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Our West End Newsletter July 2018

“Expect and Support the Best in West End”

Issue 65

We Have the Receipts By Brent Brewer We are 65 issues old. Don’t worry, we are not retiring. Before we have a senior moment (it happens to the best of us), we are showing receipts. Since our inaugural issue in March 2006, Our West End Newsletter’s mission has always been “creating a vibrant community.” Each issue creates chances for connections among West End’s neighbors, businesses and institutions. When new neighbors move in, these connections ground them to the neighborhood. This helps create a vibrant community; but, it is also surprisingly good for the local economy.

There are a few constants in OWEN’s publication history: 1) We are 100% funded by local advertisers and 2) we exclusively print at the West End Print Shop. By printing locally, we have directly contributed over $25,000 into our local economy, helping to keep the print shop’s doors open to support the success of other local businesses. You may love the stories, but OWEN is also an invitation to patronize our local businesses. It works. Every issue, about half a dozen neighbors admit to buying locally based on our recommendations. If you’re keeping receipts, assuming a six-fold return on our advertisement investments, this little newsletter has been responsible for an economic impact in the neighborhood of over $150,000.

Our West End Newsletter, ”The Receipts”

Like all “new things”, bike amenities have taken on deeper meanings as they absorbed into the West End narrative.


Publisher’s Corner 65th Anniversary Reflection I had lived in Grant Park and in Midtown, but what I noticed about Historic West End is that people really cared about their neighborhood, the people in their neighborhood, and the things that made the neighborhood a great one -- things like the houses, the thriving small business community, the community leaders and volunteers who pour so much of their hearts into the West End. I bought a home here on Grady Place - in 2003. When I was working with Our West End Newsletter (OWEN) from 2006 to 2008, there were over 100 people in the community who wrote articles for the paper, 50+ people who distributed the paper door-to-door, 100

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businesses and organizations that took out advertisements. We had a 2 ½ page calendar section with just stuff happening in Historic West End. There were so many people putting SO MUCH into their community. I think the only reason we couldn't keep that business model going at the time was the sheer cost of printing newspapers. That weighed down the whole effort. And then I got married to a woman who had a home in Fayette County, so I moved there.

The energy of the folks in Historic West End helps the community keep the paper going.

But Historic West End holds a deep place in my heart. I'll never forget the sense of unity we put together (and held) in getting OWEN off the ground. That took a huge amount of people's time and energy. Thankfully, Brent Brewer has kept the paper going the last ten years and changed the business model to make it sustainable from a cost standpoint.

Honestly those were five of the most rewarding and fulfilling and enjoyable years of my life.

Our West End News

OWEN is just one example of how Historic West End takes care of itself and its people. From Hammonds House and Wren's Nest and NPU-T and WEND to the West End Merchant's Coalition and Music In The Park and managing the historic designation and the community gardens....wow!

Michael Mumper, Founder, Our West End Newsletter

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Area West Realty: 2018 Real Estate Update Excerpts from February 16, 2018 “A Closer Look” Whenever we need real estate advice, we look to Nia Knowles, Atlanta real estate broker and community advocate, a real estate professional who survived the mortgage fraud/foreclosure crisis and thrived following the recession with Area West Realty. Recently, Nia took part in a roundtable discussion on a segment of WABE/NPRs “A Closer Look” with Rose Scott. Below are some highlights (in no particular order): •

It is a seller’s market because the inventory is so low. The reason the inventory is so low EVERYWHERE is because people don’t move like they use to. Only 11% moved last year down from a high of 45%.

Buyers are looking further South to West End, East Point, and College Park. (Buyers) Changing

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their desire to be in other intown neighborhoods. •

In West End and Southwest Atlanta, long time renters, who have paid $400 and $500 for the last 10-15 years, can get displaced. These rental properties are owned by investors. Now that the market is heating up. People are able to now buy these homes that our long time neighbors lived in.

Investors who bought 100s of properties during the foreclosure crisis are sitting on the properties.

Our housing stock are similar to Virginia Highland and Grant Park. Craftsman bungalows. People are buying them. Buyers still do like the open floor plan. Renovated 3/2, on average, are going for the mid 300s. These are legitimate buyers and people this time.

On the westside, you can still get a deal in neighborhoods north of Martin Luther King Dr: Hunter Hills, Dixie Hills and Grove Park.

Our West End News

Issue 65


Welcome the West End CID By Terry Ross Community organizers are excited to announce a major step to advance economic development in Atlanta’s Historic West End community. As many of you have heard, the West End was recently approved for a CID (Commercial Improvement District). What many of you may not know is that a West End CID (WECID) will prove to be a positive game changer. How does it work? Now let’s do the math. If a property is worth $500,000, the owner will pay an additional $2,500 in real estate taxes. These additional monies are then placed into the WECID coffers for improvements within the neighborhood. What kind of improvements, you ask? Much needed trash receptacles, along with scheduled commercial trash pickups, can be expected to appear in the near

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future. It’s now possible to expect a private security force, patrolling and protecting the West End commercial district. WECID can also plan and pay for landscaping improvements, decorative gateways, branding, advertising and so much more. The WECID has been a ten-year passion project of the West End Mercahnts Coalition (WEMC) and took the efforts of two generations of business advocates. Conceived by black business pioneers like Mrs. Lottie Watkins and Mr. Julian Fuller (both deceased); but finally, it was brought to fruition by contemporary businessmen such as Charles Williams of Elexis Realty. The CID properties exceed $51 million in appraised land value. The district’s area includes commercial and industrial property south of I-20 and includes properties along Lee Street, Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard, White Street and Donnelly Street.

Our West End News

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20th Annual Theater Festival Opens July 26th

By Jennifer Kimball Celebrating 20 years of the Essential Theatre Festival and five years in the West End, the 2018 Essential Theatre Play Festival opens July 27 at the West End Performing Arts Center! This year’s playwriting award winners are Rachel Graf Evans with Built to Float and Avery Sharpe with Woke.

Premiering July 27, with Neighborhood Night July 28 at 8pm, Built to Float by Rachel Graf Evans is the magical realist tale of two sisters trying not to drown in the haunted legacy of their troubled family. Woke by Avery Sharpe premieres on August 3. Neighborhood Night is August 5 at 7pm. Woke follows two friends from different backgrounds who are trying to navigate the already rocky transition from high school to college. When a calamitous event captures national attention, they are forced to wrestle

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with their different understandings of social awareness. Through family, romance, and their own friendship, they painstakingly and comically explore what it truly means to be woke. And always, we’ll be hosting our Bare Essentials Play Reading Series—this year’s dates are August 7, 14 and 22. Bare Essentials readings are always free and open to the public. Readings start at 7:30 pm and are followed by a constructive conversation with the director, playwright and cast. West End neighbors get $5 tickets—in advance or at the door—for Neighborhood Nights (July 28 and August 5th) and the evening of the August West End ArtWalk with promo code NEIGHBOR.

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West Hunter Baptist. 1040 RDA Blvd SW

West End

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Our West End News

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July 2018 OWEN Issue 65  

July 2018 OWEN Issue 65

July 2018 OWEN Issue 65  

July 2018 OWEN Issue 65

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