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VOL. 16, ISSUE 2 • JANUARY 10, 2019

It’s a Laugh a Minute in Chattanooga Local, visiting comedians make for an exciting comedy scene CHATTANOOGA'S WEEKLY ALTERNATIVE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM


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FROM THE EDITOR VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • JANUARY 10, 2019

BREWER MEDIA GROUP Publisher James Brewer, Sr. FOUNDED 2003 BY ZACHARY COOPER & MICHAEL KULL

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Gary Poole gary@chattanoogapulse.com Assistant Editor Jenn Webster City Editor Alex Curry Music Editor Marc T. Michael Film Editor John DeVore Contributors Adam Beckett Thom Benson Rob Brezsny Jessie Gantt-Temple Matt Jones Sandra Kurtz Mike McJunkin Ernie Paik Rick Pimental-Habib Michael Thomas Cartoonists Jen Sorenson • Tom Tomorrow

ADVERTISING

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Director of Sales Mike Baskin mike@brewermediagroup.com Account Executives Rick Leavell • Cindee McBride Libby Phillips • John Rodriguez Danielle Swindell

CONTACT Offices 1305 Carter St. Chattanooga, TN 37402 Phone 423.265.9494 Email info@chattanoogapulse.com Website chattanoogapulse.com Facebook @chattanoogapulse THE FINE PRINT: The Pulse is published weekly by Brewer Media and is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. The Pulse covers a broad range of topics concentrating on music, the arts, entertainment, culture and local news. The Pulse is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publisher may take more than one copy per weekly issue. The Pulse may be distributed only by authorized distributors. Contents Copyright © 2019 by Brewer Media. All rights reserved.

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It’s A Laugh A Minute In Chattanooga Chattanooga’s local comedy scene is on fire right now. Mainstream comedians have been consistently coming to town, the improv scene activity is at an all-time high, and the local stand-up acts are all in full stride. It’s nothing short of a bustling environment for jokes and laughter all around the Scenic City.

NAKED RIVER BREWING

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A STARTLE OF WINGS

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“We wanted a place where time erases. It was always about having a great environment,” says Jake Raulston, the President of Naked River Brewing Company.

I love checking the mailbox here at The Pulse. There’s always something interesting. Once there was even a piece of hate mail which I kept and have a look at any time I need a laugh.

FROM METAL TO PRINTS

As she recently moved to a south-side facing studio on the fourth floor of Chattanooga Workspace, Janet Campbell-Bradley is exploring a new view with a new medium and a new last name.

4 DAYS OF ADVENTURE

It’s about that time again. Seven years ago, the Lookout Wild Film Festival began offering a niche film event, one particularly suited to Chattanooga.

4 CONSIDER THIS

16 MUSIC CALENDAR

19 JONESIN' CROSSWORD

9 SHADES OF GREEN

18 MUSIC REVIEWS

21 NEW IN THEATERS

19 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

22 SUSHI & BISCUITS

12 ARTS CALENDAR

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BEGINNINGS · CITY LIFE

Who Would Make A MoonPie Beer?

Cons ider This w ith Dr. Rick

Naked River finds a home on the Southside “What you think you want for your life is not always the same as your heart and soul guiding you to why you are here.” — Qigong Master Chunyi Lin This quote speaks to our intuition, our inner voice, inner wisdom. Learning to trust that intuition—also called a “gut feeling”—does not come naturally to everyone. Yet everyone who learns to listen within knows clearly the feeling of suffering consequences from going against their inner wisdom, versus being in the flow of what is right for them in that moment. How do we learn to trust ourselves? To develop our own healthy processes leading to healthy choices? I suggest we push the pause button, take a breath and consider this: Discard everything. Surround yourself with only the people and things that speak to your heart. The question of what you want around you is actually the reflection of how you want to live your life. When you listen, your heart and soul will guide you. — Rick Pimental-Habib, Ph.D.

“W

E WANTED A PLACE WHERE TIME erases. It was always about having a great environment,” says Jake Raulston, the President of Naked River Brewing Company.

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I have a flight of seven beers sitting next to my sample of Texas-style brisket. I’m trying to listen to what Jake and his business partner Mike are saying, but that brisket keeps winking at me, distracting me, calling my name. It’s such a comfortable space, a per-


THE COMIX

The brewery is an avid supporter of the Tennessee River Gorge Trust, which vows to protect 17,000 acres of the Gorge. A portion of sales from the Gorge IPA goes directly to the trust.” fect spot to spend a happy afternoon with friends and loved ones. They have unabashedly achieved their goal. The beers are good. Really good, even. “It’s important for us that we don’t get set in our ways of brewing,” says Jake. “We have to keep changing it up. We’re really after in-your-face flavors.” The brewery has partnered with MoonPie, a Chattanooga staple, to create a MoonPie Stout. The brewing team hand-crumbles 900 pounds of pies per brew session to create a sweet 8% ABV stout with a smooth, marshmallow-filled finish. I’m usually not into sweet beers, but this one is delicious and full of nostalgia. The Gorge IPA, their best-selling brew since they opened late last year, is juicy and smooth with citrus notes stemming from Mosaic and Citra hops. The Robo C.O.P. (Coffee Oatmeal Porter) is excellently eye-opening, malty and rich. Created through a partnership with Velvet Robot Coffee, the dark brew concoction will put a distinct pep in your step. That brisket though, it’s something special. To be honest, I haven’t had brisket this good outside of the state of Texas until now. The menu offers a wide range of BBQ and traditional sides: pulled pork, smoked turkey, ribs, potato salad, slaw, greens, and more. Haven’t had enough moon pie? Try

one of four deep-fried offerings for dessert. A grilled cheese sandwich is sure to please the little ones at the family-friendly taproom. The brewery has a decidedly outdoorsy feel. All the owners and partners of Naked River are avid nature lovers and wanted to pay homage to their passion for wilderness and the natural world. “We all grew up on the river,” says Mike Robinson, a partner at the brewery. The small tight-knit team has a communal mentality about their mission. The brewery is an avid supporter of the Tennessee River Gorge Trust, which vows to protect 17,000 acres of Tennessee’s River Gorge. A portion of sales from the Gorge IPA goes directly to the trust. The building is sprawling, a massive, open floor plan that connects the brewing equipment and process face to face with the guests. Believed to be one of the oldest buildings in Chattanooga, the structure began as a foundry around 1875. Naked River Brewing Company is open seven days a week. During the warmer months, the outdoor patio is prime real estate for anyone looking to enjoy a relaxing day. Follow them online at @nakedriverbrew. You can also rent the upstairs area out for private events in the 75-person range. Come on out and support locality, craftsmanship, and deliciousness. CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JANUARY 10, 2019 • THE PULSE • 5


COVER STORY

It’s A Laugh A Minute In Chattanooga Local, visiting comedians make for an exciting comedy scene

C

HATTANOOGA’S LOCAL COMEDY SCENE IS ON FIRE RIGHT NOW. Mainstream comedians have been consistently coming to town, the improv scene activity is at an all-time high, and the local stand-up acts are all in full stride. It’s nothing short of a bustling environment for jokes and laughter all around the Scenic City. By Adam Beckett Pulse contributor

While local music has always been the powerhouse entity that has grabbed the most public attention, it seems as if Chattanooga has found yet another form of entertainment to make it stand out, and has absolutely started to gain recognition on a national level. Multiple businesses, organizations, and outlets that center around comedy have been taking off lately and spiraling towards success. While many places simply host comedy nights featuring named-brand comedians, others open their doors to give local talent the opportunity to lunge toward the stage and present themselves through the multiple, evergrowing facets of performance comedy. It is fantastic that we live in a place where aspiring comedians can take a shot at performing stand-up comedy, as terrifying as it may or may not seem to the endeavoring comedians. Taking a shot at stand-up comedy takes a tremendous amount of courage. Supposedly, it is like all things: some people have what it takes, and others do not. Standing on an open stage all alone in hopes of making people laugh seems like it can be scary, unless of course you are the person on stage who has managed to somehow grasp the full attention of the room, and who has them hysterically laughing for half an hour or more. It is unclear what exactly the difference is. Why can one person borderline make people pee their pants from laughter, and another with similar characteristics get booed off the stage and maybe even literally get things thrown at them (that is actually a thing, by the way)? Are there even any grey areas? There certainly do not seem to be. Generally speak6 • THE PULSE • JANUARY 10, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

ing, it is mostly one or the other; there is no safe in between. So it definitely is a spooky place to stand, and a place that takes a thick-skinned person to even attempt. Seemingly the difference maker is stage presence, mixed with the ability to read a room and know what material to pitch on the fly to a crowd of mostly complete strangers. Also, the absence of any kind of fear whatsoever is of the utmost importance; those hecklers can smell fear from a mile away, and they can get pretty relentless with their hisses and boos. It can be intimidating just to think about it. Kudos to the brave souls who venture out and make an attempt. It is impressive to see success stories from people who grabbed an open mic and ended up with a career in making people laugh. It certainly is possible. It just takes that first step like anything else, only this particular first step might involve people seriously throwing things at them or booing them off stage. After talking to multiple comedians both locally and beyond, it seems like one lure of performing in Chattanooga as a local aspiring comedian is the lack of disgruntled competitors around town who could not catch a break. In larger cities, the broken and discouraged entertainers who do not make the approval cut for the spotlight just sit in the audience as a team and make the


comedians putting themselves out there miserable by excessive group heckling. It allegedly is a big problem across the map, but it does not seem to be an excessive issue locally. Cities like Atlanta and Chicago typically have more people trying to break through, so naturally have more failed performers to team up on the newcomers to help drive them away. Heckling and stage performers go hand and hand and can trace back to the beginning of the movement. It is actually pretty bizarre to think about. Humans are really funny creatures. It is almost like humanity has a built-in drive that inspires us to mess with people who try to entertain us. It does not make any sense to me; I prefer to encourage and support as opposed to attempting to discourage those who want to make me laugh. Certainly I would never throw food or fruit at an entertainer. Somewhere along the lines heckling has integrated with standup comedy and has incorporated itself in the comedy scene in general. It has become a part of it, if it has not always been. Many of the funniest moments in stand-up history involve heckling interaction between the performer and the haters. YouTube is chock full of some heckling interaction. It is worth it to watch some of it in order to help to understand the frequency, hilarity, and occasional intensity of the heckling. The funniest part of it is that the heckling and intermittent throwing of random items at less-than-optimal performers is not only tolerated by the rest of the crowd, but it is often encouraged and appreciated, even sometimes by the performer’s families and loved ones. Mankind is great in many ways; this does not seem

After talking to multiple comedians both locally and beyond, it seems like one lure of performing in Chattanooga as a local aspiring comedian is the lack of disgruntled competitors around town who could not catch a break.” to be one of those ways. Oftentimes the hecklers can be funnier than the actual comedians. Still, they are just people who do not have the courage to stand up in front of a crowd and attempt to entertain, so they just show up to a place with the sole intention of embarrassing people publicly. It is a pretty well-known fact that alcohol consumption also coincides with the comedy scene, so hecklers are mostly belligerent, hammered-drunk individuals who have thrown caution to the wind and will behave however they want. While getting heckled would be bad enough, performers at historic vaudeville shows who did not match the crowd’s standards, or who would take up too much stage time, would be dragged off the stage by a large hook-shaped cane, sometimes pretty brutally. One minute the performer would be doing their thing, and the next minute the dreaded hook would come from nowhere and surprisingly snatch them off the stage. It really did not matter if they were standing on top of a fence; when the hook came out, it was game over for the entertainer. The word vaudeville can be

traced to its French origins and uses parts of words for translation to mean “voice of the city,” meaning that the town has spoken, now drag the poor sap off the stage. Getting the hook is now a thing of the past. Today’s politically correct version of the hook is a blatant, blinking light that indicates to the performer that their time to immediately exit stage left has arrived. Be it the hook, the blinking light, or the heckler as the culprit for removing an entertainer from a stage, it is all better than entertaining for specific royalty through time and doing a bad job. Comedians could be killed or publicly shamed as punishment for their failed attempt to entertain their lords. Regardless, it is all meshed with public performers and is simply a part of it. Those attempting to get involved should just know that it is going to happen, even once a high level of success has been achieved. It is always going to happen in the comedy realm. Those out there who feel like they have what it takes to reach the next level as a comedian are certainly starting in the right place. The beauty of Chat-

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COVER STORY

Chattanoogans that know about the booming local comedy scene have been basking in its glory for quite a while; however, for far too many people the scene remains untapped.” tanooga’s comedy scene is that it is constantly flowing. On any given night, over the outstretches of the whole city awaits a wide variety of opportunities to grab a mic and roll the dice in front of a live audience. It is a good measuring stick for a person to know if they have the ability to connect with an audience and make them laugh, or if the “talk of the city” is going to have them looking for an imaginary hook. The Comedy Catch is Chattanooga’s most long-standing comedy facility. They opened for business in 1985 and have never looked back. They have done their part to open their doors for people to explore their comedic sides, and have also brought in standup comedy legends including Jerry Seinfeld, Jeff Foxworthy, Ron White, D.L. Hughley, Carlos Mencia, Rob Schneider, Tommy Chong, Tommy Davidson, Carrot Top, Tracy Morgan, Pauly Shore,

Bobcat Goldthwait, and the amazing fruit-smashing Gallagher, where the audience needs plastic sheets to help prevent smashed fruit bits from getting all over their clothes. In more recent times, The Tivoli Theater has also done a fantastic job of bringing in national sensations to our local stage. A few major players of the comedy game who have let loose on the Tivoli stage over the last couple of years are Aziz Ansari, Dave Chappelle, Kevin Hart, Gabriel Iglesias, Eddie Izzard, Brian Regan, and Katt Williams. These comedy stars are not putting Chattanooga on their national tours for no reason; they are coming because the Scenic City is currently experiencing a boom in the comedy culture. It is not just one or two places that are hosting comedy events. Every place imaginable all over town is jumping in on the comedy craze. Another catalyst for the expansion

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of the local comedy scene is Improv Chattanooga. The local group of comedians presents their comedy show every Friday and Saturday night at their new Rossville Avenue location. They do comedy on the fly, and no two shows are ever the same. The group does a variety of entertaining themes and plays games, much like the hit network television show, Whose Line Is It Anyway? The group has various shows like Improv vs. Stand Up, and Visit Rock Village, where they perform an ongoing improv soap opera set in Chattanooga’s local tourist trap, “Rock Village.” They have gained public notoriety, and are making some waves in the comedy world. Go check it out sometime. Chattanoogans who know about the booming local comedy scene have been basking in its glory for quite a while; however, for far too many people the scene remains untapped. It has been hiding in plain sight while steadily knocking the funny bones of those who know where to find it. At some point in time while watching stand up on television or at live shows, the majority of people have at least thought to themselves that they could get up there and knock em all down and have the whole room cracking up. Some people push all their doubts into the back of their minds

and carpe diem. Everybody else either wants to only heckle or just does not want to deal with the public speaking, heckling, or presumed public failure aspects of standing up in front of a crowd while telling jokes. Chattanooga’s local comedy scene is a good place for an aspiring comedian to start. Searching “Chattanooga open mic comedy” online will reveal multiple locations that offer the local public a starting place to get past the proverbial wet feet and to give live, real-time stand-up comedy a shot. It will either be a crash and burn setting, or it will be a pivotal point and potentially the start of a new career for the attempter. Do you have what it takes? People say that I belong on a stage doing standup; I do love to watch it, but I for one fall in the “do not want to deal with it all” category. Try something different; tap into the hysteria and get out there to support the local comedy scene. Adam Beckett is a professional writer that has a tremendous passion for life, love, dancing, and adventures. Love is his intention for everything that he does, especially writing. He uses writing as a platform to spread positivity.


COLUMN · SHADES OF GREEN

Doing Our Part For The Planet Climate change requires immediate actions from everyone

2 Sandra Kurtz

Pulse columnist

Walk, bike, ride a CARTA shuttle, or drive an electric vehicle for transportation. Buy local produce and eat less or no meat. Avoid waste and plastic. Compost, reuse, share, barter, and recycle.”

Sandra Kurtz is an environmental community activist, chair of the South Chickamauga Creek Greenway Alliance, and is presently working through the Urban Century Institute. You can visit her website to learn more at enviroedu.net

019. IT’S HERE. WE DIDN’T do so well preserving the planet and its sustaining ecosystems last year. Let’s hope this year, given catastrophic signals of huge wildfires, disastrous flooding, heat waves, prolonged droughts, coral bleaching, and sea rise, that we are catching on to the need for climate change action. The scientist-laden Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change just issued its latest report saying the world is headed for painful problems sooner than expected as greenhouse gas emissions keep rising. If you make New Year’s resolutions, taking a vow for climate change actions would be vitally important for your well-being and that of all our children. There are plenty of things you can do in your everyday life, as you likely know: Reduce your carbon footprint by using less energy at home. Walk, bike, ride a CARTA shuttle, or drive an electric vehicle for transportation. Buy local produce and eat less or no meat. Avoid waste and plastic. Compost, reuse, share, barter, and recycle. Plant trees. Create some habitat. Don’t pollute the water with fertilizers and poisonous chemicals. Adjustments, yes, but a simpler, fulfilling lifestyle too. Still, it’s not enough. Extensive use of fossil-based energy has gotten us into this situation. Switching to other energy forms is the answer. We are on our way despite the unconscionable reticence of our present government. Solar and wind industries continue to grow across the world. Here in the U.S., the Mayors National Climate Action Agenda has resulted in many city actions. For example, nearby Atlanta has adopted a resolution to use 100 percent clean energy for city operations by 2025 and citywide by 2035. New Orleans in in the top ten solar cities nationwide with more than 3,000 rooftop installations. Many have been

placed on low- and moderate-income homes through an extensive solar leasing program. While Chattanooga Mayor Andy Berke has not signed on with these mayors, the city did pass a resolution to work toward 100 percent renewables and has had much success in reducing energy use in government buildings. The airport, VW, and several local businesses already rely on solar energy. EPB has established Solar Share, a community solar project, for individuals to purchase solar energy. Still, it’s not enough. We must eliminate all fossil fuel infrastructure as quickly as possible. Reject nuclear power, too, as it’s expensive, takes too long to build, and has a radiation tradeoff plus radioactive waste with no satisfactory disposal solutions. Here’s one economic action to explore: Cease investments in banks supporting fossil fuels. Green America has a database of banks and credit unions that avoid fossil fuel support. Only one is listed for Chattanooga: TRUST Federal Credit Union. Investors can support renewable energies. Still, it’s not enough. We need to share housing space. Land is being gobbled up by development and urban sprawl to the detriment of the flora and fauna that we depend on for survival as part of a healthy ecosystem. Further, our waters

suffer from poor quality. The TN Department of Environment & Conservation estimates that 30 percent of state streams cannot support healthy aquatic wildlife while 40 percent are unsuitable for human recreation. Yet local homebuilders want relaxed ordinances allowing stormwater runoff on steep slopes. They also want to fill in and build in our floodplains, which are so vital to capture increased floodwaters sure to come from climate change impacts. Speak to elected officials. Consider a future suggested by Leonardo DaVinci, as he wrote in his notebooks back around 1480: “The rivers will be deprived of their waters, the earth will no longer put forth her greenery, the fields will no more be decked with waving corn, all the animals finding no fresh grass for pasture will die. In this way, the fertile and fruitful earth will be forced to end with the element of fire; and then its surface will be left burnt up to cinder and this will be the end of all earthly nature.” Which option will we choose for a future planet that includes the human species? DaVinci’s or climate change action? A path of materialism, overpopulation, and over-consumption of our natural resources is not in our best interest. That’s all the more reason to choose climate change action. It’s urgent!

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JANUARY 10, 2019 • THE PULSE • 9


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

From Metal To Prints Janet Campbell-Bradley expands her craft

A Buffet Of Crazy Writers Once there was a group of local writers. They wrote in different genres. They wrote in different styles. They were very different in age, experience, political outlook, and their stance on the Oxford comma. But they were all writers. And they were all perhaps a little crazy, each in their own way. A couple of times a month, they gathered at a local buffet restaurant to eat and to talk about writing and life in general. They criticized one another, brainstormed together, laughed as much as they disagreed and shared what they learned in a group that’s been going strong for more than a decade. And now they have published a collection of short stories they’ve aptly titled “Crazy Buffet” (available on Amazon). “If you find an author whose style you like, who stirs your emotion with a phrase, who plants a story in your mind that you remember long after you’ve put the book aside, we’ll call that a success,” says the organizer of the Crazy Buffet Club. Even better, the group decided that the profits from the collection would go to support a regional arts or writing program. The profits from sales of the first edition will go to the Young Southern Student Writers, sponsored by the Southern Lit Alliance and UTC’s Department of English. Learn more at crazybuffet.club — Michael Thomas

By Jessie Gantt-Temple

Pulse contributor

From collaborations with the Chattanooga Zoo and the Hunter Museum, she has several completed prints on display and for sale.”

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A

S SHE RECENTLY MOVED TO A SOUTH-SIDE FACing studio on the fourth floor of Chattanooga Workspace, Janet Campbell-Bradley is exploring a new view with a new medium and a new last name. Known for her elegant, intricately handmade jewelry, newlywed Janet is learning printmaking while teaching others her instinctive craft of metalsmithing. “Doing printmaking takes me out of the field of jewelry, but I love metalsmithing,” she explains. So she is experimenting with mixed media that still includes metal but incorporates softer materials such as sumi ink, Masa paper, and wax. From collaborations with the Chattanooga Zoo and the Hunter Museum, she has several completed prints on display and for sale. “I feel good at the smaller stuff but I want to take my work even larger,

which is tough to do with metals, so my goals are to create more 2D prints and teach more workshops,” she says. As she previously set defined dates for these workshops, this year she has opted for by appointment only so as to create fewer restrictions for herself and her students. Janet taught her first class in 2017. With more than 20 years of experience in soldering, stone setting and jewelry making, she’s eager to show others how to create with metal in a hands-on workshop that ranges from a one-and-done class to a more indepth skills-building series. Her one-and-done, three-hour “Make And Take” class provides the


participant an overview of basic skills. Each student leaves with a finished, one-of-a-kind piece. These singlesession classes are more fun with more people, so Janet encourages at least three and up to six in one workshop. Copper-silver pendant, hammered wire bangle, and silver earrings are a few projects that are available, but feel free to contact Janet and discuss what options you have as a novice jewelry designer. “I can customize these classes so one can choose from a variety of already made elements, then take those pieces and build one creation from that,” Janet says as she walks me over to a felt display tray that contains handmade, trinket-sized copper circles, silver squares, and gold rectangles. “It would still be very handson but allows the student not to be so overwhelmed with design and spend more time on the fabrication.” For someone who is interested in learning how to solder with a torch or set stones, her fundamentals series includes multiple classes over about the span of a month that educate the student in detail on a specific skill. This more intensive workshop would be better with a one-on-one approach, though Janet says she could host up to three sets of hands. She is a self-taught metalsmith who attended the Appalachian Center for Crafts and her first interest was in de-

Janet has frequented many art shows including the RiverArtsFest in Memphis, the Atlanta Dogwood Festival, and Prairie Village in Kansas City.” sign—specifically, women’s apparel and bridal gowns. “I sew very well and also create patterns from scratch; however, I sort of hated the process of sewing during college, so I never explored clothing design seriously and found myself having more patience with metals,” she explains. “Learning and feeling, moving the flame.” Because she loves to travel, Janet has frequented many art shows including the RiverArtsFest in Memphis, the Atlanta Dogwood Festival, and Prairie Village in Kansas City. She’s traveled as far as the ArtFest Fort Myers in Florida. “Chattanooga is a great location for artists, as it is centrally located for great art shows,” she says. “Including the 4 Bridges Arts Festival, I did the art show circuit full time until about 2008, then I went back to work full time.” She worked as a project manager in an e-commerce environment but her degree in fashion merchandising called her back in 2014. Because she has ample inventory of her jewelry, Janet has been pursu-

ing the art of printmaking for the past couple years and is enamored with all the different processes. “Etching, collagraphs, drypoint, and stencils just to name a few,” Janet notes. “My main technique is called a monotype.” You can see her style of adornment in these print pieces that showcase her ability to use organic shapes and subtle finishes to create a peaceful ambiance. From her jewelry to her prints, there is a robust beauty with asymmetrical balance that looks and feels immediately familiar, yet entirely unique. You may purchase her pieces at Plum Nelly or at her Chattanooga Workspace studio 4E. February will launch the Chattanooga Workspace’s First Friday of 2019, so make plans to stop in and more of her work will be available. If you don’t have the chance to chat with her then, and you want to get more details on participating in a workshop, contact her through the Janet Campbell Jewelry Facebook page or email jmcmetals@gmail.com

THU1.10

FRI1.11

SAT1.12

Intro to Zentangle

Something Rotten

An easy-to-learn, relaxing, and fun way to create beautiful images by drawing structured patterns 6 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. chattanoogaworkspace.com

The hilarious story of Nick and Nigel Bottom, two brothers who are desperate to write a hit play. 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. tivolichattanooga.com

80’s Night at the Theatre It's a live table read of one of the '80s biggest comedy films. We just can't tell you which one. 7 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. theatrecentre.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JANUARY 10, 2019 • THE PULSE • 11


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR

Dancing with Isadora

THURSDAY1.10 Urban Farmers Market and Marketplace 3 p.m. Miller Park 910 Market St. millerparkmarket.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 5 p.m. Hutton & Smith Brewing Co. 431 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 760-3600 huttonandsmithbrewing.com Dancing with Isadora 6 p.m. The Hunter Museum of American Art 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968 huntermuseum.org Ice on the Landing 6 p.m. Chattanooga Choo Choo 1400 Market St. iceonthelanding.com Introduction to Zentangle 6 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com PSC Winter Show Reception 6:30 p.m. Gallery at Blackwell 71 Eastgate Loop (423) 648-8001 blackwellautoinc.com

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Shaun Jones 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Alcoholics Not Anonymous Comedy Open Mic 8 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 682-8200 chattanoogabarley.com Country Line Dancing Class 8 p.m. Westbound Bar 24 Station St. (423) 498-3069 westboundbar.com

FRIDAY1.11 Excel at Excel: Intermediate Excel Training 9 a.m. The Edney Innovation Center 1100 Market St. (423) 643-6770 theedney.com Out On 8th 5 p.m. West Village 802 Pine St.
 (423) 424-1831 westvillagechattanooga.com Sweater Bling Party! 6 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St.

(423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Ice on the Landing 6 p.m. Chattanooga Choo Choo 1400 Market St. iceonthelanding.com The Song Market 7 p.m. The Camp House 149 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 702-8081 thecamphouse.com Shaun Jones 7:30, 9:45 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Something Rotten 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com Improv “Movie” Night: 80’s Slasher Flick 8 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Ruby Falls Lantern Tours 8:30 p.m. Ruby Falls 1720 S. Scenic Hwy. (423) 821-2544 rubyfalls.com Good, Old-Fashioned

Improv Show 10 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SATURDAY1.12 Beginner Macrame: Wall Hangings 9 a.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Writing the Mind Alive: A Winter Weekend Writing Retreat 10 a.m. Proprioceptive Writing Center 1401 Williams St. (423) 413-8978 Women’s Introduction to Mountain Biking - Level 1 11 a.m. Harrison Bay State Park 8411 Harrison Bay Rd. (423) 344-6214 tnstateparks.com Ready! Set! Goals! for 2019 Noon Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Something Rotten 2, 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre


Women’s Introduction to Mountain Biking 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com Creating a 2019 Vision Board 3 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Ice on the Landing 6 p.m. Chattanooga Choo Choo 1400 Market St. iceonthelanding.com Winter in West Village 6 p.m. West Village 802 Pine St. westvillagechattanooga.com 80’s Night at the Theatre (Surprise Film Inspiration) 7 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com Shaun Jones 7:30, 9:45 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Tim Warners Fine Art Experience 7:30 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Company 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Your Stories 8 p.m.

Soap Making 101 Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Whose Line Chattanooga 10 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SUNDAY1.13 Writing the Mind Alive: A Winter Weekend Writing Retreat 10 a.m. Proprioceptive Writing Center 1401 Williams St. (423) 413-8978 Ice on the Landing 6 p.m. Chattanooga Choo Choo 1400 Market St. iceonthelanding.com Shaun Jones 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com

MONDAY1.14 Writing for Stress Relief 5:30 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St.

(423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Winter Belly Dance Session 5:45 p.m. Movement Arts Collective 3813 Dayton Blvd. (423) 401-8115 movementartscollective.com Ice on the Landing 6 p.m. Chattanooga Choo Choo 1400 Market St. iceonthelanding.com Joggers & Lagers 6 p.m. Chattanooga Brewing Co. 1804 Chestnut St. chattabrew.com

TUESDAY1.15 Wake Up & Run 6 a.m. Fleet Feet Sports 307 Manufacturers Rd. (423) 771-7996 fleetfeetchattanooga.com Science on Tap! 5 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 682-8200 chattanoogabarley.com Chess K-night 5 p.m. Mad Priest Coffee Roasters 1900 Broad St. (423) 393-3834 madpriestcoffee.com

Passionate & Practical Goal Setting 5:30 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Tuesday Night Chess Club 6 p.m. Downtown Library 1001 Broad St. (423) 643-7700 chattilibrary.org Ice on the Landing 6 p.m. Chattanooga Choo Choo 1400 Market St. iceonthelanding.com Couple’s Massage 101 6:30 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Paths to Pints along the Riverwalk 6:30 p.m. The Tap House 3800 St. Elmo Ave. taphousechatt.com

WEDNESDAY1.16 Middle Eastern Dance 10:30 a.m. Jewish Cultural Center 5461 North Terrace (423) 493-0270 jewishchattanooga.com

Main Street Market 4 p.m. 522 W. Main St. mainstfarmersmarket.com Soap Making 101 5:30 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Ice on the Landing 6 p.m. Chattanooga Choo Choo 1400 Market St. iceonthelanding.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 7:30 p.m. The Bitter Alibi 825 Houston St. (423) 362-5070 thebitteralibi.com Matt Mitchell 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Open Mic Comedy 8 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400 jjsbohemia.com

Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JANUARY 10, 2019 • THE PULSE • 13


THE MUSIC SCENE

Noah Zacharin: A Startle Of Wings Canadian folkie marries poetry and music Adriana Lecouvreur Live At The Met It’s a lush valentine for your eyes and ears— 18th-century passion set in a working replica of a Baroque theater. For the first time at the Met, soprano Anna Netrebko sings the title role of Adriana Lecouvreur, the great French actress in love with the military hero Maurizio, sung by tenor Piotr Beczala. Gianandrea Noseda conducts Cilea’s tragedy, which Sir David McVicar directs. The cast also features Anita Rachvelishvili as the Princess of Bouillon, Adriana’s rival for Maurizio’s affections, and baritone Ambrogio Maestri as Michonnet. “A pinnacle of a lifetime of opera-going… Anna Netrebko is the ultimate diva” (Observer) in the title role of the real-life actress who intrigued 18th-century audiences with her on- and offstage passion. Beczała is “in sterling form” (Financial Times), while mezzo-soprano Rachvelishvili is “stupendous” (New York Times). The engrossing new staging helps transport viewers to a world where Adriana Lecouvreur actually lived and loved. Whether you love opera or are just wanting to get your feet wet (so to speak), The Met: Live in HD is a great way to experience worldclass opera right here in town. Come see for yourself this Saturday at 12:55 p.m. at either East Ridge 18 or Hamilton Place 9. — Michael Thomas

By Marc T. Michael Pulse Music Editor

Weighing in at fourteen tracks and forty-nine minutes, it’s a study in what’s best in contemporary folk music.”

14 • THE PULSE • JANUARY 10, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

I

LOVE CHECKING THE MAILBOX HERE AT THE PULSE. There’s always something interesting. Once there was even a piece of hate mail which I kept and have a look at any time I need a laugh.

I was quite pleased, recently, to find a package from Noah Zacharin about a new album and an upcoming gig in Chattanooga. Alas, I was immediately dismayed to discover the gig was back in November. Funny thing about the mail, I can order something from Guangzhou, China, and have it in two weeks. I can order something from Canada (where Zach is based) and get it three months later. So, unfortunately, Noah’s local gig has come and gone and

while I wish I could have helped promote it, I can at least still tell you about this remarkable new album. In the first place, Noah is a critically acclaimed guitarist, practicing that particular craft since the tender age of nine. It’s a skill that pairs nicely with his song-writing ability, which has been likened to that of James Taylor and David Wilcox. In fact, Rick Fielding, a musical legend in his own right, once said of Noah, “He’s…one of the best songwriters this country has


Nature is an ongoing theme throughout the album, sometimes literally, sometimes metaphorically, but it certainly speaks to what makes the man tick.” ever produced.” For a country that has given the world the likes of Leonard Cohen, Gordon Lightfoot, Neil Young, Stan Rogers, and Joni Mitchell, that is one hell of an endorsement. In reviewing A Startle of Wings, it’s evident that Fielding was not exaggerating. Weighing in at fourteen tracks and forty-nine minutes, it’s a study in what’s best in contemporary folk music. Nature is an ongoing theme throughout the album, sometimes literally, sometimes metaphorically, but it certainly speaks to what makes the man tick (when not touring or recording, he spends his time in an off-grid cabin in a region known as the geological core of the North American continent). The imagery is gorgeous and effective and this comes as no surprise given that Zacharin is also an accom-

plished and award-winning poet. His mastery of language allows him to wield words the same way a painter wields pigments. Sunrise over the barn, old hound in slow sleep howl / never knew he mourns lousy neighbors and I know it all now / all roads lead to ruin so I lie back in my own heat / fresh bread and coffee smell like flesh burning in my sleep / My thoughts are darker than they’re deep. Honestly, if it weren’t for the gorgeous guitar work, the lyric sheets for this album would be well-served being bound in a small, stylish, leather-covered edition. The guitar work, though… it would be easy, given his strong writing style, to relegate the guitar to mere accompaniment. It would work, it would be effective, but his guitar work itself is so unique, so complex and yet so seem-

ingly at ease, it’s really a second voice. In essence, every song is really a duet between the man and his instrument. Noah made two appearances in Chattanooga in 2018. According to his latest tour schedule, it appears the closest he’ll come to the Scenic City in 2019 is a November gig in LaGrange, Georgia. That’s almost a three-hour haul from here, but it’d absolutely be worth the drive. In the meantime, of course, there’s a wealth of material available online through the website noahsong.com, including a septenary of older albums (Wings is number eight,) concert footage, lyrics, and poetry. Turn on, tune in, and discover why fans, critics, and peers revere the work Noah Zacharin, one of the greatest songwriters Canada has ever produced.

Mark your calendars for next Friday as Sluggo’s North Vegetarian Café proudly presents Mythical Motors, along with special guests Whiskey Angel and TBA. Mythical Motors, Chattanooga’s most prolific producers of albums and cassette tapes, are bringing their clever, upbeat, and stylishly retro brand of power-pop to the north shore for one night only. With a string of critically acclaimed releases under their collective belts, Matt and the boys are even more popular for their high-energy live performances. Joining them will be Nashville’s kick-ass, 78 mph psychedelic rock-and-roll hooligans, Whiskey Angel. The thinking man’s party band, Whiskey Angel specializes in fast, loud, and clever. As if these two complementary bands weren’t enough, the night will be rounded out by a special appearance from TBA, the enigmatic band whose music, influences, members, images, albums, merchandise and carbon footprint are unlocatable anywhere Google goes. Still, they must be awfully popular, given the large number and variety of bills they appear on. All in, it’s a great night for rock and roll in the Scenic City at Sluggo’s next Friday night. Show starts at 10 p.m. and goes on until who knows when. — MTM

THU1.10

FRI1.11

SAT1.12

Richard Smith

Tennessee’s Dead

Matt Stephens Project

There are a lot of good guitarists out there, but Richard is truly on another level. Come and find out for yourself. 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org

Bringing people one step closer together through the love and magic of the music of The Grateful Dead. 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com

You want a party? You got a party! Playing everything from Prince to Lady Gaga to Earth, Wind & Fire. 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JANUARY 10, 2019 • THE PULSE • 15


LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR

Cosmic Shift

THURSDAY1.10 Cat Man Smothers 2 p.m. Virgola Wine Bar 608 Georgia Ave. chattanoogawinebar.com James Crumble Trio 6 p.m. St. John’s Meeting Place 1278 Market St. stjohnsrestaurant.com Matt Downer & Hara Paper 6:30 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Company 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com John Carroll 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Toby Hewitt 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Open Mic Night 7 p.m. Moccasin Bend Brewing Co. 3210 Broad St. bendbrewingbeer.com Richard Smith 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Barefoot Nellie & Co. 7:30 p.m.

16 • THE PULSE • JANUARY 10, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com Jesse James & Tim Neal 7:30 p.m. Mexi-Wing VII 5773 Brainerd Rd. (423) 296-1073 Keepin’ It Local 8 p.m. The Social 1110 Market St. publichousechattanooga.com Open Mic Night with Jonathan Wimpee 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Oweda, The Night Birds 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

FRIDAY1.11 Binji Varsossa 6 p.m. Cancun Mexican Restaurant 1809 Broad St. (423) 266-1461 Heatherly 6 p.m. Heaven & Ale Brewing Co. 300 Cherokee Blvd. heavenandalebrewing.com Gino Fanelli 6:30 p.m.

Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Amber Fults 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com The Song Market 7 p.m. The Camp House 149 E. MLK Blvd. thecamphouse.com Tim Lewis 7 p.m. El Meson 248 Northgate Park elmesonchattanooga.com Robin Grant & The Standard 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Backwater Still 8:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com Amber Carrington 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com Stone Cold Fox, Sunkonscious, Midnight Promise, The Stephen Busie Band 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

Tennessee’s Dead 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com E.T. (Eric Turner) 9 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com Ayla Sylver 10 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com Down Stroke 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

SATURDAY1.12 Binji Varsossa 6 p.m. Cancun Mexican Restaurant 1809 Broad St. (423) 266-1461 Flattop Boxers 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Megan Howard 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Seven to the Sea


Robin Grant & The Standard 7 p.m. Charles & Myrtle’s Coffeehouse 105 McBrien Rd. christunity.org Forever Bluegrass 7 p.m. Westbound Bar 24 Station St. westboundbar.com Tim Lewis 7 p.m. El Meson 248 Northgate Park elmesonchattanooga.com Lucy Isabel 8:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com The Matt Stephens Project 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com Cosmic Shift 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Tennessee’s Dead 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Down Stroke 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

SUNDAY1.13 Jalil Muhammad 11 a.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com Carl Pemberton 11 a.m. Westin Chattanooga 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com The Other Brothers & E.T. 2 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Company 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Bluegrass Jam 4 p.m. Fiddlers Anonymous 2248 Dayton Blvd. (423) 994-7497 Open Mic with Jeff Daniels 6 p.m. Long Haul Saloon 2536 Cummings Hwy. (423) 822-9775 Mathis & Martin 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com

MONDAY1.14 Open Air with Jessica Nunn 6 p.m. The Granfalloon

Elenowen

400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Mike Mcdade 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Monday Nite Big Band 7 p.m. The Coconut Room 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Very Open Mic with Shawnessey Cargile 8 p.m. The Well 1800 Rossville Blvd. #8 wellonthesouthside.com

TUESDAY1.15 Danimal 6 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Megan Howard 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Bill McCallie and In Cahoots 6:30 p.m. Southern Belle 201 Riverfront Pkwy. chattanoogariverboat.com Sage Against The Machine 7 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Company

1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Space Jam Open Mic with Xll Olympians 7 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com Open Mic Jam Session 7 p.m. Crust Pizza 3211 Broad St. crustpizza.com Live Jam Session with Freddy Mc & Friends 8 p.m. Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Open Mic with Mike McDade 8 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com

WEDNESDAY1.16 The Other Guys 6 p.m. SpringHill Suites 495 Riverfront Pkwy. springhillsuites.com Maria Sable 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Jesse James Jungkurth 7 p.m.

Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Jazz in the Lounge: Dexter Bell & Friends 7 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Elenowen 7 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Company 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Randall Adams 8 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Priscilla & Little Rickee 8 p.m. Las Margaritas 1101 Hixson Pike (423) 756-3332 Hammell on Trial 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Prime Cut Trio 9 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com

Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JANUARY 10, 2019 • THE PULSE • 17


ERNIE PAIK'S RECORD REVIEWS

Alison Statton & Spike Bimini Twist (Tiny Global Productions)

I

n an alternate universe, the trio Young Marble Giants—formed around 40 years ago in Cardiff, Wales by brothers Stuart and Philip Moxham with vocalist Alison Statton—might have released, without fanfare, its stark, chilly masterpiece album Colossal Youth (one of this writer’s all-time favorite albums) and then simply disappeared, as seemingly quietly and mysteriously as it appeared. However, as it turns out, it served as the roots of a blooming musical family tree; after Young Marble Giants disbanded in 1980 (reunion shows would happen, years later), Stuart Moxham started The Gist—its album Embrace the Herd being an overlooked treasure—and Alison Statton co-founded the breezy-yet-sophisticated pop band Weekend with Simon Booth and Spike, which had a brief but practically flawless career. After singing for Ian Devine starting in the late ’80s as the outfit “Devine and Statton,” Statton reunited with Spike from Weekend for a fruitful run in the ’90s, ending with 1997’s The Shady Tree, another unheralded album with a gen-

18 • THE PULSE • JANUARY 10, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

tly puzzling demeanor and spooky electronics. After a 20-year gap, Alison Statton & Spike have finally released a welcome full-length follow-up to The Shady Tree, entitled Bimini Twist, that will particularly appeal to fans who were drawn to Weekend and its eclectic ways. Actually, the liner notes of Weekend’s 1982 album La Varieté state that the title is “the French term for popular radio, everything that’s not heavy rock; music drawing on diversity and depth.” That title could certainly apply to Bimini Twist—comprised of home recordings solely made by Statton and Spike — which celebrates both small moments and occasional arrangements that sound large, with stirring Latin-influenced rhythms. The opening “Just Us Two” is the intersection of the duo’s various methods, with Spike’s trademark jazzy nylon-string guitar chords sporting a Brazilian tug but also some odd electronic chimes; the enigmatic “Alone Together” resides in its own alien world with metal percussion and hazy viola flourishes. “Curse or Pray” is a number that comes straight from a smoky lounge, while “Under Cover” offers a pert, tight slice of pop that never overstays its welcome. “Distraction” saunters with an easygoing mood before its surprise final minute, where it speeds up and magnifies its samba style. Consistently, Statton sings with her calm, warm voice on such upbeat numbers or more minimal, intimate tracks such as the closing

“Sleepless,” with an uncanny ability to tap into your person, as if delivering a secret to your cupped ear.

Anguish Anguish (RareNoise)

T

he new band Anguish has one hell of a setup—put together two-thirds of the sinister New Jersey hip-hop outfit Dälek, two members of the intense Swedish free jazz trio Fire! and keyboardist Hans Joachim Irmler from the legendary German band Faust, with each element capable of making bold and disorienting sounds. With so many distinctive and strong musical personalities in the room, the payoffs could be rewarding but there are challenges present, as well; does this new amalgam have its own identity, and how do the pieces fit together without everyone stepping on everyone’s toes? The opening instrumental track “Vibrations” is a warm-up, with dark ambient tones and Mats Gustafsson’s piercing and echoing tenor sax terror-bleats, tag-teaming Mike Mare (of Dälek) who supplies distorted wah-guitar licks. A cathartic release happens on the following dense

track “Cyclical / Physical” but it doesn’t go quite as far into sonic obliteration territory as one might expect, perhaps so that the lyrics from Will Brooks (a.k.a. MC Dälek) are still distinguishable. The album’s title track is thick with smoke in its dirtied-up jazz approach, with Irmler and Gustafsson showing restraint amid ambient noise. After some amorphous treading, the album seems to really launch with “Gut Feeling,” partially due to its heavy beat that draws listeners in, combined with sick, queasy sounds and delirious reeds; Brooks barks out defiant wordplay (“Neither saved or a savior / Always minor never major”) with the chorus of “F--- your frail feelings” sticking out. The eight-minute “Healer’s Lament” offers slow doom jazz with Brooks’ desolate spoken-word descriptions and ends with wailing, animalistic free jazz, and one of the album’s most effective moments is the instrumental “DEW,” with unfettered, filthy sax bleats and evil, guttural noises. “A Maze of Decay” uses some genuinely unsettling sounds with buzzing electronics and wispy, shadowy sonic spectres, and the final, glorious track “Wümme” (named after Faust’s hometown) uses a driving rhythm that wisely avoids the (overused) strict motorik beat—its mounting intensity, pained shouts, and inspired disorder demonstrate the powerful synthesis of this ensemble, although the album takes a few tracks to find its footing.


JONESIN' CROSSWORD

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In 1984, singer-songwriter John Fogerty released a new album whose lead single was “The Old Man Down the Road.” It sold well. But trouble arose soon afterward when Fogerty’s former record company sued him in court, claiming he stole the idea for “The Old Man Down the Road” from “Run Through the Jungle.” That was a tune Fogerty himself had written and recorded in 1970 while playing with the band Creedence Clearwater Revival. The legal process took a while, but he was ultimately vindicated. No, the courts declared, he didn’t plagiarize himself, even though there were some similarities between the two songs. In this spirit, I authorize you to borrow from a good thing you did in the past as you create a new good thing in the future. There’ll be no hell to pay if you engage in a bit of self-plagiarism. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book is a collection of fables that take place in India. Three movies have been made based on it. All of them portray the giant talking snake named Kaa as an adversary to the hero Mowgli. But in Kipling’s original stories, Kaa is a benevolent ally and teacher. I bring this to your attention to provide context for a certain situation in your life. Is there an influence with a metaphorical resemblance to Kaa: misinterpreted by some people, but actually quite supportive and nourishing to you? If so, I suggest you intensify your appreciation for it. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Virginia Woolf thought that her Piscean lover Vita Sackville-West was a decent writer, but a bit too fluid and effortless. Self-expression was so natural to Sackville-West that she didn’t work hard enough to hone her craft and discipline her flow. In a letter, Woolf wrote, “I think there are odder, deeper, more angular thoughts in your mind than you have yet let come out.” I invite you to meditate on the possibility that Woolf’s advice might be useful in 2019. Is there anything in your skill set that comes so easily that you haven’t fully ripened it? If so, develop it with more focused intention. ARIES (March 21-April 19): Computer-generated special effects used in the 1993 film Jurassic Park may seem modest to us now. But at the time they were revolutionary. Inspired by the new possibilities revealed, filmmakers like Stanley Kubrick, George Lucas, and Peter Jackson launched new projects they had previously thought to be beyond their ability to create. In 2019, I urge you to go in quest of your personal equivalent of Jurassic Park’s pioneering breakthroughs. According to my analysis of the astrological omens,

you may be able to find help and resources that enable you to get more serious about seemingly unfeasible or impractical dreams. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I’m a big proponent of authenticity. I almost always advise you to be yourself with bold candor and unapologetic panache. Speak the truth about your deepest values and clearest perceptions. Be an expert about what really moves you, and devote yourself passionately to your relationships with what really moves you. But there is one exception to this approach. Sometimes it’s wise to employ the “fake it until you make it” strategy: to pretend you are what you want to be with such conviction that you ultimately become what you want to be. I suspect now is one of those times for you. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The students’ dining hall at Michigan State University serves gobs of mayonnaise. But in late 2016, a problem arose when 1250 gallons of the stuff became rancid. Rather than simply throw it away, the school’s Sustainability Officer came up with a brilliant solution: load it into a machine called an anaerobic digester, which turns biodegradable waste into energy. Problem solved! The transformed rot provided electricity for parts of the campus. I recommend you regard this story as a metaphor for your own use. Is there anything in your life that has begun to decay or lose its usefulness? If so, can you convert it into a source of power? CANCER (June 21-July 22): If you grow vegetables, fruits, and grains on an acre of land, you can feed twelve people. If you use that acre to raise meat-producing animals, you’ll feed at most four people. But to produce the meat, you’ll need at least four times more water and twenty times more electric power than you would if you grew the plants. I offer this as a useful metaphor for you to consider in the coming months. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you should prioritize efficiency and value. What will provide you with the most bang for your bucks? What’s the wisest use of your resources? LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Modern kids don’t spend much time playing outside. They have fun in natural environments only half as often as their parents did while growing up. In fact, the average child spends less time in the open air than prison inmates. And today’s unjailed adults get even less exposure to the elements. But I hope you will avoid that fate in 2019. According to my astrological estimates, you need to allocate more than the usual amount of time to feeling the sun and wind and sky. Not just because it’s key to your physical health, but also because

many of your best ideas and decisions are likely to emerge while you’re outdoors. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): NASA landed its robotic explorer Opportunity on Mars in January of 2004. The craft’s mission, which was supposed to last for 92 days, began by taking photos and collecting soil samples. More than 14 years later, the hardy machine was still in operation, continuing to send data back to Earth. It far outlived its designed lifespan. I foresee you being able to generate a comparable marvel in 2019, Virgo: a stalwart resource or influence or situation that will have more staying power than you could imagine. What could it be? LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In 1557, Welsh mathematician Robert Recorde invented the equals sign: =. Historical records don’t tell us when he was born, so we don’t know his astrological sign. But I’m guessing he was a Libra. Is there any tribe more skillful at finding correlations, establishing equivalencies, and creating reciprocity? In all the zodiac, who is best at crafting righteous proportions and uniting apparent opposites? Who is the genius of balance? In the coming months, my friend, I suspect you will be even more adept at these fine arts than you usually are. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): There’s a modest, one-story office building at 1209 North Orange Street in Wilmington, Delaware. More than 285,000 businesses from all over the U.S. claim it as their address. Why? Because the state of Delaware has advantageous tax laws that enable those businesses to save massive amounts of money. Other buildings in Delaware house thousands of additional corporations. It’s all legal. No one gets in trouble for it. I bring this to your attention in the hope of inspiring you to hunt for comparable situations: ethical loopholes and workarounds that will provide you with extra benefits and advantages. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): People in the Solomon Islands buy many goods and services with regular currency, but also use other symbols of worth to pay for important cultural events like staging weddings and settling disputes and expressing apologies. These alternate forms of currency include the teeth of flying foxes, which are the local species of bat. In that spirit, and in accordance with current astrological omens, I’d love to see you expand your sense of what constitutes your wealth. In addition to material possessions and funds in the bank, what else makes you valuable? In what other ways do you measure your potency, your vitality, your merit? It’s a favorable time to take inventory.

“Hey Nineteen”—welcoming in the new year. ACROSS 1 Gymnastics equipment 5 Pointillism detail 8 It’s called “orange” but is really black 13 “Grand Ole” venue 14 Salve plant 16 Collect little by little 17 Element #19, whose chemical symbol derives from the word “alkali” 19 “No Hard Feelings” band The ___ Brothers 20 Here, at the Louvre 21 Italian city where “Rigoletto” is set 23 ___ facto 24 British tabloid since 1964 26 Not so much 28 Card game holding where it’s impossible to score 19 points 34 Number on a liquor bottle 37 Instrument with stops 38 Actor KeeganMichael 39 Julia Roberts, to Emma Roberts

40 Singer with the hit 2008 debut album “19” 41 Lima, for one 42 Belarus, once (abbr.) 43 Afghani neighbor 44 Spend thoughtlessly 45 Stephen King series that makes many references to the number 19 48 Yokozuna’s activity 49 “The Stranger” author Camus 53 Hare crossing your path, e.g. 55 Eucharist disks 59 “See-saw, Margery ___” 60 Cold-weather coat 62 Golf course hangout known as the “19th hole” 64 Simon’s brother 65 Chuck 66 Comédie segment 67 Charges on personal property 68 “Karma Chameleon” singer ___ George 69 Achievement DOWN 1 Hasbro game with voice commands

2 Division of a geologic period 3 “Glee” character Abrams 4 One of four singers on the “Lady Marmalade” remake 5 Coca-Cola bottled water brand 6 “The Reader” actress Lena 7 Publicize 8 Links gp. 9 Language spoken in “The Lord of the Rings” 10 Souvenirs 11 They may be steel-cut 12 Prefix meaning “inside” 15 National bird of Australia 18 Character pursued by Gargamel 22 Aquarium accumulation 25 Aberdeen resident 27 End of the end of October? 29 “___ Yellow” (Cardi B song) 30 Spiner of “Star Trek: The Next Generation”

31 Spaghetti ___ e olio (garlicky pasta dish) 32 “That’s swell!” 33 Physical force unit 34 Realm of one “Christmas Carol” ghost 35 “Tom Sawyer” band 36 Like popular library books 40 It’ll show you the way 41 Insulting comment 43 “___ not kidding” 44 Language for Llanfairpwllgwyngyll 46 ___ Donuts 47 Quavering, like a voice 50 Draw out 51 Wailers fan, maybe 52 Presidential policy pronouncement, probably 53 Birthstone of some Scorpios 54 Burkina Faso neighbor 56 “Oh,” overseas 57 Mess up, as lines 58 Prefix with vision or Disney 61 Part of Q&A, for short 63 Lummox

Copyright © 2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords. For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents perminute. Must be 18+ to call. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle No. 918 CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JANUARY 10, 2019 • THE PULSE • 19


FILM & TELEVISION

Four Days Of Adventure The LWFF appeals to nature lovers, film fans

Don’t Try This At Home There are certain accomplishments that can only be described as “singular.” These rarest of achievements are so fundamentally incredible as to be, or at least seem, unrepeatable. Fortunately, the cameras were rolling on June 3, 2017 when Alex Honnold secured his place in the rock climbing pantheon by scaling the 3,000–foot vertical face of Yosemite National Park’s legendary El Capitan without ropes or other safety equipment. His was the kind of physical trial with only two possible outcomes: Either he was perfect, or he was going to die. That day, Honnold was perfect. Honnold’s daredevil feat of physical triumph may never be repeated, but thrill seekers who want to relive this incredible achievement from the safety of solid ground can experience it—vicariously and without fear of serious injury—through the stunning National Geographic film Free Solo. Honnold’s epic accomplishment is expertly paired with Yosemite’s pristine, larger-than-life scenery by renowned adventure photographer, filmmaker and climber Jimmy Chin and his wife and co–director Emily Vasarhelyi. Where better to witness such a grand achievement than on the six–story screen of the Tennessee Aquarium IMAX 3D Theater? From Jan. 11–17, Chattanooga’s largest screen will host special nightly showings of this masterful documentary. — Thom Benson

By John DeVore Pulse Film Editor

It’s a festival for adventurers, for conservationists, for climbers and bikers and rafters and hikers and anyone else who loves the outdoors.”

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I

T’S ABOUT THAT TIME AGAIN. SEVEN YEARS AGO, the Lookout Wild Film Festival began offering a niche film event, one particularly suited to Chattanooga. The LWFF is a celebration of the “wild” places of the world and the people who seek them out. Beginning Thursday, Jan. 24 at the Tivoli, the festival stretches four days over the weekend and features some 17 hours of film. It’s a festival for adventurers, for conservationists, for climbers and bikers and rafters and hikers and anyone else who loves the outdoors. If walking in the woods behind your house is your idea of getting in touch with nature, come to the Lookout Wild Film Festival. If you enjoy the dandelions that break through the sidewalk outside of your office, come to the Lookout Wild Film Festival. Not everyone can travel to Antarctica, to Norway, to Brazil. We can’t all visit exotic locales, or wrestle with bears, or descend into the

depths of the Earth. We can, however, appreciate those who do. We can watch in wonder at the images they capture and the drama they discover. We can support their causes and marvel at their achievements. The LWFF lets us do just that. It’s a great event, one that grows and changes every year. The festival will feature short films and one full-length film every night. The schedule of short films has yet to be published, although the titles are available on the LWFF website. Here’s the roster of their fulllength films: Thursday, January 24 Dirtbag: The Legend of Fred Beckey Fred Beckey was a legendary


climber and mountaineer, a man who pioneered climbing in North America. He was first on hundreds of peaks, paving the way for climbers around the country and around the world. He was also known as a dirtbag—a man who lived by his own rules. He never sought financial security; he lived only for the climb. He continued this lifestyle until he passed away at age 94 in 2017. Dirtbag follows him toward the end of his life and is a portrait of a man who lived his own way because it was the only way he knew how. Friday, January 25 Confluence A film by Amy Marquis, Confluence follows a journey by indie rock band The Flapjack Affair as they tour the Colorado River Basin, hoping to meet the people who live there and weave their story into their music. The Colorado River Basin contains a large number of public lands, including the rim of the Grand Canyon, Rocky Mountain National Park, Dinosaur National Monument, the Glen Canyon Dam, and Bears Ears National Monument (an area recently reduced by 85 percent by the Trump

We can’t all visit exotic locales, or wrestle with bears, or descend into the depths of the Earth. We can, however, appreciate those who do.” administration). The film hopes to show, through music, how these lands bring the country together. Saturday, January 26 Bears of Durango In this Kickstarter documentary, filmmakers follow wildlife researchers, led by Dr. Heather Johnson, who are studying the effects of human interactions on bear behavior in Durango, CO. Durango has evidently grown significantly in recent years, leading to a dramatic increase in human/bear contact. Over a six-year period, Dr. Johnson has studied how this has affected bears in the area by diving head first into bear dens. A culmination of this study, the film hopes to raise awareness about bear conservation. Sunday, January 27 The Bikes of Wrath Inspired

by

John

Steinbeck

(and a little Springsteen) a group of four Australian men decide to make a 2,600-mile bicycle trek from Oklahoma to California, with only $420 to share, the same as the Joad family in “The Grapes of Wrath”. The film offers an in-depth look at the heart of America, using the lens of the 20th century American novel. It’s a road trip movie like no other, an adventure for the ages. Remember, these are just the feature films found in the LWFF. In total, there are forty-five films that offer a unique perspective on the wild places of the world. These films are important, as these wild spaces are shrinking in number by the day. You can see the full roster at lookoutfilmfestival.org Tickets for the Lookout Wild Film Festival can be purchased from the Tivoli Box Office. This event sells out every year, so make sure to get yours soon. Support local film.

✴ NEW IN THEATERS ✴

The Upside A comedic look at the relationship between a wealthy man with quadriplegia and an unemployed man with a criminal record who's hired to help him. Director: Neil Burger Stars: Kevin Hart, Bryan Cranston

Perfect Strangers Seven friends gather for dinner and decide to play a game in which all incoming messages and calls will be on display for the entire group, leading to a series of revelations that gradually unravels their 'normal' lives. Director: Álex de la Iglesia Stars: Belén Rueda, Eduard Fernández

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JANUARY 10, 2019 • THE PULSE • 21


FOOD & DRINK · SUSHI & BISCUITS

Desi Brothers’ Curry-fueled Dream Introducing Chattanooga to the delights of Indian street food

I Mike McJunkin Pulse columnist

If you like Indian food, you will love the street food. If you’re not a fan of Indian food, you should try the street food anyway because it is a whole new world of flavors.”

Mike McJunkin is a native Chattanoogan who has traveled abroad extensively, trained chefs, and owned and operated restaurants. Join him on Facebook at facebook.com/SushiAndBiscuits

AM AN UNABASHED STREET food enthusiast. The vast majority of my favorite flavors, dishes, and dining experiences came while standing on a busy sidewalk or precariously perched on a tiny plastic stool beside a well-worn street food cart. Imagine the joy that burst forth from the depths of my street food-soaked amygdala when I discovered the Indian street food counter at Desi Brothers on Brainerd Road. This, of course, prompts a series of questions. “What is Desi Brothers?” “What street food counter?” “What is Indian street food?” “Are you sure you didn’t see this in a curry-fueled fever dream?” First, yes, I am certain I didn’t dream this after a night of Bollywood films and chugging bhang lassis. Second, “Desi Brothers” is the answer to the question, “Does Chattanooga have an Indian mini-supermarket?” Desi Brothers isn’t the only Indian market in town but they are the largest and thus far, they are the only place in town to get ready-to-eat Indian street food. If you like Indian food, you will love the street food. If you’re not a fan of Indian food, you should try the street food anyway because it is a whole new world of flavors. India is the seventh largest country in the world with an incredibly dense network of a billion people from thousands of heterogeneous subcultures, all with their own foods and their own take on nationally eaten dishes. If your exposure to Indian food consists of your local Indian buffet’s colorcoded, flavor-impaired gravies and the microwave samosas your college roommate used to perfume the dorm with on movie nights, then prepare your mouth for a flavor riot. Desi Brothers’ street food counter is just to the right after you enter their doors. Remember, this is street food, so don’t

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expect a maître d’, salt sommelier, or Flora Danica place settings. The ten-dish menu hangs unpretentiously protected in plastic, along with color photos of each dish. For the uninitiated, these photos are comforting—allowing a preview of what you’re getting. But that comfort quickly fades to confusion and concern when you realize very little of what’s in those photos is familiar. With no menu descriptions in sight, these colorful plates of food seem fraught with risk and potential disappointment. I could ramble on about how tasty all of the dishes are, how every bite was an explosion of deliciousness bursting with flavor rainbows, and how eating this food elevated my consciousness to give me a deeper understanding of the nature of reality. I could do that. But it seems more helpful to give you a little guide through their menu and in turn, some of India’s most popular street foods. Let’s start with the puris. Puris are small breads that crisp and puff up when fried. For panipuri, the cook punches a hole in the puri and typically fills it with potato, pani (green sauce made with cilantro, mint, ginger, chilis) and sweet tamarind sauce. Ragda panipuris are similar, but are filled with cooked white peas (ragda) instead of potato. Of the puris, my favorite is the ragda puri chaat. Puris are filled with ragda and topped with a blizzard of chutneys, red onion, tomato, yoghurt sauce, and sev (crunchy chickpea flour noodles) making every bite a bold mouthful of what makes all food irresistible—sweet,

sour, spicy, tangy, and crunchy. (Pro tip: don’t get puris to-go, they get soggy very quickly.) Next up are the chaats. Chaat is a generic Indian word for street food, but they are generally a crispy carb base layer, such as samosas or puffed rice, followed by a dose of cilantro-mint and tamarind chutneys. Then they pile on a vegetable like potato, onion, and/or tomato, some crunchy stuff like sev or fried chickpeas, and finally a sprinkling of chaat masala (spice mix) and maybe some fresh herbs. Finally, there are the pav dishes. Pav is an eggless bread, shaped like a dinner roll with a golden crusty top and soft, spongy center. They are served hot and buttered alongside a vegetable curry (pav bhaji) or filled with a fried, curried potato fritter (vada pav). Dabeli is a Krystal burger sized sandwich made from a pav roll stuffed with spiced potato, onions, coriander, coconut, peanuts, sweet and spicy chutneys, and a sprinkling of sev on top. Pour yourself a $1 cup of some of the city’s best masala chai from the thermos at the end of the counter, pull up a folding chair, and enjoy your chaat, puris, and pavs. Then tell your friends, because no one should be deprived of a good chaat.


CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JANUARY 10, 2019 • THE PULSE • 23


The Pulse 16.02 » January 10, 2019  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative

The Pulse 16.02 » January 10, 2019  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative