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CHAMBER

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WEDNESDAY JULY 17, 7:30PM CHAMBER

JULY 17

JULY

BMC PRESENTS

PORTER CENTER AT BREVARD COLLEGE

JULY 16

BMC ARTIST FACULTY: COPLAND AND THE COLD WAR COPLAND (1900-1990) The Cat and the Mouse

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts

Piano Variations Douglas Weeks, piano

COPLAND

“Hoe Down” from Rodeo Benjamin Sung, violin Jihye Chang, piano

COPLAND

El Salón México (arr. L. Bernstein) Jihye Chang, piano

-INTERMISSIONCOPLAND

Into the Streets May First Excerpts from Copland’s Senate Testimony (1953)

COPLAND

Piano Quartet Adagio serio Allegro giusto Non troppo lento Caroline Chin, violin Scott Rawls, viola Alistair MacRae, cello Michael Chertock, piano

Funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities

ABOUT THE MUSIC Aaron Copland, himself a pianist, composed prolifically and significantly for piano. In fact, his keyboard output felicitously traces his striking stylistic odyssey–and also his shifting political orientation. Of the piano works we hear tonight, The Cat and the Mouse (1920) is the earliest Copland composition still widely played. This “Humoristic Scherzo” depicts a cat stalking and disposing of its prey, precedes Copland’s studies with Nadia Boulanger in Paris (1921-24)–and therefore predates the formative influences to come of France, and of Stravinskyan modernism. The Piano Variations (1930), coming a decade later, is pure Copland: a bracing wake-up call; a new American sound; skyscraper music of steel and concrete. Its angular rhythms and dissonant tonal shards vibrate with the intensity and nervous energy of Copland’s New York. No previous American had achieved such concise freshness of style. At the same time, it was a kind of music that confounded audiences­— and Copland reacted with concern to their consternation. Of the “job of the forties,” he wrote: “the radio and phonograph have given us listeners whose sheer numbers in themselves create a special problem,” one whose solution was “to find a musical style which satisfies both us and them.” The reorientation Copland espoused was pursued in lectures and broadcasts for layman, and by the books What to Listen for in Music (1939) and Our New Music (1941). It was equally embedded in such well-known works as tonight’s El Salon Mexico (1936). And, seeking a “new audience,” Copland was impelled to compose for film. As a

2019 Summer Institute & Festival

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Profile for Brevard Music Center

2019 BMC Overture Magazine  

The seasonal publication for the annual Brevard Music Center Summer Festival. Overture includes all festival programming and program notes,...

2019 BMC Overture Magazine  

The seasonal publication for the annual Brevard Music Center Summer Festival. Overture includes all festival programming and program notes,...