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KATHLEEN VLODEK ART • NATION OF MAKERS • DREW GIBSON MUSIC

Walk. Feel. Be. The best way to experience the Scenic City is on foot CHATTANOOGA'S WEEKLY ALTERNATIVE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE VOLUME 16, ISSUE 24 • JUNE 13, 2019

BREWER MEDIA GROUP Publisher James Brewer, Sr. FOUNDED 2003 BY ZACHARY COOPER & MICHAEL KULL

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Gary Poole gary@chattanoogapulse.com Assistant Editor Jenn Webster City Editor Alex Curry Music Editor Marc T. Michael Film Editor John DeVore Contributors Rich Bailey • Adam Beckett Thom Benson • Rob Brezsny Matt Jones • Sandra Kurtz Tony Mraz • Ernie Paik Rick Pimental-Habib Alex Teach • Michael Thomas Editorial Interns Kelsey Fox • Ensley McFarland Cartoonists Jen Sorenson • Tom Tomorrow

ADVERTISING Director of Sales Mike Baskin mike@brewermediagroup.com Account Executives Rick Leavell • Cindee McBride Libby Phillips • Lisa Roche John Rodriguez • Danielle Swindell

CONTACT Offices 1305 Carter St. Chattanooga, TN 37402 Phone 423.265.9494 Email info@chattanoogapulse.com Website chattanoogapulse.com Facebook @chattanoogapulse THE FINE PRINT: The Pulse is published weekly by Brewer Media and is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. The Pulse covers a broad range of topics concentrating on music, the arts, entertainment, culture and local news. The Pulse is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publisher may take more than one copy per weekly issue. The Pulse may be distributed only by authorized distributors. Contents Copyright © 2019 by Brewer Media. All rights reserved.

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Walk. Feel. Be. There is endless beauty located all throughout the stunning city of Chattanooga. Hidden gateways unlock some of the most tranquil natural settings in the country, and the often-bustling downtown scene has a tremendous amount of life and energy for people to tap in to as well.

HERE COME THE MAKERS

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A COUNTRY PINK FLOYD

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This weekend, 600 leaders of the “maker” movement from around the country arrive for the Nation of Makers conference, or NOMCON.

One of the most enjoyably frustrating parts of this job is finding words to describe music that doesn’t fit neatly into a recognizable genre. This has been an especially enjoyable morning.

7 SHADES OF GREEN

PAIRING PLAY & DARKNESS

Many local rock and roll fans and live music supporters know Kathleen Vlodek as the bassist/ vocalist (and sometimes guitarist) of the stellar punk band One Timers.

A HISTORY OF DISASTER

The 1980s offered a lot of fears—strangers, Satan, communism (nothing new), etc. Some of these, like communism, have shifted some. We’re not afraid of communist countries now.

18 MUSIC REVIEWS

22 ON THE BEAT

12 ARTS CALENDAR

19 DINING OUT

23 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

16 MUSIC CALENDAR

21 NEW IN THEATERS

23 JONESIN' CROSSWORD

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 13, 2019 • THE PULSE • 3


CITY LIFE · BETWEEN THE BRIDGES

Cons ider This w ith Dr. Rick

Here Come The Makers Nation of Makers comes to Chattanooga By Rich Bailey Pulse contributor

“I always wanted to be somebody. Now I realize I should have been more specific.” — Lily Tomlin This well-known quote from the brilliant comedienne/actress Ms. Tomlin has a lot of meaning below its humorous surface. To wonder, “Who am I, really?” is to engage in a dance with your soul. With your intentions. Your self-esteem. Your dreams. I encourage you to ponder this notion regularly, and to check in with yourself during your meditations and quiet moments. Are you on the path you desire? Are you choosing happiness? Are you honoring your wants and needs in this short, precious life? The 18th-century writer and philosopher Goethe put it this way: “Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it.” And Walt Disney said simply, “If you can dream it, you can do it.” He should know. — Rick Pimental-Habib, Ph.D.

Maker culture has been growing as a movement since the early 2000s— according to one estimate, the number of maker spaces increased from 100 to 1,400 worldwide from 2006 to 2016.”

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HIS WEEKEND, 600 LEADERS OF THE “MAKER” movement from around the country arrive for the Nation of Makers conference, or NOMCON.

Maker Faires are like public festivals of home-made stuff, from robots to arts and crafts, while NOMCON is a convention for people and organizations who support maker activities such as Maker Faires and maker spaces—essentially work spaces with shared access to tools and support. Like the typical business convention, NOMCON will feature lots of networking and insider talk about how to do what these people do, only better. Things like social equity in maker spaces, crowdfunding for innovation, and getting more people engaged in making. But NOMCON is way cooler than the average convention, featuring keynotes that range from quilting to synthetic biology, a presentation from Chattanooga’s Baylor School about biology-based making and synthetic biology (fairly common na-

tionwide but rare in Chattanooga), and a panel on how the maker culture has helped build Chattanooga’s startup scene. MAKING IN ACTION “Making is inherent to all of us. From the dawn of time, we’ve all been able to create and make,” said Kate Warren, executive director of Art120, a Chattanooga nonprofit that makes art bikes and art cars, while teaching kids how to weld and make art. She leads the local logistics team for NOMCON. Kate is showing me an example of making in action. We’re in Garage Bound, a welding and metal fabrication shop started by Michael Brandt. He’s part of a team that was brought together by NOMCON and Magic Wheelchair, a national nonprofit, to make a wheelchair costume for Amelia, a 17-year-old from


EDITOONS

Alabama. The build team has gathered to fabricate the framework that will attach an interactive replica of the spaceship Milano from Guardians of the Galaxy to Amelia’s chair. Amelia will receive the finished chair Saturday afternoon at NOMCON. In addition to Brandt, the team includes: Strat Parrott, a business owner who designed and fabricated the main body of the Milano; Elyse and Marty Farris, cosplayers who painted and assembled the body and wings of the ship; Ian Cole and Brady Fulton, national assistive technology experts provided by Magic Wheelchair, who are designing an interactive electronics panel that will create lighting and sound effects; and Christian Glenn, an engineering student and member of the ChattLab maker space, who is project manager. “I think there are a lot of people who see the maker movement or attend a Maker Faire, and they’re like ‘I don’t make robots,’ but you don’t have to make a robot to be a maker,” said Kate. “You have an idea, you have a passion of something you want

to make happen in the community or something you want to create, and that’s what a maker is.” MAKING A MOVEMENT Maker culture has been growing as a movement since the early 2000s— according to one estimate, the number of maker spaces increased from 100 to 1,400 worldwide from 2006 to 2016. But some bad news broke last Friday. Maker Media, the parent company of Make magazine and Maker Faire, ceased operations and laid off all 22 of its employees. Nation of Makers is separate from Maker Media, and NOMCON is not affected by the shutdown. The maker community is rallying with a GoFundMe page, and Oculus cofounder Palmer Luckey has expressed interest in funding the company. So maybe that maker spirit will be able to rebuild one of the movement’s cornerstones. For more information about NOMCON, taking place this weekend at the Chattanooga Convention Center, visit NomCon.org CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 13, 2019 • THE PULSE • 5


with

Gary, Beth & Eric

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COLUMN · SHADES OF GREEN

Will Humans Survive Development? Support Sen. Alexander’s “Preserve Our Parks” bill

H Sandra Kurtz

Pulse columnist

The essential, interconnected web of life on Earth is getting smaller and increasingly frayed. This loss is a direct result of human activity and constitutes a direct threat to human well-being in all regions of the world.” Sandra Kurtz is an environmental community activist, chair of the South Chickamauga Creek Greenway Alliance, and is presently working through the Urban Century Institute. You can visit her website to learn more at enviroedu.net

ERE’S THE RECENT WARNING from the UN Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services Report: Nature is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history—and the rate of species extinctions is accelerating, with grave impacts on people around the world now likely. The report says around one million animal and plant species are now threatened with extinction. Further, native species in land-based habitats have fallen by 20 percent and 40 percent for amphibians. The report also says insect species numbers are down. In fact, around 60 percent of mammal biomass today consists of domesticated animals for human use, including 1000 million cows and 600 million cats. That’s an overpopulation issue not of animals, but of people. The report’s assessment co-chair, Professor Josef Settele, said, “The essential, interconnected web of life on Earth is getting smaller and increasingly frayed. This loss is a direct result of human activity and constitutes a direct threat to human well-being in all regions of the world.” Did you get that? HUMAN well-being. Loss of plants and animals is connected to human species demise. And what is the cause of this massive loss some call the Sixth Extinction? Well, it’s us—not somebody somewhere else—us. And why should we care? Because loss of biodiversity is not only an environmental issue; it is related to sustainable justice and development goals including poverty, hunger, loss of farmland, migration, health, water, cities, climate, oceans, and land for all Earth inhabitants. Why is it happening? The report lists the reasons in priority order: 1.) Changes in land and sea use; 2.) Direct exploitation of organisms; 3.) Climate change; 4.) Pollution; and 5.) Invasive

alien species. These reasons are all interconnected. Locally we can’t do much about sea use although we do consume ocean fish. Overfishing is a problem as is plastic and waste. Climate change is bringing warmer temperatures due to pollution. Also, our import of plants and sometimes animals from around the world has allowed invasive species to run amuck without natural controls. Tennessee is one of the most biodiverse places in the world. Land use is our challenge. We change the land every day, primarily due to urban sprawl and development that ignores the natural services provided by our wetlands, natural fields, and forests with their biodiverse habitats. We get free clean air and water treatment, air conditioning, food, flood management, carbon sequestration, waste recycling, ecosystem balance, recreation, and aesthetic rejuvenation. Let’s not give it away so easily when a waiver is requested to fill in a wetland or cut down a forest for some deemed profitable endeavor. We are experiencing the proverbial death by 1000 cuts. Every wetland, natural meadow, or forest we lose already had a highly complex, well-developed web of specialized organisms working together. Such Tennessee species as the harelip sucker fish, Carolina parakeet, and 9 species of mussels are already extinct all due to human interference. Today, 62 Tennessee animal species are on the endangered species list, including primarily bats, mussels, fish, crayfish, and even a flying squirrel. There are also 11 threatened species. Plants number 13 endangered and 7 threatened. Ruth’s golden aster, Tennessee yellow-eyed grass, and Spring Creek bladderpod are listed. There are others unlisted.

What can be done then to stop the loss of ecosystems that support human existence? Michael Bloomberg just invested $500 million in a Beyond Carbon Initiative to stop burning of fossil fuel. Mining destroys ecosystems. Don’t have $500 million? You can still work to change attitudes. If you think wetlands and forests are ugly or better used for shopping centers, entertainment, or housing, think again. Challenge yourself to reduce your use of fossil fuel and nuclear-powered energy. Reduce your consumption of products, especially plastic, and work to reduce the amount of waste in your garbage can. Drive less. On a governmental level, speak up for saving land and water. Ask legislators to pass Senator Alexander’s Preserve Our Parks bill. Ask TVA to move more quickly to renewables. Join environmental groups. Guard against construction permits that unnecessarily take away land or water space. A lifeless planet does not improve the economy. Put the saving of natural land as a top priority and take part in protecting it. Work to live in harmony with nature, not wipe it out. CORRECTION: In my May column, I shared incorrect information. The Red Wolves Soccer Club owner does not envision a tunnel under I-75 to connect a stadium to Camp Jordan, but wants a footbridge over the highway instead.

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 13, 2019 • THE PULSE • 7


COVER STORY

Walk. Feel. Be.

The best way to experience the Scenic City is on foot

By Adam Beckett Pulse contributor

Taking time out to walk is one of the best forms of selfcare available to humans, but it is slowly being forgotten by the masses.” Photos courtesy: Chattanooga Chamber of Commerce, Hamilton County Parks & Recreation

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HERE IS ENDLESS BEAUTY LOCATED ALL THROUGHout the stunning city of Chattanooga. Hidden gateways unlock some of the most tranquil natural settings in the country, and the often-bustling downtown scene has a tremendous amount of life and energy for people to tap in to as well. On any given day, tourists and locals alike have the ability to get a glimpse of all that it has to offer in just a few hours. People who explore Chattanooga can be walking around beautiful waterfalls in a secluded part of nature one minute, and less than an hour later be strolling on the Walnut Street Walking Bridge downtown enjoying an extraordinary sunset. With that said, when is the last time that you went for a walk? Not like a walk to your car, job, or to your neighbor’s house, but a walk for pleasure or perhaps a walk to process life and feelings in general. Often, people might not realize that they feel a certain way about

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something until they take some personal time to walk it out. Answers unfold with each step. Realizations and truths fall out of the sky like an Acme anvil, smashing into the consciousness of the person walking. Taking time out to walk is one of the best forms of self-care available to humans, but it is slowly being forgotten by the masses. Technological advances brought forth the age of ride-sharing apps like Uber, Lift, and Greencar, which have made adventuring on foot a thing of the past. In prior years many people who did not have a vehicle handy would often have no choice but to walk to their desired destinations.

Where it admittedly is not always the best way to travel, people who walk know that with each stride they are strengthening their mind, body, and spirit while simultaneously soaking in life. Other forms of self-care are equally important, but walking is a centering form of it and is extraordinarily beneficial for human beings. People who skimp on self-care practices are not allowing the impact of daily life to wash away. Stress consistently builds up, and when people do not take time out of their life for stress management or self-care, they can turn into ticking time bombs. Let’s compare it to being the stinky guy in the room. Suppose a person started a legal CBD regimen using the flower form of CBD, and they got a hold of a particular strain that was extra pungent. They decide to smoke it on the way to a public gathering with friends, not even thinking about the fact that the stinky CBD would follow them like a fragrant dust cloud. When they get into a public setting the stench overtakes the room and it is not until friends let them know that they need to do something to fix the issue that the problem gets solved. The stink remains until the person goes and airs out their clothes and takes the steps necessary to remove the funky CBD stank. When a person does not take time for self-care practices like walking, negative feelings of anxiety, worry, stress, etc. continuously build up like foul CBD flowers. The person experiencing the feelings does not necessarily see the negative build up, or know that they are the stinky person in the


room, but everybody else can see it. It is not until they become aware that they can take steps to correct it. Walking is a great way to continuously air the musty stench out. What separates Chattanooga from other cities is its walker-friendly layout. There are walking opportunities that can be fulfilling without chewing up a whole day. Sometimes a quick thirty-minute or hour walk is sufficient enough to do its job. On a walk, people get the opportunity to explore a mix of city life and the great outdoors. Where sometimes it is best to start walking without a set destination, some Chattanooga walks offer incredible opportunities for people to explore the nearly forgotten form of self-care. A few of the spots that should be considered prime walking locations are the bridges over the Tennessee River, Stringer's Ridge, the strenuous residential areas around North Chattanooga, Greenway Farms, Coolidge/ Renaissance Park combo, and the Riverwalk trail that stretches for thirteen miles along the Tennessee River. The Bridges over the Tennessee River: People who have the time should hit all of the bridges that cross the Tennessee River (Market, Walnut, Veterans) back to back. It really is not as far as it seems and has much value. The trek is host to continuous scenic views and endless opportunities for reflection and exercise. Stringer’s Ridge: Though nature trail Stringer’s Ridge could be classified as a hike, technically it is an extension of Chattanooga’s streets and offers a lovely stomping grounds for walks. There is a scenic overlook on Stringer’s Ridge that offers a glimpse at the city from a natural perspective. The walking trails range from easy to intermediate and have a few different access points. Visitors and locals who want to walk in nature without having to drive to a location can all easily get to the walking trails.

What separates Chattanooga from other cities is its walker-friendly layout. There are walking opportunities that can be fulfilling without chewing up a whole day.” Strenuous personal favorite: One of the most rewarding but challenging walks around Chattanooga does not require a vehicle to get to for downtown visitors or locals. When stepping off of the walking bridge in North Chattanooga, if people continue up Forest Avenue, a beast of an uphill walk awaits. The neighborhood that surrounds the area offers countless incline hills that will advance the mind, body, spirit, and grit. It can be exhausting after a couple of hours but it is worth it. Special mention to some of the hills behind Publix; they are a true test of stamina. Greenway Farms: Located in Hixson, it has an open setting that offers an array of walking trails. Many flat trails are perfectly nestled in nature, while the trail to the quarry is a bit more strenuous, though very rewarding for those that make the trek. The dog park and pet-friendly trails make it an excellent location for people to bring their furry friends. This well-kept secret is a local gem and a place of peace. Coolidge Park/Renaissance Park: Though it does not seem like a very long hike, the paths that surround

Coolidge and Renaissance Parks are hosts to one of the best hiking locations in all of Chattanooga. Nestled right on the banks of the Tennessee River, the pathway between the parks has much to offer. Rich history surrounds the parks and mounted historical guides shine a light on what the areas were used for during the Civil War era. The continuous paths all loop and break off, letting walkers choose their own walking adventure on the trails. A tranquil walk that combines city and mother nature and is host to endless views of the Tennessee River, Coolidge/Renaissance Park is a location where paddleboarders and kayakers enter the Tennessee River, so occasionally one can witness the outdoor enthusiast groups hard at work—just more examples of soaking in life and deprogramming from the daily grind. Riverwalk: The thirteen-mile Riverwalk would take a long time to walk in its entirety. The total 26 miles in and out trek would take a toll on many people. Luckily for the casual walker, there are parks and parking locations along the way where people can park

and explore different sections of the trail without having to commit to the entirety at once. Along the way are beautiful views and accommodations for people to use the restrooms and get water. A few food options are scattered along the way, making sure that walkers can experience the trail worry-free. This is one of the most rewarding walks in the world. Chattanooga is lucky to have such a perfect waterfront walking path. Listening to music while walking is absolutely recommended when people are doing it for health reasons, but people walking for self-care should try to do it without headphones in. Walking is a great way to experience life and the universe at work. When jamming to some tunes, people can miss certain things that could inspire them or touch their hearts. Listening to music, a walker might miss lovers gazing into each other’s eyes, the stillness of the water creating a mirror image of the sky, birds singing their songs of freedom, and flowers growing in mysterious places. Music might deafen a walker to the natural sounds of bugs and animals alike, and to taking in signs of serendipity from the universe. Try to unplug and walk distraction free. Locals who have become desensitized to the natural setting that surrounds Chattanooga and visitors in town for a couple of days can all benefit from putting on their best walking shoes and hitting the ground with no plan or intention beyond walking. The healing properties of it will kick in organically after a few steps. It is a great way to learn the area, get some exercise, process life, tap into self-care, and explore the hidden parts of Chattanooga that can be breathtaking for those who are paying attention. Avoid being the stinky person in the room—go take a walk Chattanooga. It will benefit your life and humanity as a whole.

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 13, 2019 • THE PULSE • 9


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Pairing Play & Darkness Kathleen Vlodek’s art takes another new turn

Next Stop: Urinetown Sometimes there is an expectation for Broadway musicals to take themselves too seriously, but a musical called “Urinetown” is here to prove otherwise. The Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga will be putting on this quirky show this weekend, with a plot centered around a dystopian future in which private toilets have become obsolete after a series of extreme droughts. Creators Mark Hollmann and Greg Kotis started with a simple premise: to bring attention to an ongoing crisis while providing the audience with slapstick comedy. The plot of “Urinetown” might sound a bit absurd, but it highlights a real-life problem that starts with 850 million people worldwide not having access to clean water. The Ensemble Theatre hopes this musical helps people think about this ongoing crisis while also enjoying the comedy and jazzy songs that this musical has to offer. “Urinetown” has already gained high praise; after its Broadway debut in 2002 the musical received three Tony awards, including Best Book, Score, and Direction. “Urinetown” will be splashing its way into Chattanooga this weekend, with shows Friday–Sunday at Barking Legs Theater, 1307 Dodds Ave. Tickets are available at artful. ly/ensemble-theatre-of-chattanooga or by calling (423) 987-5141. — Kelsey Fox

By Tony Mraz Pulse contributor

The work is extremely diverse and intricate, displaying a spectrum of styles, emotions, and subjects.”

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ANY LOCAL ROCK AND ROLL FANS AND live music supporters know Kathleen Vlodek as the bassist/vocalist (and sometimes guitarist) of the stellar punk band One Timers—fans of the band know that they create a variety of music and that their songs range in style from groovy to hardcore. The same can be said for Vlodek’s visual art, which varies in style from playful and cute to dark and scary. The work is extremely diverse and intricate, displaying a spectrum of styles, emotions, and subjects—a portrait of a cute little three-toed sloth, a glitter-encrusted woodcut print of a unicorn skeleton, or a woman in a plague mask hauling a

cart through an environmentally decimated wasteland. It is almost hard to imagine that it all came from the same artist, but upon close inspection one can see a unifying sense of form, balance, and contrast. An artist for life, Vlodek has always liked to draw anytime and anywhere, on anything. She tells us about her earliest creative experiences, say-


ing, “My grandmother always had a pen in her bag that I would borrow to draw on napkins in restaurants, or (to her dismay), to draw in the bible at church on Sundays. I thought church was boring.” Though she is always trying new approaches, most of her recent work falls into three categories—a collection of acrylic paintings of animals, a series of wood cut prints, and another group of mixed media assemblage paintings. The three bodies of work are distinctly different in style, and each have a different purpose. “I like to make stuff that makes me feel better—or that makes people think, or laugh, or run away,” she says. “I kinda try anything out, because my wacky brain makes it hard to stay with one material for long.” The collection of acrylic paintings are all portraits of animals and chimeras, rendered in a slightly cartoony realist style. These wholesome images are whimsical, fun, and overwhelmingly happy. The wood cut prints are masterfully carved, mostly depicting skeletons of animals and sea life. These prints have made their way onto fliers, show posters, and t-shirts, and recently she has been applying paper prints to sanded and painted wood blocks.

Some of my favorite pieces I’ve done are the few that took a long time to complete, or ones that have a lot of deep meaning to them.”

Perhaps Vlodek’s most interesting pieces are a series of larger scale experimental mixed media assemblage paintings. In these highly personal and introspective works, she explores her emotions and memories with visual images. The resulting paintings depict scenes that are terrifying and beautiful; from apocalyptic wastelands to swirling vortexes, each contains a narrative and a profound essence. “I hope to affect others with my art in ways that it affects me,” she tells us. “I research and learn about the animals I paint, or I might be dealing with emotions that are expressed in metaphors. I like to see people laugh, or think—or just stand there in awe, or fear. I guess some of my favorite pieces I’ve done are the few that took a long time to complete, or ones that have a lot of deep meaning to them.” Her work is mostly concentrated in Chattanooga, but she had a bit of commercial success during her time in the Sunshine State.

“I designed a specialty license plate for the State of Florida when I was living there being a marine biology nerd. It is to help protect wild dolphins and a portion of sales go to research.” Vlodek is currently working on new pieces for her next art show, which is happening along with live music by One Timers and Tourist Trap this Friday at Frequency Arts. Though she is hesitant to disclose too many details of the new work, she explains it is something completely challenging, which always entails much emotion and patience —and it’s not even that large. Her work can be difficult to find, however, as she doesn’t have a web page because, as she admits, she doesn’t have a very healthy relationship with computers. “I think technically I’m on the Facebook but I try to pretend it doesn’t exist.” However, purchases can be made by contacting her via email at mipsailor@yahoo.com or on Instagram @ Kvlodek

THU6.13

FRI6.14

SAT6.15

Inappropriate Tea Party

Bowties & Blossoms

Bacon & Barrel

All proceeds go towards educating the Chattanooga area about the dangers of eating disorders. 6 p.m. The Church on Main 1400 McCallie Ave. bowtiesandblossoms.com

Bacon and whiskey? Yes please! Chattanooga’s best restaurants and a vast array of spirits together all in one place. 6 p.m. First Tennessee Pavilion 1829 Carter St. baconandbarrel.com

Life got you stressed? Art helps! This is going to be a totally beginnerfriendly paint class. 6 p.m. The Passageways 10 E. 7th St. passagewayschattanooga.com

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR THURSDAY6.13 Oscar Micheaux Black Film Festival: Super Fly Noon Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 883-0178 chattpalace.com Beginner Wheel 1 p.m. Scenic City Clay Arts 301 E. 11th St. (423) 883-1758 sceniccityclayarts.org Urban Farmers Market and Marketplace 3 p.m. Miller Park 910 Market St. millerparkmarket.com Ale on 8th 4 p.m. West Village 801 Broad St. westvillagechattanooga.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 5 p.m. Hutton & Smith Brewing Co. 431 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 760-3600 huttonandsmithbrewing.com City Sweat Workout 6 p.m. Miller Park 850 Market St. millerparkplaza.com Inappropriate Tea Party 6 p.m. The Passageways 10 E. 7th St. (423) 664-4831 passagewayschattanooga.com Introduction to the Enneagram 6 p.m. The Chattery 302 W. 6th St. (423) 521-2463 thechattery.org Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile” 7 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Center 400 River St. (423) 267-8538 theatrecentre.com Alcoholics Not Anonymous Comedy Open Mic 8 p.m.

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Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 682-8200 chattanoogabarley.com African American Family Film Series 8:30 p.m. Miller Park 850 Market St. millerparkplaza.com Oscar Micheaux Black Film Festival: School Daze 9:30 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 883-0178 chattpalace.com

FRIDAY6.14 The Most Dangerous Year 4 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 883-0178 chattpalace.com Airplantapalooza 5:30 p.m. Bees on a Bicycle 1909 Market St. (703) 225-9686 beesonabicycle.com Augusta Wilson Playmakers Festival 6 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Center 400 River St. (423) 267-8538 theatrecentre.com Bowties and Blossoms 6 p.m. The Church on Main 1400 McCallie Ave. (423) 622-2666 bowtiesandblossoms.com Kathleen Vlodek, Tourist Trap, One Timers 6 p.m. Frequency Arts 516 Tremont St. (423) 260-8387 James Gregory 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Urinetown 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave.

(423) 624-5347 barkinglegs.org Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile” 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Center 400 River St. (423) 267-8538 theatrecentre.com Improv “Movie” Night 8 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Trap N Paint 8 p.m. The Camp House 149 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 702-8081 thecamphouse.com Video Game Night 8 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. (423) 521-3977 stonecupcafe.com Ruby Falls Lantern Tours 8:30 p.m. Ruby Falls 1720 S. Scenic Hwy. (423) 821-2544 rubyfalls.com Good, Old-Fashioned Improv Show 10 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SATURDAY6.15 Colors of Cancer Festival and 10K Run / 1 Mile Fun Run 8 a.m. Ross’ Landing 100 Chestnut St. (423) 499-2606 Not Your Average Mutt-er 9 a.m. McKamey Animal Center 4500 North Access Rd. (423) 305-6506 mckameyanimalcenter.org Spirit Yoga 9:30 a.m. West Village 801 Pine St. westvillagechattanooga.com Beginner Handlettering

10 a.m. The Turnbull 1401 Fort St. (423) 521-2643 theturnbull.com Chattanooga River Market 10 a.m. Tennessee Aquarium Plaza 1 Broad St. publicmarkets.us The Dark Side of Emancipation 10 a.m. Renaissance Park 200 River St. (706) 866-9241 nps.gov/chch Scratching Your Roots: A Black Genealogy Workshop 10 a.m. Chattanooga Public Library 1001 Broad St. (423) 643-7700 chattlibrary.org Shades of Poetry Writers’ Workshop and Open Mic 1:30 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Center 400 River St. (423) 267-8538 theatrecentre.com The Most Dangerous Year 4 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 883-0178 chattpalace.com Bacon & Barrel 6 p.m. First Tennessee Pavilion 1829 Carter St. baconandbarrel.com Carson Whittaker Gallery Show 7 p.m. WanderLinger Art Gallery 1208 King St. (423) 269-7979 wanderlinger.com James Gregory 7, 9:15 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Urinetown 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347 barkinglegs.org Improv vs. Stand-Up:


PROMedy Edition 8 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile” 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Center 400 River St. (423) 267-8538 theatrecentre.com Whose Line Chattanooga 10 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SUNDAY6.16 Jay Pfeil Etching and Engraving Demo 11 a.m. River Gallery 400 E. 2nd St (423) 265-5033 river-gallery.com Chattanooga Market 12:30 p.m. The Chattanooga Market 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile” 2:30 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Center 400 River St. (423) 267-8538 theatrecentre.com Urinetown 2:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347 barkinglegs.org The Most Dangerous Year 4, 7 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 883-0178 chattpalace.com Disney Classic Outdoor Movie Night 8 p.m. Trailhead Juice 3211 Broad St. (423) 803-6211 trailheadjuice.com Chatt Talk Tonight: Film

9 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 803-6578 chattpalace.com

MONDAY6.17 Incoming Artists 10 a.m. Reflections Gallery 1635 Rossville Ave. (423) 892-3072 reflectionsgallery.com “Places and Faces of Black Folk” Art Exhibit 5:30 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center 200 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-8658 bessiesmithcc.org Spring Belly Dance Session 5:45 p.m. Movement Arts Collective 3813 Dayton Blvd. (423) 401-8115 movementartscollective.com Joggers & Lagers 6 p.m. Chattanooga Brewing Co. 1804 Chestnut St. (423) 702-9958 chattabrew.com Stonewall Uprising: The Year that Changed America 7 p.m. Heritage House Arts and Civic Center (423) 855-9474 River City Dance Club 7:45 p.m. Peace Strength Yoga 3800 St. Elmo Ave. (813) 731-9581 rivercitydanceclub.com

TUESDAY6.18 Ray Murphy Golf Classic 11 a.m. Lookout Mountain Golf Club 1730 Wood Nymph Trail (423) 756-5558 tcmidsouth.com Chess K-night 5 p.m. Mad Priest Coffee Roasters 1900 Broad St. (423) 393-3834 madpriestcoffee.com Beginner Wheel

6 p.m. Scenic City Clay Arts 301 E. 11th St. (423) 883-1758 sceniccityclayarts.org Healthy Desserts Class: Raw Chocolate Truffles 6 p.m. The Chattery 302 W. 6th St. (423) 521-2643 thechattery.org Juba Dance Festival 6 p.m. Chattanooga Theater Center 400 River St. (423) 267-8538 theatrecentre.com Moves, Grooves, and Brews Yoga 6 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. (615) 496-6070 wanderlinger.com Tony L. Turnbow: Hardened to Hickory Presentation 6 p.m. Star Line Books 1467 Market St. (423) 777-5629 starlinebooks.com Tuesday Night Chess Club 6 p.m. Downtown Library 1001 Broad St. (423) 643-7700 chattilibrary.com Paths to Pints along the Riverwalk 6:30 p.m. The Tap House 3800 St. Elmo Ave. taphousechatt.com Open Mic Comedy 7 p.m. Common General 3800 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 521-2389

WEDNESDAY6.19 Juneteenth Commemoration Ceremony Noon Miller Park 850 Market St. millerparkplaza.com Main Street Market 4 p.m. 522 W. Main St.

mainstfarmersmarket.com Artsperience 6 p.m. Mad Knight Brewing Company 4015 Tennessee Ave. madknightbrewing.com Beginner Embroidery: Pet Portraits 6 p.m. The Chattery 302 W. 6th St. (423) 521-2643 thechattery.org Beginner Wheel 6 p.m. Scenic City Clay Arts 301 E. 11th St. (423) 883-1758 sceniccityclayarts.org Chattanooga Jewish Film Series 7 p.m. Jewish Cultural Center 5461 North Terrace Rd. (423) 493-0270 jewishchattanooga.com Improv Open House 7 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com The Third Wife 7 p.m. The Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 803-6578 chattpalace.com Open Mic Comedy 7 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 7:30 p.m. The Bitter Alibi 825 Houston St. (423) 362-5070 thebitteralibi.com Open Mice Comedy 8 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400 jjsbohemia.com Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 13, 2019 • THE PULSE • 13


THE MUSIC SCENE

If Pink Floyd Were Country Drew Gibson defies musical classification

Don’t Miss Jordan Hallquist Jordan Hallquist is a singer/songwriter who was born and raised in Chattanooga. He began singing in his church at the age of three and was playing guitar by the time he turned twelve. His love for music runs deep, starting with his grandmother and running all the way to Jordan and his brother. Some of Jordan’s influences include Jason Isbell, Bruce Springsteen, and Neil Young. This is heard the moment he picks up his guitar. His unique voice and unmatched guitar skills prove his sound is a mix between classic rock and Americana— he even brings a little hint of the blues. Jordan Hallquist is confident singing anywhere from a small local coffee shop to the more carefree and chaotic environment of the night scene. He perfectly adjusts to his surroundings both with his covers of popular songs and with his own pieces, keeping the crowd on their feet and ready for anything. Jordan Hallquist performs around the Chattanooga area regularly. This weekend be sure to catch him at The FEED Co. Table & Tavern on Friday night, where his performance will begin at 9 p.m. Enjoy delicious food and then head out to the covered porch to hear some of the best music in the area. — Ensley McFarland

By Marc T. Michael Pulse Music Editor

Gibson’s style is so gorgeously unique that the only direct comparison I could make is to Gibson.”

14 • THE PULSE • JUNE 13, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

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NE OF THE MOST ENJOYABLY FRUSTRATING parts of this job is finding words to describe music that doesn’t fit neatly into a recognizable genre. This has been an especially enjoyable morning, as Drew Gibson’s latest album, Shipbuilder, defies conventional description. His last critically acclaimed album, 2015’s 1532, was compared to Justin Townes Earle by the Washington Post. That’s a fair cop, but this latest release steps up the complexity quite a bit. I’ve said many times, and I mean it, that I don’t like discussing one person’s music by comparing it to another artist. It seems lazy and even disrespectful to the artist you are reviewing. At the same time, there are

instances when a style is so unique, the best you can do is offer an approximation by citing elements from other broadly known examples, so keep in mind as we proceed that I am in no way merely saying, “Oh, he sounds like this or that band.” Gibson’s style is so gorgeously unique that the only direct comparison I could make is to Gibson. Of course if you aren’t already familiar with this rising star, that doesn’t do


Gibson has already caught the attention of critics and fellow performers alike, and each successive album suggests that we’ve only seen the tip of the iceberg.” you much good, so let’s look at some common ground between what he has created and some other rather famous performers who clearly share many of the same sensibilities. Vocally, the album lies somewhere between Mark Lanegan and Bruce Cockburn, with perhaps a bit of Mark Knopfler. In fact, one could take the Knopfler reference a bit further, as Gibson’s excellent finger style playing is in the same class as the Dire Straits frontman. Relaxed and tasteful, the guitar is far more substance than flash, lending an air of gravitas and reserved cool to the overall tone of the music and complemented by some of the most tasteful steel guitar work you’re likely to hear. The vocals are powerful, but powerful in a low, almost whispering way. That seems like a paradox, at least if you take “powerful” to mean “loud”, but what I mean here has more to do with tension than volume. Some singers will express their raw emotion by shredding their vocal cords. Gibson, on the other hand, paints an aural picture of a man filled to the brim with raw emotion, using every ounce of his energy to mete it out in careful doses. Powerful in-

deed. Beyond that, Gibson’s bio references both country and blues, and the influences are unmistakable but, in my opinion, far from an adequate description; there’s more at work here than those humble but strong foundations. A pervasive steel guitar certainly lends some credence to the country roots, but… the arrangements are nearly orchestral in their complexity and the end product is less country than “if Pink Floyd were country.” Track seven, “Waitress”, sports a vocal solo at the midway point that plays like a cooler, calmer, more collected version of “Great Gig in the Sky.” It is my personal favorite track on an album that is nothing but outstanding tracks. Gibson has already caught the attention of critics and fellow performers alike, and each successive album suggests that we’ve only seen the tip of the iceberg when it comes to his genius for lyrics, melody, and musicality. Drew Gibson will be performing in Chattanooga at the Stone Cup on Frazier on Sunday, June 23rd. The early brunch show (start time is 12:30 p.m.) is free and I highly recommend you stop by and hear for yourself an artist who smolders with intensity.

It's A SummerWeen Spooktacular!

Our fair city’s most cuddly psychopaths are at it again this Saturday as River City Rumpus presents the return of SummerWeen! It’s going to be a veritable Weirdmageddon of sideshow and burlesquery, with the talents of international stars Cut Throat Freak Show featuring Jeremy Kinison, Scarlett Storm, and Rebel Rabbitt. Subterranean Cirqus’ own Princess of Pain, Pinkie, will be presenting a new world record breaking stunt to add to her collection. Be warned, it will not be for the faint of heart.

Music will be provided by the Society of the Blind Eye—a collaboration of Genki Genki Panic and Double Dick Slick (so you know it’ll be really good). With a midnight costume contest and beats by Malicious on the back patio, it’s the best damn summertime Halloween, ever. So grab your goat, bedazzle your face, and head on down to the Mystery Sha…JJ’s Bohemia this Saturday night where they put all the fun in “No Refund”! Schembulock! — MTM

THU6.13

FRI6.14

SAT6.15

New Grass Express

The Fridge

Electric Avenue

High energy, hard driving bluegrass and gospel music all come together for a great evening. 7:30 p.m. The FEED Co. Table and Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com

This year’s Road to Nightfall winner features an electro and psychedelic pop sound that will get you dancing. 7 p.m. Miller Plaza 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com

Spot-on renditions of all your favorite MTVera '80s tunes. Skinny ties and Members Only jackets always welcome. 9 p.m. Songbirds South 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 13, 2019 • THE PULSE • 15


LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR THURSDAY6.13 James Crumble Trio 6 p.m. St. John’s Meeting Place 1278 Market St. stjohnsrestaurant.com Ryan Oyer 6 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com Danimal & Friends 6 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Open Mic Thursday 6 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. stonecupcafe.com Thursday Night Jazz 6 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Steve Busie 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Bluegrass and Country Jam 6:30 p.m. Graze Nazarene Church 6310 Dayton Blvd. (423) 842-5919 Toby Hewitt 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Webb Barringer 7 p.m. Edley’s Bar-B-Que 205 Manufacturers Rd. edleysbbq.com Amber Fults 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com New Grass Express 7:30 p.m. The FEED Co. Table and Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com Jesse Jungkurth & Friends 7:30 p.m. Mexi-Wing VII 5773 Brainerd Rd.

16 • THE PULSE • JUNE 13, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

(423) 296-1073 Open Mic Night with Jonathan Wimpee 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Hunger Anthem, Yeah Right, Shehehe 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

FRIDAY6.14 Summer Music Weekends 8:30 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. seerockcity.com Tre Powell 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com The Fridge, Danimal Planet 7 p.m. Miller Plaza 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com Todd Sharp 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co Zach Ryan 7 p.m. Charlie’s BBQ & Bakery 2309 E. Main St. Lew Card 7 p.m. Oddstory Brewing Company 336 E. MLK Blvd. oddstorybrewing.co Luke & Logan Fest 7:30 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com Megan Howard 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Scott Forbes & Adam Stone 8:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com Rick Rushing

9 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com Jordan Hallquist 9 p.m. The FEED Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com John Carroll 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Hit Town 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com The Fridge 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Cutlass Cult 9:30 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Aunt Betty 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

SATURDAY6.15 Summer Music Weekends 8:30 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. seerockcity.com Jimmy Dormire 12:30 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium Plaza 1 Broad St. publicmarkets.us Priscila & Little RicKee 2 p.m. Scottie’s on The River 491 Riverfront Pkwy. scottiesontheriver.net Jason Lyles 2 p.m. River Drifters 1925 Suck Creek Rd. riverdrifterschatt.com The Briars 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St.

westinchattanooga.com Randy Steele 7 p.m. Charles & Myrtle’s Coffeehouse 105 McBrien Rd. christunity.org The Other Brothers 7 p.m. Gate 11 Distillery 1400 Market St. gate11distillery.com Forever Bluegrass 7 p.m. Westbound Bar 24 Station St. westboundbar.com Webb Barringer 7 p.m. Edley’s Bar-B-Que 205 Manufacturers Rd. edleysbbq.com Drew Bunting 7 p.m. Hutton & Smith Brewing Co. 431 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 760-3600 huttonandsmithbrewing.com Courtney Holder 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Diamond Dogs 8 p.m. Mayo’s Bar and Grill 3820 Brainerd Rd. mayosbarandgrill.com Backwater Still 8:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com John K. 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Electric Avenue 9 p.m. Songbirds South 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co Matt Stephens Project 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com Little Raine Band 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com


Austin Zackary Band 10 p.m. Sky Zoo 5709 Lee Hwy. (423) 521-2966 Aunt Betty 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

WEDNESDAY6.19

SUNDAY6.16 Summer Music Weekends 8:30 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. seerockcity.com Andy Dailey 10 a.m. The Westin 801 Pine St. marriott.com Shaun Munday 11 a.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com Mark Andrew 11 a.m. The Edwin Hotel 102 Walnut St. theedwinhotel.com Carl Pemberton 11 a.m. Westin Chattanooga 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Papa Sway Noon Southside Social 1818 Chestnut St. thesouthsidesocial.com Rick Rushing 12:30 p.m. The Chattanooga Market 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com Danimal and Friends 12:30 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com Joel Clyde 1 p.m. Slick’s Burgers 309 E. Main St. slicksburgers.com Jhett & Callie Sue 1:30 p.m. Flying Squirrel Bar

A Day To Remember 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com The Other Brothers 2 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Bluegrass Jam 4 p.m. Fiddlers Anonymous 2248 Dayton Blvd. (423) 994-7497 Open Mic with Jeff Daniels 6 p.m. Long Haul Saloon 2536 Cummings Hwy. (423) 822-9775 Jeff & Hayden 6 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com

MONDAY6.17 Open Air with Jessica Nunn 6 p.m. The Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Papa Sway 6 p.m. Big River Grille 2020 Hamilton Place Blvd. bigrivergrille.com Monday Nite Big Band 7 p.m.

The Coconut Room 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Blues Night Open Jam 7 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co Open Mic Night 7 p.m. Fiddler’s Anonymous 2248 Dayton Blvd. (423) 994-7497 Very Open Mic with Shawnessey Cargile 8 p.m. The Well 1800 Rossville Blvd. #8 wellonthesouthside.com

TUESDAY6.18 David Bingaman 6 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com Acoustic Bohemian Night 6:30 p.m. Mexi-Wing 9 6925 Shallowford Rd. (423) 468-3366 Danimal 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com

Space Jam Open Mic with Xll Olympians 7 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com Mark Andrew 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com A Day To Remember 7:30 p.m. The Signal 1810 Chestnut St. thesignaltn.com Live Jam Session with Freddy Mc & Friends 8 p.m. Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Open Mic with Mike McDade 8 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com Spencer Thomas 8 p.m. The Woodshop 5500 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 991-8876 2nd Hand Street Band 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

John Carroll 6 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com Amber Fults 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Jesse James Jungkurth 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Papa Sway 7 p.m. River Drifters 1925 Suck Creek Rd. riverdrifterschatt.com Dexter Bell & Friends 7 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Open Mic & Jam Night 7 p.m. Wanderlinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Megan Howard 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Terry Parker on TNT 8 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Priscilla & Little Rickee 8 p.m. Las Margaritas 1101 Hixson Pike (423) 756-3332 Hunter McIntosh, AD Stewart 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Sam Carter 9 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@ chattanoogapulse.com

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 13, 2019 • THE PULSE • 17


ERNIE PAIKS’S RECORD REVIEWS

New Music From TENGGER, Tiny Holes

TENGGER Spiritual 2 (Beyond Beyond Is Beyond) The itinerant couple of itta (from South Korea) and Marqido (from Japan) comprises the group TENGGER, formerly known as “10” and since renamed after their son RAAI was born; when pronounced, the new band name means “sky” in Mongolian and “sea” in Hungarian. In addition to employing a confusing use of capitalization, the band has a sound that draws from such genres as minimalism, drone, ambient, new age, and psychedelic music, but for this writer, the most blatant source of inspiration on the group’s latest album, Spiritual 2 seems to be German Krautrock from the ‘70s. However, one resists the temptation to dub TENGGER’s style as a cringe-inducing term

such as Kimchi-rock, substituting one type of fermented cabbage for another, as influences can be a tricky matter. Take the example of TENGGER’s “Kyrie”, which offers warm pipe organ drones, evoking a solemn and reverent spirituality; as explained to Dusted, the band had the German group Popol Vuh’s “Kyrie” (from 1972’s Hosianna Mantra) in mind, which features the vocals of Korean singer Djong Yun. The group also cites Japanese ambient composer Hiroshi Yoshimura and points out how certain American composers, like Terry Riley, drew from Asian sources, while certain Krautrock acts borrowed drone elements from the likes of Terry Riley. “High” opens Spiritual 2 with a cosmic momentum, bringing to mind Radioactivity-era Kraftwerk with Marqido’s analog synths and artificial beats that sound a little more modern than pure throwbacks. It chugs along with a two-note backbone and itta’s scattered angelic vocal flourishes, and perhaps as a tribute to Krautrock band NEU!’s 1973 album NEU! 2 (in particular, the “remixes” on Side B) the tracks

“Middle” and “Low” present the exact same music of “High” but played back at correspondingly slower speeds. Reflecting its title, the glistening 16-minute “Wasserwellen” (“water waves” in German) uses repeating, effervescent synth notes and drones to evoke the perpetual motion of ocean waves, being meditative and soothing. This critic hesitates to recommend Spiritual 2 to anyone who hasn’t heard all of the aforementioned artists; with expectations in check, the album isn’t quite as transcendental as one might want, but it works in its own highly derivative yet pleasing way.

Tiny Holes City of Siege: Olympia (K)

T

here’s a difference between a joke and absurdity, and

this writer proffers that the Olympia, Washington band Tiny Holes from the early ‘80s can’t be dismissed as a joke band—although it was definitely absurd. The group formed out of the trio Professional Ethics, which was comprised of musician and producer Steve Fisk (of Pell Mell and Pigeonhed), sound artist Steve Peters and Bruce Pavitt, best known as the founder of the Sub Pop label; with the addition of drummer Phillip Hertz and bassist Paul Tison, the quintet became Tiny Holes, and it played a sort of art-post-punk that didn’t seem to take itself too seriously. City of Siege: Olympia serves as Tiny Holes’ debut album, coming 38 years after it was recorded at a live performance at Popeye’s in Olympia, for a benefit concert for the community radio station KAOS-FM. At times, the listener might wonder if the performers are playing the same song, with a loose delivery and improvised sounds peppering the basic song structures. However, on tracks like “Adventure”, the elements come together—a restless bass line, guitar lines weaving in and out, a meandering keyboard—to

form an actual song, yet there is the constantly nagging feeling that things could fall apart at any second. This style might seem unprofessional, but one could make a good case that it’s an effective use of tension. Live drumming competes with drum machine beats, and everything else competes with everything else, including keyboard splashes and singsongy melodies, crisp post-punk/ funk bass lines, and electric guitar slashes. The vocals can go from deadpan to fervent, and the Gang of Four-esque “Flying in an Airplane” offers strange operatic singing alternating with a low-key delivery; on “I Love You”, the vocals are delirious and half-awake, clashing with the cheesy beatbox rhythm and perky, cutesy keyboard notes. The closest point of comparison would be James Chance and the Contortions, particularly with the chaotic style, keyboard tones, sax flourishes and bizarro funk, and Tiny Holes seemed to live happily in its own strange little world for its brief existence—there’s nothing to “get” with its eccentricity and it can simply be enjoyed as the absurd, wild and playful obscurity it is.

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Drink Early And Stay Up Late Cooper’s Alley is going full-on party zone with LUAU

T

he geniuses behind London Calling have a new idea, and it’s called LUAU. Remember Passageways 2.0? Remember the glittering triangles that canopy the Cherry Street entrance to Cooper’s Alley? If you follow that shining passage back to the alley between Cherry and Market streets, you’ll find a former concrete wasteland that’s been renovated with a long, yellow, squarish noodle that spans the alley like a happy snake, sometimes at sit-upon level and sometimes curling up to become overhead art. In fact, it’s a great place for a pop up, and LUAU is that pop up. LUAU will build upon this promising start with an enormous, 13x10ft. outdoor Tiki bar, Crayola-colored chairs and tables, fairy lights, a big open grill, and plenty to drink. While the theme is nominally Hawaiian, there’s a strong nod to the fact that rich Westerners defined what we think of as “Tiki culture”. LUAU is unapologetically a work of imagination. ‘“Luau’ is Hawaiian for an outdoor gathering or party—at LUAU you’re on holiday, beer in hand. There’s no shame in drinking early and staying up late,” says London Calling owner James Heeley. “Tiki culture arose from a wealthy generation of Americans’ desire to create nostalgia and escapism. At LUAU, we’re playing with that theme—how to escape the everyday in the brick and mortar of the city!” You may have been inside London Calling—but that means nothing for LUAU. While the dimly lit speakeasy encourages innuendo, subtle flirtation, and gin-fueled conversations

“Tiki culture arose from a wealthy generation of Americans’ desire to create nostalgia and escapism. At LUAU, we’re playing with that theme—how to escape the everyday in the brick and mortar of the city!” with the ghost of T.S. Eliot, LUAU will address your every sense organ in the loudest manner possible. Eyes? You’ll be led to Cooper’s Alley by the sight of fairy lights glimmering atop the bar’s 9-ft. height. Ears? Reggae and dub legend Milele Roots will ensure you vibrate higher. If you haven’t heard this Chattanooga grandfather of all things reggaelicious, LUAU is your chance. Nose? That’s smoke from the grill, where skewers from a wealth of tropical cultures will have your mouth watering.

Tongue? Red Stripe beer, cold and simple. Or the sweet syrup of a slushie cocktail. Yes, slushie cocktail is a thing. Yes, you will become happily tipsy, very fast. Body? The concrete’s hot, the shade’s cool. And Milele Roots is playing. You’ll be dancing, right? LUAU is a pop-up event, but it’s part of Heeley’s larger vision for the neighborhood, the Innovation District, and Chattanooga as a whole. “We want the Innovation District to be a destination like Southside or the North Shore,” Heeley says. “Hopefully the LUAU pop up will really activate the alley. It’s a trendy event— there’ll be a feel that you’re not in Chattanooga; you’re in a much larger city.” LUAU is just one adventure percolating in Heeley’s mind. After all, that giant Tiki bar isn’t disposable. Instead, Heeley plans a long-term investment in the area. “We do one thing and I’m already

working on the next,” he says. “I get super excited to create these experiences for people.” LUAU is a free event, so stroll down Cooper’s Alley through either the 7th Street or Cherry Street entrance at 5 p.m. on Thursday, June 20 and start to dance. If you’re thirsty, you can buy a cocktail slushie or can of Red Stripe; if you’re hungry, try one of the skewers of chicken or vegetables, flavored with Thai curry, Jamaican jerk, or Hawaiian seasoning. You don’t even have to go home from your Innovation District day job—just loosen your tie, pop open a beer, and get ready to hula the night away. Or if you’re coming from elsewhere, that’s ok, too—LUAU will be going on all night. “It’s here today, gone tomorrow,” James says. You’ll want to be here, at LUAU. To learn more, visit facebook. com/londoncallingbar or Instagram @LUAUPOPUP

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 13, 2019 • THE PULSE • 19


FILM & TELEVISION

A History Of Disaster Chernobyl illuminates institutional flaws

Take A Little Trip ...To The Moon The entire world was watching a grainy TV signal on July 20, 1969 when Neil Armstrong became the first person to set foot on the moon, declaring, “That’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.” Audiences will once again experience the thrill of one of humanity’s greatest achievements when Apollo 11: First Steps Edition launches at the Tennessee Aquarium IMAX Theater on Friday at 7 p.m. This film is a special, giant-screen version made exclusively for science centers and museum theaters and derived from Todd Douglas Miller’s critically-acclaimed theatrical documentary Apollo 11. Dr. June Scobee Rodgers, the Founding Chair of the Challenger Center for Space Science Education, recalls the thrill of that night. “When it was about time for them to step out onto the moon, I woke my children up. We sat down in front of the TV, and we were just cheering. It was spectacular to see.” Rodgers will be the featured speaker for the launch of Apollo 11: First Steps Edition. She will provide honest and thoughtful insights about our nation’s space program as well as discussing her work promoting STEM studies through the global network of 43 Challenger Centers. With the engines starting up in preparation for an all-new space race, the opportunity to relive Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin’s unprecedented odyssey is just as thrilling today as when mankind left its first footprint in the lunar soil. — Thom Benson

By John DeVore Pulse Film Editor

Satan has lost his grip on the nation’s youth, now that Dungeons & Dragons is mainstream and heavy metal has gimmick bands like Okilly Dokilly (Ned Flanders themed).”

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T

HE 1980S OFFERED A LOT OF FEARS—STRANGers, Satan, communism (nothing new), etc. Some of these, like communism, have shifted some. We’re not afraid of communist countries really, but anything that might resemble socialism, like tax increases for schools, I guess, are downright terrifying (tax cuts for the extremely wealthy are A-OK, though). Satan has lost his grip on the nation’s youth, now that Dungeons & Dragons is mainstream and heavy metal has gimmick bands like Okilly Dokilly (Ned Flanders themed). And strangers? Well, now that we have more guns than people, strangers aren’t quite so frightening. We have new fears now—Russian Twitterbots, mommy bloggers, climate change. The last, of course, is more dangerous than anything Satan could have come up with during the ‘80s. A recent report even claims that human civilization could end by 2050, due entirely to

climate change. Our leaders are grappling with how to cut carbon emissions, hoping to transfer energy production away from fossil fuels to sustainable energy models using wind and solar. These are worthwhile solutions, indeed. But due to another fear from the 1980s, one option is being left out, despite its ability to cut carbon emissions drastically. Nuclear power lost favor in the U.S. after the Three Mile Island accident in 1979, but the resistance to nuclear was solidified due to the disaster in Chernobyl in 1986. If you ask, most people can tell you


about some vague details—radiation poisoning, birth defects, cancer. A miniseries from HBO, however, tells the story in more human terms. It’s not one that demonizes the technology, but explains how human systems can wreak havoc on the natural order. While we are able to bend nature to our will, our selfish and petty worldviews can cause that nature to break in dramatic and horrifying fashion. One of the things the Chernobyl series does well is explain the science in easily understandable terms. I have no background in nuclear power, but I could reasonably explain the disaster thanks to the series. Essentially, a safety test was scheduled for the power plant, which should have been completed long before the plant opened. It had been running for several years and the management needed to complete the tests. The test required the plant to run under low power, which was not good for surrounding factories that needed the power to complete quotas for the month. Due to this, the test was scheduled for midnight. The night shift workers had never performed a test of this nature. Management ignored all safety protocols. A series of complicated maneuvers were made to

The series focuses on the causes of the disaster only marginally, however. It’s more concerned with the human stories created by an impossible situation.”

successfully complete the test. These maneuvers set up an exact sequence of events that would trigger an explosion due to a fatal flaw within the reactor. It was an extremely unlikely scenario that only happened due to gross negligence peppered with institutional ignorance. The series focuses on the causes of the disaster only marginally, however. It’s more concerned with the human stories created by an impossible situation. The plant workers who desperately tried to find out what happened. The first responders who died trying to control the fire. The men who lost their lives trying contain the radiation. The residents of nearby Pripyat who lost their homes, many of whom suffered and died due to radiation exposure. The ignorant and self-serving politicians who tried to ignore, deflect, and cover up the true nature of the disaster. The series is a complex frame-

✴ NEW IN THEATERS ✴

work of humans working to save potentially millions of lives within a system that refuses to accept blame or even acknowledge a terrifying, world-changing reality. Despite taking place in the Soviet Union, there are far too many frustrating parallels to American politics, particularly concerning an overwhelming devotion to a single party ideology. There’s nothing critical to say about the series. The writing, directing, acting, and filmmaking are all exceptional. Understandably, the subject matter might keep some away. I’m rarely a fan of the disaster film—they tend to focus on the victims, heightening the drama and body count for effect. But Chernobyl is more than a disaster series. It’s a film about responsibility. About consequence. About doing the right thing in the face of annihilation. Chernobyl is an inspiration for what’s to come.

Men in Black: International The Men in Black have always protected the Earth from the scum of the universe. In this new adventure, they tackle their biggest threat to date: a mole in the Men in Black organization. Director: F. Gary Gray Stars: Tessa Thompson, Chris Hemsworth, Rebecca Ferguson, Emma Thompson

Shaft John Shaft Jr., a cyber security expert with a degree from MIT, enlists his family's help to uncover the truth behind his best friend's untimely death. Can you dig it? Director: Tim Story Stars: Alexandra Shipp, Samuel L. Jackson

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 13, 2019 • THE PULSE • 21


COLUMN · ON THE BEAT

The Art Of Compliance Officer Alex applies Sun Tzu to a traffic stop

S Alex Teach

Pulse columnist

He came up to the window in a bladed position, kind of turned towards the passenger door, with his right hand understandably on the butt of his pistol.”

When officer Alexander D. Teach is not patrolling our fair city on the heels of the criminal element, he spends his spare time volunteering for the Boehm Birth Defects Center.

O I GOT PULLED OVER THE other day. It's a strange sensation for me. Not for the role reversal, but for the fact that I tend to drive in my 40's the way most people do in their 80's (not out of due caution or anything, I just detest being in a hurry for anything) so my curiosity is piqued. Was there a vehicle defect? Or perhaps a bloody human hand protruding from the trunk? Or would this just be a little game of “Constitutional Roulette”, as I liked to call it, by a bored copper? I did what came naturally and used my turn signal to pull over to the left, and upon stopping I rolled down my window...then jammed my hands straight out, fingers splayed, and waited for instructions. I have been pulled over maybe two times in the last decade, and I did the same thing that first time as I was doing now, and it had the same effect now as then in stopping the City's law enforcement representative in his tracks for a few seconds. (In fact, he took a step back towards his door.) “Sir,” he yelled. “Why are your hands out the window like that?” “Because I'm afraid of being shot by a rookie cop,” I responded, watching him in the mirror. Now he was puzzled. I was complying, which is usually a 50/50 occurrence, but I was in fact complying too much and I could tell this was messing up the script. What was he going to say? “Keep your hands inside the vehicle where I cannot see them?” “Stop complying?” This possibly hasn't happened to him before and while I was, in fact, afraid of being shot by a rookie cop, I was now

22 • THE PULSE • JUNE 13, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

amused. The aforementioned options not gaining traction in his mind, he finally began to proceed towards my car again for lack of a better option. This time, however, I could see him unsnap one of the safeties on his holster. He came up to the window in a bladed position, kind of turned towards the passenger door, with his right hand understandably on the butt of his pistol. “Sir, you can put your hands in the car.” I did so, placing them on the wheel at the 2 and 10. “Okay, I pulled you over for driving left of center,” he continued. I did not agree with this, but I also know I've got him operating on a level 9 instead of a healthier level 4 so I chose not to dispute it at this point. “I need your license and registration, and proof of insurance.” “I am using my right hand and opening my glove box,” I informed him before doing so. His left eyebrow raised and I could see he was breathing a bit faster. What was WITH this guy? he was thinking, until he couldn't take it anymore. “Sir, why

are you acting this way. I'm not going to shoot you.” “That's why I'm acting this way. I'm getting my wallet out of my back pocket with my right hand now.” Officer Friendly has now gone from nervous to cautious to at long last getting a little pissed. “Who taught you this?” he asked. “The police academy,” I responded. And at that, his jaws clenched while his sphincter assumedly relaxed in concert. “Are you shitting...” He glanced down at his body camera and corrected. “Are you kidding me?! You best have some ID.” “You didn't even ask me about my gun?” I queried as I produced my sworn credentials. I could tell when he threw them back into my lap and walked away in disgust that the encounter was at an end, which means I got to maintain my current 100 percent traffic stop survival rating. It's all about finding a balance, folks. You have your extremes of resisting, and I have my extremes of complying. Funny how they nearly generate the same results, yeah?


JONESIN' CROSSWORD

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the 1960s, Gemini musician Brian Wilson began writing and recording bestselling songs with his band the Beach Boys. A seminal moment in his development happened while he was listening to his car radio in August 1963. A tune he had never heard before came on: “Be My Baby” by the Ronettes. Wilson was so excited he pulled over onto the shoulder of the road and stopped driving so he could devote his full attention to what he considered a shockingly beautiful work of art. “I started analyzing all the guitars, pianos, bass, drums, and percussion,” he told The New York Times. “Once I got all those learned, I knew how to produce records.” I suspect a pivotal moment like this could unfold for you in the coming weeks, Gemini. Be alert! CANCER (June 21-July 22): My dear Cancerian, your soul is so rich and complicated, so manysplendored and mysterious, so fertile and generous. I’m amazed you can hold all the poignant marvels you contain. Isn’t it sometimes a struggle for you to avoid spilling over? Like a river at high tide during heavy rains? And yet every so often there come moments when you go blank; when your dense, luxuriant wonders go missing. That’s OK! It’s all part of the Great Mystery. You need these fallow phases. And I suspect that the present time might be such a time. If so, here’s a fragment of a poem by Cecilia Woloch to temporarily use as your motto: “I have nothing to offer you now save my own wild emptiness.” LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): America’s premier eventologist is Leo-born Adrienne Sioux Koopersmith. When she was going through a hard time in 1991, she resolved to buoy her spirits by creating cheerful, splashy new holidays. Since then she has filled the calendar with over 1,900 new occasions to celebrate. What a perfect way to express her radiant Leo energy! National Splurge Day on June 18 is one of Adrienne’s favorites: a time for revelers to be extra kind and generous to themselves. That’s a happy coincidence, because my analysis of the astrological omens suggests that this is a perfect activity for you to emphasize during the coming weeks. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Let me keep my mind on what matters, which is my work, which is mostly standing still and learning to be astonished.” Virgo poet Mary Oliver made that statement. It was perfectly reasonable for her, given her occupation, although a similar declaration might sound outlandish coming from a nonpoet. Nonetheless, I’ll counsel you to inhabit that frame of mind at least part-time for the next two weeks. I think you’ll benefit in nu-

merous ways from ingesting more than your minimum daily dose of beauty, wonder, enchantment, and astonishment. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libran philosopher Michel Foucault articulated a unique definition of “criticism.” He said that it doesn’t dish out judgments or hand down sentences. Rather, it invigorates things by encouraging them, by identifying dormant potentials and hidden beauty. Paraphrasing and quoting Foucault, I’ll tell you that this alternate type of criticism ignites useful fires and sings to the grass as it grows. It looks for the lightning of possible storms, and coaxes codes from the sea foam. I hope you’ll practice this kind of “criticism” in the coming weeks, Libra—a criticism that doesn’t squelch enthusiasm and punish mistakes, but instead champions the life spirit and helps it ripen. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Help may be hovering nearby, but in an unrecognizable guise. Rumpled but rich opportunities will appear at the peripheries, though you may not immediately recognize their value. A mess that you might prefer to avoid looking at could be harboring a very healthy kind of trouble. My advice to you, therefore, is to drop your expectations. Be receptive to possibilities that have not been on your radar. Be willing to learn lessons you have neglected or disdained in the past. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): As much as I love logic and champion rational thinking, I’m granting you a temporary exemption from their supremacy. To understand what’s transpiring in the coming weeks, and to respond with intelligence, you will have to transcend logic and reason. They will simply not be sufficient guides as you wrestle and dance with the Great Riddle that will be visiting. You will need to unleash the full power of your intuition. You must harness the wisdom of your body, and the information it reveals to you via physical sensations. You will benefit from remembering at least some of your nightly dreams, and inviting them to play on your consciousness throughout the day. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): For the sake of your emotional and spiritual health, you may need to temporarily withdraw or retreat from one or more of your alliances. But I recommend that you don’t do anything drastic or dramatic. Refrain from harsh words and sudden breaks. For now, seal yourself away from influences that are stirring up confusion so you can concentrate on reconnecting with your own deepest truths. Once you’ve done that for a while, you’ll be primed to find helpful clues about where to go next in managing your alliances.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I’ve got a list of do’s and don’t’s for you. Do play and have fun more than usual. But don’t indulge in naïve assumptions and infantile emotions that interfere with your ability to see the world as it really is. Do take aggressive action to heal any sense of abandonment you’re still carrying from the old days. But don’t poison yourself with feelings of blame toward the people who abandoned you. Do unleash wild flights of fantasy and marvelous speculations about seemingly impossible futures that maybe aren’t so impossible. But don’t get so fixated on wild fantasies and marvelous speculations that you neglect to embrace the subtle joys that are actually available to you right now. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “At times, so many memories trample my heart that it becomes impossible to know just what I’m feeling and why,” writes Piscean poet Mark Nepo. While that experience is familiar to everyone, it’s especially common for you Pisceans. That’s the bad news. But here’s the good news: in the coming weeks, your heart is unlikely to be trampled by your memories. Hence, you will have an excellent chance to know exactly what you’re feeling and why. The weight of the past will at least partially dissolve and you’ll be freer than usual to understand what’s true for you right now, without having to sort through confusing signals about who you used to be. ARIES (March 21-April 19): We may not have to travel to other planets to find alien life. Instead of launching expensive missions to other planets, we could look for exotic creatures here on earth. Astrobiologist Mary Beth Wilhelm is doing just that. Her search has taken her to Chile’s Atacama Desert, whose terrain has resemblances to Mars. She’s looking for organisms like those that might have once thrived on the Red Planet. In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to use this idea as a metaphor for your own life. Consider the possibility that you’ve been looking far and wide for an answer or resource that is actually close at hand. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Philosopher Martin Buber believed that some stories have the power to heal. That’s why he said we should actively seek out stories that have the power to heal. Buber’s disabled grandfather once told Buber a story about an adored teacher who loved to dance. As the grandfather told the story, he got so excited that he rose from his chair to imitate the teacher, and suddenly began to hop and dance around in the way his teacher did. From that time on, the grandfather was cured of his disability. What I wish for you in the coming weeks is that you will find stories like that.

“Themeless Plug”—another freestyle for you. ACROSS 1 Success story focus, maybe 12 Catered to? 15 Stat that may figure into a walking itinerary 16 Bambi’s aunt (in the book) 17 She played Edith Bunker in 2019 18 Music game with a floor pad, for short 19 “48___” (Nick Nolte film) 20 Like the works of Sappho 22 Brazilian jiu-___ 26 Gregarious beginning? 27 Most down 33 “Passages” author Sheehy 34 Charlotte or Gabrielle, in Broadway’s “Cinderella” 35 Radius neighbor 36 Aunt, in Asuncion 37 First option

38 Is down with 39 Measuring cup marks, for short 41 Frilly underskirts 44 She played Romy 45 Conned person’s revelation 46 Intense loathing 48 “Starry Night” setting 49 Gavin of “The Love Boat” 52 Calendar divs. 54 Theta preceder 55 State with the shortest motto (“Hope”) 61 “___ blu, dipinto di blu” (“Volare” alternate title) 62 “Bake him away, toys” speaker 63 Packers’ pts. 64 Moldable, squishy material in some ASMR videos DOWN 1 Late comedian Kinison

2 TV actor Longoria 3 The Once-___ (“The Lorax” narrator) 4 Part of WTF? 5 Woven compositions? 6 Petri dish substance 7 P.D. investigators 8 Gen. Eisenhower’s WWII command 9 “Rent” heroine 10 Final answer? 11 Roan answer 12 NYC historical site where the Stamp Act Congress met 13 Finished like the 2019 Scripps National Spelling Bee 14 What the “cool” smiling face emoji wears 21 Marinara brand 22 “Hold on!” 23 Cowed 24 Dramatic performances, quaintly 25 Maple syrup,

essentially 28 Longstocking of kids’ books 29 Ait, e.g. 30 Les ___-Unis 31 ___ clear message to 32 Oregon, for one 40 TV lawyer Goodman 42 It still holds up 43 Boat propeller 47 Gardasil maker 50 “___ Mark!” (line from “The Room” in memes) 51 “___ the Pigeon” (“Sesame Street” song) 52 It’s perpendicular to the warp 53 Fuzzy fruit 56 Kaitlin’s “It’s Always Sunny...” role 57 Some smartphones 58 Turkish title 59 “The Sound of Music” extra 60 Dentist’s deg.

Copyright © 2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords. For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents perminute. Must be 18+ to call. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle No. 940 CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JUNE 13, 2019 • THE PULSE • 23


Profile for Brewer Media Group

The Pulse 16.24 » June 13, 2019  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative

The Pulse 16.24 » June 13, 2019  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative