Page 1

VOL. 16, ISSUE 11 • MARCH 14, 2019

The Flavor Of Local Libations sampling chattanooga's signature cocktails

St. Patrick’s Day celebrates the Irish Artist Joel Smith truly does it all Meeting Our New Furry Neighbors CHATTANOOGA'S WEEKLY ALTERNATIVE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM


2 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM


FROM THE EDITOR VOLUME 16, ISSUE 17 • MARCH 14, 2019

BREWER MEDIA GROUP Publisher James Brewer, Sr. FOUNDED 2003 BY ZACHARY COOPER & MICHAEL KULL

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Gary Poole gary@chattanoogapulse.com Assistant Editor Jenn Webster City Editor Alex Curry Music Editor Marc T. Michael Film Editor John DeVore Contributors Rob Brezsny • Kevin Hale Matt Jones • Sandra Kurtz Mike McJunkin • Ernie Paik Rick Pimental-Habib Michael Thomas • Brandon Watson Editorial Intern Jason Dale Cartoonists Jen Sorenson • Tom Tomorrow

ADVERTISING Director of Sales Mike Baskin mike@brewermediagroup.com Account Executives Rick Leavell • Cindee McBride Libby Phillips • John Rodriguez Danielle Swindell

CONTACT Offices 1305 Carter St. Chattanooga, TN 37402 Phone 423.265.9494 Fax 423.266.2335 Email info@chattanoogapulse.com Website chattanoogapulse.com Facebook @chattanoogapulse THE FINE PRINT: The Pulse is published weekly by Brewer Media and is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. The Pulse covers a broad range of topics concentrating on music, the arts, entertainment, culture and local news. The Pulse is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publisher may take more than one copy per weekly issue. The Pulse may be distributed only by authorized distributors. Contents Copyright © 2019 by Brewer Media. All rights reserved.

6 4 30

The Flavor Of Local Libations Over many years and beers my favored drink selections have devolved into the most rudimentary of tastes. Whiskey neat chased with antifreeze and PBR with any sunset will often do me just fine.

OUR ANIMAL FRIENDS

10

AN IRISH HOLIDAY?

36

Let’s talk about animals! From the furry, adorable ground-dwelling busybodies to the kingly beasts of the wild, animals are a beloved and essential part of our world.

The season is upon us. St. Patrick’s Day is this Sunday, March 17th and as the McManus brothers will tell you, everybody is Irish on St. Patrick’s Day.

A MULTIMEDIA COBBLER

When you think of a cobbler, you might think of some old English man in a village who mends and makes shoes. In our digital era, most people buy their shoes at a store or online.

TYPICALLY MARVEL

The Marvel Cinematic Universe is nearing a crossroads. This spring marks the culmination of ten years of filmmaking. There have been scores of movies.

5 CONSIDER THIS

15 SPRING DRINK GUIDE

32 MUSIC CALENDAR

5 EDITOONS

27 MIXOLOGY

34 MUSIC REVIEWS

9 SHADES OF GREEN

29 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

37 NEW IN THEATERS

29 JONESIN' CROSSWORD

38 SUSHI & BISCUITS

12 ARTS CALENDAR

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MARCH 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 3


CITY LIFE · BETWEEN THE BRIDGES

Cons ider This w ith Dr. Rick

Meet Our Animal Friends There are many new ways for Chattanoogans to encounter our furry neighbors By Alex Curry Pulse City Editor

“It is better to light a candle than curse the darkness.” — Eleanor Roosevelt This month being Women’s History Month, I’ve heard from several of the important women in my life. Their consensus: “EVERY month needs to be women’s history month!” If you’re smart, you don’t argue. The great women throughout history who have inspired me is a very long list. But I’ll share some favorites with you over these next weeks and see if you find some inspiration as well. I’ll begin with Eleanor Roosevelt, a First Lady whose books, speeches and independent way of life illustrated her passionate desire to give shape to American women’s voices. She said, “You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, ‘I lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along.’ You must do the thing you think you cannot do.” — Rick Pimental-Habib, Ph.D.

It is an exciting era in Chattanooga for those concerned with animals. It’s time to meet Betsy. Betsy is a bit of a pioneer, the first giant anteater in the area.”

4 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

L

ET’S TALK ABOUT ANIMALS! FROM THE FURRY, adorable ground-dwelling busybodies to the kingly beasts of the wild, animals are a beloved and essential part of our world. More than just cute and fluffy, they make up the immensely complex ecosystem that keeps us all alive and makes the earth a stunning enchantress of seductive beauty. Elusive, inaccessible, yet totally surrounding us at all times, completely ingrained in our world, the animal kingdom is a gargantuan topic of discourse. Advancements in technology have allowed programs like Planet Earth to bridge the gap to the animal world like never before. It is an exciting era in Chattanooga for those concerned with animals. It’s time to meet Betsy. Betsy is a bit of a pioneer, the first giant anteater in the area. A native of Chicago, Betsy is excited about warmer weather and the endless buffet of insects that previ-

ously found refuge in our beautiful city. Betsy has finished moving into her new custom-designed apartment at The Chattanooga Zoo and, after some time adapting to her new environment, has finally made her premiere to the public. The Chattanooga Zoo is an accredited member of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA). They are working with Betsy as part of the Species Survival Plan, which hopes to preserve a variety of species in the wild. Though often shy, Betsy is working hard with the AZA to find a suitable husband so that her kind can continue to breed. Giant anteaters are classified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as on the Red List of Threatened Species as Vulnera-


EDITOONS

ble, or At High Risk of Endangerment in the Wild. Chattanooga is doing its part to help Betsy and her kind thrive and rediscover their place in nature. Though they are amazing animals, giant anteaters don’t make for appropriate pets. You’ll have to visit the zoo where, if you’re lucky, Betsy will come out and say hello. If you’re in the market to find a pet or to help out more pet-friendly animals, look no further than the Humane Educational Society of Chattanooga. Every year, the society hosts a blacktie fundraiser to help gather greatly needed monetary contributions. “It brings in a lot of money for our special needs fund, which goes to animals with emergency medical needs,” says Ragan Walker from the Humane Educational Society of Chattanooga. “Each year we have a dinner, auction, and feature a runway show with a few of our special medical cases. This year we will be showing a dog that was thrown from a vehicle and a cat that has paralysis in its back end. The

tickets sell out pretty fast each year.” The society runs a special needs fund for animals with pressing medical concerns, which accepts contributions year-round. They also offer pet adoption services and volunteer opportunities for animal lovers of all types. If you aren’t sure if adopting a pet is the right move in your life, they offer the ability to foster a pet for a block of time. Fostering a pet is a great way to sample life as an animal-owner without making the full-time commitment that a furry friend needs on a more permanent basis. Visit aza.org, chattzoo.org, and heschatt.org for more information on how to get involved with animals in our community. Whether you’re looking for a new best friend to take hiking and camping, a cat to push things off of your table and mock you, a short-term foster commitment, or a few minutes with a truly spectacular animal, Chattanooga is surely the place to be. CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MARCH 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 5


COVER STORY

The Flavor Of Local Libations Chattanooga's signature cocktails are so good you won’t be embarrassed to drink them in front of people

O

VER MANY YEARS AND BEERS MY FAVORED drink selections have devolved into the most rudimentary of tastes. Whiskey neat chased with antifreeze and PBR with any sunset will often do me just fine. By Brandon Watson Pulse contributor

But sometimes us burly knuckle-draggers should to mix it up. Sometimes the inner Hemmingway needs to let loose and sample concoctions of signature varieties and not be resigned to the stale burn of the same old libations. Questing to discover the best signature drinks in the city can be daunting if you’re starting tabula rasa. Venturing away from your

usual dive on a weekend can be a bone-chilling prospect, especially if you already have a special dent for your toochis at a favorite establishment. But have no fear, mighty consumers of spirits and adult beverages! I offer this guide to get you started on your drinking revelries the right way. Whether you are just passing through town or an entrenched local, these signature cocktails are some of the best you can find.

6 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

Best Sellers at Bar Moxie GOT MOXIE Bacardi Dragon Berry, fresh lime, black cherry. I coined a new term when I ventured into this trendy hotspot right off King Street: “When you can’t think, choose pink.” This peppy little sipper tastes like Bar Moxie’s scene: fresh and alive. Don’t be put off by the weird pink color; the Bacardi Dragon Berry blends well with the black cherry and crushed ice. The taste is crisp and smooth with just a hint of rum when you take a deep pull. It’s not heavy on the fruity side, which I really appreciated. I recommend rimming the glass with the fresh lime then dropping it in for a perfect citrusy finish after each sip.

This little beauty is also Hotel Moxie’s complimentary drink, so when you check in be sure to give this lively cocktail a try to shake the mileage off and settle in for a relaxed vibe. SOUTHERN SPIKED TEA Chattanooga Whiskey, peach schnapps, sweet tea. Lo and behold, a spiked tea my dear Grandpa would’ve loved! There is a special place in my heart for spiked teas and Bar Moxie’s got the formula just right. Living out in the dusty sage badlands of California, spiked sweet teas were a favorite of mine. Nothing gets a body through the desert chill like a Tennessee whiskey, sugar, and caffeine. Southern Spiked Tea at Bar Moxie is made with Chattanooga Whiskey and you can tell when you pick up that amazing smoky smooth finish. The peach schnapps gives this cocktail a little fruity tinge but the overall sweetness isn’t overbearing. It warms you up like a toddy but is cool and refreshing at the same time. Be careful, though—you’ll forget the whiskey is in there halfway through a high-ball. A big recommend if you love a true taste of southern hospitality with a whiskey finish.


Pleasant Pick-me-ups at Puckett’s SEE RUBY FALL Rosemary-infused Corsair Gin, Cointreau, cranberry, lime. There is nothing like recovering from a night of drinking by staggering into a bar at eleven in the morning. I’m not one for the brunch scene but after tasting of this ruby-red bugger I may have to change my low-brow ways. See Ruby Fall is smooth, sweet, and refreshing. The clean lime scent opens up the palate for the crisp wash of Corsair Gin with the lip-smacking finish of Cointreau and cranberry. Honestly, it’s a mélange of fantastic in a tiny glass. For all my burly mannish ways, this cocktail was so good I didn’t feel ashamed to drink it in front of people. See Ruby Fall is near perfection from start to finish. It’s vibrant and smooth and just right to invigorate the bones from a night of hard partying. Just don’t get carried away or the only thing falling will be you. SMOKEY THE BEAR Corsair Triple Smoke whiskey, Deauville Amaretto, ginger beer, lemon. If relaxation came in a high-ball glass and was served on the rocks with lemon it would be Smokey The Bear. Oh baby, this cocktail could pair well with clear mountain mornings reading the paper. The Corsair Triple Smoke has a complicated flavor profile that drops hints of maltiness with cherry, but oh dear lord, with the amaretto it becomes a new thing entirely. Smokey The Bear hits you with the bitter then eases into a smoky sweet lullaby at the finish. The tinge of spice from the ginger beer and citrus tang keep each sip alive and eye opening until the ice rattles. I recommend this one to anybody looking to glide into life and enjoy the finer things while they drink and ponder long and hard about preventing forest fires.

Mad Mixes at The Mad Priest WAIT & HOPE Monte Verde Mescal, Espolon Tequila, Peach Scrub, orange juice, Cinnamon Oak Fire. Of course, I had to read the menu about six times before I could wrap my mind around this one. I then had to stare at it for several minutes before anything made sense. Wait & Hope comes out literally smoking and reeking of a rough morning around a booze-snuffed bonfire. It’s smoky and spicy and fills the mind with terrible decisions of misspent youth; and this is way before you take a deep breath and drink the thing. However, tequila lovers rejoice! This beast is all you need to quench a thirst for something heavy and spicy. This drink carries heat due to the chunk of artisanal ice setting the flavor of Espolon Tequila off. Wait & Hope is rimmed with tasty cinnamon and sea salt, which doesn’t take the edge off

but really intensifies the flavors. This hot darling is amazing to get the blood flowing but should be consumed by true lovers of the agave and maybe with a fire marshal present. Tequila isn’t my poison of choice but definitely give this one a go just for the sheer spectacle of it being delivered in a giant smoke cloud. Drink up and wait until all hope (and spatial awareness) leaves your body. BOURBON REVOLUTION JW Kelly Bourbon, Rothman & Winter Apricot, Licor 43, salted apricot. This schizophrenic concoction has a hard time being anything but a good time in a fancy glass. For all its smug pretentiousness it hits like a Confederate cannon ball to the face. Bourbon Restoration harbors true flavors of a post-antebellum bourbon with some fruity notes teasing the tongue’s periphery. The gorgeous amber and orange hue of a drink served chilled in a long-stemmed glass insidiously hides the bourbon sucker punch. I recommend drowning the salted apricot to really set off the delicate fruit and spice notes of the liquor. Overall, it’s exciting, it’s aromatic, it’s bourbon. Really, it’s bougie bourbon; you’ll stare at it like it’s bourbon, and you’ll make life decisions like it’s bourbon. Hooray, it’s Bourbon!

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MARCH 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 7


COVER STORY

Signatures at Southside Social BIG LEBOWSKI Tito’s Vodka, Kahlua, milk, almond, vanilla. Southside’s take on The Dude’s trademark drink-of-choice and a clever play on the infamous White Russian cocktail. What’s clever about it? Perhaps it’s the milky sweetness concealing Tito’s Vodka like dirty ransom money from nihilist hitmen. There is nothing complex about the flavor; it’s smooth and heavy on the vanilla which lingers on the tongue like a snarky quip. For a lazy afternoon of watching couples feeding each other cheese burgers or bowling as the sun sets behind Lookout Mountain, it’s perfect. It’s a drink that embodies the chill. It’s so chill, in fact, that you may forget you are consuming alcohol and be lulled into imaging you’re drinking a delicious milkshake…so be careful if you decide to chug this. Pairs well with bowling, bathrobes, and sunshades. EIGHT FOOT BUNCH Blue Chair Bay Banana and Coconut rum, melon, pineapple. If Harry Bellefonte’s music could be summed up in a cocktail, it would be this bright-yellow monstrosity. Southside Social has somehow condensed the taste of the Caribbean into a tiny glass of aromatic greatness. The first thing to note with Eight Foot Bunch is the strong coconut scent with a citrus spike of pineapple. But it doesn’t end there; the initial sip immediately takes the mind away to far places, where it settles into a unique tropical chorus of white-rum daydreams and salty sea breezes. Eight Foot Bunch finishes with a light banana flavor and a lasting hint of coconut that is easy on the taste buds. It’s like a piña colada with a banana as a chaser. It’s colorful, it’s delicious, it’s a tropical party from start to finish. It should be chugged from a hollowed-out pineapple with loud calypso music in the background. I hope these cocktails will serve as great starting-off points, but this by no means is the definitive list of places or drinks to experience. Chattanooga has hundreds of places to check out and near thousands of signature drinks to imbibe. Whether you’re a cocktail cognoscente or whiskey snob like me, Chattanooga has many libations that can appeal to just about everyone. 8 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

When not vaporizing zombies or leading space marines as a mousepad Mattis, wriiter and gamer Brandon Watson is making gourmet pancakes and promoting local artists.


COLUMN · SHADES OF GREEN

Tell TVA To Go Greener, Faster Assessing the agency for the good of the future

T

Sandra Kurtz

Pulse columnist

In reading this draft IRP, Sierra Club and other environmental organizations have noted the lack of energy efficiency and conservation plans to save energy.”

Sandra Kurtz is an environmental community activist, chair of the South Chickamauga Creek Greenway Alliance, and is presently working through the Urban Century Institute. You can visit her website to learn more at enviroedu.netw

VA, BETTER KNOWN AS THE Tennessee Valley Authority, is a quasiFederal agency that first began in 1933 as part of President Roosevelt’s New Deal when the average income in the Tennessee Valley was $639 a year. Its mission was to modernize a depressed region, develop fertilizers, teach ways to improve crop yields, control forest fires, and improve habitat for fish and wildlife. They were to build dams to control floods, improve navigation, and generate cheap electricity. By 1934, TVA had hired 9,000 people. Ten years later 16 dams had been built. Today, TVA generates electricity primarily from 7 nuclear reactors, 32 dams, and 6 remaining coal-fired plants (many closed), plus a pumped storage plant, natural gas plants, a diesel generator site, 15 small solar sites, and one wind energy site. Wholesale power is then sold to 154 local power companies and 58 directserve industrial customers. Around 9.7 million ratepayers in parts of seven states pay for this largest government-owned public power provider. Actually, there is little government oversight, though the President nominates TVA board members who are then approved by the U.S. Senate. Since TVA is public power people get a say in how the agency operates to benefit the citizens it serves. Is the mission being met? Are people benefitting energy-wise, environmentally, and economically? How should the agency shape itself for the future? Enter the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) for guidance. TVA is assessing what the future may hold and how to adapt to it. It’s a big job given the size of the agency, the expansive territory, and the many unknowns around resource access, public health, economic ups and downs, electricity demand, and speed of climate change impacts.

There are many “what ifs”. What if grid resiliency is stressed or what if more people made use of solar panels at home, or what if lots of renewable energy was added to the electric grid? Maybe it’s business as usual? TVA formed an IRP working group to come up with six possible scenarios—the “what ifs”. Modeling ensued that produced six scenarios plus suggested strategies: 1) Current Outlook, 2) Economic Turndown, 3) Valley Load Growth, 4) Decarbonization, 5) Rapid Demand/Response (DER) Adoption, and 6) No Nuclear Extensions. The draft is out and public meetings are occurring across TVA’s region. The next one is scheduled for March 20 in Chattanooga at Battle Academy School from 5–6:30 pm. Check tva.gov/irp for information and to read the 237-page document. It’s important to show up and also send in your comments. Once all comments and ideas are considered, a preferred scenario will be selected for approval at the TVA Board this August. An environmental impact statement analyzing any impacts associated with an updated IRP is being determined, too. Which scenario would you choose, knowing electricity demand is down, fossil fuels pollute, and costly nuclear leaves radioactive waste without solution? Further, climate change is bringing catastrophic storms, flooding, changes in agriculture, droughts and excessive heat. Which scenario would be the most flexible to turn on and off as needed? What is the timeframe for plan implementation? Your answer as to which scenario may be “none of the above”. In reading this draft IRP, Sierra Club and other environmental organizations have noted the lack of energy efficiency

and conservation plans to save energy. As environmental attorney Brian Paddock said, “You can’t make even solar energy as cheap as you can save energy.” In fact, this IRP seems remarkably unambitious. Closing the last fossil fuel plants and not extending nuclear licenses are good, but not soon enough. Given the speed of change, we should move more quickly to support distributed energy, use of renewables, and energy efficiency. Why has wind power been ignored? Why is there no mention of research for power storage solutions? After all, TVA led the way with fertilizer development. Storage solutions make solar and wind more reliable. This so-called 20-year plan does not value enough the urgency embedded in the science-based conclusions of the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Negative impacts of climate change are speeding up, leaving us fewer years to take action. TVA, as in the past, ought to be a leader to benefit the people and environment in the Valley. TVA has not selected the right goal. It should be focused extensively on leadership around climate change action. Instead of Integrated Resource Plan, we should call this one the Inferior Resource Plan.

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MARCH 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 9


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

A Multimedia Cobbler Artist Joel Smith truly does it all

George And Lennie On Stage A hallmark of American literature from celebrated author John Steinbeck, the 1937 novella “Of Mice and Men” is being adapted from the written word to the dramatized stage by Back Alley Productions. Audiences will have an opportunity to see a visual representation of depression-era tribulations in an invigorating performance. For those unfamiliar with the novella’s plot or in need of a refresh since their initial reading, the narrative follows protagonists George Milton and Lennie Small, two ranch workers who wander California searching for farming opportunities to stay afloat amidst the economic downturn of the 1930s. Their search isn’t without any difficulty, though, as false accusations of rape towards Lennie lead the duo to a new farm which only ushers further conflict with the owner’s son, Curley, along with his wife. Without revealing too much, the plot reminds of the Depression’s harsh realities and the dire circumstances forced onto countless unfortunate souls during the bygone era. If a graphic representation of human nature and its many complexities set in an American at one of its most miserable periods sounds fascinating, “Of Mice and Men”, with its emotional and historical significance springing from the very land we live and sow upon, will certainly satisfy your fascination. “Of Mice and Men” will be performed this Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., as well as Sunday at 2:30 p.m., at Back Alley Productions at the Mars Theatre in LaFayette, Georgia, with additional shows scheduled next weekend. For tickets and more information, visit bapshows.com or call (706) 996-8350. — Jason Dale

W

HEN YOU THINK OF A COBBLER, YOU might think of some old English man in a village who mends and makes shoes. In our digital era, most people buy their shoes at a store or online where information is available in a click. By Kevin Hale Pulse contributor

Since the invention of the internet and software programs like Photoshop, paint has spilled onto the computer screen and artist Joel Smith has found a way to merge both worlds to become a modernday media cobbler. His story starts with graphic design and incorporates commercial painting, fine art, Photoshop and even woodworking. “Growing up, me and my cousins thought comic books were really cool and we used to bounce sketch-

10 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

es off of each other,” says Smith. “I really excelled at art in school and won awards here and there.” Smith then moved to Murfreesboro to attend Middle Tennessee State University. Graphic design piqued his interest. He completed several commissions during college, then found a unique outlet for his creativity in the Murfreesboro Mellow Mushroom. At the time, Mellow Mushroom needed someone to paint an oldhippie era school bus located in their restaurant. “Mind you, this is just a big open space at the time,”

says Smith. “There are no drop ceilings and the bus was cut in half. But only the front part of the bus stood inside the space.” The restaurant wanted a Merry Prankster, Grateful Dead, Summer of Love vibe. “They offered me a lifetime supply of beer and pizza or money,” laughs Smith. “I thought if I eat pizza and drink beer all the time, it wouldn’t be too good for me. So, I took the money!” It’s still touted as Murfreesboro’s only indoor dining bus with seating inside a hollowed-out shell. As he reflects on his journey from keyboard to dining bus, it’s clear that influences and ideas come from everywhere for Smith. “A lot of it starts as fantasy,” he explains. “It can begin as a feeling I’m trying to express visually.” And


in cobbling media together, Smith really uses his art as a tool. “I sketch to express something I’m thinking,” says Smith. “It could be to promote a business, which can be allencompassing for entrepreneurs.” Smith also draws inspiration from water and its transient characteristics. “Its reflective properties and the way it moves intrigues me,” says Smith. “There are so many representations of water to be explored.” One technique Smith champions and experiments with is marbling, in which the artist paints on top of the water—whose surface tension serves as a canvas of sorts—and lays a canvas on top of the water, then lifts the paint right off. Smith has always been an animal lover and currently enjoys painting pet portraits. He is a fan of dogs, specifically Golden Retrievers. “Of course, pets aren’t going to sit still for a portrait,” laughs Smith. “I just have to paint from a photo of the animal and add some digital touches later.” Being a media cobbler, Smith uses all kinds of objects in his art and understands the benefits of using Photoshop as well as painting by hand. Easier and faster than painting, Photoshop turns the computer into canvas and studio. Smith understands Photoshop can never completely replace paint, brushes, and texture; still, being

Smith understands Photoshop can never completely replace paint, brushes, and texture; still, being active in both digital art and traditional visual art is necessary for him as an illustrator and painter.” active in both digital art and traditional visual art is necessary for him as an illustrator and painter. “Digitally, there are so many brushes and colors it can become dizzying,” says Smith. “You can mimic any style so much that you can’t tell the difference. It’s like cheating but everybody does it.” Smith makes sure he stays grounded and sees painting as a time-honored craft. “Painting on a canvas is almost more noble,” says Smith. “It’s more emotionally rewarding than creating digitally.” Similarly, Smith has turned his hand to venerable crafts such as carpentry. “When I lived on the Southside, there were a bunch of carpenters and they needed woodworkers,” he remembers. “I used to frame houses in college for extra money and I used to build houses with my dad growing up.” One thing led to another and soon Smith was involved with the famous Chattanooga artist Wayne White.

Smith played a small part in what became Wayne-O-Rama, White’s love letter to the Scenic City. The installation included interactive sculptures, giant puppets and immersive sound design. “It was great, hands-on experience and a great way to network,” says Smith. Being a self-described media cobbler means you’ve got a lot of balls in the air and are always looking for the next opportunity. Smith realizes visual artists must stick together, so he started Chattanooga Artists Collective on Facebook. “I follow this guy calling himself Mural Joe on YouTube,” says Smith. “He does these tutorials on how to paint great scenery and portraiture.” A true cobbler of art, Smith seems powerfully driven to meet every art lover and explore every art form. “With this art game, it’s about meeting the right people,” he says. “There’s never enough time sometimes, is there?”

THU3.14

FRI3.15

SAT3.16

West Side Story

Video Game Night

The classic musical retelling of Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet with great music and lots of dance. 7 p.m. Chattanooga Christian School 3354 Charger Dr. ccsk12.com

Come out and test your video gaming skils with some of Chattanooga's best and have a great cup of coffee as well. 8 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. stonecupcafe.com

An Afternoon with Poet Bill Brown One of Tennessee's best will read from his latest book, "Cairns: Poems New and Selected". 3 p.m. Star Line Books 1467 Market St. starlinebooks.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MARCH 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 11


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR Movies with Mat: Forrest Gump

THURSDAY3.14 Red Wolf Revival Film Screening Noon Reflection Riding Arboretum 400 Garden Rd. (423) 821-1160 reflectionriding.org Urban Farmers Market and Marketplace 3 p.m. Miller Park 910 Market St. millerparkmarket.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 5 p.m. Hutton & Smith Brewing Co. 431 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 760-3600 huttonandsmithbrewing.com Art + Issues: An Artful Sense of Space 6 p.m. The Hunter Museum of Art 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968 huntermuseum.org City Sweat: Million Dollar Sweat 6 p.m. Miller Plaza 850 Market St. millerparkplaza.com Enter Your Views 7 p.m. RISE Chattanooga 401 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 402-0452 risecha.org West Side Story 7 p.m. Chattanooga Christian School 3354 Charger Dr. (423) 265-6411 ccsk12.com Earlene “Beauty of Ra” McConnell 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Movies with Mat: Forrest Gump 7:30 p.m. Hutton & Smith Brewing Co. 431 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 760-3600 huttonandsmithbrewing.com

12 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

Alcoholics Not Anonymous Comedy Open Mic 8 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 682-8200 chattanoogabarley.com Country Line Dancing Class 8 p.m. Westbound Bar 24 Station St. (423) 498-3069 westboundbar.com

FRIDAY3.15 Red Wolf Revival Film Screening Noon Reflection Riding Arboretum 400 Garden Rd. (423) 821-1160 reflectionriding.org West Side Story 7 p.m. Chattanooga Christian School 3354 Charger Dr. (423) 265-6411 ccsk12.com Of Mice and Men 7:30 p.m. Back Alley @ Mars Theater 117 N. Chattanooga St. (706) 996-8350 bapshows.com Jen Kober 7:30, 9:45 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233

thecomedycatch.com Improv “Movie” Night Presents: Buddy Cop Movie 8 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Video Game Night 8 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. (423) 521-3977 stonecupcafe.com Ruby Falls Lantern Tours 8:30 p.m. Ruby Falls 1720 S. Scenic Hwy. (423) 821-2544 rubyfalls.com Good, Old-Fashioned Improv Show 10 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SATURDAY3.16 Native Plant Marketplace & Expo 8 a.m. UTC University Center 615 McCallie Ave. tnvalleywildones.org Wildlife Photography Workshop 9 a.m. Reflection Riding Arboretum

400 Garden Rd. (423) 821-1160 reflectionriding.org Shamrock City 9 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. (706) 820-2531 seerockcity.com All About Spring Rose Care 10 a.m. UT Extension Office 6183 Adamson Cir. (423) 855-6113 extension.tennessee.edu Chattanooga River Market 10 a.m. Tennessee Aquarium Plaza 1 Broad St. (423) 648-2496 publicmarkets.us The St. Chatty’s Day Parade 11 a.m. Southside District of Chattanooga 55 E. Main St. (423) 757-5259 Bryan Powell Book Signing 11 a.m. McKay Books 7734 Lee Hwy. (423) 892-0067 mckaybooks.com Red Wolf Revival Film Screening Noon Reflection Riding Arboretum 400 Garden Rd. (423) 821-1160 reflectionriding.org Chattanooga Art Tour


Whose Live Anyway?

1 p.m. The Hunter Museum of Art 10 Bluff View. (423) 267-0968 newsouthtourco.com Introduction to Weaving 1 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com West Side Story 1:30 p.m. Chattanooga Christian School 3354 Charger Dr. (423) 265-6411 ccsk12.com An Afternoon with Poet Bill Brown 3 p.m. Star Line Books 1467 Market St. (423) 777-5629 starlinebooks.com Learn to Stand Up Paddleboard (SUP) Class 3 p.m. Chester Frost Park 2318 N. Gold Point Cir. (423) 209-6894 parks.hamiltontn.gov “Men” Opening Reception 6 p.m. Versa Gallery 1919 Union Ave. versagallery.org Rescues on the Runway 6 p.m. Chattanooga Convention Center 1150 Carter St.

(423) 756-0001 heschatt.org West Side Story 7 p.m. Chattanooga Christian School 3354 Charger Dr. (423) 265-6411 ccsk12.com Maama Tried: All-Female Art Show 7 p.m. Chattanooga Brewing Co. 1804 Chestnut St. chattabrew.com Films with Friends Vol. 2 7 p.m. The Woodshop 5500 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 991-8876 thewoodshop.space Of Mice and Men 7:30 p.m. Back Alley @ Mars Theater 117 N. Chattanooga St. (706) 996-8350 bapshows.com Singles Shamrock Social 7:30 p.m. Brainerd United Methodist Church 4315 Brainerd Rd. (706) 483-6166 chattanoogausadance.com Jen Kober 7:30, 9:45 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Whose Live Anyway? with Chip Esten, Joel Murray, Greg

Proops, and Jeff B. Davis 8 p.m. Walker Theatre 399 McCallie Ave. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com Improv vs Standup 11 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SUNDAY3.17 Shamrock City 9 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. (706) 820-2531 seerockcity.com Collegedale Market 11 a.m. Collegedale Commons 4950 Swinyar Dr. (423) 648-2496 publicmarkets.us Artful Yoga: Liberation Flow 1:30 p.m. The Hunter Museum of Art 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968 huntermuseum.org Of Mice and Men 2:30 p.m. Back Alley @ Mars Theater 117 N. Chattanooga St. (706) 996-8350 bapshows.com Women’s Flat Tire Repair

Workshop 6:30 p.m. Harrison Bay State Park 8411 Harrison Bay Rd. (423) 344-6214 tnstateparks.com Jen Kober 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Southern Adventist University Symphony Orchestra 7:30 p.m. Collegedale Church of Seventhday Adventists 4829 College Dr. E. (423) 396-2134 collegedalechurch.com

MONDAY3.18 Winter Belly Dance Session 5:45 p.m. Movement Arts Collective 3813 Dayton Blvd. (423) 401-8115 movementartscollective.com Beginner Poetry 6 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Joggers & Lagers 6 p.m. Chattanooga Brewing Co. 1804 Chestnut St. chattabrew.com An Irish-American Salute to Western Director John Ford 7 p.m. Heritage House Arts Center 1428 Jenkins Rd. (423) 855-9474 chattanooga.gov River City Dance Club 7 p.m. Peace Strength Yoga 3800 St. Elmo Ave. (813) 731-9581 rivercitydanceclub.com

TUESDAY3.19 Wake Up & Run 6 a.m. Fleet Feet Sports CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MARCH 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 13


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR

Comedy Open Mic Night

307 Manufacturers Rd. (423) 771-7996 fleetfeetchattanooga.com Red Wolf Revival Film Screening Noon Reflection Riding Arboretum 400 Garden Rd. (423) 821-1160 reflectionriding.org Chess K-night 5 p.m. Mad Priest Coffee Roasters 1900 Broad St. (423) 393-3834 madpriestcoffee.com Tuesday Night Chess Club 6 p.m. Downtown Library 1001 Broad St. (423) 643-7700 chattilibrary.com Paths to Pints along the Riverwalk 6:30 p.m. The Tap House 3800 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 682-8234 taphousechatt.com English Country Dance for All! 7 p.m. Heritage House Arts and Civic Center 1428 Jenkins Rd. (423) 855-9474 chattanooga.gov

10 a.m. Chattanooga Convention Center 1150 Carter St. (423) 756-0001 chattanoogaconventioncenter.org Red Wolf Revival Film Screening Noon Reflection Riding Arboretum 400 Garden Rd. (423) 821-1160 reflectionriding.org Main Street Market 4 p.m. 522 W. Main St. mainstfarmersmarket.com Improv Open House 7 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 7:30 p.m. The Bitter Alibi 825 Houston St. (423) 362-5070 thebitteralibi.com Comedy Open Mic Night 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com

WEDNESDAY3.20 EXPO Chattanooga

14 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

Map these locations on chattanoogapulse. com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com


DRINK SPRING 2019 courtesy of The Chattanooga Pulse


16 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • SPRING DRINK GUDE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM


BREWER MEDIA GROUP Publisher James Brewer, Sr.

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Gary Poole gary@chattanoogapulse.com Assistant Editor Jenn Webster Contributors Jason Dale Michael Thomas

ADVERTISING Director of Sales Mike Baskin mike@brewermediagroup.com Account Executives Rick Leavell Lippy Phillips John Rodriguez

CONTACT Offices 1305 Carter St. Chattanooga, TN 37402 Phone 423.265.9494 Fax 423.266.2335 Email info@chattanoogapulse.com Website chattanoogapulse.com Facebook @chattanoogapulse THE FINE PRINT Chattanooga Drink is published biannually by The Pulse and Brewer Media. Chattanooga Chow is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. Chattanooga Drink is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publishers may take more than one copy per weekly issue, please. © 2019 Brewer Media

CHATTANOOGA'S WEEKLY ALTERNATIVE

27 18 20

In Praise Of The All-American Bar Ever since I turned 21 (and not a minute beforehand, honest, officer), I’ve been a big fan of bars. High-end bars, dive bars, hotel bars, cocktail lounges, tiki bars, restaurant bars, nightclub bars, and even (when pressed) a fern bar.

NEW AMSTERDAM VODKA

19

THE TAP HOUSE

21

New Amsterdam Vodka is five-times distilled from the finest grains then filtered three times. It’s so smooth you can create a perfect cocktail or drink it straight, making it one of the best vodkas available.

In St. Elmo’s Historic District right outside the beautiful Lookout Mountain valley, the nearly two-year-old The Tap House resides as both a distinctive and lively bar accompanying the captivating area.

SOUTHSIDE SOCIAL

The first thing you notice when you walk through the main doors of Southside Social is the noise. It’s a happy noise. The noise of people talking, drinking, eating, bowling, and playing games.

BLUEWATER GRILLE

Since its inception thirteen years ago, Bluewater Grille has distinguished itself as the preeminent seafood restaurant in the downtown area, serving premier quality seafood within its elegantly cultivated dining room.

THE PULSE • SPRING DRINK GUIDE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • 17


DRINK SPRING 2019

New Amsterdam Vodka N

ew Amsterdam Vodka is five-times distilled from the finest grains then filtered three times. It’s so smooth you can create a perfect cocktail or drink it straight, making it one of the best vodkas available. Our premium process makes our distilled vodka as iconic as the cityscape on the bottle. Our flavors are crafted using our award-winning original 80-proof vodka. And as good as the Original Vodka is, New Amsterdam has an entire line of great tasting flavored vodkas, perfect for any occasion or specialty cocktail. Peach tastes like biting into a fresh, Georgia peach. Succulent peach flavor is rounded out with orange blossom and a touch of vanilla to create a complex and pleasant fruit profile. This peach-flavored vodka mixes perfectly with your favorite cocktails. Pineapple vodka has bright, refreshing aromas of pineapple and tropical fruit. Flavors of juicy, freshly cut pineapple and coconut cleanse the palate. For the weekend, try our pineappleflavored vodka. Mango vodka tastes like biting into a fresh, juicy Alphonso Mango with layers of tropical fruit aromas of papaya and passion fruit. Liven up your drink with a splash of our mango-flavored vodka. Red Berry vodka offers sweet, juicy flavors of ripe raspberries, strawberries, blackberries, and boysenberries. A touch of lime zest brightens the berry flavors on the palate and the flavors are rounded together with brown spice and sweet vanilla. Coconut vodka leads with sweet aromas of fresh coconut. Creamy, sweet toasted coconut and tropical fruit flavors of pineapple, banana, mango and papaya build to a beautifully complex fruit profile. A hint of sweet lime flavor cleanses at the back end and finishes soft and mellow. Orange vodka offers sweet aromas of freshly cut orange and orange blossom, leading to flavors of ripe orange fruit, tangerine, and clemen-

tine. Brighten up your drink with our refreshing orange-flavored vodka. Raspberry vodka offers a refreshing, crisp profile layered with sweet, bright, raspberry flavors. The complexity of the natural fruit flavor is perfectly balanced with just enough bite. Lemon vodka offers a refreshing, crisp profile layered with sweet, bright lemon flavors to add the perfect amount of zest to your liquid concoction. Apple vodka offers a refreshing, crisp profile layered with sweet, bright apple flavors. The complexity of the natural fruit flavor is perfectly balanced with just enough bite for a clean, smooth finish. But there’s a lot more to New Amsterdam Vodka than just premium taste. The master mixologists at New Amsterdam have created a number of tasty cocktails for you to make on your own for dinner parties or just to impress your friends.

briefly. Garnish with a lime wedge.

New Amsterdam Mexican Mule • 2 parts New Amsterdam Vodka • 2 dashes Tabasco sauce • Top with ginger beer or ginger ale Build directly into a rocks glass with ice and stir

So the next time you’re at your favorite vendor of fine spirits, pick up a bottle of New Amsterdam and experience premium vodka taste without having to pay premium prices. New Amsterdam. Pour your soul out.

18 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • SPRING DRINK GUDE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

New Amsterdam Russian Coffee • 2 parts New Amsterdam Vodka • 1 part strong coffee • ½ part triple sec • 1 part milk Shake ingredients very well with ice and strain over ice into a rocks glass or up into a martini glass. Garnish with 3 floating coffee beans. New Amsterdam Mango Sunrise • 1½ parts New Amsterdam Mango • 2 parts orange juice • A splash of lemon-lime soda Shake the vodka sunrise ingredients together in a cocktail shaker half-filled with ice cubes. Strain this delicious mango vodka drink into a rocks or highball glass filled with ice. Garnish the cocktail with a mango wedge and mint leaf.


DRINK SPRING 2019

Southside Social

T

he first thing you notice when you walk through the main doors of Southside Social is the noise. It’s a happy noise. The noise of people talking, drinking, eating, bowling, and playing games. It’s a good noise. And once you’re inside, you’ll be happy to add to that noise as well. “Our focus is on quality,” explains General Manager Josh Lang. “Our menu has changed extensively, becoming more chefdriven because of Chef Mike Blanton. We like to call it ‘quality bar food’—familiar foods with a fresh outlook.” And it’s not just the food menu that is expanding. Southside Social’s already well-stocked bar has gotten even larger, with new local drafts and liquors. “For example, our Beer of the Month is Naked Light from our friends over at Naked River Brewing. And as the weather heats up, so will the cocktails,” Lang notes, before pointing to a prominent frozen drink machine. “Of course,

you can never go wrong with a Chatt Whiskey Slushie.” Great food, great beverages… what more can you want? Why, lots (and lots) of games, of course. The bowling lanes have long been a favorite attraction for downtown residents and workers alike, but what many people may not know about are the wide variety of other games available…all of the them absolutely free to play. “We have skeeball, darts, pool tables, cornhole outside on our patio for when the weather warms up, classic games, and a whole lot more,” says Lang. “It’s all part of what makes Southside Social a family-friendly place, a place for everyone.” There’s indeed something for everyone, no matter your age. So what are you waiting for? Head on down to Chestnut Street right across from Finley Stadium for good food, good drinks, and good fun. And don’t be afraid to make some noise. You’ll fit right in. THE PULSE • SPRING DRINK GUIDE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • 19


DRINK SPRING 2019

The Tap House

I

n St. Elmo’s Historic District right outside the beautiful Lookout Mountain valley, the nearly twoyear-old The Tap House resides as both a distinctive and lively bar accompanying the captivating area. Unlike most bars, the place is family friendly with a welcoming and easygoing atmosphere supplemented by its illuminated ambiance and wood décor. Seats aren’t clumped together so there’s no fear of claustrophobia, and the music isn’t playing so loud you have to shout in order to speak, as at other bars. In addition to the interior, there’s also seating outside to enjoy the ever approaching Spring weather, providing enough space to grab a drink comfortably. Outdoor seating is also dog-friendly. The bar boasts an impressive thirty tap lineup. It's not too large to overwhelm you, but not so small that you would find your options limited. Their selection typically consists of six local brews and an assortment of old favorites, as well as cider, but the choices are never stagnant. As it rotates throughout the month, you’re bound to find either a new favorite or an old classic from the bar’s diverse tap curation

20 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • SPRING DRINK GUDE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

any day of the week. In the coming months, The Tap House will be a welcome home for those who want to enjoy a casual glass of wine with friends and family. Drinking wine after a stressful day at work is unquestionably improved when company is involved. While importance is certainly placed on the drink selection, The Tap House isn’t a bad spot to grab a bite either. The menu offers a range of sandwiches and snacks—perfect for an appetizing lunch paired with a cold brew or just a small bite to hold you over as you talk amongst your companions. On April 6th, The Tap House will be celebrating its second anniversary by pairing up with Velo Bikes and holding a bike scavenger hunt that will hit several local breweries and bike shops before bringing participates back to the bar itself. The event will be an active and rewarding opportunity with cold pints and friends waiting at the finish line along with live music. And even if you would rather not participate, you are still welcome to join everyone and celebrate the two-year anniversary of one of Chattanooga’s most charming and inviting sites to drink collectively.


DRINK SPRING 2019

Bluewater Grille S

ince its inception thirteen years ago, Bluewater Grille has distinguished itself as the preeminent seafood restaurant in the downtown metropolitan area, serving premier quality seafood within its sophisticated and elegantly cultivated dining room. But besides the appetizing dishes which originated in the Atlantic, Bluewater serves an expansive drink selection consisting of beers and cocktails brewed and crafted in an on-site brewery shared with sister restaurant Big River Grille only steps away from the restaurant itself. One of the locally-crafted cocktails, the Barrel Aged Boulevardier, is assembled using Chattanooga distilled whiskey, as well as Campari and vermouth, all aged meticulously in oak barrels for over thirty days. Another locally-crafted cocktail, the Garden Collins, employs Lass & Lions vodka from the on-site brewery infused with cucumber and basil over the course of three days, then shaken together with lemonade and finished with a soda at its savory peak. In addition to the locally-crafted cocktails, there’s also a diverse selection of specialty cocktails for one to choose from. The Geisha Martini is a Japanese cocktail that can be enjoyed ten thousand kilometers away from its homeland, featuring an eclectic mix of Absolut vodka, Shöchö, Soho lychee, fresh cucumber, and lemonade. Or if you favor a more tropical

taste, the Coconut Mojito should prompt coastal nostalgia with its concoction of Malibu rum, fresh mint, lime, coconut cream, and pineapple juice, even in an inland city like ours. Recently, Bluewater has enlisted George Cobbs, a service industry veteran working in the business for almost twenty years and a member of the Bluewater’s parent company Craftworks for seventeen years, as their general manager. He began working with Craftworks at Rock Bottom Restaurant & Brewery in Arlington, Virginia, and now Bluewater hopes to bring his food industry expertise to Chattanooga. With his prowess in the food industry and Bluewater’s status as a top-tier seafood option in the city, it’s effortless to say that the restaurant will only yield further success under Cobbs’s tested and adept direction. •••• Show this article to receive a piece of Dolly's Triple Chocolate Cake with purchase of entree.

THE PULSE • SPRING DRINK GUIDE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • 21


Chattanooga Bar & Nightclub Guide 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 485-3050 1885grill.com 3rd Deck Burger Bar 151 Riverfront Pkwy. (423) 266-4488 chattanoogariverboat.com Abuelo’s 2102 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 855-7400 abuelos.com Acropolis Mediterranean Grill 2213 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 899-5341 acropolisgrill.com Alan Gold’s Discotheque 1100 McCallie Ave. (423) 629-8080 alangolds.com Alchemy 801 Pine St. (423) 531-4653 westinchattanooga.com Alimentari Cucina e Bar 801 Chestnut St. (423) 498-3190 alimentarichattanooga.com Alleia 25 E. Main St. (423) 305-6990 alleiarestaurant.com American Wings 4011 Brainerd Rd. (423) 475-6212 2613 E. 3rd St. (423) 803-3919 Amigo Mexican Restaurant 5794 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-5435 5450 Hwy. 153 (423) 875-8049

We strive to make our listings accurate, but things change. We recommend you call in advance or visit websites before visiting any restaurant.

1906 Dayton Blvd. (423) 870-9928 3805 Ringgold Rd. (423) 624-4345 6701 Hwy. 58 (423) 710-8970 amigorestaurantonline.com Applebee’s 5606 Brainerd Rd. (423) 553-9203 356 Northgate Mall Dr. (423) 875-8353 2342 Shallowford Village Rd. (423) 499-1999 applebees.com Aretha Frankensteins 518 Tremont St. (423) 265-7685 arethas.com Back Inn Café 411 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033 bluffviewartdistrict.com Backstage Bar 29 E. 14th St. (423) 629-2233 backstagechattanooga.com Bad Daddy’s Burger Bar 1924 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 475-5948 baddaddysburgerbar.com Bar Louie 2100 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 855-4155 barlouieamerica.com Barley Taproom

22 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • SPRING DRINK GUDE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

253 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 682-8200 chattanoogabarley.com Bar Moxie 1220 King St. (423) 664-1180 Basecamp Bar & Restaurant 346 Frazier Ave. (423) 803-5251 basecampcha.com Beast + Barrel 16 Frazier Ave. (423) 805-4599 beastandbarrel.com Beef O’Brady’s 5958 Snow Hill Rd. #100 (423) 910-0261 ooltewahbeefobradys.com Big Chill & Grill 103 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 267-2445 bigchillandgrill.com Big Don’s Bar & Karaoke 306 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 755-0041 Big River Grille 222 Broad St. (423) 267-2739 2020 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 553-7723 bigrivergrille.com Bluewater Grille 224 Broad St. (423) 266-4200 bluewaterchattanooga.com

Boathouse Rotisserie & Raw Bar 1459 Riverside Dr. (423) 622-0122 boathousechattanooga.com Boccaccia Restaurant 3077 S. Broad St. (423) 266-2930 boccacciarestaurant.com Bonefish Grill 2115 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 892-3175 bonefishgrill.com Bourbon Street Music Bar 2000 E. 23rd St. (423) 475-5118 Brewhaus 224 Frazier Ave. (423) 531-8490 brewhausbar.com Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-9878 budssportsbar.com Buffalo Wild Wings 120 Market St. (423) 634-0468 5744 Hwy. 153 (423) 877-3338 buffalowildwings.com Carrabba’s Italian Grill 2040 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 894-9970 carrabbas.com Charlie’s Restaurant & Lounge 8504 Dayton Pike (423) 842-9744 Chattanooga Billiards Club 725 Cherry St. (423) 267-7740 cbcburns.com Chattanooga Billiards Club East


110 Jordan Dr. (423) 499-3883 cbcburns.com Chattanooga Brewing Company 1804 Chestnut St. (423) 702-9958 chattabrew.com Chili’s 408 Market St. (423) 265-1511, 5637 Brainerd Rd. (423) 855-0376 1921 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 892-6319 123 Northgate Mall Dr. (423) 877-4344 chilis.com Christy’s Sports Bar 3469 Brainerd Rd. (423) 702-8137 Citron Et Sel 212 W, 8th St. (423) 498-5802 citronetsel.com Community Pie 850 Market St. (423) 486-1743 communitypie.com Conga Latin Food 26 E. Main St. (423) 201-4806 Crust Pizza 3211 Broad St. (423) 766-4040 100 Singal Mountain Blvd. (423) 710-3780 crustpizza.com Den Sports Bar & Lounge 1200 E. 23rd St. (423) 475-6007 Diamond Billiard Club 3600 Hixson Pike (423) 877-5882 diamondbilliardclub.com Diamonds & Lace Showbar (Babes Sports Bar) 115 Honest St. (423) 855-1893

Dorato Cuisine & Spirits 801 Pine St. (423) 531-4653 westinchattanooga.com Dos Amigos 3208 Amnicola Hwy. (423) 495-1802 Easy Bistro 203 Broad St. (423) 266-1121 easybistro.com Edley’s BBQ 205 Manufacturer’s Rd. (423) 498-2772 edleysbbq.com El Meson 2204 Hamilton Pl. Blvd. (423) 894-8726 248 Northgate Park (423) 710-1201 elmesonchattanooga.com Eleven and H20 Bar DoubleTree Hotel 407 Chestnut St. (423) 756-5150 doubletree3.hilton.com Embargo 62 301 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 551-4786 Empire Distributors 3794 Tag Rd. (423) 899-3962 empiredist.com Feed Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. (423)708-8500 feedtableandtavern.com Firebirds Wood Fired Grill 2107 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 308-1090 firebirdsrestaurants.com Fireside Grille 3018 Cummings Hwy. (423) 821-9898 firesidechattanooga.com Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. (423) 602-5980 flyingsquirrelbar.com

Frothy Monkey 1400 Market St. (423) 680-6343 frothymonkey.com Fuji Japanese Steak & Sushi 2207 Overnite Dr. (423) 892-2899 5437 Hwy. 153 (423) 531-3183 fujisteakchattanooga.com Gate 11 Distillery 1400 Market St. (423) 825-4283 gate11distillery.com Georgia Winery 6469 Battlefield Pkwy. Ringgold, Ga. (706) 937-9463 georgiawines.com Hair of the Dog Pub 334 Market St. (423) 265-4615 hairofthedogpub.net Hana’s Steak & Sushi 2200 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 855-8204 hanachattanooga.com Harley House 3715 Rossville Blvd. (423) 867-7795 Heaven & Ale 304 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 602-8286, 9431 Bradmore Ln. (423) 903-3333 heaven-and-ale.com Hennen’s Restaurant 193 Chestnut St. (423) 634-5160 hennens.net HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. (423) 362-8335 hificlydeschattanooga.com Hooters 5912 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-8668 hooters.com Hutton & Smith Brewing Co.

431 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 760-3600 huttonandsmithbrewing.com Ichiban Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar 5621 Brainerd Rd. (423) 892-0404 5035 Hixson Pike (423) 875-0473 5425 Hwy. 153 (423) 875-0404 yourichiban.com IL Primo 1100 Hixson Pike (423) 602-5555 primochattanooga.com I’m Game 110 Jordan Dr. (423) 802-5045 cbcburns.com Inside Restaurant 800 Chestnut St. (423) 266-7687 J. Alexander’s 2215 Hamilton Pl. Blvd. (423) 855-5559 jalexanders.com J & J Lounge 2208 Glass St. (423) 622-3579 Jack Brown’s Beer & Burger Joint 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 682-8198 jackbrownsjoint.com James County Cattle Company 2553 Lifestyle Way (423) 899-9111 jamescountycattle.com Jay’s Bar 1914 Wilder St. (423) 710-2045 Jax Liquors 216 Market St. (423) 266-8420 facebook.com/jaxliquors JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd.

THE PULSE • SPRING DRINK GUIDE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • 23


(423) 266-1400 jjsbohemia.com Jefferson’s 618 Georgia Ave. (423) 710-1560 jeffersonsrestaurant.com Jimmy D’s Sports Bar & Grill 3901 Rossville Blvd. (423) 867-2624 La Altena 314 W. Main St. (423) 266-7595 615 Commercial Ln. (423) 877-1447 8644 E. Brainerd Rd. (423) 893-9047 La Fiesta Mexican Grill 8523 Hixson Pike (423) 843-1149 lafiestarestauranttn.com Lakeshore Grille 5600 Lake Resort Terrace (423) 710-2057 lakeshoregrille.com Las Margaritas 1101 Hixson Pike (423) 756-3332 4604 Skyview Dr. (423) 892-3065 7015 Shallowford Rd. (423) 553-8686 Leapin’ Leprechaun 101 Market St. (423) 777-9097 theleprechaunpub.com Local 191 191 Chestnut St. (423) 648-6767 local191.com Logan’s Roadhouse 3592 Cummings Hwy. (423) 821-2948 504 Northgate Mall Dr. (423) 875-4443 logansroadhouse.com London Calling 715 Cherry St. 24 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • SPRING DRINK GUDE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

londoncallingbar.com Lookout Winery 11848 Highway 41, Guild, Tn. (727) 499-8974 lookoutwinery.com Lupi’s Pizza Pies 406-A Broad St. (423) 266-5874 2382 N. Ocoee St. (423) 476-9464 5506 Hixson Pike (423) 847-3700 1414 Jenkins Rd. (423) 855-4104 9453 Bradmore Ln. (423) 602-7499 lupi.com Mad Priest Coffee & Cocktails 719 Cherry St. (423) 541-1395 madpriestcha.com Maggie G’s 400 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 757-7722 Marsha’s Backstreet Café 5032 Brainerd Rd. (423) 485-7911 marshasbackstreetcafe.com Mash & Hops 168 1st St. NE Cleveland, TN (423) 667-9245 mashandhops.com Matilda Midnight 120 E. 10th St. (423) 710-2925 matildamidnight.com Mayan Kitchen 507 Broad St. (423) 682-7835 mayankitchen.com Mayo’s Restaurant & Lounge 3820 Brainerd Rd. (423) 624-0034 mayosbarandgrill.com Mellow Mushroom 205 Broad St.

(423) 266-5564 2318 Lifestyle Way (423) 468-3737 mellowmushroom.com Memo’s 430 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 267-7283 Mexiville 811 Market St. (423) 805-7444 mexivilletn.com Mexi-Wing VII 5773 Brainerd Rd. (423) 634-8899 mexi-wingchattanooga.com Mi Casa Mexican Restaurant 3029 Rossville Blvd. (423) 805-4443 Mike’s Hole in the Wall 525 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 475-5259 mikesholeinthewall.com Mitch’s Sports Bar 2555 Harrison Pike (423) 698-4123 Moe’s Original BBQ 221 Market St. (423) 531-6637 moesoriginalbbq.com Mojo Burrito 3950 Tennessee Ave. (423) 822-6656 1800 Dayton Blvd. (423) 870-6656 1414 Jenkins Rd. (423) 296-6656 mojoburrito.com Molcajete Mexican Restaurant 6231 Perimeter Dr. (423) 760-8200 molcajeterestauranttn.com Mountain City Club 729 Chestnut St. (423) 756-5584 mountaincityclub.org Naked River Brewing Co. 1791 Carter St.


(423) 541-1131 nakedriverbrewing.com O’Charley’s 5301 Hixson Pike (423) 877-8966 2340 Shallowford Village Dr. (423) 892-3343 ocharleys.com Odd Story Brewing Co. 336 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 682-7690 oddstorybrewing.co Old Chicago 250 Northgate Mall (423) 877-3450 2006 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 325-9095 oldchicago.com Old Gilman Grill 216 W. 8th St. (423) 269-7449 oldgillmangrill.com Outback Steakhouse 501 Northgate Mall (423) 870-0980 2120 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 899-2600 outback.com P.F. Chang’s 2110 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 242-0045 pfchangs.com Pier 88 Boiling Seafood and Bar 2288 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 468-3683 pier88seafood.com Pickle Barrel 1012 Market St. (423) 266-1103 goodfoodchattanooga.com Pin Strikes 6241 Perimeter Dr. (423) 710-3530 pinstrikes1.com Pizza Bros 501 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 269-7900 pizzabroschattanooga.com

Poblano’s Mexican Cuisine 551 River St. (423) 490-7911 poblanoschattanooga.com Provino’s 5084 S. Terrace Plaza (423) 443-4927 provinos.com Public House 1110 Market St. (423) 266-3366 publichousechattanooga.com Regan’s Place 24 Station St. (423) 667-3775 regans.net Robar 191 Chestnut St. (423) 648-6767 Rodizio Grill 439 Broad St. (423) 777-4999 2100 Hamilton Place Blvd. (423) 498-3999 rodiziogrill.com Rumors 3884 Hixson Pike (423) 870-3003 Ruth’s Chris Steak House 2321 Lifestyle Way (423) 602-5900 ruthschris.net Scottie’s on the River 495 Riverfront Pkwy. (423) 269-7487 scottiesontheriver.net Sekisui 1120 Houston St. (423) 267-4600 sekisuichattanooga.com Shogun Japanese Steak & Sushi 1806 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 296-6500 shogunchattanooga.com Sigler’s Craft Beer & Cigars 1309 Panorama Dr.

(423) 485-3271 siglerscraftbeerandcigars.com Sing It or Wing It 410 Market St. (423) 757-9464 singitorwingit.org Sky Zoo 5709 Lee Hwy. (423) 521-2966 skyzoochattanooga.com Silhouette’s Bikini Sports Bar & Grill 1401 E. 23rd St. (423) 622-6734 Slick’s Burgers 309 E Main St. (423)760-4878 slicksburgers.com Sluggo’s Vegan Cafe 501 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 752-5224 Smokey Bones Bar & Fire Grill 2225 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 893-7850 smokeybones.com Sofa King Juicy Burger 1743 Dayton Blvd. (423) 490-7632 sofakingjuicyburger.com Solarium Café 120 E. 10th St. (423) 710-2925 thedwellhotel.com Southern Burger Co. 9453 Bradmore Ln., Ooltewah (423) 825-4919 southernburgerco.com Southside Pizza 612 E. Main St. (423) 498-2193 Southside Saloon 1301 Chestnut St. (423) 757-4730 southsidesaloonandbistro.com Southside Social 1818 Chestnut St. (423) 708-3280 THE PULSE • SPRING DRINK GUIDE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • 25


thesouthsidesocial.com St. John’s 1278 Market St. (423) 266-4400 stjohnsrestaurant.com Sticky Fingers 2031 Hamilton Pl. Blvd. (423) 899-7427 420 Broad St. (423) 265-7427 stickyfingers.com STIR 29 E. 14th St. (423) 531-7847 stirchattanooga.com Sushi Nabe of Kyoto 110 River St. (423) 634-0171 sushinabechattanooga.com Sweet Basil Thai Cuisine 5845 Brainerd Rd. (423) 485-8836 sweetbasilthairestaurant.com T.MAC 423 Market St. (423) 267-8226 tmacrestaurants.com Table South Chattanooga Marriott 2 Carter Plaza (423) 756-0002 Taco Mamacita 109 N. Market St. (423) 648-6262 tacomamacita.com Taconooga 207-A Frazier Ave. (423) 757-5550 8174 E. Brainerd Rd. (423) 475-6192 taconooga.com Taco Roc 6960 Old Lee Hwy. (423) 653-1001 tacoroc.com Taqueria Jalisco 1634 Rossville Ave. (423) 509-3430 850 Market St.

(423) 362-8056 T-Roy’s 2300 Glass St. (423) 629-8908 Terminal Brewhouse 1464 Market St. (423) 752-8090 terminalbrewhouse.com Terra Nostra Tapas & Wine Bar 105 Frazier Ave. (423) 634-0238 terranostratapas.com Texas Roadhouse 7035 Amin Rd. (423) 899-8293 texasroadhouse.com The Backstage Bar 29 E. 14th St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com The Bitter Alibi 825 Houston St. (423) 362-5070 thebitteralibi.com The Blue Plate 191 Chestnut St. (423) 648-6767 theblueplate.info The Brew & Cue 5017 Rossville Blvd. (423) 867-9402 The Brew Market & Beer Garden 1510 Riverside Dr. (423) 648-2739 brewmarketchatt.com The Comedy Catch 29 Station St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com The Chop House 2011 Gunbarrel Rd. (423) 892-1222 thechophouse.com The Dwell Hotel 120 E. 10th St. (423) 267-7866 thedwellhotel.com

26 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • SPRING DRINK GUDE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

The Fix Lounge 825 Houston St. (423) 362-5070 thebitteralibi.com The Foundry Chattanoogan Hotel 1201 Broad St. (423) 424-3775 chattanooganhotel.com The Honest Pint 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192 thehonestpint.com The Meeting Place 1274 Market St. (423) 266-4571 stjohnsmeetingplace.com The Office Inside City Café 901 Carter St. (423) 634-9191 citycafemenu.com The Palms 6925 Shallowford Rd. (423) 499-5055 thepalmsathamilton.com The Press 168 1st St. NE Cleveland, TN (423) 584-6077 thepressonfirst.com The Social 1110 Market St. (423) 266-3366 publichousechattanooga.com The Tap House 3800 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 682-8234 taphousechatt.com Tipoff Sports Bar & Grill 830 Dodson Ave. (423) 622-2900 Tony’s Pasta Shop & Trattoria 212 High St. (423) 265-5033 bluffviewartdistrict.com Totto Sushi & Gril 330 Frazier Ave.

(423) 508-8898 tottonooga.com Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike (423) 266-1996 tremonttavern.com Tupelo Honey 1110 Market St. (423) 779-0400 tupelohoneycafe.com Two Ten Jack Warehouse Row 1110 Market St. (423) 551-8799 Universal Joint 532 Lookout St. (423) 468-3725 ujchattanooga.com Urban Stack Burger Lounge 12 W. 13th St. (423) 475-5350 urbanstack.com Virgola Wine Bar 608 Georgia Ave. (423) 771-7773 chattanoogawinebar.com WanderLinger Brewing Company 1208 King St. (423) 269-7979 wanderlinger.com Westbound Bar 24 Station St. (423) 498-3069 westboundbar.com Wine Down 9431 Bradmore Ln. (423) 531-9463 winedownbar.com Ziggy’s 607 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 265-8711 ziggysbarandgrill.net

Note: We strive to make our listings accurate, but things change. We recommend you call in advance or visit websites before visiting any restaurant.


MIXOLOGY

In Praise Of The All-American Bar Our man on the barstool extols the virtues of communal drinking

E

ver since I turned 21 (and not a minute beforehand, honest, officer), I’ve been a big fan of bars. High-end bars, dive bars, hotel bars, cocktail lounges, tiki bars, restaurant bars, nightclub bars, and even (when pressed) a fern bar. I judge my travels and vacations not on the sights I’ve seen or the attractions I’ve visited, but on the bars/ lounges/pubs I’ve spent a seemingly inordinate amount of my free time inhabiting. Listing my top ten places to visit isn’t by location, but by where I’ve tipped a glass or two of tasty intoxicants. A long line of girlfriends, most of whom I met in a bar now that I think about it, have often questioned my love for social drinking. And with reason, for I am in fact considered to be the classic lightweight when it comes to imbibing. Even so, it’s rare for me to go more than a few days without spending a few quality hours passing the time in one of my favorite watering holes. “Why do you go out, when you have a full bar at home?” they ask. “Why do you want to spend ten times what it costs to buy a bottle, paying by the drink?” The simple answer is that I’m not paying for the drink; I’m paying for the community. Some people spend hundreds of dollars on golf equipment, greens fees, cart rentals, golf clothes and whatnot for personal entertainment. I do the same thing, only indoors, surrounded by like-minded people, and without having to exert

Alcohol has long been called the ‘social lubricant’, and for a very good reason. When people get a drink or two inside them, they tend to relax and let their hair down socially.” more energy than it takes to raise and lower a pint glass. Turning through the pages of this very issue of The Pulse, you’ll be introduced (or re-introduced) to many of Chattanooga’s finest drinking establishments—of which we are blessed to have quite a variety from which to choose. Having once lived in a dry county in the Georgia hinterlands, I, more than most, truly appreciate how “blessed” is the appropriate word to use. “But why go to bars to hang out with people?” that long line of exes has asked more than once. “Surely

there are less expensive places to be sociable.” Indeed, there are many places to go, but there is something about bars that makes them far more interesting to me: the spirit of the people (no pun intended). Okay, maybe the pun was a bit intended. But to my point, I’ve always enjoyed the company of other drinkers. Alcohol has long been called the “social lubricant”, and for a very good reason. When people get a drink or two inside them, they tend to relax and let their hair down socially. You can have discussions about near-

ly everything under the sun: sports, politics, entertainment, politics, music, politics, history, and even a political discussion or two. Try doing that at the library. Even better is when you find the “regular” bar. That one establishment that you make a habit of returning to like a swallow to Capistrano, only a lot more often. You get to know the regulars, the bartenders, the barbacks, even the delivery people. Okay, maybe I spend a bit too much time in my favorite establishments, but that’s just me; I like meeting people. “You just like spending time with those people more than me.” Well, to be honest, they don’t care if I’ve vacuumed the house, fed the dog, taken out the trash, made the bed, remembered their birthday, or replaced the toilet paper roll. So, maybe I do. And maybe next time around I need to start dating a bartender. — Michael Thomas

THE PULSE • SPRING DRINK GUIDE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • 27


JONESIN' CROSSWORD

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In 2014, NASA managed to place its MAVEN spacecraft into orbit around Mars. The cost of the mission was $671 million. Soon thereafter, the Indian government put its own vehicle, the Mangalyaan, into orbit around the Red Planet. It spent $74 million. As you plan your own big project, Pisces, I recommend you emulate the Mangalyaan rather than the MAVEN. I suspect you can do great things—maybe even your personal equivalent of sending a spacecraft to Mars—on a relatively modest budget. ARIES (March 21-April 19): The coming weeks might be a good time to acquire a flamethrower. It would come in handy if you felt the urge to go to a beach and incinerate mementoes from an ex-ally. It would also be useful if you wanted to burn stuff that reminds you of who you used to be and don’t want to be any more; or if you got in the mood to set ablaze symbols of questionable ideas you used to believe in but can’t afford to believe in any more. If you don’t want to spend $1,600+ on a flamethrower, just close your eyes for ten minutes and visualize yourself performing acts of creative destruction like those I mentioned. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Taurus aphorist Olivia Dresher writes that she would like to be “a force of nature,” but “not causing any suffering.”The way I interpret her longing is that she wants to be wild, elemental, uninhibited, primal, raw, pure—all the while without inflicting any hurt or damage on herself or anyone else. In accordance with your astrological omens, Taurus, that’s a state I encourage you to embody in the coming weeks. If you’re feeling extra smart—which I suspect you will—you could go even further. You may be able to heal yourself and others with your wild, elemental, uninhibited, primal, raw, pure energy. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In some major cities, the buttons you push at a crosswalk don’t actually work to make the traffic light turn green faster. The same is true about the “Close Door” buttons in many elevators. Pushing them doesn’t have any effect on the door. Harvard psychologist Ellen Langer says these buttons are like placebos that give you “the illusion of control.” I bring this phenomenon to your attention, Gemini, in hope of inspiring you to scout around for comparable things in your life. Is there any situation where you imagine you have power or influence, but probably don’t? If so, now is an excellent time to find out—and remedy that problem. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Philip Boit was born and raised in Kenya, where it never snows except on the very top of Mount Kenya. Yet he represented his country in

the cross-country skiing events at the Winter Olympics in 2002 and 2006. How did he do it? He trained up north in snowy Finland. Meanwhile, Kwame NkrumahAcheampong competed for Ghana in the slalom in the 2010 Winter Olympics. Since there was no snow in his homeland, he practiced his skills in the French Alps. These two are your role models for the coming months, Cancerian. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’ll have the potential to achieve success in tasks and activities that may not seem like a natural fit. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the process of casting for his movie The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, director David Fincher considered selecting A-list actress Scarlet Johansson to play the heroine. But ultimately he decided she was too sexy and radiant. He wanted a pale, thin, tougher-looking actress, whom he found in Rooney Mara. I suspect that in a somewhat similar way, you may be perceived as being too much something for a role you would actually perform quite well. But in my astrological opinion, you’re not at all too much. In fact, you’re just right. Is there anything you can do—with full integrity—to adjust how people see you and understand you without diluting your brightness and strength? VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1993, an English gardener named Eric Lawes used his metal detector to look for a hammer that his farmer friend had lost in a field. Instead of the hammer, he found the unexpected: a buried box containing 15,234 old Roman silver and gold worth more than four million dollars today. I bring this to your attention, Virgo, because I suspect that you, too, will soon discover something different from what you’re searching for. Like the treasure Lawes located, it might even be more valuable than what you thought you wanted. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “The role of the artist is exactly the same as the role of the lover,” wrote author James Baldwin. “If I love you, I have to make you conscious of the things you don’t see.” To fully endorse that statement, I’d need to add two adverbs. My version would be, “The role of the artist is exactly the same as the role of the lover. If I love you, I have to kindly and compassionately make you conscious of the things you don’t see.” In accordance with current astrological omens, I recommend that you Libras enthusiastically adopt that mission during the coming weeks. With tenderness and care, help those you care about to become aware of what they’ve been missing—and ask for the same from them toward you. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): For thousands of generations, our ear-

ly ancestors were able to get some of the food they needed through a practice known as persistence hunting. They usually couldn’t run as fast as the animals they chased. But they had a distinct advantage: they could keep moving relentlessly until their prey grew exhausted. In part that’s because they had far less hair than the animals, and thus could cool off better. I propose that we adopt this theme as a metaphor for your life in the coming weeks and months. You won’t need to be extra fast or super ferocious or impossibly clever to get what you want. All you have to do is be persistent and dogged and disciplined. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Wompsi’kuk Skeesucks Brooke is a Native American woman of the Mohegan tribe. According to her description of Mohegan naming traditions, and reported by author Elisabeth Pearson Waugaman, “Children receive names that are descriptive. They may be given new names at adolescence, and again as they go through life according to what their life experiences and accomplishments are.” She concludes that names “change as the individual changes.” If you have been thinking about transforming the way you express and present yourself, you might want to consider such a shift. 2019 will be a favorable time to at least add a new nickname or title. And I suspect you’ll have maximum inspiration to do so in the coming weeks. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): For many of us, smell is our most neglected sense. We see, hear, taste, and feel with vividness and eagerness, but allow our olfactory powers to go underused. In accordance with astrological omens, I hope you will compensate for that dearth in the coming weeks. There is subtle information you can obtain—and in my opinion, need quite strongly—that will come your way only with the help of your nose. Trust the guidance provided by scent. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Essayist Nassim Nicholas Taleb says humans come in three types: fragile, robust, or antifragile. Those who are fragile work hard to shield themselves from life’s messiness. The downside? They are deprived of experiences that might spur them to grow smarter. As for robust people, Taleb believes they are firm in the face of messiness. They remain who they are even when they’re disrupted. The potential problem? They may be too strong to surrender to necessary transformations. If you’re the third type, antifragile, you engage with the messiness and use it as motivation to become more creative and resilient. The downside? None. In accordance with the astrological omens, Aquarius, I urge you to adopt the antifragile approach in the coming weeks.

“Just Kidding”—or is it the other way around? ACROSS 1 Jean jacket material 6 Prefix meaning “ten” 10 Elliot of The Mamas & the Papas 14 Blunt married to John Krasinski 15 “Chill in the Air” singer ___ Lee 16 Spoken aloud 17 Sudden change of plans to not tumble down the hill after Jack? 19 “Escape (The ___ Colada Song)” 20 Had some gummy bears, perhaps 21 Statuary segment 22 Lightheaded 23 Like some terriers’ coats 24 “Beds ___ Burning” (Midnight Oil song) 25 Return 28 Earp/Clanton shootout site 33 Charles of polytonal music 34 ___ Lodge (motel chain) 35 Historic timespan 36 Utility vehicle that

stays road-bound (and not on your lawn)? 40 One of a handful of notable hockey surnames in crosswords 41 Letter before India 42 Love, deified 43 bell hooks, for one 45 City with the ZIP 93888 47 Pen filler, perhaps 48 Twofold 49 Attacks, like a unicorn might 52 Hear about 54 Law enforcement gps. 57 Tournament type 58 Putting area sponsored by fruit spread? 60 Touch down 61 Eye creepily 62 Bird on a coin 63 Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist 64 Low digits? 65 First U.S. “Millionaire” host Philbin DOWN 1 “It’s ___ vu all over again!”

2 Give off, as light 3 River near the Valley of the Kings 4 Feverish, maybe 5 Washington WNBA teammate 6 Unlike almond milk and soy cheese 7 911 first responders 8 2017 Pixar movie 9 ___ Wednesday 10 Giant office machine 11 Calif. neighbor 12 “SNL” alum Horatio 13 Do in a dragon 18 Do the job 22 Slang for “friend” in “A Clockwork Orange” 23 Nesting insect 24 Proactiv target 25 “And knowing is half the battle” cartoon 26 Do-___ (second chances) 27 They’re held by growlers 28 Eight-member group 29 1980s-’90s German leader Helmut 30 Brings up 31 Lighting problem?

32 Wonder Woman’s weapon 34 Online banking transactions, briefly 37 “Most definitely!” 38 It doesn’t go in the microwave 39 Projectionist’s need 44 Meeting outline 45 Nick in the “Captain Marvel” movie 46 Smith, to Yogi Bear 48 Broad valleys 49 Spieth sport 50 Character formed by Pearl and Amethyst on “Steven Universe” 51 Artist Magritte 52 “The ___ Movie 2: The Second Part” (2019) 53 Cosmo competitor 54 Simon of “Shaun of the Dead” 55 Grocery store section 56 Star Fox console, once 58 Scribble (down) 59 “Party for One” singer Carly ___ Jepsen

Copyright © 2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords. For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents perminute. Must be 18+ to call. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle No. 927 CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MARCH 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 29


THE MUSIC SCENE

Irish Holiday...Or American Homebrew? St. Patrick’s Day celebrates the Irish Disapora Building A Musical Wall How important is music? It’s a question that is rarely asked, because for many (most) of us, it would be the same as asking how important food, clothing, and shelter are. But even as important as music may be, there are those among us who do not have access to creating music, even simple music. And that is something a group of UTC students are trying to correct. Kevin Finch, Matthew Branning, Gary Paradis, and John Crabtree banded together and created what they call the Music Wall. It was in response to a challenge from their professor, Cecelia Wigal, to help solve a problem faced by someone with disabilities and design a device to reduce or even alleviate that problem. The result was a foam-covered wall that holds 12 cowbells, two triangles, two sets of wind chimes, a wooden xylophone, two tambourines, two cymbals and a steel drum. “We thought about instruments that would be useful on the shape and structure,” says Paradis. “We agreed on percussion instruments for a couple of reasons. They’re pretty low-maintenance. You don’t have to tune them. They’re pretty durable; they should last a lifetime.” The Music Wall has found a home at the Ooltewah location of Open Arms Care, which works with those who have intellectual disabilities. “Since the students installed the wall, I haven’t gone a single day without hearing a client playing its instruments,” says day services manager McKenzie Brandt. “They’re having a blast.” — Michael Thomas

By Marc T. Michael Pulse Music Editor

There were certainly religious observations much earlier, but even there the history is murky at best.”

30 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

T

HE SEASON IS UPON US. ST. PATRICK’S DAY is this Sunday, March 17th and as the McManus brothers will tell you, everybody is Irish on St. Patrick’s Day. Of course, some will argue that everyone is a bad caricature of Irish on St. Patrick’s Day and many view it as simply a great day for a party. The truth of what it is or isn’t, as is so often the case, isn’t nearly so simple as one might hope. Even reputable sources have conflicting stories. According to one source, the celebration began in 1631 when the Church established a feast day to honor Ireland’s patron

saint. Curious, then, that the website IrishCentral cites the research of Dr. Michael Francis who, in 2017, found evidence in the form of Spanish archives that a St. Patrick’s Day celebration was held in St. Augustine in 1600, with a parade being part of the festivities the following year. Boston held its first St. Patrick’s Day parade in 1737, New York in 1762. The first St. Patrick’s Day parade in Ireland didn’t happen until 1903. Of course the ven-


The earliest celebrations in the American colonies—and like it nor not, much of what we associate with the annual festival was born here, not in Ireland—weren’t especially religious.” erated parade is only one aspect of the holiday. There were certainly religious observations much earlier, but even there the history is murky at best. The earliest celebrations in the American colonies—and like it nor not, much of what we associate with the annual festival was born here, not in Ireland—weren’t especially religious. Moreover, there is serious debate over whether these American celebrations named in honor of a Catholic saint were started by Protestant immigrants, less as a religious observance and more as a celebration of Irish heritage. In fact, the origins and significance of the holiday are murky enough that I briefly considered paraphrasing a common clickbait trope by titling the article, “Everything

EVERYONE Knows About St. Patrick’s Day is WRONG!” That’s not entirely true, of course, it never is, but it seems that what the day is about depends largely on who you are. It is celebrated in Ireland, where it’s a national holiday, but it does seem inescapable that thanks to the Irish Diaspora, the celebration really started here, largely as a celebration of heritage and the “auld sod” in the new world. There are some unfortunate consequences to the popularity of the festival, foremost being the perpetuating of certain negative stereotypes whose origins can be found in the anti-Irish/anti-immigrant bigotry of earlier days. These stereotypes have been paradoxically embraced and sustained by the vaudevillian songs and even the Irish folk

Come Out And Party On The Parkway Finally, the air is warming, the slush is melting, and green leaves are hovering like hummingbirds on the willow fronds. It’s time to listen to music and dance. And dance you can, this Saturday at the annual St. Paddy’s Party on the Parkway downtown on Patten Parkway. Now in its sixth year, all proceeds from the popular daylong event will go to support Chattanooga Sound Corps and Chattanooga’s Kids on the Block. Commencing immediately after the St. Patrick’s Day Parade, the event features non-stop live music indoors and out, a “kid zone” packed with activities for the little ones from 3 to 6 p.m., traditional food, dancers, pipers, buskers, artists, and more. The music lineup includes local artists Nick Lutsko, Spinster, The Molly Maguires (celebrating their 20th anniversary), Psychic Dungeon, Summer Dregs, I Can Japan, Kerchief, Dirty Blonde, Ayla Sylver, The Scarlet Love Conspiracy, Monday Night Social, Better Thieves, Stringers Ridge, and many more. The entirety of Patton Parkway will be dedicated to the event, and tickets are available now through Eventbrite. Bring your children, your pets, or just yourself and spend a spring day supporting some great causes. — MTM

revival of the fifties. It certainly is a time for food, song, and yes, adult beverages, but it is not nor should it ever have been a symbol of overindulgence. Still, people are people and one imagines that with the right marketing, Arbor Day could become a drinking holiday. Negative stereotypes or not, it is a time to appreciate Irish culture, music, dance, food, storytelling, and the inevitable result of a diaspora that has left exponentially more people in the world with Irish ancestry than there are actual people living in Ireland. So eat, drink, and be merry my friends, but exercise a little caution and common sense. We all want to be around to celebrate together next year, after all.

THU3.14

FRI3.15

SAT3.16

River City Sessions

Jimmy Dormire

Habitat For House!

Sherry Cothran headlines this month's RCS, along with a presentation of Appalachian "Deeper Roots" monologues. 7:30 p.m. The Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com

WanderLinger continues to make a name for themselves with local music, featuring guitar virtuoso Jimmy Dormire/ 8 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com

A fundraiser for Habitat for Humanity featuring a lineup of great EDM performers and some special surprises! 10 p.m. Music Box @ Ziggy’s 607 Cherokee Blvd. ziggysbarandgrill.net

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MARCH 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 31


LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR THURSDAY3.14 Emerald Butler 6 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com Danimal & Friends 6 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Steve Busie 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Amber Fults 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Jesse Jungkurth & Friends 6:30 p.m. Mexi-Wing VII 5773 Brainerd Rd. (423) 296-1073 Cody Ray, Grizzly Fowler, Webb Barringer 7 p.m. Heritage House Arts Center 1428 Jenkins Rd. chattanooga.gov Toby Hewitt 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Fox Mountain Express 7:30 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com River City Sessions 7:30 p.m. The Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com The Black Jacket Symphony: Queen’s A Night At The Opera 8 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. tivolichattanooga.com Mark Andrew 8 p.m. The Social 1110 Market St. publichousechattanooga.com Open Mic Night with Jonathan Wimpee

32 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

The Black Jacket Symphony

9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Modern Adventures, Side Affect, JoDonk, Willix 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

FRIDAY3.15 Binji Varsossa 6 p.m. Cancun Mexican Restaurant 1809 Broad St. (423) 266-1461 Pentagram, Brother Dege, Dirty Streets 6 p.m. Music Box @ Ziggy’s 607 Cherokee Blvd. ziggysbarandgrill.net Butch Ross 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Gino Fanelli 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Mike & Nancee Micham 7 p.m. Fiddlers Anonymous

2248 Dayton Blvd. (423) 994-7497 The 9th Street Stompers 7 p.m. Oddstory Brewing Company 336 E. MLK Blvd. oddstorybrewing.co Tim Lewis 7 p.m. El Meson 248 Northgate Park elmesonchattanooga.com Jimmy Dormire 8 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Company 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Rain: A Tribute to the Beatles 8 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. tivolichattanooga.com Naked Phunk 8 p.m. Doc Holidays Bar and Grill 742 Ashland Ter. docholidaysbarandgrill.com Art of the Groove with Tryezz 8 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com The Young Fables 8:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com

Amber Fults 9 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com David 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Misfit Toyz 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com Ployd, Mad Salvy, Nice Things 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Lew Card 9 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com Back N Black: The Ultimate ACDC Tribute 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Jordan Hallquist & The Outfit 9 p.m. Fireside Grille 3018 Cummings Hwy. firesidechattanooga.com The Daly Special


Music Box @ Ziggy’s 607 Cherokee Blvd. ziggysbarandgrill.net

Soviet Shiska

SUNDAY3.17

10 p.m. The Social 1110 Market St. publichousechattanooga.com Alistar Paige 11 p.m. The Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. chattpalace.com

SATURDAY3.16 Shamrock City 9 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. Lookout Mountain, GA seerockcity.com Butch Ross 12:30 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium Plaza 1 Broad St. publicmarkets.us Flattop Boxers 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Ryan Oyer 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Northwoods Revival 7 p.m. Charles & Myrtle’s Coffeehouse 105 McBrien Rd.

christunity.org Forever Bluegrass 7 p.m. Westbound Bar 24 Station St. westboundbar.com Channing Wilson 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Tim Lewis 7 p.m. El Meson 248 Northgate Park elmesonchattanooga.com Stringer’s Ridge Band 7 p.m. Oddstory Brewing Company 336 E. MLK Blvd. oddstorybrewing.co Ben Van Winkle and the Figment Chamber Ensemble 7:30 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. theatrecentre.com LiL Raine Band 8 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Playin Possum Blues Band 8 p.m. River Drifters 1925 Suck Creek Rd. riverdrifterschatt.com Chatham County Line

8 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Backwater Still 8:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com John Carroll 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com St. Paddy’s Day Extravaganza 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com That 90’s Show 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Soviet Shiska, Genki Genki Panic 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Naked Phunk 9 p.m. Trish’s Sports Bar 4762 Highway 58 (423) 269-8400 Habitat For House! (Underground EDM) 10 p.m.

Shamrock City 9 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. Lookout Mountain, GA seerockcity.com Rowdy Henson 10 a.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com Pay The Reckoning 11 a.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com PeAcE MeRcHaNtS 11 a.m. STIR 1444 Market St. stirchattanooga.com Carl Pemberton 11 a.m. Westin Chattanooga 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Webb Barringer Band 1 p.m. Slick’s Burgers 309 E Main St. slicksburgers.com Von Wamps 1:30 p.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com Mother Legacy 2 p.m. Rumors 3884 Hixson Pike (423) 870-3003 The Other Brothers 2 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Mozart & Ravel 3 p.m. Chattanooga State Humanities Theatre 4501 Amnicola Hwy. chattanoogastate.edu Bluegrass Jam 4 p.m. Fiddlers Anonymous CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MARCH 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 33


LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR

Eric Kirkendoll 2248 Dayton Blvd. (423) 994-7497 Stringers Ridge, Tri-Selkie, The Wolfhounds, The Molly Maguires 5 p.m. The Honest Pint 35 Patten Pkwy. thehonestpint.com Zech Dallas 5 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com Open Mic with Jeff Daniels 6 p.m. Long Haul Saloon 2536 Cummings Hwy. (423) 822-9775 Double Shot 6:30 p.m. Westbound Bar 24 Station St. westboundbar.com Life & Culture, Paradiso, Swimwear, Ben Lee b2b Ian F., C4mpchilla, H4ppy C4mper, Spinchilla 7 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com ET, Chelsea Lovitt 7 p.m. Mad Knight Brewing Company 4015 Tennessee Ave. madknightbrewing.com For King & Country 7 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St.

34 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

tivolichattanooga.com

MONDAY3.18 Open Air with Jessica Nunn 6 p.m. The Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Mike Mcdade 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Blues Night Open Jam 7 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Monday Nite Big Band 7 p.m. The Coconut Room 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Very Open Mic with Shawnessey Cargile 8 p.m. The Well 1800 Rossville Blvd. #8 wellonthesouthside.com

TUESDAY3.19 Eric Kirkendoll 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Songwriters Stage

7 p.m. The Camp House 149 E. MLK Blvd. thecamphouse.com Danimal 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Space Jam Open Mic with Xll Olympians 7 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com Cody Ray 7:30 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Live Jam Session with Freddy Mc & Friends 8 p.m. Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Open Mic with Mike McDade 8 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com

WEDNESDAY3.20 Amber Fults 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Jesse James Jungkurth

7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Jazz In The Lounge: Dexter Bell & Friends 7 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Randall Adams 8 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Rhythm & Brews Open Jam 8 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Priscilla & Little Rickee 8 p.m. Las Margaritas 1101 Hixson Pike (423) 756-3332 Bit Brigade performs Mega Man III 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Sexy Beast 9 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com


ERNIE PAIK’S RECORD REVIEWS

New Music From Sindre Bjerga, Rema-Rema

Sindre Bjerga Hesitation Marks (Eh?)

L

istening to the new cassette Hesitation Marks from the Norwegian artist Sindre Bjerga, this writer imagines some kind of exploratory team from another planet, sifting through the remnants of human civilization on Earth. Some technologically advanced detecting device hums and buzzes as it’s used to scan the rubble, where a damaged Walkman cassette player is found, which miraculously still works, but the playback is severely garbled, so that the spoken message on the tape is rendered incomprehensible. Hesitation Marks documents two live, improvised sets recorded in the Netherlands and Germany in 2017, and Bjerga, a prolific electro-acoustic musician and creator of the Gold Soundz label, doesn’t use conventional instruments,

opting to primarily employ a microphone and a portable cassette player, which is manipulated by Bjerga’s fingers to distort the playback speed, warping the output sounds. To the listener, there seems to be no recipe for what makes certain parts more entrancing and intriguing than others. On one hand, the more dense and complex moments offer more to absorb and process, and at times, a firm tug out of a pit of more subtle, less stimulating passages is welcome. Possibly subconsciously, the listener wants cues to know that the musician is paying attention and constantly adjusting and reacting. Generally, a sense of mystery works in favor of this material, where the sound seems to exist in the ether beyond earthly materials or human actions; however, there are small joys that come with recognition— like a pop song being aurally deformed—that draw the listener back to reality. Low fidelity ambient noises, residing within a limited frequency range—whooshes and whirls, with grit and hiss—provide atmospherics while taped voices, like voicemail messages from ghosts, offer an eerie element, which can be both disturbing and slightly com-

ical, particularly because they can’t be understood.

Rema-Rema Fond Reflections (4AD)

T

his writer’s first exposure to Rema-Rema—like most listeners, he ventures to guess—was through the strikingly and unflinchingly bleak 1984 cover of “Fond Affections” recorded by This Mortal Coil, 4AD founder Ivo Watts-Russell’s dreamy, goth-friendly studio project with a rotating cast of singers and musicians. Its lyrics are gently devastating and nihilistic to an almost absurd degree, with lines such as “There’s no light at the end of it all / Let’s all sit down and cry.” It took this critic years to finally hear Rema-Rema’s original version from its sole release, the posthumous 1980 four-song EP Wheel in the Roses (“wheel” being a verb in the title, referring to flowers for the band’s metaphorical funeral), and

he was impressed by how it was even colder and more desolate than This Mortal Coil’s cover. Rema-Rema had a brief existence in 1978-79, and its members went on to more popular acts including Adam and the Ants, The Wolfgang Press, Psychic TV, and Renegade Soundwave. Since Rema-Rema’s family tree is better known than its actual recordings, the new collection Fond Reflections is a good remedy for that. Both vinyl and CD editions feature 50 minutes of demo recordings, most of which are previously unreleased, but the CD edition is recommended, since it includes a second disc which contains Wheel in the Roses plus three tracks taken from the same studio and live sessions from which the original EP drew. Both discs begin with the killer one-two punch of “Feedback Song” followed by “Rema-Rema.” “Feedback Song” sports a piercing bass line and squealing guitar tones, amid sinister synth modulations and death march drums, and the demo version is a little more indulgent than the studio version. “Rema-Rema” grinds with an abrasive bass, Velvet Underground-inspired simple riff and floor-tom/

snare beat, and industrial, chiming guitars—it makes perfect sense that the band Big Black covered this track. The unreleased material is welcome but not as revelatory as one might crave; in general, the band offers variations of its primitive repetition, depending heavily on compelling timbres and momentum to carry a song. Standouts on the demo disc include the intense “Why Ask Why” and a more raw-sounding “Instrumental”, with wilder guitars and an extreme envelope effect on the synth. The liner notes were written by drummer Dorothy Max Prior (simply known as “Max”), discussing notable events in the band’s history and interesting tidbits; for example, surprisingly, the group was hugely influenced by funk acts like Bootsy Collins and James Brown, and “Instrumental” grew out of an attempt to cover the “Doctor Who” theme song. Max described “Entry” as “the definitive Rema-Rema song,” which was rejected by both the Charisma and 4AD labels (its provocative lyrics likely being the reason), but this writer would argue that Rema-Rema can’t be adequately summarized in a single song.

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MARCH 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 35


FILM & TELEVISION

Captain Marvel: Typically Marvel Seiting the table for the fight against Thanos The Rise And Fall Of Scarlett O'Hara When adjusted for inflation, the top-grossing film of all time is the 1939 classic Gone With The Wind. And while nearly everyone is aware of the movie, and can recite any number of classic lines from memory, how many of us have actually seen it on the big screen? Well, now you have a chance to correct that lack (or renew an old film acquaintance) as Victor Fleming’s epic vision of the Civil War era South still has the power 80 years later to transfix audiences. Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh, Olivia de Havilland, Leslie Howard, and Hattie McDaniel star in this classic epic of the American South. On the eve of the American Civil War, rich, beautiful and self-centered Scarlett O’Hara (Leigh, in her Oscar-winning role) has everything she could want—except Ashley Wilkes (Leslie Howard). As she struggles through the early years of the war, the Battle of Atlanta, and Reconstruction, Scarlett discovers the strength within herself to protect her family and rebuild her life. Through everything, she longs for Ashley, seemingly unaware that she is already married to the man she really loves (Gable)—and who truly loves her—until she finally drives him away. Only then does Scarlett realize what she has lost...and decides to win him back. Come out and celebrate the anniversary of one of the most revered motion pictures of all time this Sunday at 1 p.m. at either East Ridge 18 or Hamilton Place 8. — Michael Thomas

By John DeVore Pulse Film Editor

I’d imagine the studio will continue these characters in the same way soap operas continue theirs—a cycle of death and rebirth always with a new actor playing the part.”

36 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

T

HE MARVEL CINEMATIC UNIVERSE IS NEARING a crossroads. This spring marks the culmination of ten years of filmmaking. There have been scores of movies. Some have been more successful than others, but most, if not all, have been blockbusters in their own right. From Iron Man to Ant-Man, and a lot of other characters in between, the films have told one cohesive story leading to Avengers: Endgame and the final fight against the Mad Titan Thanos. After that, however, the question is this: where do they go from here? Many of the actor contracts for their flagship characters like Iron Man and Captain America are coming to an end. Will they recast these roles? Or will they move on to new characters in from the near endless stable of Marvel superheroes? The answer may be a bit of both. No one should be surprised if

Steve Rogers or Tony Stark “die” during Avengers: Endgame. But no one should be surprised if they make a comeback as someone else either. I’d imagine the studio will continue these characters in the same way soap operas continue theirs—a cycle of death and rebirth always with a new actor playing the part. But there are new characters as well, characters like Captain Marvel, who are meant to pick up the neverending story and run with it. There’s been something of a pattern in MCU movies. The first film, the origin story, is never quite as good as the sequels. This may be because


audiences are tired of origin stories. There’s always an accident, a foundational moment, a power testing, and a final battle. Superhero stories rarely break the mold. Captain Marvel is no different in this respect. There are some slight differences—the film is set in the mid-nineties and the origin is pieced together through recovered memories which leads to some complex narrative choices. But ultimately the film follows this pattern. Carol Danvers (Brie Larson), aka Captain Marvel, is a test pilot for the Air Force who coincidentally finds herself in the middle of an intergalactic war between two alien species called the Kree and the Skrulls. How she acquires her powers is woven into the story itself, but if you’re curious and not interested in seeing the movie, you can read up on how Hal Jordan, otherwise known as the Green Lantern, acquires his because both origin stories are basically the same (although Marvel Studios changed it slightly for the film to ward off this comparison). Comic book writers love to borrow from each other, it seems. The choice to set the film is the nineties is meant to serve the later narratives in Avengers: Endgame,

Like Captain America and Thor before her, she is at once perfect and too capable, showing no struggles or personality.”

as Captain Marvel appears to be something of an ace in the hole for Earth’s Mightiest Heroes against Thanos. She’s the cavalry, the rescuer, the ultimate Marvel power who can change the course of the battle. As such, her character is somewhat bland. Like Captain America and Thor before her, she is at once perfect and too capable, showing no struggles or personality. This, too, is an issue with the origin story, as well as the setting. We know she’s going to survive and we know Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) is going to survive because we see the pager at the end of Avengers: Infinity War. Therefore, the stakes simply aren’t very high. It’s as if the film was only made to introduce the character rather than give the character a purpose, which, of course, it was. It’s not a bad movie-going experience, but it’s not exactly mind blowing, either. Marvel makes competent films and this one is no different, al-

though some of the CGI is distracting (particularly the cat). The de-aging on both Samuel L. Jackson and Clark Gregg (Agent Coulson) can take the viewer out of the moment, too. Also, because I’ve seen all of these films more than I’d care to admit, Nick Fury encountering a dangerous alien threat in the nineties opens up something of plot hole from all the way back in 2012. During the Avengers, his excuse for creating weapons using the Tesseract is that Thor showed them that humanity wasn’t alone in the universe and that they were “hopelessly, hilariously outgunned.” Either Fury was lying, or the writers forgot about that line. I can imagine it’s hard to keep track of everything over the course of twenty-one films and ten years. At certain point, I’d imagine they’ll stop trying. When they do, they’ll be one step closer to their source material.

✴ NEW IN THEATERS ✴

Captive State Set in a Chicago neighborhood nearly a decade after an occupation by an extra-terrestrial force, Captive State explores the lives on both sides of the conflict—the collaborators and dissidents. Director: Rupert Wyatt Stars: Vera Farmiga, Machine Gun Kelly

Wonder Park Wonder Park tells the story of a magnificent amusement park where the imagination of a wildly creative girl named June comes alive. Directors: David Feiss, Robert Iscove, Clare Kilner Stars: Sofia Mali, Jennifer Garner, Ken Hudson Campbell, Kenan Thompson

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MARCH 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 37


FOOD & DRINK · SUSHI & BISCUITS

Time To Up Your Rice Game Our resident chef notes there is much to learn about a simple grain

I Mike McJunkin Pulse columnist

There are more than 40,000 varieties of cultivated rice and it seems like most ethnic markets stock all of them, so it can be daunting to figure out which rice to buy for your shrimp creole or stir-fry.”

Mike McJunkin is a native Chattanoogan who has traveled abroad extensively, trained chefs, and owned and operated restaurants. Join him on Facebook at facebook.com/SushiAndBiscuits

THOUGHT I KNEW WHAT RICE tasted like. White rice tasted like thousands of gummy, flavorless, starch blobs whose sole raison d’être was to soak up the flavor of whatever I mixed with it; and brown rice tasted like thousands of gummy, papier-mâché flavored starch blobs that tasted like licking a cardboard box no matter how much butter or chicken broth you added to the equation. But then my sons smuggled a small cloth sack of freshly harvested rice back from a village deep in the mountains of Nepal. That small sack of rice changed the way I looked at this ubiquitous grain for the rest of my life. I put a pot of this precious contraband on the stove with nothing but a touch of salt and the wonderfully fragrant aroma of rice immediately filled the kitchen. This was not a vague, hint of rice smell that would sometimes come from those carbs-in-a-minute boxes; this rice grabbed your face in both hands and kissed you with an aroma that was enough to make me start reconsidering my relationship with Uncle Ben before even taking my first bite. But when I did take that first bite, I could only think, “Oh! That’s what rice is supposed to taste like!” In that moment, I realized the rice I had been eating my entire life was an imposter, a mountebank feeding me weak pabulum in the guise of nutritious grains. The taste was subtly sweet and simply more “ricey” than any rice I had ever encountered. Think of the difference between freshly ground coffee and coffee that’s been in the back of your freezer for two months and you’ll be getting at the difference between this rice and run-ofthe-mill supermarket rice. Then, a wave of sadness swept over me as I realized I would probably never have this taste again. The local supermarket certainly didn’t carry fresh,

38 • THE PULSE • MARCH 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

hand-farmed rice from Nepal, but I wondered about those bags of rice stacked shoulder-high in the Asian and Indian markets around town. I wondered if those varieties of rice would really be that much different from those $.99 bags of white rice or even the Good Uncle. The short answer is yes, and you should stop buying cheap, supermarket white rice unless you prefer flavorless, nutritiondeficient granules of discontent. But which rice should you buy? There are more than 40,000 varieties of cultivated rice and it seems like most ethnic markets stock all of them, so it can be daunting to figure out which rice to buy for your shrimp creole or stir-fry. If you keep the following basics in mind and stay away from cheap, supermarket white rice you’ll step your rice game up dramatically. • American long-grain white rice is the most common rice in American kitchens. Basmati rice and jasmine rice are not only much more flavorful than their longgrain American cousins, but they are also “aromatic” varieties and are much more fragrant. I recommend “Three Ladies” brand jasmine rice from Thailand (it’s my favorite all-purpose rice) and “Dehraduni” basmati rice from India. • Short-grain rice is used in Japanese and Caribbean dishes due to its clingy, moist, and firm texture when cooked. Nishiki Japanese rice is my go-to shortgrained option but California Calrose rice is excellent as well. • Sticky rice, or glutinous rice, is a specific type of rice that is sweet and especially sticky when cooked. For dishes such as Thai mango and sticky rice, this

is the rice you need. • Medium-grain rice varieties like Arborio and bomba tend to absorb copious amounts of liquid and produce a lot of starch, so they are perfect for dishes like paella, risotto, and soups plus desserts like rice pudding. • Brown rice has had its outer husk removed, but retains its bran layer (unlike white rice), along with more vitamins, minerals, and fiber than plain or instant white rice. • Colored rices, like red, black, and purple, also derive their color from pigments in the retained bran layer and share a distinctive nutty flavor and firm texture. • Pro tip: wild rice isn’t actually rice, it’s a grain harvested from several species of grass. Tastes good, but it’s not rice. If you’re still unsure, the best option is to just ask the folks at the market which rice matches what you’re looking for or suits the dish you’re cooking. They know what varieties they have on hand and the differences between them, and you won’t have to learn Thai, Bengali, or Indonesian to sort out your Japonica from your Kullakkar. Life’s too short to eat bad rice!


CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • MARCH 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 39


Profile for Brewer Media Group

The Pulse 16.11 » March 14, 2019  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative

The Pulse 16.11 » March 14, 2019  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative