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VOL. 16, ISSUE 20 • MAY 16, 2019

Nick Lowe Visits Chattanooga The show of a lifetime comes to Songbirds CHATTANOOGA'S WEEKLY ALTERNATIVE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM


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FROM THE EDITOR VOLUME 16, ISSUE 20 • MAY 16, 2019

BREWER MEDIA GROUP Publisher James Brewer, Sr. FOUNDED 2003 BY ZACHARY COOPER & MICHAEL KULL

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Gary Poole gary@chattanoogapulse.com Assistant Editor Jenn Webster City Editor Alex Curry Music Editor Marc T. Michael Film Editor John DeVore Contributors Adam Beckett Rob Brezsny Steven W. Disbrow Matt Jones Mike McJunkin Ernie Paik Rick Pimental-Habib Michael Thomas Addie Whitlow Cartoonists Jen Sorenson • Tom Tomorrow

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ADVERTISING Director of Sales Mike Baskin mike@brewermediagroup.com Account Executives Rick Leavell • Cindee McBride Libby Phillips • Lisa Roche John Rodriguez • Danielle Swindell

CONTACT Offices 1305 Carter St. Chattanooga, TN 37402 Phone 423.265.9494 Fax 423.266.2335 Email info@chattanoogapulse.com Website chattanoogapulse.com Facebook @chattanoogapulse THE FINE PRINT: The Pulse is published weekly by Brewer Media and is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. The Pulse covers a broad range of topics concentrating on music, the arts, entertainment, culture and local news. The Pulse is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publisher may take more than one copy per weekly issue. The Pulse may be distributed only by authorized distributors. Contents Copyright © 2019 by Brewer Media. All rights reserved.

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Nick Lowe Visits Chattanooga In Nick Lowe’s extraordinary five-decade music career, he’s recorded perfect pop songs such as “Cruel to Be Kind” and “So It Goes”, produced Elvis Costello’s first five albums and “New Rose” by the Damned (considered to be the first British punk single) and written oft-covered standards, such as “(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love and Understanding” and “The Beast in Me”.

PROSTATE CANCER FIGHT

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BLESSED IS THE BOOGIE

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Prostate cancer. It’s an ugly horror that leaves movie monsters looking like child’s play. The fear of a boogeyman under the bed can never compare to the real-life endemic.

Dom Mariani. The Western Australian Music Awards Hall of Famer has a career that would merit an entire book (or two). The Stems, The Go-Starts, The Someloves, DM3.

MURDER ON THE NILE

If asked to name a few of the most influential detective writers of all time, you’re likely to think of English author Agatha Christie, and for good reason.

EXTREMELY WICKED

America has an obsession with serial killers. In fact, it seems like America has an obsession with death in general. Our entertainment is almost always couched in some sort of threat.

4 CONSIDER THIS

21 THE ART OF BUSINESS

21 NEW IN THEATERS

5 EDITOONS

16 MUSIC CALENDAR

22 SUSHI & BISCUITS

7 JUST A THEORY

18 MUSIC REVIEWS

23 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

19 ART OF BUSINESS

23 JONESIN' CROSSWORD

12 ARTS CALENDAR

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MAY 16, 2019 • THE PULSE • 3


CITY LIFE · BETWEEN THE BRIDGES

Team ZERO Fights Prostate Cancer

Cons ider This w ith Dr. Rick

Ironman athletes do righteous battle By Alex Curry Pulse City Editor

“The greatest fear in the world is of the opinions of others. And the moment you are unafraid of the crowd you are no longer a sheep. You become a lion. A great roar arises in your heart, the roar of freedom.” — Osho When we care so much about the opinions of others, we become filled with anxiety and a sense of dependency. We are dependent on their approval, and anxious that we won’t get it. There are all sorts of reasons this happens; these reasons are planted in childhood, and they’ve had a long time to develop, to root themselves deeply in our psyches. So to let go of this need, this fear, is one of the hardest things we can do. We are not just trying to develop a freedom within, but we’re trying to change what is already there, and then give ourselves permission to be free. Fear-free. Consider this: To begin, just imagine how incredible that would feel.

In fact, one in nine men will suffer from prostate cancer in their lifetime and it takes the life of about one in 41 men.”

— Rick Pimental-Habib, Ph.D.

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ROSTATE CANCER. IT’S AN UGLY HORROR THAT leaves movie monsters looking like child’s play. The fear of a boogeyman under the bed can never compare to the real-life endemic of a treacherous demon living and breeding inside of our bodies. It is the second most common cancer among men in the United States. In fact, one in nine men will suffer from prostate cancer in their lifetime and it takes the life of about one in 41 men. Team ZERO, the leading national non-profit dedicated to ending prostate cancer, is diligently fighting the battle against the grim disease. I had the pleasure of speaking with Jeffrey Kline, an advocate for Team ZERO and a survivor of prostate cancer. “I became involved with ZERO when I was first diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2014. A few friends and fellow patients introduced me to them through their athlete program. I have been a lifelong runner and triathlete and I have been coaching

runners and triathletes globally for 25 years,” says Jeffrey. “One of the biggest draws for me to ZERO was their grassroots approach to raising awareness and funds for research and their direct involvement with patients. I have been involved in many fundraising activities for them and they have always supported my efforts and the efforts of my athletes and friends that get involved with events they work on, like [this Sunday’s] Ironman 70.3 Chattanooga.” Jeffrey particularly approves of Team ZERO’s individual approach, which is different from that of many national advocacy groups. “In a nutshell, they care about individuals and not just big corporate


EDITOONS

donors. For me, that is the biggest selling point. This isn’t a corporate disease we suffer from. It’s an individual and family disease. ZERO takes the time to touch base with us personally. They offer consultations, advice, medical assistance, direction, and so much more,” Jeffrey says. “I have reached out to many other foundations over the last five years that support prostate cancer and surprisingly enough the answer I get (if I get an answer) is a canned out-of-a-box response. Not the case with ZERO; it’s always a personal email or phone call. That alone speaks volumes.” His story is striking, one of a man at peak physical condition, training his body for immense challenges and tests of stamina. Yet despite his healthy outlook on life, he was still diagnosed with stage 4 prostate cancer. Rather than rolling up the sidewalk and calling it quits, he chose to use his mental stamina to complement his physical abilities. He would beat the disease with continued health, proper diet, and dedication. Since his diagnosis, he has completed two Ironman events and is running 120 miles through the Rockies in order to continue to increase awareness.

“A simple blood test can save your life. Don’t hesitate to get tested today,” says Jeffrey. As with most diseases, the earlier you know about them, the more advantage and leverage you have to fight them. Prostate cancer has the ability to spread to other parts of the body if left untreated. If you think you or someone you know may be at risk, the time to act is now. Visit cancer.org for more general information on the disease. Visit support.zerocancer.org in order to learn more about how you can help the battle against prostate cancer. Any size donation helps families in need and provides doctors with funds in order to continue life-saving research. ZERO provides services that save lives. From free tests to financial support to sharing informational education, ZERO is a power player in the fight to end prostate cancer. You can be there, too, and help them achieve their ultimate goal of beating the disease once and for all. And be sure to check out all the events leading up and including this Sunday’s Ironman 70.3 here in Chattanooga by visiting ironman.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MAY 16, 2019 • THE PULSE • 5


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COLUMN · JUST A THEORY

Are There Moons Full Of Life? NASA’s probes reveal possibilities in our own solar system

B Steven W. Disbrow Pulse columnist

While the planets themselves were amazing and awe-inspiring, it turned out that the really interesting places were the moons of the planets.”

ACK IN THE 1970’S, NASA was just sending the first wave of robotic explorers into the outer solar system. Thanks to a fortuitous alignment of the planets, and some amazing astro-navigational feats by the folks at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, we were treated to our first close-up looks at all the outer planets, except Pluto. (Which came just a few years ago thanks to the New Horizons probe.) But, a funny thing happened during those voyages…while the planets themselves were amazing and awe-inspiring, it turned out that the really interesting places were the moons of the planets. One of Jupiter’s moons, Io, is a literal hell-scape, covered in sulfur volcanoes. (And the first known example of active volcanoes outside of Earth.) Other worlds, however, were even more interesting than that, because they seemed to be hiding oceans of liquid water just below their surfaces. In fact, several of these ocean worlds exist as moons in the outer solar system, just waiting for us to return to them. But why bother with oceans of water that are billions of miles away? Well, here on Earth, wherever there’s liquid water, there’s life. So, in the search for alien life, these are the most likely places we’ll find it. And, compared to worlds around other stars, these are right in our back yard. EUROPA

Steven W. Disbrow is the proprietor of “Improv Chattanooga” on the South Side of town. He also creates e-commerce systems and reads comic books when he’s not on stage acting like a fool.

Discovered in January of 1610 by Galileo, Europa is a moon of Jupiter, and one of the most promising candidates for a subsurface ocean and life. The surface of Europa is crisscrossed with cracks of varying colors. The cracks are in the surface ice of an ocean that covers the entire moon and the colors are caused by…well, we don’t know yet. But one hypothesis is that the material in the cracks is organic materi-

al, ejected from below by plumes or a process similar to the plate tectonics we have here on Earth. Of course, if the surface is covered with ice, how does the ocean below stay liquid? That’s due to tidal forces on the planet caused by Jupiter’s gravity. Just as our moon causes tides that move the oceans here on Earth, Jupiter causes tides in Europa’s waters. Those tides generate heat, and that heat keeps all but the outermost water in a liquid state. ENCELADUS Moving (much) further out into the solar system, we have Enceladus. One of Saturn’s larger moons, Enceladus is home to another (suspected) sub-surface ocean. It definitely has water geysers (which were photographed by the Cassini probe), with more than 100 individual identified geysers. Fun fact: The geysers of Enceladus are the source of the particles in Saturn’s outermost, “E” ring. The E ring is actually unstable, and, without the geysers of Enceladus replenishing it, would have disappeared long before we would have ever seen it. The southern region of Enceladus is also covered in cracks similar to Europa. This suggests that, here too, we have an ice shell that breaks, which allows sub-surface water to flow out, where it promptly freezes. TRITON Much, much further out, around Neptune, we have Triton. Because Triton is

so far away from the Sun, it’s a real long shot for a liquid water ocean, but there are some tantalizing hints that one might be there: geysers, surface cracks similar to the ones at Europa and Enceladus, and a surface that’s otherwise “younger” than you’d expect for an object so far out in the Solar System. AND MORE! The above is just a sampling of possible ocean worlds that exist in our solar system. There’s also Jupiter’s moon Callisto, and Saturn’s moon Titan. (A probe was already sent to, and landed on Titan, which was awesome. But, Titan’s lakes are made of liquid methane. It’s basically a world full of natural gas!) And those are just the moons! There’s also a couple dwarf planets that may have subsurface water along with who knows what in the Kuiper belt out past Pluto. The point is, one day, we’ll go to all of these places, and we’ll dive down into these oceans. And even if it’s just a microbe, or the European equivalent of a shrimp, one of these worlds may well tell us that we aren’t alone in the Universe.

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MAY 16, 2019 • THE PULSE • 7


COVER STORY

Nick Lowe Visits Chattanooga The show of a lifetime comes to Songbirds

By Ernie Paik Pulse contributor

In his seven decades on the planet, Lowe has never visited Chattanooga, which will be remedied this Saturday with a solo performance at Songbirds.”

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N NICK LOWE’S EXTRAORDINARY FIVE-DECADE MUSIC career, he’s recorded perfect pop songs such as “Cruel to Be Kind” and “So It Goes”, produced Elvis Costello’s first five albums and “New Rose” by the Damned (considered to be the first British punk single) and written oft-covered standards, such as “(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love and Understanding” and “The Beast in Me”. But in his seven decades on the planet, Lowe has never visited Chattanooga, which will be remedied this Saturday with a solo performance at Songbirds. Lowe, however, does have links to Tennessee, both through musical affinities and relatives—having formerly been married to Carlene Carter, which made him a stepson of Johnny and June Carter Cash. “I still have friends in Nashville, and I’ve always loved so much of the music that’s come out of Nashville,” said Lowe via phone, from his West London home. “I do feel when I go there, I don’t feel that much of a stranger.” In recent years, Lowe has found an-

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other fruitful Tennessee connection, collaborating with the masked Nashville garage/surf-rock band Los Straitjackets, which shares the same label (Yep Roc) and manager as Lowe. “When we first got together, we had to start somewhere,” said Lowe. “I sent them a list of songs I thought we could do, and they really learned the record. “They did a pretty good job of it— they’re great musicians—but it didn’t take very long before I said to them, ‘This would be much better if we didn’t try to copy the record.’ As soon as we started doing that, that’s when it started to get good.” “It started to feel more natural, not

quite so stiff as if they were a backing band,” said Lowe. “I started writing songs with this project in mind, so that now, it sounds like an entity all on its own.” Lowe has embraced such ways to expand his audience, and he supported Wilco on its fall 2011 tour. “After I toured with Wilco, I found there are lots more younger people coming to see my shows, and I give them a lot of credit for that,” said Lowe. “It’s really, really great when [there’s a wide age group]; that’s when everyone starts to have fun.” In the ’70s, Lowe developed his chops as a member of the pub-rock group Brinsley Schwarz and later formed the power-pop quartet Rockpile with Dave Edmunds; he was an in-house producer for the British indie label Stiff Records and was nicknamed “Basher” for his raw, urgent production style. Lowe’s initial run of acclaimed solo albums, starting with 1978’s Jesus of Cool and 1979’s Labour of Lust, went from pop-rock gems to rockabilly stompers with lyrics that swerved from cheeky to heartfelt. However, after his 1990 album Party of One, Lowe decided to “duck out of things for a while” and reassess his situation. “I’d spent two or three years, not exactly licking my wounds, but I had to clean up my act,” said Lowe. Lowe made a new record, The Impossible Bird, which in retrospect serves as a milestone, marking the beginning of the second stage of his career. “I thought it was the best record I’d made for a while, but I couldn’t get anyone to take this record,” said Lowe. “And then I got some interest from this


little label in Boston, Upstart Records. They put this record out, and it started getting a lot of interest from a younger generation.” “All I needed was to go on tour and promote it, but I couldn’t. I was broke essentially,” said Lowe. “I’d made this record all on favors.” In 1992, the film The Bodyguard, starring Whitney Houston and Kevin Costner, came out, and its soundtrack album became the best-selling soundtrack album of all time. On the soundtrack album was Curtis Stigers’ cover of “(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love and Understanding”, which generated close to one million dollars in royalties for Lowe. “That really couldn’t have come at a better time for me,” he said. “Presto, I was able to pay off a whole lot of debts and pay all my musicians. “I was able to tour America in a decent bus, stay at reasonable hotels and also make another record. And a few bits and pieces, couple of suits, took a couple of people out to dinner, and that was about it. “But of course, it put me back in business again, and I fall to my knees and give thanks to Kevin Costner every day,” concluded Lowe, with a laugh. Nowadays, Lowe describes himself foremost as a songwriter. “It’s very nice work if you can get it, getting your songs covered,” he said. “I’m always keen, not only because it’s a source of revenue, but I’m always interested to hear how people do my songs. “I’m always very excited when people will take one of my songs and really change it completely. When that happens, it cheers me up.” Lowe compares his work to craftsmanship moreso than artistry. “I am more of an old-fashioned Tin Pan Alley kind of guy,” said Lowe. “And that’s really out of style; in a way I feel like it’s a kind of craft. “I sometimes feel like some of the

I’m always very excited when people will take one of my songs and really change it completely. When that happens, it cheers me up.” songwriting I do is being like a thatcher—someone who knows how to fix a thatched roof, or a dry stone wall, a wall you see over here in the country made out of stones. You just place them very skillfully without any cement or anything to keep them up, but they’re very strong. It’s a craft which is sort of dying out.” With vivid characters and situations in his songs, many fans have assumed that they are autobiographical. “They get quite disappointed when I say, ‘No, no, no, I made it all up,’” said Lowe. “Most people think that all songwriters are writing absolutely about their own experiences, and in a way you are, because I know exactly, like everybody else does, what it feels like to have your heart broken or to feel betrayed or to feel misused, mistreated or to feel guilty. “They’re autobiographical in that I’ll have the character behave in a way that I might have behaved, or have

something happen in the song that’s happened to me. But it won’t be actually autobiographical. I choose entertainment over authenticity any day.” Lowe also favors clarity over enigma. “I always try make it pretty clear what I’m talking about,” he said. “I suppose that comes from my love of country music, where the lyric is always so clear and easy to read and with no fat on it. I think nowadays that writing is really mysterious. I used to think it was a process of writing, but I think it’s a process of listening.” Lowe describes his “listening” method of creation as being in apartment with thin walls, overhearing a radio in the next room. “One day, they program a new tune on this station, and suddenly you hear this tune coming through the wall, and you say, ‘Whoa, what the hell’s that?’ and by the time you’ve taken notice of it, it’s finished, it’s gone,” he explained. “Occasionally

it’ll come on again on the radio station, and the next time you’re ready for it. You’ve got a wine glass you can hold up to the wall, so you can hear it. And it’s because you want to sing this song. “So each time it comes on the radio in the flat next door, you learn a little bit more of it. It’s almost like they’ve been written before. I don’t mean just ripping stuff off. It’s complete; it feels like it all stands up, and it all makes sense.” His best work has always grown from time for contemplation, Lowe added. It’s a luxury he hasn’t always been able to afford—but given the gift of time, he has made magic. One song that took over ten years for Lowe to write was “The Beast in Me” for Johnny Cash, which appeared on his 1994 album American Recordings. “I played to him before it was finished really. It was an extremely embarrassing occasion,” said Lowe. “He told me, ‘It’s good, you’ve got something going here, but it’s just not right yet.’ “Every time I’d see him, he’d always ask me how’s ‘The Beast in Me’, and I’d mentally get it out of the box and have a look at it again. It had a really good first verse, but I never really got any further than that, until the last time I saw him play in London at the Albert Hall, and he asked me about it that night.” Lowe went home and finished the song that very night. “And it all joined up, it all sounded like it had been written at the same time, and it was sort of amazing, really.” One might wonder why it has taken so long for Nick Lowe to play Chattanooga. At 70, his music might not have the more brash style of the “Basher”, but he’s a deliberate writer of timeless songs with a rich, velvety voice that has never sounded better— and some things are worth the wait.

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MAY 16, 2019 • THE PULSE • 9


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

‘Murder On The Nile’ Goes Film Noir

CTC delivers twist on classic Christie mystery New Works From Chattanooga Ballet Ever since the 1860 original choreographed by Marie Taglioni, companies have been staging “Le Papillion (The Butterfly)”. It’s a fairy tale about a mistreated maidservant, Farfalla, imprisoned by an evil fairy, Hamza. A prince, Djalma, happens by the fairy’s house and is smitten by Farfalla, but her jealous mistress turns her into a butterfly. From there, tropes reminiscent of the Seven Swans, the Frog Prince, and other tales abound. Farfalla alternates between woman and butterfly several times, and Hamza, too, gets a turn at beauty when she intercepts a kiss meant for her rival. Eventually Hamza is turned into stone and the prince and Farfalla live happily ever after. The original ballet, scored by Jacques Offenbach, has been revived and reset periodically across the late 19th and 20th century; still, it’s far less familiar than staples such as “Swan Lake” or “The Sleeping Beauty”. Previews on Chattanooga Ballet’s Facebook page reveal scintillating costumes and crisp, bright choreography. You can experience this gossamer fairy tale at Chattanooga Ballet’s new production, choreographed by artistic director Andrew Parker, this Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The evening production also features other new choreography by Maggie Pelton and Christopher Stuart. Visit theatrecentre.com/current-productions to purchase tickets. — Jenn Webster

By Addie Whitlow Pulse contributor

A dramatic murder, several suspects that all have motives, casting shade, casting shadow, suspicion on each other, the ultimate reveal, and the whodunnit.”

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F ASKED TO NAME A FEW OF THE MOST INFLUential detective writers of all time, you’re likely to think of English author Agatha Christie, and for good reason. From “Murder on the Orient Express” to “Endless Night”, Christie wrote more than 60 now-classic detective stories during the first half of the 20th century. Almost any play based on the work of Agatha Christie could arguably be a good one; however, the Chattanooga Theatre Centre is going to make their production of “Murder on the Nile”, which opens Friday evening at 8 p.m., even more intriguing and exciting with a classic film noir twist. “Murder on the Nile”, written in 1944, is Christie’s stage adaptation of her 1937 novel “Death on the Nile”. It tells the tale of nine passengers aboard the Lotus, a paddle steamboat chartered by English aristocrats, as it travels

down the Nile River on a honeymoon voyage. In classic detective novel fashion, a mysterious tragedy occurs, and the fate of the passengers aboard the Lotus is no longer certain. “It’s the Agatha Christie we know and love. A dramatic murder, several suspects that all have motives, casting shade, casting shadow, suspicion on each other, the ultimate reveal, and the whodunnit. We have that great reveal at the end,” guest director Courtenay Cholovich explained. “It’s a fast-moving show. There’s a lot in


the language; there’s a lot of detail. Audiences will have a lot on their plate to keep up with. There’s a lot of really interesting details and nuances to relationships that are in [the show].” This production is Cholovich’s directorial debut with the Theatre Centre, but she has acted and directed extensively in New York City. She starred in the Theatre Centre’s production of Agatha Christie’s “The Mysterious Affair at Styles” in 2018, so she’s familiar with Christie’s work on stage. She arrived at the idea of adding a film noir twist to this production primarily because of the characters’ use of language. “The cadence and the style of the language…really fit in with what we think of as the classic 1940’s film noir style of performance. And I was really intrigued by that. I think it adds an extra layer of intrigue and mystery to it,” said Cholovich. “The entirety of the set and the costumes, lighting, everything is in grayscale, black and white, to reflect that. And we’re playing with shadow work, those contrasts between light and dark, you know. Thematically, it’s that constant balance between good and evil, wearing those shades of gray.” When first reading through the script, Cholovich explained that she strives to see if anything about the

They’ve managed to embody both the presentational whodunnit style and the Agatha Christie murder mystery, with that characteristic, film noir experience.” characters or the language pops out at her, which is exactly what happened when she read through “Murder on the Nile”. It was also written in the midst of the film noir trend in America, which was a period from the 1920’s–50’s in which films were a bit more deviant, as characters had hidden agendas and sexual motives. “Because the play is set in 1944, it’s right around the same noir period, so it really just fit perfectly, in my mind. And watching it unfold, I see it more and more with the actors. They really embody a stage version, obviously, because film acting is much different than stage acting,” said Cholovich. “But they’ve managed to embody both the presentational whodunnit style and the Agatha Christie murder mystery, with that characteristic, film noir experience. That really sharp, you know, accented words, with a lot of beats and rhythm. A lot of fast talkers and wise guys.” The cast of ten started rehearsals in mid-March, giving them about eight

weeks of rehearsal. “Murder on the Nile” is going to be performed in the Circle Theatre, in order to provide a more intimate murder mystery experience. Cholovich explained that the set gives the illusion of being larger than it actually is, which is important as the entirety of the show is set on the observation deck of the Lotus. “Murder on the Nile” opens Friday night at 8 p.m. and runs through June 9, with evening shows Thursday through Saturday and Sunday matinee shows. Because Agatha Christie shows have been so popular at the Theatre Centre, the performance schedule has an additional week. Reservations are recommended as seating is limited. Tickets are available online or by calling or visiting the Theatre Centre box office. If you’ve ever wanted a chance to see one of Agatha Christie’s most famous works on stage, with a film noir twist that fits in perfectly with the murder mystery drama, then be certain to catch the CTC’s production of “Murder on the Nile”.

THU5.16

FRI5.17

SAT5.18

The Chattanooga Margarita Festival

Peter Pan

BrickUniverse LEGO Fan Expo

Because who doesn't love a nice cold margarita? Add in great food and music and it's a party! 6 p.m. First Tennessee Pavilion 1826 Carter St. chattanoogamargfest.com

The timeless tale of the boy who refused to grow up comes to the stage. 7:30 p.m. Back Alley @ The Mars Theater 117 N. Chattanooga St. LaFayette, GA bapshows.com

For every kid who loved LEGOs, here's your chance to relive your childhood memories. 10 a.m. Chatt. Convention Center 1150 Carter St. brickuniverse.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MAY 16, 2019 • THE PULSE • 11


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR THURSDAY5.16 Urban Farmers Market and Marketplace 3 p.m. Miller Park 910 Market St. millerparkmarket.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 5 p.m. Hutton & Smith Brewing Co. 431 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 760-3600 huttonandsmithbrewing.com The Chattanooga Margarita Festival 6 p.m. First Tennessee Pavilion 1826 Carter St. (423) 266-4041 chattanoogamargfest.com Un/Folding with Paper 6 p.m. The Hunter Museum of American Art 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968 huntermuseum.org PSC Presents Calvin Sneed 7 p.m. St. John’s United Methodist Church 3921 Murray Hills Dr. (423) 892-2257 stjohnumc.org Matt Mitchell 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Movies with Mat: Return to Oz 7:30 p.m. Hutton & Smith Brewing Co. 431 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 760-3600 huttonandsmithbrewing.com Alcoholics Not Anonymous Comedy Open Mic 8 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 682-8200 chattanoogabarley.com Country Line Dancing Class 8 p.m. Westbound Bar 24 Station St. (423) 498-3069 westboundbar.com

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PSC Presents Calvin Sneed

FRIDAY5.17 Matt Mitchell 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Peter Pan 7:30 p.m. Back Alley @ The Mars Theater 117 N. Chattanooga St. LaFayette, GA (706) 996-8350 bapshows.com Improv “Movie” Night 8 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile” 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com Video Game Night 8 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. (423) 521-3977 stonecupcafe.com Ruby Falls Lantern Tours 8:30 p.m. Ruby Falls 1720 S. Scenic Hwy. (423) 821-2544

rubyfalls.com Good, Old-Fashioned Improv Show 10 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SATURDAY5.18 Mountain Biking Skills Training-Level 2 9 a.m. Enterprise South Nature Park 190 Still Hollow Loop (423) 893-3500 parks.hamiltontn.gov Rock City’s Southern Blooms Festival 9 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. Lookout Mountain, GA (706) 820-2531 seerockcity.com Glitz & Glamour Fashion Show 9:30 a.m. Chattanooga Convention Center 1150 Carter St. (423) 756-0001 Chattanooga River Market 10 a.m. Tennessee Aquarium Plaza 1 Broad St. publicmarkets.us BrickUniverse LEGO Fan Expo

10 a.m. Chattanooga Convention Center 1150 Carter St. (423) 756-0001 brickuniverse.com Explore Downtown Living Tour 10 a.m. Waterhouse Pavilion 850 Market St. (423) 265-3700 rivercitycompany.com Latte Art 10 a.m. Mad Priest Coffee Roasters 1900 Broad St. (423) 393-3834 madpriestcoffee.com MGHC: Successful Gardening on Slopes! 10 a.m. UT Extension Office 6183 Adamson Cir. (423) 855-6113 extension.tennessee.edu Overnight Backpacking Class Noon Cloudland Canyon State Park 122 Cloudland Canyon Park Rd., Rising Fawn, GA gastateparks.org Chattanooga Ballet: Le Papillon 2, 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com Peter Pan


Learn to Kayak Class 2:30, 7:30 p.m. Back Alley @ The Mars Theater 117 N. Chattanooga St. LaFayette, GA (706) 996-8350 bapshows.com Learn to Kayak Class 3 p.m. Chester Frost Park 2277 Gold Point Cir. N. (423) 643-6888 outdoorchattanooga.com Laura Willett Art Show Opening & Talk 7 p.m. WanderLinger Art Gallery 1208 King St. (423) 269-7979 wanderlinger.com Matt Mitchell 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile” 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com Your Stories 8 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Improv vs Standup 10 p.m.

Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SUNDAY5.19 Rock City’s Southern Blooms Festival 9 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. Lookout Mountain, GA (706) 820-2531 seerockcity.com BrickUniverse LEGO Fan Expo 10 a.m. Chattanooga Convention Center 1150 Carter St. (423) 756-0001 brickuniverse.com Chattanooga Market 12:30 p.m. The Chattanooga Market 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com Artful Yoga: Climbing Into May 1:30 p.m. The Hunter Museum of American Art 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968 huntermuseum.org Chattanooga Ballet: Le Papillon 2 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St.

(423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile” 2:30 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com Matt Mitchell 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com

MONDAY5.20 Spring Belly Dance Session 5:45 p.m. Movement Arts Collective 3813 Dayton Blvd. (423) 401-8115 movementartscollective.com Joggers & Lagers 6 p.m. Chattanooga Brewing Co. 1804 Chestnut St. chattabrew.com

TUESDAY5.21 Wake Up & Run 6 a.m. Fleet Feet Sports 307 Manufacturers Rd. (423) 771-7996 fleetfeetchattanooga.com Chess K-night

5 p.m. Mad Priest Coffee Roasters 1900 Broad St. (423) 393-3834 madpriestcoffee.com Tuesday Night Chess Club 6 p.m. Downtown Library 1001 Broad St. (423) 643-7700 chattilibrary.com Paths to Pints along the Riverwalk 6:30 p.m. The Tap House 3800 St. Elmo Ave. taphousechatt.com Comedy #atthemoxy 6:30 p.m. The Moxy 1220 King St. (423) 664-1180 moxy-hotels.marriott.com English Country Dance for All! 7 p.m. Heritage House Arts & Civic Center 1428 Jenkins Rd. (423) 855-9474 chattanooga.gov Comedy with Dave Stone and Big Lazy 8 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

WEDNESDAY5.22 Main Street Market 4 p.m. 522 W. Main St. mainstfarmersmarket.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 7:30 p.m. The Bitter Alibi 825 Houston St. (423) 362-5070 thebitteralibi.com Comedy Open Mic Night 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Open Mice Comedy 8 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MAY 16, 2019 • THE PULSE • 13


THE MUSIC SCENE

Blessed Is The Boogie Hard rock laced with vintage blues

One Family, Music Everywhere Many of our neighbors in Chattanooga are homeless. We wring our hands about it, but no one looks in the mirror and says, “The buck stops here.” Until someone did. That someone was Shawnessey Keith Cargile. Almost 10 years ago, Shawnessey and his friends were hosting a substancefree party series. They decided to give any additional funds they collected to charity. They focused on homeless families. Now in its eighth year, GIVE5 is a city-wide party extravaganza, raising enough money to securely house one homeless family. 2019 GIVE5 events will take place all afternoon and evening this Sunday. Visit Main Terrain, the HART Gallery, Starline Books, HiFi Clyde’s, State of Confusion, The Well, Slick’s Burgers, the Granfalloon, VELO Coffee, or Bleu Cheese Coffee Shop to enjoy the party and hear music and poetry. Among the don’t-miss acts listed are poet Jody Harris at Starline Books, singer Tryezz at HiFi Clyde’s, and guitar master Matt Bohannon at The Granfalloon. Why not make an afternoon of it? Wander the Southside supporting a great cause and taking in all the dance, art, music, and song your heart can hold. — Jenn Webster

By Marc T. Michael Pulse Music Editor

Released just over a month ago, Blessed is the Boogie is ten tracks of pure vintage goodness, a hard-driving rock and roll album.”

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D

OM MARIANI. THE WESTERN AUSTRALIAN MUSIC Awards Hall of Famer has a career that would merit an entire book (or two). The Stems, The Go-Starts, The Someloves, and DM3 are just some of the credits to his name. Fortunately, or unfortunately, this article isn’t about the career of one of Australia’s most important musicians, but about his latest band and album, Datura4 and Blessed is the Boogie. Released just over a month ago, Blessed is the Boogie is ten tracks of pure vintage goodness, a harddriving rock and roll album with its blues roots proudly on display. “Black Dog Keep Running” is a riff-heavy guitar god’s offering, re-

splendent with multiple, tasteful solos and a dash of funky wah wah pedal. This one track alone establishes the band as on par with any so-called supergroup of the ‘60s and ‘70s. Solid but not ostentatious, it’s the kind of hard rocking tune you can listen to over and over without ever getting bored. The title track, “Blessed is the Boogie”, is the pedigreed offspring of Chicago blues and rock music, right down to the refrain of “boom


Every lead line is perfectly tailored and timed to the song it appears in, not as common a condition in a world where lead guitarists are given license to ‘do some stuff there for a few bars’.” boom boom boom” and the wailing blues harp. The choral sounding vocals lend it an unmistakable cool that’s hard to put into words except to say that if you can picture the most badass scene of the most badass character in an allaround badass movie, this is what’s playing in the background. “Looper” opens with a positively Zeppelinesque riff, quickly giving way to a wall of heavy guitar rhythm and plaintive lead. Once again, blues is in the DNA of this song, but you’d have to know it to hear it. To the naked ear, is a nasty, slinky precursor to the heavy metal music that came later in the decade. “Run with Lucy” picks up the tempo from there, pulling off the Alice Cooper trick of simultaneously sounding upbeat and mean. It seems like as good a time as any to point out that while every track so far has featured some gorgeous guitar solo work, at no point does it sound redundant or superfluous. Every lead line is perfectly tailored and timed to the song it appears in, not as common a condition in a world where lead guitarists are given license to “do some stuff there for a few bars”. It is a testament to the maturity of Mariani and

company’s playing that they have all this horsepower at their command without ever overusing it. “Ooh Poo Pah Doo” is pure anthem; a bit Gary Glitter, a bit Slade, it features Ray Manzarek style organ work that is untouchable. The band demonstrates its versatility on the next several tracks, including “Evil People Pt. 2”, “Not for Me”, and “Cat on a Roof”. A hard rocking band they are, but there’s more to Datura4 than guitar hero glory days. They are capable and competent in multiple genres and prove it with a broad range of sound and style. Rounding out the album is “The City of Lights”, a tune that, while staying true to the vintage stylings of the album, would not sound out of place in the least on any college radio station today. Mariani is a man with an impressive reputation and an impressive talent and he has gathered together a group of his peers, Warren Hall and Stu Loasby, along with special guests Howie Smallman and Howie Shawcross, to create an album that earns its place in the Valhalla of legendary supergroups. It is pure listening pleasure and it is available now through Alive Naturalsound Record.

Are You Ready For Some Fire?

Have you made your Memorial Day weekend plans yet? How about combing the two, and no, we don’t mean grilling. Mark your calendar for Sunday, May 26 at Barking Legs Theater to see the Chattanooga Fire Cabaret present Rock Steady. Fire, clowning, burlesque, acrobatics (and more) all set to No Doubt’s Rock Steady album, is sure to be a blazingly good time. The doors open at 7:30 p.m., with the fire commencing an hour later. This is a ticketed event and only fifty tickets are available. And it will set out (which is why we’re telling you about it now). So stop what you’re doing and secure your tickets today through Eventbrite. Go ahead. We’ll wait. And once you’ve done that, be sure to follow the Chattanooga Fire Cabaret’s event page for ongoing updates regarding the other talent for the evening. Of which there will be plenty, we’re sure. Easily one of Chattanooga’s hottest acts, the Fire Cabaret never fails to bring top notch entertainment you won’t find anywhere else in town. — MTM

THU5.16

FRI5.17

SAT5.18

The Wild Feathers

STDz, Two Dead Men, Perry from The Ashes of Folly, Tempus

The Dead Deads

The Nashville-based group is being heralded by many as the " next great American rock ‘n’ roll band". 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co

A night of in-your-face, blast-your-ears, 200 proof hard rock 'n roll. 9 p.m. Music Box @ Ziggy’s 607 Cherokee Blvd. ziggysbarandgrill.net

Whoever said rock was only for the boys has never seen The Dead Deads in action. These ladies kick ass! 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MAY 16, 2019 • THE PULSE • 15


LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR THURSDAY5.16 Jason Lyles 6 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com Danimal & Friends 6 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Eric Kirkendoll 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Uptown Big Band 7 p.m. The Honest Pint 35 Patten Pkwy. thehonestpint.com Ellis Paul 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co Will Stratton 7 p.m. Plus Coffee 3800 St. Elmo Ave. pluscoffee.co Toby Hewitt 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Webb Barringer 7 p.m. Edley’s Bar-B-Que 205 Manufacturers Rd. edleysbbq.com Megan Howard 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Double Cross 7:30 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com LVNDR, Killakeyz 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com The Wild Feathers 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St.

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songbirdsguitars.co Nordista Freeze with Superbody & Dook Walt Jr 9 p.m. Sluggo’s Vegetarian Cafe 505 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 752-5224

FRIDAY5.17 Mockingbird String Quartet 6 p.m. Heaven & Ale Brewing Co. 300 Cherokee Blvd. heavenandalebrewing.com Preston Ruffing 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Jacob Jolliff Band, New Grass Express 7 p.m. Miller Plaza 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com Mark Andrew & Gino Fanellli 7 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Jimmy Dormire 7 p.m. Naked River Brewing Co. 1791 Reggie White Blvd. nakedriverbrewing.com Captain and the Kid 7 p.m. Oddstory Brewing Company 336 E. MLK Blvd. oddstorybrewing.co Ryan Oyer 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Grayson Corbin Band 7:30 p.m. Cambridge Square 9453 Bradmore Ln. cambridgesquaretn.com The Art of the Groove with Tryezz 8 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com Matt Downer 8:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way

puckettsgro.com Jordan Hallquist 9 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com Randy Steele with Skunk Weed Juju 9 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com No Quarter: A Tribute To Led Zeppelin 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co STDz, Two Dead Men, Perry from The Ashes of Folly, Tempus 9 p.m. Music Box @ Ziggy’s 607 Cherokee Blvd. ziggysbarandgrill.net Jack Kirton 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Sexy Beast 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com The Sh-Booms, Aaron Carney Band, Better Thieves 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Wasted Riffs 9:30 p.m. The Brew & Cue 5017 Rossville Blvd. (423) 867-9402 Rye Baby 10 p.m. The Social 1110 Market St. publichousechattanooga.com The Pickup Lions 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

SATURDAY5.18 Jfest 11 a.m.

Tennessee Riverpark 4301 Amnicola Hwy. jfest.com Up the Dose 11 a.m. White Lightning Harley Davidson 7720 Lee Hwy. (423) 892-4888 Travis Bowlin 12:30 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium Plaza 1 Broad St. publicmarkets.us Bluegrass in the Park 4 p.m. Miller Park 910 Market St. chattanoogapresents.com Ayla Sylver 6 p.m. BrewHaus 224 Frazier Ave. brewhausbar.com Naomi Ingram 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Nick Lowe 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co Fine Neighbors String Band 7 p.m. Mountain Arts Community Center 809 Kentucky Ave. signalmacc.org The Divine Poetess & The Frequency 7 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. stonecupcafe.com Mark Andrew 7 p.m. Edley’s Bar-B-Que 205 Manufacturers Rd. edleysbbq.com Forever Bluegrass 7 p.m. Westbound Bar 24 Station St. westboundbar.com Jesse Jungkurth 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com J.S. Bach: Mass in B Minor


7:30 p.m. First Cumberland Presbyterian 1505 N. Moore Rd. firstcumberland.com The Pretty Penny Band 7:30 p.m. Cambridge Square 9453 Bradmore Ln. cambridgesquaretn.com Sammy David, Marona, Jacob Fletcher 8 p.m. The Spot 1800 E. Main St. spotvenue.co David Bingaman 8 p.m. River Drifters 1925 Suck Creek Rd. riverdrifterschatt.com Josh Gilbert 8:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com The Night Birds 8:30 p.m. James County Cattle Company 2553 Lifestyle Way jamescountycattle.com Heatherly 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Nirvanna: A Tribute To Nirvana 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co The Timberwolf Band 9 p.m. Trish’s Sports Bar 4762 Highway 58 (423) 269-8400 Captain Midnight Band 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com The Dead Deads, Hurts to Laugh, Tom Pappas 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com The Pickup Lions 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

SUNDAY5.19 Airenne Espiritu 11 a.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com Mark Andrew 11 a.m. The Edwin Hotel 102 Walnut St. theedwinhotel.com Carl Pemberton 11 a.m. Westin Chattanooga 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Drakeford 12:30 p.m. The Chattanooga Market 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com Danimal and Friends 12:30 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com Blues, Bluegrass, & BBQ 1 p.m. Chattanooga Choo Choo 1400 Market St. choochoo.com GIVE5 1 p.m. Southside Chattanooga E. Main St. Nikki Elias and the Cosmic Collective 1:30 p.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com The Other Brothers 2 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Matt Downer 2 p.m. The Chattanooga Market 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com Mid-South Symphonic Band Concert 3 p.m. Volkswagen 8001 Volkswagen Dr. midsouthsymphonicband.com Bluegrass Jam 4 p.m. Fiddlers Anonymous

2248 Dayton Blvd. (423) 994-7497 Travis Tritt with The Cadillac Three 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com

MONDAY5.20 Open Air with Jessica Nunn 6 p.m. The Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Monday Nite Big Band 7 p.m. The Coconut Room 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Blues Night Open Jam 7 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co

TUESDAY5.21 Mark Andrew 6 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com Danimal 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Space Jam Open Mic with Xll Olympians 7 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com Nick Edward Williams 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com The Wailers 8 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.co North Shore Jazz 8 p.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St.

flyingsquirrelbar.com Live Jam Session with Freddy Mc & Friends 8 p.m. Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com

WEDNESDAY5.22 Megan Howard 6 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com PJ Masks 6 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com Gino Fanelli 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Papa Sway 7 p.m. River Drifters 1925 Suck Creek Rd. riverdrifterschatt.com Jesse James Jungkurth 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Steely Bruno Quartet 7 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Steve Busie 7:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Terry Parker 8 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Priscilla & Little Rickee 8 p.m. Las Margaritas 1101 Hixson Pike (423) 756-3332 Sexy Beast 9 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MAY 16, 2019 • THE PULSE • 17


ADAM BECKETT’S RECORD REVIEWS

New Music From Treiam, RedWood

Treiam DreamAreReal

W

ith the plethora of impressive emcees consistently wrecking the airwaves in Chattanooga, it can be a daunting task for artists who are not already in the limelight to stand out. Potent music is on an even flow and the local artists are always trying to raise the bar. In an impressive display of an artist coming up by combining unique sound with an individual flow is Treiam, with his new album DreamAreReal. The poetic emcee shows a lot of diversity between tracks, and the beats com-

plement the verses flawlessly. When listening to the words it is apparent that the artist is a deep thinker with a great amount of life experience. He finds a way to connect to his music and pour his thoughts and feelings into the mic with style and grace. It is easy to understand what he represents and his different rides through struggle and success. The standout track on the album is “Losses”. It tells a story of going through the struggle and keeping a positive mindset while fighting through various losses and setbacks that life can sometimes throw at people. Other compelling tracks include “FresStylee(Alot)”, “Kush”, and “Marcedes”. To further show the depth of Treiam, the back of his CD cover states, “It all started with a love for you, now my love for you survived your pain but was too late cause now my love is gone”, “this is the no love saga Ch. 1”. As the album progresses

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many different sides of the artist come out and every bit of it is who he is. The album distills the life experience that he gained to turn him into the person that he is today. That is what music is all about, turning poetic selfexpression into sound. Those out there who have been sleeping on this album should go check it out as soon as possible. Support this local dynamo.

RedWood Liminal State

I

sn’t it fantastic how Chattanooga artists just keep emerging from the fog? Music is in the air and it is

inspiring people of all backgrounds to tap into their creative juices. It is truly a beautiful thing. On the dance music-esque side of things, RedWood recently dropped a refreshingly chilled-out album, Liminal State, that paves its own way musically, and is a music lover's dream. The tracks on the album all combine to create a musical masterpiece. The whole album was beautifully produced and packed full of emotion. With a good mixture of relaxed ambient beats and head-bobbing hip shakers, the album really takes the listener on a ride. The artist obviously hit his flow state when producing this album. He was able to create his own sound. This album cannot really be classified under any genre— while it does kind of fit the dance music mold, it really has a vibe of its own. Heady, potent lyrics reminiscent of a troubadour match with a sound that can

be simply summed up as beautiful music that consists of multiple instruments and sounds. Each song on the album is an instant classic, and individually they skyrocket into top slots of the soundtrack to my life. This music is good for most settings; it is centering, grounding music that is nothing less than captivating. All of the tracks on the album bid for the standout track award; however, “Confused” seems to shine a little brighter than the rest. There is something about it that holds a place in my heart. “Metronome”, “Raindrop”, and “RedLight” are all some serious jam, too. Far too often, musicians try hard to sound like somebody else, or fall in line with a specific genre. Magic happens when artists make the music that is in their hearts and unleash their own powerful sounds to the universe. Support this local artist and check out this local treasure.


Getting Married #atthemoxy Cool new venue expands downtown options

F

or most of us, our wedding is the largest event we will ever host. It’s a day that brides-to-be have planned and envisioned since childhood (we won’t even talk about that secret Pinterest board you’ve been curating for years). Now you’ve found The One, and it got real…fast.

The exciting, stressful (maybe expensive?!) task of designing and executing a wedding weekend is here. Daunting, yes; but this is your day, and no matter what, it’s going to be amazing! So grab S.O. by the hand…it’s time to taste tiny slivers of cake, book the photographer, and tour endless venues. The Scenic City offers a number of beautiful locations showcasing the city’s best assets (stress endless). However, despite this exhaustive search you haven’t found it… the venue of your dreams…that one location that properly captures you. Enter Moxy Chattanooga Downtown’s Railyard; offering the convenience of a downtown location, the beauty of an open-air venue, and gorgeous views of the surrounding mountains. Situated in Chattanooga’s bustling Southside neighborhood, The Railyard is a fully customizable outdoor venue with a great vibe, a little bit of history, and an urban eccentric aesthetic. Since opening day last November, the 108-room hotel, located on the corner of Market and King Streets, has quickly made a splash as a nightlife hot spot and experiential accommodation option. Now, Moxy is inviting brides and grooms to consider the The Railyard for their big day. A last-minute elopement, a highly anticipated ceremony cap-

“Named for its placement along now-dormant train tracks, the industrial modern styling of The Railyard is a blank canvas that design enthusiasts will love for its flexibility.” ping off a long engagement, or a third-time-around black-tie soiree? All are welcome #atthemoxy! Named for its placement along now-dormant train tracks, the industrial modern styling of The Railyard is a blank canvas that design enthusiasts will love for its flexibility. The ~3,000 sq. foot space can host events of up to 180 guests. From food trucks to fine dining, the option of outside catering allows you to fully actualize your wedding vision while maximizing your budget. The use of the full-service outdoor bar (housed in a canary yellow train container!) is part of your space

rental, along with staff to serve your party all the champagne or Chattanooga Whiskey they can handle. Other inclusions are personalized messaging on the hotel’s signature ticker board sign, select décor packages, seating, electricity, builtin stage, setup, and cleaning fees, making the space’s affordable price point incredibly appealing. Leave the hard work to us! The Sales and Events team at the Moxy is on hand throughout the process to help take the fuss out of everything. The knowledgeable event staff will gladly connect you with vendors who can help ensure your wedding is uniquely you, and won’t be soon forgotten! Moxy’s mixologists will work with the couple to create a signature cocktail to be served from the container bar, along with a custom bar menu and service options designed to your specifications. Give your guests a reception to remember by adding some moxie to your entertainment! Bands, DJs,

drum lines, photo booth busses, live animals, cousin Troy the party animal… all are welcome in The Railyard. The entire space is outfitted with games from clue to corn hole to ensure your special night goes down in party history. As the reception winds down, guests can continue their celebrations as long as they wish as Bar Moxy—located in the hotel lobby— is open 24/7 with alcohol service until 2 a.m. This eliminates the “So where is everyone going next?” question that is inevitable at all of the best weddings. Those who have had enough fun can settle into the comforts of their guestrooms upstairs without concern for transportation. Discounted pricing is available for wedding parties utilizing ten sleeping rooms or more. To schedule a tour or learn more contact Kacey Swindell, Director of Sales, at (423) 402-7800 or kacey@moxynooga.com.

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MAY 16, 2019 • THE PULSE • 19


FILM & TELEVISION

Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile Movie offers a “making-of” take on Ted Bundy The Saga Of Tanya The Evil Like many here in Chattanooga, we at The Pulse are big fans of anime. And one of the most intriguing new films is Yutaka Uemura’s Saga of Tanya the Evil—The Movie. The film is based on the popular Japanese television series Yojo Senki: Saga of Tanya the Evil, and comes to the big screen locally for one night only this Thursday at both AMC’s East Ridge 18 and Regal’s Hamilton Place 8 at 7:30 p.m. The series centers on Tanya Degurechaff, once a man, now sentenced to live out her life as a girl in an alternate-timeline past to atone for previous sins. In the movie present, UC 1926, Tanya is leading the Imperial Army’s 203rd Air Mage Battalion to victory against the Republic’s stragglers. (More or less, the Empire is Germany and the Republic represents the U.S.) The Mage Battalion expects a vacation after returning victorious, but instead receives special orders from Staff HQ. They are told that there were signs of a largescale deployment near the Empire-Federation border. Faced with the prospect of a new major enemy, the desperate Empire fans the flame of war. On the other side, another magical girl, Warrant Officer Mary Sue, takes up arms hoping to bring the Empire—and in particular Tanya, who killed her father—to justice. Tanya must not only contend with an enemy she has created, but also reckon with the fact that her actions could alter the course of history. This exclusive one-night event will feature premiere footage of an interview with Director Yutaka Uemura. — Michael Thomas

By John DeVore Pulse Film Editor

As a country, America has an obsession with death, which is why there are so many movies about serial killers.”

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MERICA HAS AN OBSESSION WITH SERIAL killers. In fact, it seems like America has an obsession with death in general. Our entertainment is almost always couched in some sort of threat—action movies, horror movies, comedies, romance, even children’s movies, all have an element of danger. I suppose it should come as no surprise. We’re a nation of “stand your ground” laws, of more guns than people, of mixed martial arts, of ceaseless war. Art is often a reflection of the society that creates it. Our movies show who we are. You might argue that films from other countries possess the same elements. You’d be right. But film started here. The American film in-

dustry dominates popular culture worldwide. The elements you see in other film from other countries are and continue to be inspired by what we produce. The glorification of violence and death is a large part of our exports. It’s not always welcome—China, in particular, has a taboo against showing dead bodies, part of a cultural superstition about death


and ghosts. In fact, the government routinely edits media from the U.S. to remove the death. Game of Thrones in China plays like a boring medieval documentary. At any rate, as a country, America has an obsession with death, which is why there are so many movies about serial killers. Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile is one of the more recent ones. It’s about Ted Bundy. Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile is a different serial killer film. It’s one that shows almost no violence of the usual sort. It’s not a film that focuses on the crimes or their horrific details. Instead, it’s a look at Bundy himself. It’s like a fictionalized version of a “Making a Murderer” type show, where the accused asserts their innocence over and over, with a compelling degree of certainty, amplified by a supporting cast of characters who provide context for that innocence. It wasn’t until just before his execution that Bundy offered a full confession. He hoped to be spared the electric chair for coming clean, or at least receive a stay. What’s fascinating about the film is just how convincing Ted Bundy appeared to be. This was, of course, how he managed to be so successful as a killer. We all know that he was guilty— he’s Ted Bundy. But even for those

Efron’s portrayal shatters that belief. He doesn’t show us a mask—we see the same Ted Bundy throughout the film.”

that followed the case, those who have seen documentaries or read books about him, the constant denials and explanations and general charm on display in the film still plant a seed. You find yourself wondering: was Ted Bundy railroaded into the electric chair? Of course not. He’s TED BUNDY. These doubts the film sows, however, make the monster that much more terrifying. It’s the effortless charm of Zac Efron that really sells this story. Like the real Ted Bundy, Efron is attractive and convincing. He plays up Bundy’s shock at the nature of the accusations, showing his frustration with the prosecution, and his general confidence that he’s going to win the day. Bundy never had his psychosis successfully classified—despite being interviewed and diagnosed by a number of psychiatrists, none could really agree on his exact diagnosis. Narcissism, multiple personality disorder, bipolar, sociopathy/psychopathy, are all mentioned but none effectively capture his evil. Many of these

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diagnoses require something of a mask, a face shown to others hiding one's true nature. But most of us feel like we can see through something like that. Efron’s portrayal shatters that belief. He doesn’t show us a mask—we see the same Ted Bundy throughout the film. He never drops the façade, at least not in any measurable way. He is charming and smart and confident and a cold-blooded killer. Beyond Efron’s performance, which is excellent, the film is good enough to warrant watching. There are a smattering of other actors, like Jim Parsons and Haley Joel Osment, that bring their own interesting performances as well. In particular, the Florida courtroom scenes are wonderful due to the interplay between Efron and John Malkovich, who plays the affable Christian judge Edward D. Cowart. Lily Collins does a lot of heavy lifting as Liz Kendall, Bundy’s Washington girlfriend who ultimately turned him in. Overall, the film is an interesting take on a well-worn subject.

John Wick: Chapter 3-Parabellum Super-assassin John Wick is on the run after killing a member of the international assassin's guild, and with a $14 million price tag on his head—he is the target of hit men and women everywhere. Director: Chad Stahelski Stars: Keanu Reeves, Halle Berry, Ian McShane, Laurence Fishburne

A Dog's Journey A dog finds the meaning of his own existence through the lives of the humans he meets. Yeah, that's pretty much the entire plot of the movie. But, hey, cute dog. Director: Gail Mancuso Stars: Josh Gad, Dennis Quaid

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MAY 16, 2019 • THE PULSE • 21


FOOD & DRINK · SUSHI & BISCUITS

How Sweet Tea Came To Be Plus, our resident chef’s cat is apparently a dragon

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Mike McJunkin Pulse columnist

Then my cat turned into a dragon, picked me up by my tail, and reminded me that neither tea, nor ice, nor sugar is really native to this area and that snacking on morning glory seeds causes hallucinations.” Mike McJunkin is a native Chattanoogan who has traveled abroad extensively, trained chefs, and owned and operated restaurants. Join him on Facebook at facebook.com/SushiAndBiscuits

S THE LATE AFTERNOON SUN begins to slowly sink behind Lookout Mountain, I’ve already taken my position in the weathered rocking chair that stands watch over my equally weathered front porch. With a banjo at my side and the haunting strains of old Southern gospel weaving through the magnolia trees, I quietly celebrate the end of another day with a huge pitcher of iced sweet tea and the latest town circular on outdated Southern stereotypes. My mind wanders and I ponder the long history of the South’s most iconic beverage. I imagine the joy that the early Southern pekoe pioneers must have experienced as they raised those first glasses of sweet, Southern iced tea in victory—having tamed the ancient tea fields of Alabama, the sugar cane valleys of Kentucky, and the great ice plains of Tennessee to create the region’s most iconic beverage. Then my cat turned into a dragon, picked me up by my tail, and reminded me that neither tea, nor ice, nor sugar is really native to this area and that snacking on morning glory seeds causes hallucinations. My cat is such a buzzkill. Once I awakened from my seed-induced adventure I was left with a lingering set of questions. Why is my cat such a buzzkill? How did I get on my roof? How did sweet iced tea become the South’s most iconic beverage when none of its ingredients are native to the region? (You deal with morning glory seed hangovers your way—I’ll deal with them my way.) Americans have been drinking tea since Colonial times (we even threw a big tea party once in the Boston harbor). Early New Englanders drank both green and black teas, hot as well as a variety of cold sweetened, alcoholic tea “punches”

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that evolved into nonalcoholic versions just before the Civil War. By the 1860’s, iced tea was commonplace in the North—where they had a long history of harvesting ice from frozen lakes and ponds—but in the South ice didn’t exactly grow on trees, and to make iced tea, you need ice. In the early 1900’s, ice began to be shipped from the North down to Southern states, but it was expensive, which made iced tea a drink for the gentile upper-class who could afford to buy ice and an icebox to store it. Then the Tennessee Valley Authority brought electrification—and, consequently, refrigeration—to the masses, spawning the arrival of iced tea for and by the people. Sugar, on the other hand, actually has roots in Louisiana thanks to Jesuit priests and the knowledge of Haitian refugees and slaves, so it’s not much of a stretch to see how Southerners would turn to sugar to counter the natural bitterness of tea. There is some debate, however, about just how sweet sweet tea should be, and when to add the sugar—in the kitchen while the tea’s still hot, or at the table when served. The basic recipe for sweet, Southern, iced tea requires a culinary skill level just one step above boiling water. Brew a few bags of Luzianne or Lipton tea, pour the hot tea and an unnatural amount of sugar into a pitcher, add water to dilute to taste, stir and serve over ice (lemon slices optional). How much sugar you use is up to you and your endocrinologists, but

typically it’s somewhere between drinking a Coca-Cola and eating enough candy corn to dissolve your teeth. We know from early recipes and the existence of tall tea glasses and stirring spoons that there is historical precedence for serving guests unsweetened tea with a bowl of sugar at the table for them to use as necessary. This is behavior from a dark chapter in our past that should never be foisted on anyone ever again. If I request sweet tea and you bring me cold, unsweetened tea and packets of sugar, I will release the hounds of hell upon your very being—in that I will say, “Bless your heart” and roll my eyes as you walk away. Make sweet tea sweet, and leave unsweetened for those forced into a sugar-deprived existence. Southern food and sweet tea go together like morning glory seeds and cats; iwt’s really impossible to enjoy one fully without the other. No one wants to wash down a plate of fried chicken with a glass of water and pulled pork just isn’t the same without a big glass of sweet iced tea. So pull up a chair on the front porch, make yourself a big pitcher of the “house wine of the South,” and chill.


JONESIN' CROSSWORD

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I think it’s time for a sacred celebration: a blow-out extravaganza filled with reverence and revelry, singing and dancing, sensual delights and spiritual blessings. What is the occasion? After all these eons, your lost love has finally returned. And who exactly is your lost love? You! You are your own lost love! Having weaved and wobbled through countless adventures full of rich lessons, the missing part of you has finally wandered back. So give yourself a flurry of hugs and kisses. Start planning the jubilant hoopla. And exchange ardent vows, swearing that you’ll never be parted again. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The Louvre in Paris is the world’s biggest art museum. Over 35,000 works are on display, packed into 15 acres. If you wanted to see every piece, devoting just a minute to each, you would have to spend eight hours a day there for many weeks. I bring this to your attention, Gemini, because I suspect that now would be a good time for you to treat yourself to a marathon gaze-fest of art in the Louvre—or any other museum. For that matter, it’s a favorable phase to gorge yourself on any beauty anywhere that will make your soul freer and smarter and happier. You will thrive to the degree that you absorb a profusion of grace, elegance, and loveliness. CANCER (June 21-July 22): In my astrological opinion, you now have a mandate to exercise your rights to free speech with acute vigor. It’s time to articulate all the important insights you’ve been waiting for the right moment to call to everyone’s attention. It’s time to unearth the buried truths and veiled agendas and ripening mysteries. It’s time to be the catalyst that helps your allies to realize what’s real and important, what’s fake and irrelevant. I’m not saying you should be rude, but I do encourage you to be as candid as is necessary to nudge people in the direction of authenticity. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): During summers in the far northern land of Alaska, many days have twenty hours of sunlight. Farmers take advantage of the extra photosynthesis by growing vegetables and fruits that are bigger and sweeter than crops grown further south. During the Alaska State Fair every August, you can find prodigies like 130-pound cabbages and 65-pound cantaloupes. I suspect you’ll express a comparable fertility and productiveness during the coming weeks, Leo. You’re primed to grow and create with extra verve. So let me ask you a key question: to which part of your life do you want to dedicate that bonus power? VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): It’s time for you to reach higher and dig

deeper. So don’t be a mere tinkerer nursing a lukewarm interest in mediocre stories and trivial games. Be a strategic adventurer in the service of exalted stories and meaningful games. In fact, I feel strongly that if you’re not prepared to go all the way, you shouldn’t go at all. Either give everything you’ve got or else keep it contained for now. Can you handle one further piece of strenuous advice, my dear? I think you will thrive as long as you don’t settle for business as usual or pleasure as usual. To claim the maximum vitality that’s available, you’ll need to make exceptions to at least some of your rules. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “All human nature vigorously resists grace because grace changes us and the change is painful,” wrote author Flannery O’Connor. I think that’s an observation worth considering. But I’ve also seen numerous exceptions to her rule. I know people who have eagerly welcomed grace into their lives even though they know that its arrival will change them forever. And amazingly, many of those people have experienced the resulting change as tonic and interesting, not primarily painful. In fact, I’ve come to believe that the act of eagerly welcoming change-inducing grace makes it more likely that the changes will be tonic and interesting. Everything I’ve just said will especially apply to you in the coming weeks. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): There’s a certain problem that has in my opinion occupied too much of your attention. It’s really rather trivial in the big picture of your life, and doesn’t deserve to suck up so much of your attention. I suspect you will soon see things my way, and take measures to move on from this energy sink. Then you’ll be free to focus on a more interesting and potentially productive dilemma—a twisty riddle that truly warrants your loving attention. As you work to solve it, you will reap rewards that will be useful and enduring. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Author Hélène Cixous articulated a poetically rigorous approach to love. I’ll tell you about it, since in my astrological opinion you’re entering a phase when you’ll be wise to upgrade and refine your definitions of love, even as you upgrade and refine your practice of love. Here’s Cixous: “I want to love a person freely, including all her secrets. I want to love in this person someone she doesn’t know. I want to love outside the law: without judgment. Without imposed preference. Does that mean outside morality? No. Only this: without fault. Without false, without true. I want to meet her between the words, beneath language.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Capricorn author Henry Miller wrote that his master plan was “to remain what I am and to become more and more only what I am—that is, to become more miraculous.” This is an excellent strategy for your use. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to renounce any tendency you might have to compare yourself to anyone else. You’ll attract blessings as you wean yourself from imagining that you should live up to the expectations of others or follow a path that resembles theirs. So here’s my challenge: I dare you to become more and more only what you are—that is, to become more miraculous. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): London’s British Museum holds a compendium of artifacts from the civilizations of many different eras and locations. Author Jonathan Stroud writes that it’s “home to a million antiquities, several dozen of which were legitimately come by.” Why does he say that? Because so many of the museum’s antiquities were pilfered from other cultures. In accordance with current astrological omens, I invite you to fantasize about a scenario in which the British Museum’s administrators return these treasures to their original owners. When you’re done with that imaginative exercise, move on to the next one, which is to envision scenarios in which you recover the personal treasures and goodies and powers that you have been separated from over the years. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I hate it when people tell me that I should ‘get out of my comfort zone,’” writes Piscean blogger Rosespell. “I don’t even have a comfort zone. My discomfort zone is pretty much everywhere.” I have good news for Rosespell and all of you Pisceans who might be inclined to utter similar testimony. The coming weeks will feature conditions that make it far more likely than usual that you will locate or create a real comfort zone you can rely on. For best results, cultivate a vivid expectation that such a sweet development is indeed possible. ARIES (March 21-April 19): According to humorist Dave Barry, “The method of learning Japanese recommended by experts is to be born as a Japanese baby and raised by a Japanese family, in Japan.” As you enter an intensely educational phase of your astrological cycle, I suggest you adopt a similar strategy toward learning new skills and mastering unfamiliar knowledge and absorbing fresh information. Immerse yourself in environments that will efficiently and effectively fill you with the teachings you need. A more casual, slapdash approach just won’t enable you to take thorough advantage of your current opportunities to expand your repertoire.

“Eighteen Again”—-in honor of Jonesin’s 18th anniversary. ACROSS 1 Yale graduates, slangily 5 Carpet cleaners, in brief 9 Exams for high school jrs. 14 “The Wizard of Oz” surname 15 Without ___ (perilously) 16 “Let’s do this!” 17 “Great” Macedonian king who had his first military victory at age 18 19 “Lemon Tree” singer Lopez 20 Budapest’s river 21 ___ Nas X 23 Pascal or newton, e.g. 24 Turn blue? 25 Muddling through 27 Pahoehoe or a’a, e.g. 29 Flock of geese 33 Its clock speed is measured in GHz 36 At age 18, she got her ideas for “Frankenstein” during a summer stay in Geneva 39 Football game intermission 41 Hair braid

42 Roof edge 43 “Little Sure Shot” who was an accomplished sharpshooter at age 18 46 Putdown 47 Closer 48 Unwritten exam 50 Losing streaks 53 Forged check passer 57 Impish kid 60 Establishment that can be combined with a laundromat or arcade 61 “All right, whatever ...” 62 Purple ___ (New Hampshire’s state flower) 64 Hundred Years’ War leader captured by French nobles at age 18 66 NBC comedy with Glenn Howerton and Allisyn Ashley Arm 67 NASCAR course shape 68 “Switch” ending 69 Small, round, and shiny 70 Like an optimist’s outlook

71 “Life of Pi” author Martel DOWN 1 “My goodness!” 2 ‘80s-’90s legal drama 3 “The L Word” creator/ producer Chaiken 4 Type of reproduction 5 Barn attachment 6 “Anything else?” 7 Former “The Voice” judge ___ Green 8 Word before mall or steak 9 Casino section 10 It’s real, y’all 11 “It’s ___” (Pet Shop Boys hit) 12 Collette of “Wanderlust” 13 Fit of vexation 18 James Garfield’s middle name 22 Flame source at some concerts 25 Former French first lady ___ Bruni-Sarkozy 26 Scottish denial 28 Vicks ointment 30 Pleased 31 “Shazam!”

star Zachary 32 Mr. Potato Head pieces 33 “Rumble in the Bronx” star 34 Greenhouse glass 35 Lower-arm bone 37 Tibetan source of butter 38 Grain-storage towers 40 Purpose of a certain kit 44 “Slippery” fish 45 One of the “Animaniacs” siblings 49 Dublin’s river 51 Huge 52 BYU location 54 Pageant prop 55 “The Smartest Guys in the Room” company 56 Scouting mission, briefly 57 Say too much 58 Ready to eat 59 “Fantastic Four” actress Jessica 61 ___ Connect (superbrainy BBC game show) 63 Overly modest 65 ___ in “apple”

Copyright © 2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords. For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents perminute. Must be 18+ to call. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle No. 936 CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MAY 16, 2019 • THE PULSE • 23


Profile for Brewer Media Group

The Pulse 16.20 » May 16, 2019  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative

The Pulse 16.20 » May 16, 2019  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative