Big Band 7 p.m. Honest Pint 35 Patten Pkwy. thehonestpint.com John Carroll 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Bluegrass Thursdays with Track 145 7:30 p.m. The FEED Co. Table and Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com Jesse Jungkurth & Friends 7:30 p.m. Mexi-Wing VII 5773 Brainerd Rd. (423) 296-1073 An Evening with Puddles Pity Party 8 p.m. Walker Theatre 399 McCallie Ave. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com Webb Barringer 8 p.m. The Social 1110 Market St. publichousechattanooga.com Open Mic Night with Jonathan Wimpee 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Ben Dickey, Marty Bohannon 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

FRIDAY6.21 Summer Music Weekends 8:30 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. seerockcity.com The No Good Deeds 1 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com

Binji Varsossa 6 p.m. Cancun Mexican Restaurant 1809 Broad St. (423) 266-1461 Lew Card 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Josh Gilbert Band 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co Jessy Wilson, FBI Reloaded 7 p.m. Miller Plaza 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com Tim Lewis 7 p.m. El Meson 248 Northgate Park elmesonchattanooga.com Preston Ruffing 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Ayla Silver 7:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com Outlaw 45 8 p.m. SkyZoo 5709 Lee Hwy. (423) 521-2966 Camp Normal, Fault Lines 9 p.m. Songbirds South 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co Barron Wilson 9 p.m. The FEED Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com McKinley James 9 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com Eric Kirkendall 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Drew Sterchi & The Blues Tribe

9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com Handlines, Moon Hollow, Justin and the Cosmic 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com VooDoo Slim 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

SATURDAY6.22 Summer Music Weekends 8:30 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. seerockcity.com Brian Ashley Jones 12:30 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium Plaza 1 Broad St. publicmarkets.us Binji Varsossa 6 p.m. Cancun Mexican Restaurant 1809 Broad St. (423) 266-1461 Melanie Willetts Jazz 6 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Maria Sable 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Forever Bluegrass 7 p.m. Westbound Bar 24 Station St. westboundbar.com Tim Lewis 7 p.m. El Meson 248 Northgate Park elmesonchattanooga.com Steff Mann 7 p.m. Charles & Myrtle’s Coffeehouse 105 McBrien Rd. christunity.org The Other Brothers 7 p.m. Edley’s Bar-B-Que


Todd Snider 205 Manufacturers Rd. edleysbbq.com The Briars 7:30 p.m. Gate 11 Distillery 1400 Market St. gate11distillery.com Ryan Oyer 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Heartstrings 8 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com Steff Mahan 8 p.m. Charles & Myrtle’s Coffeehouse 105 McBrien Rd. christunity.org Todd Snider with Raelyn Nelson Band 8 p.m. Walker Theater 399 McCallie Ave. tivolichattanooga.com Tyson Leamon 8:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com Deep Shag the Band 9 p.m. Songbirds South 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co Eric Kirkendall 9 p.m.

The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Misfit Toyz 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com Summerween with Cut Throat Freak Show, Society of the Blind Eye 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com White Affair 10 p.m. The Signal 1810 Chestnut St. thesignaltn.com VooDoo Slim 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

SUNDAY6.23 Summer Music Weekends 8:30 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. seerockcity.com Emmy Law 11 a.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com Carl Pemberton 11 a.m.

Westin Chattanooga 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Mark Andrew Noon 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com Papa Sway Noon Southside Social 1818 Chestnut St. thesouthsidesocial.com Brian Ashley Jones 12:30 p.m. The Chattanooga Market 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com Dana Rogers 12:30 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium Plaza 1 Broad St. publicmarkets.us Danimal and Friends 12:30 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com Medicine Man 1:30 p.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com The Other Brothers 2 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Bluegrass Jam 4 p.m.

Fiddlers Anonymous 2248 Dayton Blvd. (423) 994-7497 The Briars 4 p.m. Slick’s Burgers 309 E. Main St. slicksburgers.com Open Mic with Jeff Daniels 6 p.m. Long Haul Saloon 2536 Cummings Hwy. (423) 822-9775 Naomi Ingram 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Peter Frampton 8 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. tivolichattanooga.com Blind Draw 9 p.m. Sky Zoo 5709 Lee Hwy. (423) 521-2966 Throttle 21 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

MONDAY6.24 Open Air with Jessica Nunn 6 p.m. The Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Monday Nite Big Band 7 p.m. The Coconut Room 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Blues Night Open Jam 7 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co Open Mic Night 7 p.m. Fiddler’s Anonymous 2248 Dayton Blvd. (423) 994-7497 Monday Nite Big Band 7:30 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 20, 2019 • THE PULSE • 33


LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR Very Open Mic with Shawnessey Cargile 8 p.m. The Well 1800 Rossville Blvd. #8 wellonthesouthside.com

TUESDAY6.25 Wilbur Jones 6 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com Acoustic Bohemian Night 6:30 p.m. Mexi-Wing 9 6925 Shallowford Rd. (423) 468-3366 Danimal 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Live Space Jam Open Mic with Xll Olympians 7 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com Eric Kirkendoll 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Jam Session with Freddy Mc & Friends 8 p.m. Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Open Mic with Mike McDade 8 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com Lacing, Captain Kudzu, Bitter Calm 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

WEDNESDAY6.26 Gino Fanelli 6 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com Naomi Ingram 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar

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801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Jesse James Jungkurth 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Noam Pikelny and Stuart Duncan 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co Wednesday Jazz 7 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Open Mic & Jam Night 7 p.m. Wanderlinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Papa Sway 7 p.m. River Drifters 1925 Suck Creek Rd. riverdrifterschatt.com Rhythm & Brews Open Mic Jam 7:30 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co Ryan Oyer 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Terry Parker of TNT 8 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Priscilla & Little Rickee 8 p.m. Las Margaritas 1101 Hixson Pike (423) 756-3332 Bong Sloth 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Rosedale Remedy Band 9 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Map these locations on chattanoogapulse. com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com


ERNIE PAIKS’S RECORD REVIEWS

New Music From Sambassadeur, Altin Gün

Sambassadeur Survival (European)

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he Swedish group Sambassadeur—which takes its name from the Brazilian-influenced Serge Gainsbourg song “Les Sambassadeurs”—went from playing above-average indie-pop to creating some absolutely sublime and majestic pop songs on its third album European, including the breathtaking, Phil Spector-influenced “Sandy Dunes” with soaring strings and a brilliant cover of the obscure Tobin Sprout song “Small Parade”. This writer eagerly awaited its follow-up, wondering how the band could top the dizzying heights of European, and after nine long years, we have Sambassadeur’s fourth album, Survival, released digitally on the band’s new label European Records.

Offhand, Survival isn’t quite as outgoing as European, but repeated listens reveal a different kind of sophistication with a songcraft that seems deceptively modest, shooting for an easygoing mood rather than grand gestures. The weaving electric guitars and keyboard lines of “Foot of Afrikka” stand out, along with lead singer Anna Persson’s calm navigation through twisting melodies. The bubbly, crystalline keyboard sounds that drive “Stuck” may seem a little precious, and it’s not exactly clear what kind of style the group is attempting; but if you break the hard candy shell, there’s a solid pop song underneath the exterior. “Orustfjord” ambles along with its own demure grandeur with gentle strums and piano chords played with conviction, and it subtly builds its layers so it never outstays its welcome. The finger-picked, lithe acoustic guitar notes, warm bass and milky synth-reed melodies of “41” are perfectly balanced with Persson’s comforting voice; a similar mood is channeled on “Roads”, but its yearning sincerity comes off as a bit mawkish. The upbeat “Kors” provides

a mid-album jolt with pop hooks leading to more pop hooks, and the album finds its denouement with “Ex on the Beach”, winding down with music-box twinkling and melancholic pop balladry; it closes an album that’s a bit of a jumble and a step back from the ambitions of its predecessor, but there are intricate pop pleasures to be uncovered.

Altin Gün Gece (ATO)

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he six-piece psychedelic rock band Altin Gün, based in the Netherlands, was formed out of bassist Jasper Verhulst’s obsession with Turkish music—in particular, Turkish music from the ‘70s that melded traditional folk music with western-world rock influences (a.k.a. Anatolian rock),

including artists such as Selda Bağcan, Barış Manço, Erkin Koray, and most importantly, Neşet Ertaş. Although only one member—vocalist and keyboardist Merve Daşdemir—was born in Turkey, another member Erdinç Ecevit (who sings and plays synths and the saz, a lute-like stringed instrument) has Turkish roots; however, it’s quickly apparent when listening to the second album Gece (“night” in Turkish) from Altin Gün (which means “golden day”), that they are all serious about this music. And it’s perhaps telling that, according to Spotify’s “Where people listen” statistics, lots of people in Turkey (along with listeners in Paris and Amsterdam) are digging this stuff. “Yolcu” opens Gece, sporting a sinister riff and a thick psychedelic vibe with wah guitar from Ben Rider and funkinflected conga and drum kit beats from percussionists Gino Groenveld and Daniel Smienk, while Erdinç Ecevit’s singing in Turkish is relatively restrained, echoing and reverberating. Altin Gün’s arrangements adapt tried-and-true traditional melodies and rhythms,

transforming them into killer vamps with distortion and envelope effects that unmistakably evoke the era of ‘70s rock, when guitar solos were a fact of life and didn’t seem to be particularly indulgent. “Leyla” is an album highlight, overloaded with guitar fuzz and a funk momentum, topped with Merve Daşdemir’s ardent vocals. The album’s sole original composition is the improvised piece “Şoför Bey”, with spoken-word passages delivered by Daşdemir while the other musicians hold down a groove, but the track feels less memorable without the benefit of penetrating melodies. The grin-inducing closing track “Süpürgesi Yoncadan” on Gece is a bit of an oddball, with unabashedly cheesy synth tones, spacey sounds, and artificial beats, capturing the disco-fever era in the late ‘70s. There seems to be a distinct yet diverse strain of ‘70s revivalism that is highly competent and earnest, crossing oceans and continents for influences—The Budos Band and Khruangbin come immediately to mind—and now you can add Altin Gün to that list.

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FILM & TELEVISION

One More Plucky Young Hollywood Writer Late Night is a fresh take on a well-used genre Life Is Like A Box Of Chocolates When one talks about the “greatest actors of their generation”, Tom Hanks is a name that often ascends high on the roster of our current crop of film stars. And for good reason. One only has to list a few of his film roles to justify his inclusion in the discussion: Splash, A League Of Their Own, Big, Sleepless In Seattle, Saving Private Ryan, Apollo 13, Toy Story...the list is seemingly endless. That said, one movie that cemented his status is also one of the most controversial for its often ham-handed blending of historical facts and cinematic fiction: Forrest Gump. The tale of a simple man whose life unknowingly intertwined with some of the most indelible moments in history scored Hanks a Best Picture Oscar and was revered by audiences. To many, Gump’s life really was a box of chocolates, and proved irresistible to fans. Which brings us to this weekend, where you can relive Forrest’s journey on the big screen once again in celebration of the 25th anniversary of the classic, which also featured standout performances by Sally Field, Robin Wright, Mykelti Williamson, and Gary Sinise. Catch it this Sunday at 3 p.m. at East Ridge 18, Hamilton Place 8, or Northgate 14 and again (if you wish) at 7 p.m. at either East Ridge 18 or Northgate 14. And be sure to buy a box of chocolate candy beforehand. — Michael Thomas

By John DeVore Pulse Film Editor

The people who make films mostly know what needs to happen to make a great movie. It’s just that often life gets in the way.”

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LIKE MOVIES AND TELEVISION A LOT. THAT should come as no surprise, as I’ve been writing about them for The Pulse for nearly ten years. I’m not terribly interested in genre—whenever anyone asks what kind of movies I like, I generally respond by saying “good ones.” There’s really no sense in comparing genres to genres. Every movie has a set of goals—it has a story to tell, an aesthetic to achieve, an audience to reach. Films should be measured, mostly, by how well they achieve these goals. Personal preference does come into play, but a review should make sure to point it out. The point being: all movies have a chance to be great, regardless of type. Filmmaking is something of an insular experience. The people who

make films mostly know what needs to happen to make a great movie. It’s just that often life gets in the way—notes from the studio, budget problems, etc. all combine to make it a stressful, complicated job. Because of this, filmmakers don’t see the world outside film and television that much. As a result, a significant number of movies are made about the film industry. This makes a certain amount of sense. Common writing advice includes writing about what you know. But sometimes, writers and directors


make the mistake of thinking their jobs are more important and interesting than they are. If I never see another film about a plucky young writer/intern/fashion designer/actor finally making it in the tough world of Hollywood, I’ll probably be fine. Hollywood will keep making them, though. Still, Late Night, another entry into this genre, achieves its goals and, by my definition, is a pretty good film. I just had a hard time caring about it. Much of what makes Late Night work is Emma Thompson. Truth be told, Emma Thompson is the reason I wanted to see the film. She plays Katherine Newbury, a Jay Leno style late-night talk show host who has been on television since the ‘90s. Considered an icon, her show and her comedy have long since become stale. She doesn’t know the names of any of her writers—in fact, she hasn’t even met most of them. She largely goes through the motions of her television show, from the monologue to her guests, who include such youthful sensations as Doris Kearns Goodwin and Dianne Feinstein. At the beginning of the film, she is challenged by a soon-to-be former employee about not having any female writers. Despite having

When the biggest problem a character faces is no longer being relevant to a television show that made them loads of money, the stakes don’t seem very high.” a reputation for not liking other women, Newbury insists one hiring one. Enter Molly Patel (Mindy Kaling), a young women employed at a chemical plant who, in a confusing series of events involving an essay contest, is the first woman to interview for the job. She has no experience in television writing but she is the first woman through the door, which is enough to get her the job. Molly is the kind of girl who quotes William Butler Yeats to herself and pins inspirational messages to her bulletin board behind her desk. She’s not the kind who is going to immediately win the respect and love of her suspicious male coworkers, who are so detached from women in the workplace that they use the ladies’ room exclusively to go number two. The film is exclusively about these two women—one beginning to work her way through a maledominated society and another

✴ NEW IN THEATERS ✴

who has already done so—and their very different approaches to making their living in an environment that is, at its best, distrustful and, at its worst, openly hostile. It has a lot to say about diversity, ageism, and sexism through the lens of television. The script, written by Kaling, is funny and affable, if predictable. Kaling wrote some of the best episodes of The Office and her talent is on full display here. But the film works, like The Office, because of its star. There’s no one better than Emma Thompson. As I said, if I never saw another film like this one, I likely wouldn’t notice. When the biggest problem a character faces is no longer being relevant to a television show that made them loads of money, the stakes don’t seem very high. But that won’t stop Hollywood from telling these stories. Hopefully, if I see another one, it’ll be as good as Late Night.

Toy Story 4 When a new toy called "Forky" joins Woody and the gang, a road trip alongside old and new friends reveals how big the world can be for a toy. Director: Josh Cooley Stars: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Annie Potts, Keegan-Michael Key, Jordan Peele, Keanu Reeves

Child's Play A mother gives her son a toy doll for his birthday, unaware of its more sinister nature. Director: Lars Klevberg Stars: Aubrey Plaza, Mark Hamill, Gabriel Bateman, Brian Tyree Henry

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COLUMN · GAME ON!

A Spartan Kick To The Senses Assasin's Creed goes Greek and slays us with Hellenistic charm

I Brandon Watson Pulse columnist

Ubisoft’s latest version of the sneaky, stabby-stab genre of games, Assassin’s Creed: Odyssey is definitely worth every shiny coin spent on it and could arguably be the best so far.”

When not vaporizing zombies or leading space marines as a mousepad Mattis, Brandon Watson is making gourmet pancakes and promoting local artists.

N CELEBRATION OF ANOTHER hilarious E3 this year I went ahead and started digging into a few titles I was ashamed to play since their release dates. Mostly because of the hyper-woke pseudo-journalism surrounding them and also because of the lack of time to be objectively critical. I tend to shy away from the cringe-worthy rhetoric prevalent in a lot of reviews I’ve started to encounter. So, rest assured that any game I sample will be evaluated on its own merits of value for the time spent playing it. Ubisoft’s latest version of the sneaky, stabby-stab genre of games, Assassin’s Creed: Odyssey is definitely worth every shiny coin spent on it and could arguably be the best so far. Assassin’s Creed has always been a franchise that hits on some notes and falls flat on others. The first two games were ground-breaking forays of historical fiction/sci-fi. To be honest, AC has always been a hard thing to pin down in terms of genre and style. On one hand, you have rich adventure stories that take the player through amazing locations thoughtfully designed for historical accuracy. On the other, you could also get a repetitive gamut of runa-kill and lazy RPG elements smushed into a burrito of confuddled storytelling. For the uninitiated, Assassin's Creed is about the struggle of two opposing factions, the Assassins and the Templars. Throughout the series the groups fight over control of strange artifacts left behind by a more advanced civilization of space-faring star fascists. One group wants to use the artifacts to enslave the world and the other wants to enlighten it, but these motives become blurred as each order progresses through history. Over time the groups have hidden or lost these artifacts and it’s up to an insidious tech corporation and a wacky murder cult to find a way to

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recover them. How do they do this? Why, by inventing a hyper-realistic VR machine that allows the user to play inside the lives of their ancestors by encoding their memories through DNA, of course! You still with me? Consider the AC franchise a great big fluffernutter—a gooey sandwich of genres ranging from political intrigue, AP history classes, Grand Theft Auto with swords, and Ancient Aliens. AC: Odyssey takes an ambitious road that blends stealth-stabby action with swashbuckling fisticuffs and is smartly laden with RPG mechanics. This time the adventure places us smack in the middle of the Peloponnesian War circa 431 BCE at the center of the known world: the Greek civilization. For the first time the narrative allows for a choice between male or female protagonists, branching dialogue trees, and multiple endings. But all this takes a back seat to the overall beauty of AC: Odyssey. The cradle of the ancient world has never looked so amazing, with vibrant vistas and rolling blue waves that crash across lonely seas shores. Mediterranean cedars sway in the Macedonian moonlight. The introductory level of Cephalonia offers a sweet tour of the old world with a massive naked and anatomically correct statue of Zeus straddling the center

of the island. I didn’t take the time to research whether the Ubisoft team painstakingly mapped out the real-life ancient ruins to reproduce what these locations would look like at the time but man, I’d say it comes very close to it. And that’s just the beginning; the entire, yes, the entire map is an odyssey that spans thousands of in-game kilometers. Exploration is heavily rewarded with cool mysteries to unlock and solve throughout the ancient world. You can explore Odysseus’ ruined palace, dive the flooded temple of Aphrodite, and hunt the Caledonian Boar or become a Hellenistic pirate for epic sea-faring fun. I outfitted my trireme with a full crew of female assassins and during long hauls to the next drowned temple their sea chanties in beautiful Greek blended with the sounds of the wind and the hull cutting the waves. The game world feels so alive you could almost fall in and not think twice. Ignore the main questline or quests altogether and you will almost forget you’re playing an AC game at all. The experience feels more like a virtual tour through time and a true marvel at how far gaming technology has come. Watch the sun set from atop the crested helm of Athena Parthenos in Attika and revel in the triple A milestone that is AC: Odyssey.


JONESIN' CROSSWORD

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY CANCER (June 21-July 22): Some traditional astrologers believe solar eclipses are sour omens. They theorize that when the Moon perfectly covers the Sun, as it will on July 2, a metaphorical shadow will pass across some part of our lives, perhaps triggering crises. I don’t agree with that gloomy assessment. I consider a solar eclipse to be a harbinger of grace and slack and freedom. In my view, the time before and after this cosmic event might resemble what the workplace is like when the boss is out of town. Or it may be a sign that your inner critic is going to shut up and leave you alone for a while. Or you could suddenly find that you can access the willpower and ingenuity you need so as to change something about your life that you’ve been wanting to change. So I advise you to start planning now to take advantage of the upcoming blessings of the eclipse. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): What are you doing with the fertility and creativity that have been sweeping through your life during the first six months of 2019? Are you witheringly idealistic, caught up in perfectionistic detail as you cautiously follow outmoded rules about how to make best use of that fertility and creativity? Or are you being expansively pragmatic, wielding your lively imagination to harness that fertility and creativity to generate transformations that will improve your life forever? VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Mythologist Joseph Campbell said that heroes are those who give their lives to something bigger than themselves. That’s never an easy assignment for anyone, but right now it’s less difficult for you than ever before. As you prepare for the joyous ordeal, I urge you to shed the expectation that it will require you to make a burdensome sacrifice. Instead, picture the process as involving the loss of a small pleasure that paves the way for a greater pleasure. Imagine you will finally be able to give a giant gift you’ve been bursting to express. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In 1903, the Wright Brothers put wings on a heavy machine and got the contraption to fly up off the ground for 59 seconds. No one had ever done such a thing. Sixty-six years later, American astronauts succeeded at an equally momentous feat. They piloted a craft that departed from the Earth and landed on the surface of the moon. The first motorcycle was another quantum leap in humans’ ability to travel. Two German inventors created the first one in 1885. But it took 120 years before any person did a back-flip while riding a motorcycle. If I had to compare your next potential breakthrough to one or the other marvelous invention, I’d say it’ll be more metaphorically similar to a motorcycle flip than the moon-

landing. It may not be crucial to the evolution of the human race, but it’ll be impressive—and a testament to your hard work. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the year 37 AD, Saul of Tarsus was traveling by foot from Jerusalem to Damascus, Syria. He was on a mission to find and arrest devotees of Jesus, then bring them back to Jerusalem to be punished. Saul’s plans got waylaid, however—or so the story goes. A “light from heaven” knocked him down, turned him blind, and spoke to him in the voice of Jesus. Three days later, Saul’s blindness was healed and he pledged himself to forevermore be one of those devotees of Jesus he had previously persecuted. I don’t expect a transformation quite so spectacular for you in the coming weeks, Scorpio. But I do suspect you will change your mind about an important issue, and consider making a fundamental edit of your belief system. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You could be a disorienting or even disruptive influence to some people. You may also have healing and inspirational effects. And yes, both of those statements are true. You should probably warn your allies that you might be almost unbearably interesting. Let them know you could change their minds and disprove their theories. But also tell them that if they remain open to your rowdy grace and boisterous poise, you might provide them with curative stimulation they didn’t even know they needed. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Some children are repelled by the taste of broccoli. Food researchers at the McDonald’s restaurant chain decided to address the problem. In an effort to render this ultra-healthy vegetable more palatable, they concocted a version that tasted like bubble gum. Kids didn’t like it, though. It confused them. But you have to give credit to the food researchers for thinking inventively. I encourage you to get equally creative, even a bit wacky or odd, in your efforts to solve a knotty dilemma. Allow your brainstorms to be playful and experimental. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Spank yourself for me, please. Ten sound swats ought to do it. According to my astrological assessments, that will be sufficient to rein yourself in from the possibility of committing excesses and extravagance. By enacting this humorous yet serious ritual, you will set in motion corrective forces that tweak your unconscious mind in just the right way so as to prevent you from getting too much of a good thing; you will avoid asking for too much or venturing too far. Instead, you will be content with and grateful for the

exact bounty you have gathered in recent weeks. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your inspiration for the coming weeks is a poem by Piscean poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. It begins like this: “The holiest of all holidays are those / Kept by ourselves in silence and apart; / The secret anniversaries of the heart, / When the full river of feeling overflows.” In accordance with astrological omens, Pisces, I invite you to create your own secret holiday of the heart, which you will celebrate at this time of year for the rest of your long life. Be imaginative and full of deep feelings as you dream up the marvelous reasons why you will observe this sacred anniversary. Design special rituals you will perform to rouse your gratitude for the miracle of your destiny. ARIES (March 21-April 19): Orfield Laboratories is an architectural company that designs rooms for ultimate comfort. They sculpt the acoustic environment so that sounds are soft, clear, and pleasant to the human ear. They ensure that the temperature is just right and the air quality is always fresh. At night the artificial light is gentle on the eyes, and by day the sunlight is rejuvenating. In the coming weeks, I’d love for you to be in places like this on a regular basis. According to my analysis of the astrological rhythms, it’s recharging time for you. You need and deserve an abundance of cozy relaxation. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I hope that during the next four weeks, you will make plans to expedite and deepen your education. You’ll be able to make dramatic progress in figuring out what will be most important for you to learn in the next three years. We all have pockets of ignorance about how we understand reality, and now is an excellent time for you to identify what your pockets are and to begin illuminating them. Every one of us lacks some key training or knowledge that could help us fulfill our noblest dreams, and now is a favorable time for you to address that issue. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the next four weeks, you’re not likely to win the biggest prize or tame the fiercest monster or wield the greatest power. However, you could very well earn a second- or third-best honor. I won’t be surprised if you claim a decent prize or outsmart a somewhat menacing dragon or gain an interesting new kind of clout. Oddly enough, this less-than-supreme accomplishment may be exactly right for you. The lower levels of pressure and responsibility will keep you sane and healthy. The stress of your moderate success will be very manageable. So give thanks for this just-right blessing!

“It’s the Big One”—a sizeable pair. ACROSS 1 What “x” may mean 6 Web presence? 10 Hunk of granite 14 “___ It Goes” 15 “Mighty Bruins” is their fight song 16 Lake Titicaca neighbor 17 Meals provided at meetings, sometimes 19 Z, on some graphs 20 “The Lord of the Rings” actress Tyler 21 Comprehended 23 Allowed 24 Touches down 26 Interstellar dust cloud 28 2004 Google event, briefly 29 “Casablanca” star 31 Tagliatelle, e.g. 34 Hawaii’s “Gathering Place” 35 Current measurements 38 “All Things Considered” host Shapiro 39 Oversized candy that includes paraffin 42 Mo. with National

Pulled Pork and Cinnamon Roll Days (not at the same time, ew) 43 “Thank U, ___” (Grande album) 45 Office note 46 Reason to use sunscreen 48 Perks (up) 50 Network that revived the CBS show “Press Your Luck” 51 Salad that traditionally has anchovies 53 French automaker that turned 100 in March 57 Alex’s “Jeopardy!” predecessor 58 Ingredient in some margaritas 61 Voting “aye” 62 Bit of dust 64 Magnifying glass component 66 One with a laptop 67 Additive in some tissues 68 Blunt 69 It comes twice after “Que” in a song

70 “Monstrous” loch 71 Theater capacity DOWN 1 Small Indian hand drum 2 How doughnuts are often prepared 3 Year that Mary Tudor was born, in Roman numerals 4 Adult ed. course 5 Left-hander 6 Penguin projectiles? 7 Have a hankering 8 Remote valley 9 Relaxing 10 Massage place 11 Comic book villain introduced in 1940 12 Flounder’s friend 13 “Woo Hah!! Got You All in Check” rapper Rhymes 18 Treaty that turns 70 in 2019 22 “Big Read” gp. 25 “Vamoose, varmint!” 27 Frat guy, probably 29 Soothing ointments 30 Cedar Point’s location 31 Frying need 32 “What ___

you thinking?” 33 Like none of the words in this clue, uncharacteristically 34 Beasts of burden 36 “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road” label 37 “Animal Farm” setting 40 Cheese in a wrapper 41 Underlying themes 44 “Whether ___ nobler in the mind ...” 47 DVD player predecessor 49 “Batman Forever” actor Kilmer 50 Senator’s assistant 51 “L’Etranger” novelist 52 Got up 53 Some areas in “The Legend of Zelda” 54 “Nixon in China,” for one 55 Dadaist painter Max 56 Mr. Potato Head parts 59 Underground burrower 60 Space chimp of 1961 63 Major time period 65 “Go Set a Watchman” author

Copyright © 2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords. For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents perminute. Must be 18+ to call. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle No. 941 CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 20, 2019 • THE PULSE • 39


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The Pulse 16.25 » June 20, 2019