Employer Brand Leadership-A Global Perspective

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EMPLOYER BRAND LEADERSHIP A GLOBAL PERSPEC TIVE

Brett Minchington MBA

www.brettminchington.com


EMPLOYER BRAND LEADERSHIP A Global Perspective ISBN 978-0-646-53648-4 Copyright © 2010 by Brett Minchington www.brettminchington.com All rights reserved No part of this publication may be reprinted or reproduced or utilised in any form, electronic, mechanical or other means, now known, or hereafter invented, including photocopying and recording, or in any information storage or retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Limit of liability / Disclaimer of warranty While the publisher and author have used their best efforts in preparing this book, they make no representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy or completeness of the contents of this book and specifically disclaim any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. No warranty may be created or extended by sales representatives or written sales materials. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation. You should consult with a professional where appropriate. Neither the publisher nor author shall be liable for any loss of profit or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential or other damages.

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First published, August 2010 by Collective Learning Australia PO Box 614, Torrensville SA Australia, 5031 Email admin@collectivelearningaustralia.com Web www.collectivelearningaustralia.com Phone + 61 8 8443 4115 Fax + 61 8 8443 4149

Cover design Urban Safari Typesetting and book layout Peter Davis


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Employer Brand Leadership A Global Perspective

About the author Brett Minchington MBA International Employer Brand Strategist Corporate Advisor | Author | Educator Brett Minchington MBA, is the Chairman/CEO of Employer Brand International (EBI) and one of the world’s leading authorities on employer branding. EBI provides research, guidance and thought leadership in employer branding including consulting, publications, events/training, research and think-tanks. EBI’s expert services are provided through an international network of expert employer brand Senior Associates. EBI’s global Advisory Board consists of leading corporate professionals and academics from around the world. Brett is the founder and owner of Employer Branding Online and facilitates the EBI Employer Branding Global Community group on Linkedin. Brett’s thought leadership in employer branding led him to author “Your Employer Brand attract-engage-retain,” in 2006 which was the first book on the topic by an Australasian author and only the second in the world. The book has since been sold in 40+ countries. In 2007 Brett commenced the Employer Branding Global TourTM and has delivered workshops/masterclass/summits and keynote addresses to 1000’s of senior managers in more than 30 cities in 20 countries including Australia, China, Denmark, France, Germany, India, Italy, Malaysia, Netherlands, NZ, Philippines, Poland, Singapore, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, UAE, UK and USA. Brett is the Chair of the Australian, Italian, South African and New Zealand Employer Branding Summits. Brett has consulted in global and national employer branding projects for companies including Siemens, Hewitt, PwC, Origin, Bankwest, Australian Wine Research Institute and World Vision to assist them develop their employer brand strategy and roadmap through strategic audits and advisory solutions.


About the author

Brett’s opinion is sought globally by the media and HR, Marketing and Management publications. His articles have featured in publications around the world including titles such as The Economist, Business Week, HR Future (South Africa), The Human Factor (India), Personnel Zaradzanie (Poland), The Opinion Leader (Finland), HRM Magazine (Singapore), HR Professional (Canada), HC Magazine (Australia), Personnel Today UK, International Association of Business Communicators, Times Ascent (India), Universum Quarterly, Human Resources Magazine (Australia), NZ Management (New Zealand), onrec.com, Executive Grapevine (UK) and ERE Journal of Corporate Recruiting Leadership (USA). Brett is an International columnist on employer branding for HR Future, South Africa’s leading human resources publication. As Research Principle at Employer Brand International, he has Chaired Global Research forums to contribute to the advancement of the science of employer branding and in 2009 published the world’s largest independent research study on employer branding. Brett’s passion for employer branding is driven by a vision to make a positive and lasting impact to people’s employment experience whilst contributing to a safer, more equitable and friendly global society. He lectures in Employer Branding in the MBA program at the University of Adelaide. Brett has an MBA from University of South Australia and Bachelor of Business from Queensland University of Technology and lives in Adelaide, Australia with his wife and two children.

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Dedication

To my beautiful family: Andrea, Bailey and Taylah Minchington, my mother Barbara and sisters Darlene, Rochelle and Felicia. For your love, presence and support, I am truly grateful. You inspire me to reach new heights and to lead a wonderful life every single day.


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Employer Brand Leadership A Global Perspective

Acknowledgements I wish to sincerely thank the following people for their persistence, positive attitude and contributions to bringing my book to fruition. The wonderful team at Employer Brand International: Senior Associates Ryan Estis, Managing Director (Ryan Estis & Associates), David Parks, Vice President of Business Development (Bluepoint Leadership Development), Eugenio Amendola, Managing Director (Anthea Consulting), Véronique Frogé, Partner, Head of Employer Branding Practice (i&e Management), Per Olof Hall, Managing Director (PlanetPeople), Birgitte Seldorf, Managing Consultant (Summit Consulting A/S), Radosław Knap, Managing Partner (KNAPRO Consulting), Ron Tomlian, Managing Director (Marketing Counsel), Steven Goodman, Senior Lecturer (Marketing), Program Director Higher Degrees by Research (The University of Adelaide Business School) and Sonja Visic, Operations Manager (UAE Tawteen). Global Advisory Board Els van de Water, Senior HR Manager (Microsoft), Heather Polivka, Director of Employment Marketing (UnitedHealth Group), Michael Holm, Employer Brand Manager (IBM), René Herremans, Employer Branding Manager (Ahold), Birgitte Brix Andersen, Employer Brand Manager (Vestas Wind Systems), Matthew Jeffrey, Global Director of Talent Brand, (Electronic Arts), Kerry Noone, Senior Marketing Manager of Sodexo’s Talent, Acquisition Group (Sodexo Human Resources USA), Marta Najbert, Marketing & PR Manager (Pandora Jewelry Central Eastern Europe Operations), Linda Halse, General Manager Human Resources (Australian Wine Research Institute), Prenai Pillay, Talent Attraction Consultant (ABSA), Linda Downs, Human Resources Director, Asia Pacific (ERM), Kellie Tomney, Director (Employer Brand Works) and Fabio Dioguardi, HR Director, (Ferrero)


Acknowledgements

Thank you to the leaders who inspire me to achieve greater things in employer branding and who have written and contributed to case studies for this book: Melissa Rutledge, Employment Branding & Messaging Manager, (Intuit), Charee Klimek, Managing Partner at Vocii™, Job Mensink, Owner, brandgiving®, Gillian Hofmeyr, Director Consulting, Deloitte Consulting Pty Ltd, Nicole Brower, Manager Human Resources – Johannesburg, Deloitte & Touche, David R. Millen (IBM), Nadine-Lan Hönighaus, HR communications and former project manager employer branding, Thorsten Pinkepank, Head Global HR communications and former project leader employer branding and Dr. Anja Düll, HR Strategy and program manager employer branding, (all of BASF SE), and to EBI Advisory Board members who also wrote case studies for this book: Birgitte Brix Andersen, Linda Halse, Kerry Noone and Heather Polivka. Thank you to my event sponsors and partners and their staff who have supported my Employer Brand Global Tour to more 30 cities in 20 countries. You know who you are! And finally to my family and friends who have inspired me to write this book: Andrea, Bailey and Taylah Minchington, Barbara, Darlene, Rochelle and Felicia Minchington, Herb, Jane, Sean, James and Marnie Ewinger, Ian, Carole, Preston, Lyndal and Leanne Stewart and Sandra and Ian Bracken.

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Employer Brand Leadership A Global Perspective

Table of contents About the author

4

Dedication

7

Acknowledgement

8

List of illustrations

16

Preface

18

Employer branding global communities

21

SECTION 1: THE BUSINESS CASE FOR EMPLOYER BRANDING Chapter 1: The fundamentals of employer branding

23 23

Employer branding defined

24

The global employer brand landscape

25

Why the rise in focus on employer branding by senior management?

29

The employer brand experience

29

The benefits of adopting an employer brand approach

30

‘Employers of Choice’ or just market perception?

32

Human resources role in employer branding

33

A collaborative approach is required

34

Your employer brand budget

37

Common pitfalls of employer branding

39

SECTION 2: BEST PRACTICE IN EMPLOYER BRANDING Chapter 2: The role of leadership in employer branding

43 43

Employer brand leadership begins at the top

45

Different leadership for changing times

45

Strong leadership is linked to financial results

47

Patience is virtue in building an engaged workforce

51

Charismatic leadership

52


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Table of Contents

What do outstanding leaders do differently?

53

The role of the employer brand manager

54

Director of Employer Branding Position Description

55

Employer Brand Leadership Capability FrameworkTM

58

Leadership qualities

64

Take a long term view on your employer brand

65

Chapter 3: A strategic framework to guide your employer brand

69

Employer value proposition

70

DeďŹ ning your employer value proposition

71

Employer brand identity

72

Employer Brand Employee PlatformTM

73

Recruitment and induction

73

Compensation and beneďŹ ts

75

Career development

75

Employee research

77

Reward and recognition

78

Communication systems

78

Work environment Employer Brand Strategic

79 PlatformTM

79

Mission, vision and values

80

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)

80

Leadership

81

Corporate reputation and culture

81

People management policies and practices

82

Performance management

83

Innovation

84

The corporate brand

84


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Employer Brand Leadership A Global Perspective

Market forces

85

Customers

86

Prospective employees

87

Stakeholders

88

Chapter 4: Your Employer Brand RoadmapTM

91

1. Concept phase

92

Defining employer brand objectives and project scope

95

Identify people issues

96

Review existing employee measurement, research and people data

96

Identify key stakeholders and establish employer brand team

96

Identify internal and external employer brand drivers – Quantitative research

97

Identify internal and external employer brand drivers – Qualitative research

99

Employer value proposition (EVP) discovery workshop guidelines

100

Sample workshop questions

101

Assess the employee lifecycle and key moments of truth

101

Determine the most optional way to segment your employee population

102

Assess the effectiveness of current communication channels and the EVP’s being communicated

102

Review online/offline talent acquisition initiatives

103

2. Design phase

103

Collective thinking workshop

104

Your employer brand architecture

104

3. Integration phase

110


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Table of Contents

Employer brand management system - align with people management policies, systems and practices

110

Employer brand communications plan

111

4. Evaluation phase

113

Define metrics and measure ROI

113

Chapter 5: Measuring the return on investment of your employer brand strategy

117

How marketing informs employer brand equity

123

Brand image

124

Brand equity

125

Brand loyalty

127

The service-profit chain

130

Linking employee satisfaction with productivity, performance, and customer satisfaction

130

Impact of your human capital practices on financial performance

135

The contribution of brands to shareholder value

136

Measuring brand equity

137

The Young & Rubicam approach towards valuing brands

140

The Millward Brown approach towards valuing brands

141

The Interbrand approach towards valuing brands

142

A model of employer brand stakeholder engagement

144

Chapter 6: Building employer brand equity using social media

147

The truth is in the statistics

150

The big four

152

1. Facebook

152

2. LinkedIn

155

3. Twitter

156


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Employer Brand Leadership A Global Perspective

4. YouTube

157

Who is on the social networks?

158

Transparency and trust

161

Social media policy

161

Integrated social media campaigns

162

Measuring your return on investment (ROI)

164

Developing your social media strategy

166

Chapter 7: The convergence between the corporate, consumer and employer brand

171

An aligned approach

172

Master brand concept

173

Optimising the relationship between the brand portfolio

173

Challenges for human resources managers in adding value to the brand portfolio

176

Reputation management

176

Connected thinking

181

Brand training

184

The Brand Optmiser ModelTM

184

Internal marketing

187

Brand ambassadors

187

SECTION 3: THE FUTURE FOR EMPLOYER BRANDING Chapter 8: Employer branding 3.0

193 193

Connecting employees and customers for a better society Employer Brand 3.0 – A model of brand advocacy & loyalty Chapter 9: Future trends in employer branding

196 201

Towards 2020

202

1. Time replaces money as the new currency

203

2. Functions will blend

203


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Table of Contents

3. Changing employment contract

203

4. Less is more, small is big

204

5. The talent crisis becomes the matching crisis

204

6. New business models

204

7. Relationships will replace reputation

206

8. Continuous career development

207

9. The impact of a multigenerational workforce

207

10. Employer brands become global

208

11. Slow is fast

208

12. Organisations will get naked

208

13. Work becomes living

209

14. Connected, cleaner and greener

209

SECTION 4: GLOBAL CASE STUDIES

211

1. Philips

213

2. UnitedHealth Group

221

3. BASF

233

4. Sodexo

245

5. Vestas

254

6. IBM

269

7. The Australian Wine Research Institute

281

8. Deloitte

291

9. Intuit

299

Reference list

311

Index

319


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Employer Brand Leadership A Global Perspective

List of illustrations Figure 1: Has your company developed a clear employer branding strategy?, 26 Figure 2: Top-performing employees’ declining satisfaction with key aspects of employment deal (2009 vs. 2008), 28 Figure 3: What are the main benefits you have gained from your employer brand program? (more than one answer is possible), 31 Figure 4: Which department(s) is responsible for managing the employer brand?, 35 Figure 5: Your internal employer brand team, 36 Figure 6: In FY 2008/2009 what are your plans for expenditure on employer branding activities?, 37 Figure 7: Anticipated cost of full-scale employer brand development project, 38 Figure 8: Which activity has been most effective in enhancing your company’s employer brand?, 44 Figure 9: 2009 Top 20 best companies for leadership, 46 Figure 10: Leadership is linked to financial results: Top 20 vs. S&P 500, 47 Figure 11: Employer Brand Leadership Capability FrameworkTM,58 Figure 12: Influencers of employment choice – By AGE, 64 Figure 13: Employer Brand Excellence FrameworkTM,74 Figure 14: Your Employer Brand RoadmapTM,94 Figure 15: EBI Employer Brand Attributes IndexTM – Macro level,98 Table 1: EBI Employer Brand Attributes IndexTM – Micro level (survey split of top 10 employer brand attributes – sample company),99 Figure 16: Examples of employee segmentation variables,102 Table 2: Examples of EVP communication channels and touch points,103 Figure 17: Your Employer Brand ArchitectureTM,105 Figure 18: The Employer Value Proposition,106 Figure 19: Recruitment press advertising – St George,108 Figure 20: Career website landing page -St George,108 Figure 21: Philips career website ‘inside stories’,109 Figure 22: St George: Integrating EVP with rest of human resources strategy, 111 Figure 23: Communication methods used to engage employees and foster productivity,112 Figure 24: A coordinated, branded approach to communicating rewards helps improve employee understanding,112 Figure 25: Social media metrics are still evolving,114 Figure 26: Tangible assets as a percentage of all assets of non-financial businesses, 119


List of illustrations

Figure 27: What metrics does your company use to measure return on investment (ROI) for your employer brand strategy? (more than one answer is possible)2,121 Figure 28: Model of employer brand equityTM,125 Figure 29: The service profit chain at Sears,130 Figure 30: Profit chain modelling at the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, 132 Table 2: The contribution of brands to shareholder value,137 Figure 31: Brand valuation process,139 Figure 32: BrandAsset Valuator Model, 141 Figure 33: BrandZ 5 year review, 142 Figure 34: The Interbrand Method for Valuing Brands, 143 Figure 35: Employer Brand Stakeholder EngagementTM,144 Figure 36: Top executives participate in the use of internal and external social media , 149 Figure 37: Global web traffic to social networking sites, 151 Figure 38: Top U.S. social media sites: December 2009, 152 Figure 39: Ernst & Young Career Site on Facebook, 154 Figure 40: Deloitte NZ Facebook Fan Page – Live and Interactive Show, 154 Figure 41: Cisco Facebook Fan Page, 155 Figure 42: Sodexo careers - past, present & future linkedin group, 156 Figure 43: EA YouTube channel, 158 Figure 44: Average age distribution across social network sites, 159 Figure 45: Age distribution on social network sites, 160 Figure 46: Policy in place to address employee use of social media, 161 Figure 47: ‘It’s your future. How far will you take it’ landing page, 163 Figure 48: Few companies have tools in place to measure the effectiveness of social media, 164 Figure 49: Methods used to measure effectiveness of social media (more than one answer possible), 165 Figure 50: Engagement correlates to financial performance, 166 Figure 51: Brand disengagement sequence , 181 Figure 52: Brand Optimizer ModelTM,186 Table 3: Comparison of Employer Branding 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0, 195 Figure 53: Model of Brand Advocacy & LoyaltyTM, 197 Figure 54: Your Employer Brand Community ModelTM, 206

17


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Employer Brand Leadership A Global Perspective

Milan, Italy 2008

Copenhagen, Denmark 2009

Sydney, Australia 2009

Preface In 2006 I published my first book on employer branding titled ‘Your Employer Brand attractengage-retain’. The three years prior I followed my passion and reached out and learnt as much as I could about the field of employer branding. Since 2006 I have been fortunate to cross paths with thought leaders, practitioners, academics and vendors which helped to shape my perspective which I will share with you in this book. The first copy of ‘Your Employer Brand attractengage-retain’ was purchased by an Italian gentleman, Mr Eugenio Amendola who is now a close friend and business partner in our employer branding work in Italy. Eugenio’s friendship is one of the many benefits my passion in employer branding has bought to me over the past ten years in striving to advance the employer brand concept.

In 2007 I committed to travelling the world to connect and learn from how employer branding was unfolding in different parts of the world. This journey has involved conducting masterclass events, Chairing Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 2009 and speaking at conferences, conducting research and consulting in more than 30 cities in 20 countries including, Australia, China, Denmark, France, Germany, India, Italy, Malaysia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines, Poland, Singapore, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, UAE, UK and USA. New Delhi, India 2008


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Preface

Not only have I found there are many differences in employer branding in these countries, I have also found there are many common elements which has led to a growing interest in employer branding throughout the world. Bad Nauheim, Germany 2009

I have also been fortunate to contribute to many articles and theses on employer branding around the world and have been published in more than 15 countries in a range of publications including ‘The Economist’, ‘Business Week’ and ERE’s ‘Journal of Corporate Recruiting Leadership’. I have continued to track employer branding trends throughout the world. My day usually starts with a desktop review from sources such as www. employerbrandingonline.com, Google alerts, SmartBrief and all the world’s major newspapers. Yes, you guessed it, I spend alot of time in the virtual world and the structure of the virtual world allows me to achieve more and connect with more people than would have been possible prior to the internet. I have titled this book, ‘Employer brand leadership – A global perspective’ as I believe it captures the key success factors for leaders to contribute to the development of the employer brand concept. Today’s globalised, connected world driven by content and connections requires a new style of leader to meet the challenges of the modern world. I’ve come to the conclusion leadership is the key to unlocking the potential of your employer brand. A global perspective will assist leaders to make an informed view of what’s best in managing the employer brand in their own company. Chapter 1 presents the fundamentals of employer branding and provides insights into the key concepts whilst establishing the platform for the rest of the book. Chapter 2 discusses the role of leadership in employer branding and provides recommendations on how leaders can position the employer brand as a strategic asset for their company. Chapter 3 presents the Employer Brand Excellence FrameworkTM which will assist you to apply


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Employer Brand Leadership A Global Perspective

a robust structure to your employer brand strategy. Chapter 4 expands on the Employer Brand Excellence FrameworkTM and details an Employer Brand RoadmapTM which will assist to guide you through your employer branding initiatives. Measuring the return on investment of your employer brand strategy is critical to executive endorsement and is covered in detail in Chapter 5. The rise (and rise!) of social media usage and how companies are building employer branding equity using social media is discussed in chapter 6. Chapter 7 explores the convergence between corporate, consumer and employer branding theory and practice and will assist you to take a strategic view of employer branding by understanding the role each component of your master brand has in creating value. In the ďŹ nal two chapters I introduce the concept of employer branding 3.0 in chapter 8 and discuss how thinking in this area will connect employees and customers for a better society. I conclude in chapter 9 by presenting fourteen trends in employer branding which I believe will drive the agenda over the next 10 years. I trust this book will provide you with a relevant, meaningful and thought provoking approach to satisfy your interest in employer branding and inspire you to build upon my thinking and make your own contribution to evolving the art and science of employer branding. I hope one day we will connect and share our thinking! My best wishes

Brett Minchington MBA, B.Bus (Marketing) E brett@employerbrandinternational.com P 61 8 8443 4115 F 61 8 8443 4149 www.brettminchington.com www.employerbrandinternational.com www.employerbrandingonline.com Twitter www.twitter.com/brettminch Linkedin www.linkedin.com/in/minchington Facebook www.facebook.com/brett.minchington


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Employer Brand Leadership A Global Perspective

Adidas 181, 184

Candidate quality 119

Ahold 8, 54

Career development 75, 76, 100, 126,

American Consumer Association 131

177-78, 203, 207-08, 283-84

American Express 71

Change management 60, 289

Apple 45, 51, 173, 202, 300

Chevron 62

Bain & Company 127

Cisco 47, 48, 148, 155

Barkers 26

Citigroup 177

BASF 9, 27, 35, 72, 105-06, 211,

Coca-Cola 136, 148, 179

233-243

Communication 30, 33-35, 40, 49,

Bernard Hodes 122

53-57, 60, 62, 67, 71, 76, 78, 79, 81,

Best Buy 33, 62

85, 86, 92, 93, 96, 97, 100, 102-03,

Brand ambassadors 63, 113, 167, 187,

106-07, 110, 111-13, 122-23, 134, 148,

189

164, 174, 176, 179, 181-82, 187, 190,

Brand associations 124-25, 126

203-04, 209, 214-15, 217, 219, 222,

Brand disengagement sequence 181

224, 226-28, 229-230, 234-237, 239,

Brand equity 31, 52, 118, 123-25, 127,

241-243, 250-51, 253, 259-65, 267,

137-38, 145-46, 148, 152, 178, Brand loyalty 125-26, 187 Brand management 40, 59, 63, 190, 203, 219, 235, Employer Brand Manager’s Handbook 54 Brand portfolio 59, 123, 173-74, 176, 179, 184-86 Brand strength analysis 143 Brand training 39, 56, 184 Brand valuation process 139 BrandAsset® Valuator model 140

269, 272, 278-79, 285, 305-09 Communication channels 33, 96, 102-03, 215, 262 Communication systems 78 Community management 60 Compensation and benefits 75 Concept phase 92, 104, 107 Consumer brand 24, 34, 35, 39, 59, 70, 78, 172-76, 179 Corporate brand 30, 84, 85, 123, 136, 173-76, 178, 184, 188, 233, 235, 237, 240, 243, 249, 253, 262, 300-01, 307

BrandZ 141-42

Corporate reputation 39, 44, 81

BusinessWeek.com 45

Corporate social responsibility 46, 80,

Campbells 47 Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) 132 Candidate 24, 25, 30, 31, 32, 46, 60,

85, 98, Culture 33, 34, 40, 45, 47, 48, 52, 53, 62, 71, 75, 78, 81-83, 93, 95, 101, 107, 126, 145, 155, 157, 162, 168,

64, 75, 77, 83, 87, 97, 99, 102, 103,

172-73, 204, 208, 228-29, 236, 247,

109, 119-20, 144, 158, 161-62, 163,

250, 252, 256, 258, 260-61, 263-65,

169 175, 183, 188-89, 207, 215, 218,

283, 284, 296, 299, 301, 303,

223, 224, 226-28, 242, 246-47, 249,

306-309

250-51, 253, 256, 258, 296, 299, 300, 302-04, 306, 308-09


317

Index

Customer 24, 29, 30, 49, 52, 60, 63, 65,

Employee research 77, 96, 99, 100

70-72, 79, 83, 84, 86, 88, 97, 105,

Employee retention 30, 131

122, 128-35, 138, 143-44, 150, 157,

Employee-Customer-Profit Chain 129-30

162, 166, 168, 169, 173,179-80,

Employer attractiveness 30, 77, 178,

182-84, 187-90, 193-98, 213-14,

242

218-19, 227, 228, 233-34, 240, 245,

Employer brand architecture 97, 104-105

255, 300, 304

Employer brand associations 126

Customer engagement 56, 123, 129,

Employer brand awareness 120, 125 Employer brand defined 24

132, 145, 196 Customer loyalty 60, 122, 127, 131-33

Employer brand mix 30

Customer relationships 31, 34, 98, 169

Employer brand objectives 31, 92, 119

Customer satisfaction 86, 127-34, 187,

Employer brand programs 27, 30, 31, 34, 214, 218

190 Customer service 24, 52, 71, 88, 135,

Employer brand strategy 25, 26, 31, 33-36, 39-40, 44, 55-56, 60, 62-63,

157, 227 Dell 60, 157, 179

67, 70, 77, 83, 85-86, 92-93, 95-97,

Deloitte 54, 135, 136, 153-154, 162-163,

104, 110, 114-15, 120-21, 124, 145, 174, 204, 208, 229-30, 239, 247, 250,

169, 211, 291-97

256, 260, 266

Design phase 92, 103, 107 Deutsche Bank 24, 54

Employer brand system 30

Development Dimensions International

Employer brand council 92, 104 Employer Brand Employee PlatformTM

(DDI) 131 Dong Energy 54

(EBEP) 72-3

Dow Chemicals 133

Employer Brand Excellence FrameworkTM (EBEF) 30, 70, 74, 88,

E.ON 54 EBI Employer Brand Attributes

IndexTM

97-99 Electronic Arts (EA) 157 EMC 62, 148, 162, 167,

115 Employer Brand Global Tour 98, 202, 213 Employer Brand International’s (EBI) 4,

Employee advocacy 31, 96, 127

9, 25, 26, 31, 34-35, 37, 44, 62, 64,

Employee communication 40, 93, 123,

97, 98, 99, 120-21, 123, 135, 145,

164, 226, 230 Employee engagement 56-57, 63, 77,

173, 231 Employer Brand Leadership Capability

81, 96, 120, 121, 123, 134-135, 145,

FrameworkTM 58

169, 181, 196, 203, 227, 308

Employer brand manager 8, 40, 54, 64,

Employee lifecycle 25, 59, 101, 204

67, 216, 233, 299

Employee lifecycle management 59

Employer Brand Stakeholder

Employee referral program 56, 87, 95,

EngagementTM 144

153, 189


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Employer Brand Leadership A Global Perspective

Employer Brand Strategic PlatformTM (EBSP) 72

Human resources 30, 33-36, 40, 59, 63, 65, 67, 76, 84, 93, 96, 104, 110-11,

Employer brand virtual community 28

113, 123, 148, 153, 174, 176, 181,

Employer branding 1.0 194-195

188, 190, 203, 216, 218, 222, 226,

Employer branding 2.0 194-195 Employer branding 3.0 20, 193, 194-95, 198, 202 Employer of choice 30-32, 81, 228, 288 Employer value proposition (EVP) 56, 70-77, 95-96, 98-107, 109-111, 113, 221-230, 235-241, 243, 256, 260, 262-263 Employment promise 25, 71 Engagement 24, 30, 33, 52-54, 56-57, 63, 70, 77, 81, 96-97, 113

229, 234, 236 IABC 111, 149, 161, 165 IBM 33, 35, 54, 62, 79, 133, 157, 285, 269-79 Induction 32, 73, 75, 83, 97, 101, 114, 126, 161, 187, 203 Innovation 44, 51, 76, 84, 97, 140, 173, 175, 182, 209, 213, 284, 286-87, 291, 293, 296, 299, 300, 302, 308 Intangible assets 24, 65, 123, 137, 173-74

Enron 80, 177

Integration phase 92, 110-11

Enterprise Rent-a-Car 153

Interbrand 136-37, 142-3

Ernst & Young 54, 153-54

Intuit 51, 148, 188, 299-09

Evaluation phase 92, 113, 115

JetBlue Airways 167

EVP workshops 99

Kraft 179

Facebook 20, 21, 83, 87, 102, 126, 148,

Leadership development 24, 44, 61, 71,

150-55, 158-59, 161-63, 168, 174,

77, 135

178, 229, 249, 251-52, 270, 277, 279,

Lehman Brothers 25, 80

306

LinkedIn 122, 148, 152, 155-56, 158,

Forum for People Performance Management 134, 135

162, 168, 178, 229, 249, 251, 306 Marketing 34-35, 40, 51, 54-7, 59, 65-67,

Gallup 51, 52, 121-22, 128, 131

76, 84-85, 92-93, 118, 123-24, 126,

General Electric 44, 45

133, 144, 148, 149, 166, 174, 176,

Generation Y 75, 87, 88, 195

181-83, 190, 203, 214, 216-19, 222,

GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) 71, 72

226-27, 229, 239, 246, 260, 261,

Global financial crisis (GFC) 24, 25,

264-65, 293

27-28, 57, 65, 120, 145, 172, 195-96

Mars 82

Goldman Sachs 175

Master brand concept 173

Google 24, 50-51, 62, 66, 79, 84, 126,

McDonalds 47, 75

162, 173, 188-89, 202, 300

Microsoft 24, 45, 51-52, 77, 148, 167

Hay Group 45-47

Millward Brown 141

Hewitt’s Best Employers List 81

Model of Brand Advocacy & LoyaltyTM

HP 54, 79 HSBC157

196-97


319

Index

Model of Employer Brand EquityTM 118, 125

Sodexo 35, 60, 62, 83, 87, 88, 113, 125, 148, 155, 156, 167, 169, 175, 245-53

Morgan Stanley 136

Southwest Airlines 167

Nabisco 51

St George Bank 107, 189

Net Promoter Score (NPS) 127, 218

Stakeholder mapping 96

Nike 54, 172, 188

Starbucks 47, 48, 50, 54, 62, 83, 102,

Nordea 54 On-boarding 24, 205 PepsiCo 157 Performance Management 24, 44, 71, 93, 97, 134-35, 214, 218

148, 179, 187, 197 The Australian Wine Research Institute 281-89 The Brand Optimizer ModelTM 184 The Economist 19, 38, 137, 139

Philips 24, 27, 35, 109, 181, 202, 213-19

Towers Watson 27-28, 112, 164

PNC Bank Corporation 132

Twitter 20, 83, 87, 102, 113, 148,

Public relations 34, 81, 97, 250 Qualitative research 57, 97, 99, 215 Quantitative research 77, 97, 100 Recruitment 24-27, 30-32, 41, 55, 75,

150-52, 156-59, 161-63, 167-68, 174, 178-79, 229, 249, 251, 270, 306 UnitedHealth Group 27, 35, 54, 64, 71, 221-31

82-83, 85, 87, 97, 102, 110, 114, 118,

Universum 38

157, 163, 172, 179-80, 182-83, 189,

Vestas 27, 54, 255-67

203, 214, 234, 246, 251, 256-62,

Virgin Blue 34

264, 293, 304

Watson Wyatt Worldwide 132

Recruitment advertising 26, 39, 55, 97, 123, 228, 265 Reward and recognition 78, 83, 100

Wetpaint and Altimeter Group 165, 166 Work environment 66, 79, 97, 133, 188, 286

Ritz-Carlton 135, 175

World Vision 85, 126

SAS 24, 202

Young & Rubicam 140, 141

Satmetrix 127

Your Employer Brand Community

Sears 129, 130

ModelTM 206

Shell 181-83

Your Employer Brand RoadmapTM 91

Singapore Airlines 24

YouTube 126, 148, 150, 152, 157-58,

Social media 20, 25, 33, 55, 60, 79, 87, 111, 113-14, 118, 126, 145, 148, 149, 150, 152, 158, 160-69, 175, 179, 180, 190, 245-47, 249-52, 306 Social media metrics 114, 164 Social media policy 161 Social networks 62, 65, 79, 83, 87, 126, 150, 153, 158, 159, 161-62, 168, 179

162-63, 168, 249, 251, 294-95 Zappos 45, 52, 53, 83, 148, 156-57, 167, 179, 187