Issuu on Google+

N 01 JUNE 2011

sense

SCAPE 49째 25' 16" N 07째 28' 30" E

SIGHT TASTE TOUCH SOUND SMELL PLUS THE SIXTH SENSE

ISS 01> 1>

Travel Western Europe


sense

SCAPE

The sensory ex evoking the rela between space a geography and SENSESCAPE IS A TRAVEL

PUBLICATION BASED UPON THE FIVE SENSES­—

THE BASIC INPUTS OF HOW WE PERCEIVE

THE PEOPLE AND PLACES

AROUND US.


EDITOR

Ryan Diaz

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Sophie Milton

SENIOR EDITOR

Annabelle Gould

xperience ation and senses, d mind

PHOTOGRAPHY

Costas Mastias Oliver Hartung

DESIGN

Brenna Marketello


sense

SCAPE

N 01

SI GH T

08 Plain City

13 A Swiss Secret Tucked Away In the Alps 16 Paris Awoke At Atget's Lens

TA ST E

TO UC H

16 A Dining Explosion In A Tiny Basque Town

22 Top Ten European Flea Markets

19 Chefs Collaborate With Artists

28 Five Destinations For The Tattooed Traveler

20 Mangia, Mangia!

30 The 500-Foot Climbing Wall


SPRING 2011

SO UN D

SM EL L

30 Arts Thrive In Leipzig

36 Barcelona's Hidden Courtyards

34 In Amsterdam, A Jazz Beat

40 What's The Smell?

36 Soundscapes: Burning Man

41 The Curious Cook: Exploring The Alchemy Of Food

EX TR A

42 Hostel Love: A Practical Guide For Backpackers 44 How To Meet A Girl While Traveling 46 The Laws Of Love On The Road


ISS 01> 06 >


Sl GH “ONE’S DESTINATION

IS NEVER

A PLACE,

Plain City....... pg 08 BUT

A Swiss Secret, Tucked Away In The Alps....... pg 13 A NEW WAY

Paris That Awoke to Atget’s Lens......pg 16 OF

SEEING THINGS.”

7>


Plain City Photographed and written by Frank Schirrmeister November 11, 2010

PLAIN CITY IS AN ATTEMPT TO KEEP HOLD OF SOMETHING, TO RETAIN OR PRESERVE A PARTICULAR VISION OF BERLIN, WHOSE ONLY CONSTANT IS CONSTANT CHANGE.

BERLI N today is deemed the trendsetting city in Europe. Due to

ISS 01> 08 >

clever marketing and low-budget airlines, it is known around the world as “the place to be.” As someone who was born in Berlin, I find it difficult to keep pace emotionally as the city reinvents itself with dizzying speed. I often have the feeling that my own city doesn’t belong to me anymore, but to the forces of the global economy. When photographing Berlin, I am constantly trying to scrutinize and to challenge the popular image of the city. I explore the town beyond the facade, delve into the deeper layers of the metropolis. Since 2006 I have wandered Berlin with a large format camera, always during the weekend, always at dawn. The reason for getting up that early: the emptiness. Reducing the city to its plain, naked existence is for me a way to approach the essence of the place. Although the streets are devoid of people, traces of everyday life and activity are found everywhere. In the sallow morning light, Berlin’s makeup seems about to crumble, and a transformation happens: things, buildings, places you have seen a thousand times before appear strange and new. In a while, nothing will look the same. The urban landscapes in these photographs are mostly places in transition, waiting for their reshaping. This leaves the chance for a sequel: how will these places look in a conceivable future?


LEFT Dawn: Prenzlauer Berg district, Berlin TOP Dawn: Friedrichshain, Berlin BOTTOM Dawn: Graffiti Wall, Berlin

ISS 01> 09 >


THIS SPREAD Dawn: Tauntzienstrasse, Berlin

REDUCING THE CITY TO ITS PLAIN, NAKED EXISTENCE IS FOR ME A WAY TO APPROACH THE ESSENCE OF THE PLACE.

ISS 01> 10 >


TOP Dawn: Mitte, Berlin BOTTOM LEFT Dawn: Alexanderplatz, Berlin BOTTOM RIGHT Dawn: Friedrichshain, Berlin

ISS 01> 12 >


The Swiss Secret Tucked Away In The Alps By Kimberly Bradley May 9, 2010

IMAGIN E a mountain landscape speckled with rustic villages Zurich-based blue-chip gallerist, built a sculptural holiday whose residents speak an ancient, isolated language. house in Vnà. The Pritzker Prize-winning architect Peter Centuries-old stone dwellings with mysterious renderings of Zumthor was apparently so taken with Tschlin, a tiny village wild men and mountain goats are etched into white facades. on the Lower Engadine’s eastern edge, that he designed a Panoramic views are so clear and stunning you have to rub hotel for it. The hotel didn’t come to fruition, but the Swiss curator and art-world star Hans Ulrich Obrist plans to estabyour eyes to make sure you’re not in a Hollywood epic. This isn’t Middle Earth. It’s Switzerland’s Lower Engadine, lish an archive and artist’s residency in the same town. And the enigmatic, peripatetic artist Not Vital (pronounced a remote, rugged, near-forgotten valley in the country’s easternmost corner. Here, in the central Alps, the En river (which “note vee-TAL”), a native of the region, owns several properties becomes the Inn in Austria) cuts a deep crevasse into the that display his own sculptures and works by other artists. On landscape. It’s also an extension of the much better-known the western edge of Sent, where he was born, he spearheaded Upper Engadine, where St. Moritz’s luxury culture has long a hilly outdoor sculpture garden called Parkin Not dal Mot. In attracted skiers and celebrities — but, in some ways, it couldn’t nearby Ardez, he runs a foundation that displays art and makes a mission of collecting and archiving books and publifeel farther away. My travel companion and I were here to ski on the last of cations written in Romansh. Despite all this, the Lower Engadine has so far escaped the spring snow and hike along the still-muddy Via Engiadina trail. Our holiday rental house sat 5,500 feet above sea level, over development largely because of its inaccessibility. Old and I expected new cultural experiences — this is, after all, one traditions abound. There are those intriguing inscriptions, of the last areas in which Romansh, a language described to called sgraffiti, etched into the thick-walled buildings, a decorative custom imported from nearby Italy in the 16th century. me as “street Latin,” is predominantly spoken. But mixed in among the natural bounty was something There are even farmers who still share their houses with livestock. even more surprising: high culture. During our visit, we found And then there’s the landscape. “This valley’s rugged beauty, top-notch contemporary art galleries, hotels hosting concerts its shifts from warm to cold, dark to light, attracts and art happenings, a sculpture park, and even a microbrewery. creative people looking for contemplation,” said Hans Most of these venues have appeared in the last five years or so. Schmid, a local hotelier. Mr. Schmid would know: he gave up a job as culture direcThe artistic tradition in the Lower Engadine (or Engiadina Bassa in Romansh), however, didn’t emerge out of nothing. tor of the Swiss canton of St. Gallen to run Hotel Piz Linard, “You can feel the energy of all the creative people who’ve come which opened in a historic building in 2007. Standing pink for centuries,” said the St. Moritz-based architect Hans-Jörg and pretty on the village square of Lavin, it has become a cultural Ruch, who has, for the last 20 years, updated historic buildings draw for both locals and visitors, hosting a mix of weekend in the Upper and Lower Engadine and beyond, converting concerts, film screenings and exhibitions. Other hotels also cater to culture vultures yearning for both them into private homes and art galleries. Philosophers, authors, artists always came here, but it was quality and authenticity: In Vnà, a village of 70 residents, a usually to the upper valley,” said Ladina Florineth, owner of few entrepreneurial locals established a foundation in 2004 to Villa Flor, a charming seven-room hotel that opened last summer renovate the town’s cultural center, a building that had fallen in a renovated patrician house in the town of S-chanf. “Now into disuse. In 2008 the center became Hotel Piz Tschütta, people are discovering the lower part, which is becoming which now hosts recitals and offers a charming restaurant and more important for those who want something authentic,” guest rooms. Beyond the building, more rooms are dispersed throughout the village. she said. Then there’s the glamorous Hotel Castell— a fortress atop a While St. Moritz has hosted famous art world names like Beuys, Warhol and Schnabel, the Lower Engadine has started mountain overlooking Zuoz. Built in 1912, it reopened in to attract its share. Three years ago, Eva Presenhuber, the 2004, with the art collector Ruedi Bechtler as a primary

ISS 01> 13 >


ISS 01> 14 >


TA ST "LIVE EACH SEASON AS IT PASSES;

BREATHE THE AIR,

A Dining Explosion In A Tiny Basque Town......pg 16 DRINK THE DRINK,

Chefs Collaborate With Artists.......pg 19 TASTE THE FRUIT,

Mangia, Mangia!.......pg 20 AND RESIGN

YOURSELF TO THE

INFLUENCES OF EACH.”

ISS 01> 15 >


A Dining Explosion In A Tiny Basque Town By Ingrid K. Williams June 29, 2010

ISS 01> 16 >

TRY to imagine the gustatory experience of running up a

mountain. Drawing a blank? An avant-garde dish called Juego de Verdura claims to be just that. On a small plate there are two short glasses, one spewing cloud-like vapor and the other containing layers of egg, mushroom, vegetable soup and spinach-tinged foam. Strangely delicious, it also makes sense: Envision jogging upward past hens (there’s the egg), then mushrooms and small vegetable gardens (that’s the green soup and foam), and, upon reaching the summit, being surrounded by early morning mist (that’s the bartender’s cue to pour hot broth over dry ice, unleashing a swirl of fog over the table). This is just one fantastical example of the innovative cuisine being dreamed up by a crop of talented young chefs in Hondarribia, a hamlet in Basque Country on the northern coast of Spain. For the last decade, Basque cuisine has held a vaunted status in the culinary world; the region is awash in Michelin-starred restaurants headed by first-rate chefs like Juan Mari Arzak and Martín Berasategui. With the brightest stars orbiting around San Sebastián, that city is a revered destination for food enthusiasts eager to taste delicately constructed, technologically complex dishes that challenge every notion of what food could be. But in the last few years, the apprentices of these acclaimed kitchens have struck out on their own, extending lofty new standards across the region. With its abundant variety of local produce, a daily influx of fresh seafood, and what has become a critical mass of new talent, the tiny town of Hondarribia has emerged as one of the best places to experience the region’s ambitious cuisine, and without the parading crowds of San Sebastián, just 13 miles away.


OPPOSITE TOP Hondarribia's beach OPPOSITE BOTTOM Chef Bixente Muñoz Photos by Matias Costa

“Here there are 15 or 20 young chefs and they are all very motivated,” said Bixente Muñoz, a local chef, former protégé of Mr. Berasategui and the mastermind behind the awardwinning mountain dish, the Juego de Verdura (Vegetable Game). The chefs, he said, “try to do their own thing; some are more traditional, some are more innovative, but everything has to do with the love for the products.” Situated on Spain’s Atlantic coast, Hondarribia sits on the banks of the Bidasoa River, which flows into the ocean just beyond the town’s port. On the other side of the river — a seven-minute ferry ride away — is France. The center of town is anchored by two historically relevant neighborhoods: the ancient Parte Vieja, where a maze of cobblestone lanes winds past medieval stone palaces and traditional Basque wood-beamed houses; and the fishermen’s village known as the Marina, where old men congregate on benches along San Pedro Kalea, a tree-lined street packed with lively pintxo bars.

destination for Spanish and French vacationers. But the town has yet to begin attracting anywhere near the international crowd that flocks to San Sebastián, a state of affairs reinforced by the lack of new hotels. Instead, Hondarribia is still a place primarily for residents; most restaurants are occupied by local families and couples, not tourists. “The fact that there are so many high-level restaurants here is because of the high degree of gastronomic cultivation of the people in the region,” said Gorka Txapartegi, the chef at Hondarribia’s only Michelin-starred restaurant, Alameda. After training at Martín Berasategui’s three-starred restaurant in Lasarte that bears his name and in the starred Zuberoa kitchen in nearby Oiartzun, Mr. Txapartegi returned to Hondarribia to head the kitchen of his family’s restaurant, which has evolved from the simple tavern that his grandmother opened in 1942. Earlier this year, he was named chef of the year by the Basque Academy of Gastronomy, an impressive honor in such a food-crazed region.

THE CITY IS A REVERED DESTINATION FOR FOOD ENTHUSIASTS EAGER TO TASTE DELICATELY CONSTRUCTED, TECHNOLOGICALLY COMPLEX DISHES THAT CHALLENGE EVERY NOTION OF WHAT FOOD COULD BE. A touchstone of Basque culture and a focal point for the new breed of chefs, pintxos are small, often bite-size creations similar to Spanish tapas. The tradition of txikiteo, or pintxobar-hopping, is to go from bar to bar, grabbing a pintxo or two and a drink before moving on to the next. Throughout Basque Country, pintxo bar chefs strive to outdo one another, and formal pintxo competitions up the ante. In recent years, Hondarribia bars have competed against San Sebastián’s with favorable results, earning regional and national recognition for their tiny masterpieces. Mr. Muñoz’s Gran Sol is perhaps Hondarribia’s most successful pintxo bar and has trophies and plaques to prove it. After achieving national acclaim for his miniature creations, Mr. Muñoz sought another challenge, so in 2008 he opened a new restaurant in town, Sugarri, where he presents his gastronomic artistry on larger plates. But it was back at Gran Sol, on a recent sunny Thursday afternoon, that locals packed the bar, munching on his creative bites and sipping glasses of cider or txakoli, a local dry white wine poured from a height to grand effect. “For a long time it was San Sebastián, but now I think the food in Hondarribia is best,” said Alvaro Larramendi, a local sailor and Gran Sol regular. In addition to a stop at Gran Sol, any good Hondarribia txikiteo will include Vinoteka Ardoka across the street, and Enbata a few blocks away. Opened in 2008, Vinoteka Ardoka is a chic wine bar with black and white décor that serves modern pintxos to a younger crowd. At Enbata, businessmen in suits are more likely to be sidling up to the polished counter, eating elegant pintxos like grilled jamón ibérico with warm tomato salsa. With a charming old town, a breezy riverfront promenade and a sizable slab of sandy beach, Hondarribia is a natural

“Technical knowledge allows you to dare and try new things,” he said, which at Alameda means light, modern cuisine without any hocus-pocus. Instead, it’s the skillful presentation and delightful surprises—a tangy shot of creamy cheese in an amuse-bouche of pea soup and smoked salmon, or tiny violet flowers adorning succulent jamón ibérico and white asparagus—that help make Mr. Txapartegi’s food so pleasurable. But one needn’t be a foodie with a fat wallet to enjoy Hondarribia’s offerings. As Mr. Txapartegi put it, “good restaurants here are not just for people with a lot of money.” In fact, demand for quality cuisine at reasonable prices means that some of the best places for a sit-down meal are surprisingly unassuming locations. From Alameda, it’s a leisurely 15-minute walk into the hills past twittering birds and grazing sheep to Laia Erretegia, a rustic restaurant and cider house where the 16-euro ($20) three-course lunch might end with an outstanding, ephemeral rice pudding. Closer to the Marina, Abarka Jatetxea serves pitch-perfect food, but from the sidewalk, the restaurant could easily be mistaken for an ordinary home. And on another residential street snaking away from the Marina, the yard and swing set outside Arroka Berri give no indication that awaiting inside are elegant dining rooms, crisp linens and a kitchen that produces divine sea bass and delectable crème caramel. In a town where one can spend the day murmuring “This is the best thing I’ve ever tasted,” it’s reassuring to hear Mr. Txapartegi’s prediction for gastronomy in Hondarribia: “The cuisine will certainly evolve, but without forgetting its roots.”

ISS 01> 17 >


TOP A dish of egg, mushroom, cauliflower, asparagus and broccoli at Sugarri. BOTTOM Pintxos at Gran Sol.

HOW TO GET THERE San SebastiĂĄn Airport is actually located in Hondarribia, and a recent online search for September found an Iberia Airlines flight from Kennedy Airport, with a connection in Madrid, for about $750.

WHERE TO STAY Formerly the stomping grounds of Spanish royals, the Parador El Emperador (Plaza de Armas 14; 34-943-645-500; paradores.es) is a 10th-century castle that’s been converted into a luxury hotel in the Parte Vieja. Doubles start at 224 euros, or about $280 at $1.26 to the euro. Hotel Obispo (Plaza del Obispo; 34-943-645-400; hotelobispo.com) is a more affordable, 14th or 15th century palace with similar medieval charm. Doubles start at 96 euros. For more modern luxury, Hotel Jaizkibel (Baserritar Etorbidea 1; 34-943-646-040; hoteljaizkibel.com) is a tranquil, wood-paneled oasis. Doubles start at 100 euros.

WHERE TO TXIKITEO Gran Sol, San Pedro 65; 34.943.641.701; bargransol.com. Ardoka Vinoteka, San Pedro 32; 34.943.643.169, Enbata, Zuloaga 5; 34.943.641.400; hoteljauregui.com/restaurante.htm.

WHERE TO EAT (WITH A SEAT) ISS 01> 18 >

Alameda, Minasoroeta 1; 34.943.642.789; restalameda.com., Laia Erretegia, Barrio Arkolla 33; 34.943.646.309; laiaerretegia.com, Abarka Jatetxea, Baserritar Etorbidea 36; 34.943.641.991; www.restabarka.com., Arroka Berri, Higer Bidea 6; 34.943.642.712; www.arrokaberri.com, Sugarri, Nafarroa Behera 1; 34.943.643.123; sugarrirestaurante.com.


Chefs Collaborate With Artists By Gisela Williams January 21, 2011

IN the city of Berlin, artists collaborate with dancers and fashion designers— and, perhaps more surprisingly, with chefs. For the most part, food is a character actor in these joint efforts, a sensual diversion from a performance, but at Zagreus Projekt, a gallery space and restaurant in Mitte, it plays a starring role. For a decade, the founder of Zagreus (Brunnenstrasse 9a; 49.30.28.095.640; zagreus.net), Ulrich Krauss, has been collaborating with artists to create multi-course dinners that reflect the artwork in the surrounding space. Recent events have included a film installation from Philipp Geist, in which underwater scenes are projected on one wall while Mr. Krauss serves a meal made exclusively with ingredients from different bodies of water, and a modern Indonesian meal served within a traditional wooden longhouse built in the space by the Indonesian artist Yudi Noor. The restaurant is perhaps the most extreme example of a growing number of Berlin spaces where art meets cuisine. “Zagreus is really a unique concept,” said Caroline Hobkinson, an artist who recently worked with Mr. Krauss to create a three-course Pakistani meal that guests at the restaurant would then “share” with families from Pakistan. (The cost of the Berlin meal, 40 euros, or $51 at $1.27 to the euro, paid for a meal to be sent to a Pakistani family.) Then there are places like Joseph-Roth-Diele (Potsdamer Strasse 75; 49.30.26.36.9884; joseph-roth-diele.de), a pubstyle restaurant named after the Austrian writer and artist who once lived next door. At the cozy space, the walls are lined with illustrations and quotes from Mr. Roth’s books, giving it a period look. “When I first visited Joseph-Roth-Diele, I thought the place had been there since the beginning of the 19th century, and that J. R. himself hung out there,” the gallerist Matthias Arndt, whose influential gallery Arndt is across the street, wrote in an e-mail.

In the last two years, as the Potsdamer Strasse has emerged as Berlin’s latest gallery area, the spot has also been adopted by Berlin’s art world as an insider meeting place. The artist Christoph Niemann, a regular contributor to The New York Times website, recently chose the restaurant as the location for his 40th birthday party. “The first time I was there was for an after-party after an art lecture,” he said, adding that he’s since grown to love the hearty southern German comfort food. The menu skews more contemporary at HBC (KarlLiebknecht-Strasse 9; 49.30.24.34.2920; hbc-berlin.de), a combination art gallery, lounge, party space and art-world cantina. The décor is cutting-edge Berlin cool; the bar’s ceiling, for example, is covered with a eye-popping neon installation by the art collective Assume Vivid Astro Focus. And the vibe is equally unconventional. A typical night might include a music and film event conceived by the international art group Videokills, or a group exhibition curated by a local selfdescribed “shamanic media art collective” called dev01ded. “I’d say the events there have been quite indicative of the local young Berlin art scene,” said Jordan Nassar, exhibitions manager for Pool Gallery, a nearby art space. “It has given a lot of up-and-comers a chance to do what they want with a space.”

ISS 01> 19 >


ISS 01> 20 >


TO UC “TOUCH IS SO

CENTRAL TO WHAT WE ARE,

TO THE FEELING

Top Ten European Flea Markets.......pg 22 OF BEING

Five Destinations For The Tattooed Traveler.......pg 28 OURSELVES,

Diga di Luzzone: The 500-Foot Climbing Wall......pg 30 THAT WE ALMOST

CANNOT IMAGINE

OURSELVES WITHOUT IT."

ISS 01> 21 >


Top Ten European Flea Markets Angela Rippon January 9, 2010

1

WATERLOO, BELGIUM

What a great market this is. Held every Sunday morning in the car park of the Carrefour supermarket in Waterloo, there is plenty of parking, and a good fast-food restaurant. The 300 or so stalls are all laid out in an orderly grid so it’s easy to cover the whole market and not get confused about the location of a particular trader. It offers a good mix of genuine antiques and more contemporary collectables, but watch out for replicas. When I finally got one trader to admit that the designer handbag she was selling (for an exorbitant price) was indeed a fake, she whispered, “But it’s a good fake”—and dropped the price considerably.

2

ISS 01> 22 >

TURIN, ITALY

Carmagnola market is about a 20-minute drive south of Turin and held every second Sunday of the month (except August). Be prepared for a trek through this one: there are over 250 stalls laid out in the main square and winding pedestrian streets of the pretty town centre. With modern craftsmen set up beside bric-a-brac stalls, we found lots of lovely Italian glass and jewelry, alongside genuine antique and collectables. My co-presenter Jonty Hearnden and I also had fun with some lovingly restored Vespa scooters.


LEFT Vintage chairs, Brussels, Belgium RIGHT Gilded night stand with various objects, Turin, Italy

3

CADAQUES, SPAIN

This is a brocante market just south of Cardedeu, towards Barcelona. It’s held in a large field beside the town’s main park, and is all very rustic. While some of the dealers work off stalls or out of the back of their lorries, others just lay their items on tarpaulin on the grass. You’ll find plenty of rustic Spanish furniture, along with some very fine glass and porcelain, and a wonderful collection of fans. But take a large umbrella if it’s hot: there is no shade, and the heat can be wilting.

6

ALBA, ITALY

One of the great “discoveries” we made during filming was the warehouse markets in Italy. These are huge spaces where ordinary householders take their things to sell (the equivalent of British car-boot sales). You can buy everything, from fully fitted kitchens and furniture, to televisions, dinner services, toys and clothes. You name it — if you want to furnish your home, you can buy it here. Everything has a price (usually very cheap), and this decreases by 10% if the article has not sold after one month. Mercatino di Torino is certainly worth a rummage!

7

BARCELONA, SPAIN

Mercantic is an indoor market in the suburbs of Barcelona that is open every day from 9:30 am to 8 pm (except Mondays, Sunday afternoons and throughout August). This is a wonderful hunting ground for anyone looking for art deco or art nouveau items, as well as really fine furniture, glass, silver and porcelain.

8

LAKE MAGGIORE, ITALY

I loved the market at Borgo D’Ale for its happy atmosphere, its surprising and varied collection of antiques and collectibles, and the wonderful selection of local food. The 350 stalls set out their wares every third Sunday of the month and I defy anyone to come away empty handed from this bustling, fun and tempting collection of Italian goodies.

9 4

Once a year, in July, the huge Ciney Expo centre on the outskirts of Ciney is given over to a three-day antique/brocante fair. With hundreds of stalls both inside and out, you get a terrific variety of things on sale, from the very finest quality antiques to household wares. It’s a bit of a drive— but it’s worth it.

MILAN, ITALY

You need to be an early bird for the market at Cormano, near Milan. It starts at 7:30 am every Saturday and is over by lunchtime (2 pm). If you want a real bargain — and have comfortable walking shoes— you should find plenty of things to tempt you among the 150 stalls. The area is famous for silk — Como produces 80% of Europe’s silk and has been doing so since the 14th century — and we found some lovely fabrics among the household goods, toys, old clothes, glass and silver.

5

NAMUR, BELGIUM

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM

The flea market at Place du Jeu de Balle is in the centre of Brussels and takes place daily. Here you can find everything from junk and antiques to bargain buys and rip-offs. About 200 dealers turn up every day from 7 am until lunchtime. It’s a great place to find things you never knew you really wanted, and at knockdown prices. Once the dealers have gone, take one of the side roads from Rue Blaes into Rue Haute. Here they have a great selection of antique, brocante and craft shops. It’s a little more chic, but still good value.

10

MIREPOIX, SOUTHERN FRANCE

Some of the small towns and villages in France have a wonderful reputation for staging huge markets, just once or twice a year, when the entire community is taken over by anything from 200 to 500 stalls. It’s like a massive car-boot sale but with all the trappings of a genuine antique and collectable market. You’d be amazed at the things that turn up. These markets are called “vide-greniers”— or attic sales. The village of Auriac-sur-Vendinelle hosts one over an entire weekend in May. Certainly worth a trip if you're in the area.

AND ONE MORE BECAUSE I COULD NOT RESIST:

11

LILLE, NORTHERN FRANCE

Lille is home to probably one of the biggest markets in the country. It’s called La Braderie and is packed over the first weekend of September. And when I say big, I mean huge! It attracts over a million visitors and boasts around 200 km if pavement stalls. So be prepared for a long hike!

ISS 01> 23 >


THIS SPREAD Vintage typewriter Polaroid Camera

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM­— A GREAT PLACE TO FIND THINGS YOU NEVER KNEW YOU REALLY WANTED.

ISS 01> 24 >


ISS 01> 26 >


TOP LEFT Found French horn, Belgium

BELOW Dimensional type, Italy

TOP RIGHT Picture frame, old mirror, Italy BOTTOM LEFT Polaroid camera, France BOTTOM RIGHT Vintage picture frames, Spain

ISS ISS 01 01>> 27 >


NOISE: A STENCH IN THE EAR. UNDOMESTICATED MUSIC. THE AUTHENTICATING SIGN OF CIVILIZATION.

ISS 01> 28 >


SO UN “NOTHING EVER

SOUNDS

QUITE THE WAY

Arts Thrive In Leipzig, Bach’s Backyard.......pg 30 IT DOES WHEN YOU'RE

In Amsterdam, A Jazz Beat......pg 34 STANDING RIGHT

Soundscapes: Burning Man......pg 36 IN THE

MIDDLE OF IT."

ISS 01> 29 >


Arts Thrive In Leipzig By Gisela Williams May 9, 2010

ISS 01> 30 >


OPPOSITE Leipzig native A band plays in Clara Zetkin Park. BELOW Carolin Wendel's artist studio Photos by Oliver Hartung

ON a recent Saturday night in Connewitz, an emerging neigh- Leipzig on the global art scene about 10 years ago by promoting the now much-hyped New Leipzig School. borhood of artists and students in Leipzig, Germany, the This year, Neo Rauch, the “father” of this group of neostreets were buzzing. At Werk II, a former factory complex, a group of hoodie-clad 20-somethings drank beer in a cobble- realistic painters and considered one of Germany’s greatest living artists, is being feted with parallel exhibitions: one at stone courtyard, waiting for the Canadian indie rock band Wolf Parade to perform after a guitar-heavy set from the Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich and a retrospective at the Leipzig Museum of Fine Arts, both through Aug. 15. Dutch band We vs. Death. Mr. Lybke compared Leipzig to Berlin in the early 1990s. Next door at UT Connewitz, a crumbling, early twentieth century cinema turned intimate music hall, Mohna, a German “In Leipzig, you can wake up one morning and decide, ‘I’m an performer whose songs are set to a hybrid of folk and elec- artist,’ or the next day say, ‘I think I want to be a journalist,’ ” he said. This palpable sense that anything is possible is due tronic music, was about to step on stage. Outside, on partly to the city’s dirt-cheap rents: grand turn-of-the-century, Wolfgang-Heinze-Strasse, three heavily pierced student-types in studded jackets were hurrying toward Conne Island, one of 600-square-foot, one-bedroom flats go for as little as 300 euros a month (about $360 at $1.20 to the euro). Leipzig’s better-known music venues (a bit like CBGB in the But only in recent years has Leipzig become a desirable good days), where the Aggrolites, a hard-core reggae group place to live and visit. A few decades ago, it was a city to be from Los Angeles, was performing.

LEIPZIG DOESN’T CALL ITSELF THE CITY OF MUSIC FOR NOTHING. But when the city’s tourism office uses that title, it is referring to the grand past, when Leipzig nurtured the likes of Johann Sebastian Bach (a choirmaster at St. Thomas Church in the city for more than 25 years), Mendelssohn (who founded Germany’s first conservatory here) and Robert and Clara Schumann, whose house is now a museum. This year is the 325th anniversary of Bach’s birth, and Leipzig is celebrating with concerts, festivals and the reopening of the newly designed Bach Museum. Perhaps, if he were living in Leipzig today, Bach would be composing experimental electronic dance music. In the last two years, this city of about half a million resident s—many of them students at the 600-year-old University of Leipzig—is where some of the most innovative house and techno music is being created. “The music scene here is as good as those in other, bigger cities like Cologne or Berlin, but everyone knows each other. It’s not commercial,” said Matthias Puppe, the founder of Pop Up Leipzig, an annual alternative music trade fair and festival. The Sweden-based folksinger Bjorn Kleinhenz agrees. “Leipzig is definitely my favorite city in Germany to play in. It seems the music scene there is still very untouched by cynicism and speculation,” he said. “I get the impression people really just want to enjoy good live music.” But the city’s affinity for the arts goes well beyond music. “Leipzig is a town of students, musicians and artists,” said Gerd Harry Lybke, the owner of Eigen and Art, one of the most influential galleries in Germany, with locations in Leipzig and Berlin. Mr. Lybke is often credited with placing

avoided: a polluted, soot-covered town known mostly for its book publishing industry and the trade fairs that have been held there since the Middle Ages. Now the surplus of abandoned factory buildings, which had produced mechanical parts for products like watches and cars, and textiles, is a boon, attracting creative entrepreneurs, artists and musicians who have reclaimed the old spaces. “There’s an underground party or event in an abandoned factory or building every weekend here,” Mr. Puppe said. Even in Leipzig’s beautifully restored small historic center, a few buildings with boarded-up or broken windows remain. Perhaps the city’s most successful example of an old factory reinvented by artists is the Spinnerei, a cultural complex in a former cotton-spinning mill. The sprawling collection of brick buildings is now home to a cafe, a quirky new pension called the Meisterzimmer, artists’ studios (Mr. Rauch has one here) and 11 galleries, including Mr. Lybke’s Eigen and Art, a pioneer in the space. Located in the district of Lindenau, west of the city center, the Spinnerei has spawned a small but lively gallery scene in the area, which includes the nonprofit art space D21. At this year’s Gallery Tour Weekend in May, an estimated 15,000 visitors explored the Spinnerei. A week later, the five artists living and working in the third-floor studios that belong to the Leipzig International Art Program, or LIA, which sponsors artists in residence, were recovering from the packed event. The Israeli artist Etamar Beglikter’s cut-out black-and-white pieces still hung on the rough concrete walls of the atelier’s communal space, along with a colorful abstract

ISS 01> 31 >


IN THE LAST TWO YEARS, THIS CITY OF ABOUT HALF A MILLION RESIDENTS IS WHERE SOME OF THE MOST INNOVATIVE HOUSE AND TECHNO MUSIC IS BEING CREATED.

ISS 01> 32 >

painting by the Swiss artist Vincent Kriste. The photographer Ksenia Galiaeva, a Russian living in Amsterdam, had all her latest works displayed in her studio: photos and paintings saturated with exaggerated colors, many of them featuring her parents posing in the garden of their dacha. Ms. Galiaeva and the Japanese artist duo Mai Yamashita and Naoto Kobayashi said that during their months as artists in residence they explored some of the city’s many green spaces. Despite Leipzig’s industrial history, approximately a third of the city’s landscape is parks and gardens, the largest being the Auenwald, about 22 square miles of fields and flood-plain forest in the heart of town. “One of the things that makes Leipzig so unique is that it has seamlessly wedded nature with a vital art scene,” wrote the American artist Kylie Manning, in an e-mail message. “Canals and parks weave through abandoned buildings and cafes playing live music,” continued Ms. Manning, who took part in the LIA program last year. “It is both haunting and stimulating.” You can count the city’s affordable dining scene as another surprise. In Leipzig, not only are the artists not starving, they are eating well. Hotel Seeblick, a retro-styled hangout popular with the music crowd, offers excellent burgers and comfort food like carrot salad with apple and a balsamic tahini dressing for about 6 euros each. The daily lunch specials at the Versorgung garden cafe in the Spinnerei attract savvy local residents with a taste for art and home-cooked German food.


OPPOSITE Leipzig fashion, DJ at Werk II BELOW A band plays in Clara Zetkin Park.

Photos by Oliver Hartung

Unlike other insider restaurants in cities like Berlin or Hamburg, where regulars might stare down outsiders, these places felt welcoming. But then, Leipzig has a history of welcoming strangers, at least according to Mr. Lybke. “In the middle of nowhere, between Frankfurt and Prague, we were the marketplace where travelers met,” he said, adding that “the second time you come to Leipzig, you are considered one of us.”

HOW TO GET THERE

Leipzig is just over an hour from Berlin by train (bahn.com). Tickets are about 43 euros, or $52 at $1.20 to the euro.

WHERE TO EAT AND DRINK Regulars of Leipzig’s music scene frequent the Hotel Seeblick which, despite its name, is an intimate restaurant that serves a hearty brunch and great burgers. A classic hamburger (served with french fries and a small salad) and a beer costs about 10 euros. The Stelzenhaus is on a canal and offers crowd-pleasing dishes like poached codfish on olive cream with braised red pepper or lentil falafel with goat cottage cheese, lime and avocado. A four-course dinner is 56 euros, and main courses range from 12 to 29 euros. Visitors interested in the art scene should try the Paris Syndrom, a quirky, cool cafe at the Galerie für Zeitgenössische Kunst or the Versorgung garden cafe (49.341.351.3775) in the Spinnerei, which serves simple but good German fare.

WHERE TO STAY

The Westin Leipzig (Gerberstrasse 15; 49.341.9880; westinleipzig.com) is centrally located and has impressive views of the historic center and an excellent restaurant, the two Michelin-star Falco (falco-leipzig.de/#), which soars over the city on the 27th floor. A double room in July starts at 99 euros. The Meisterzimmer (meisterzimmer.de), situated in the Spinnerei, a building of artist studios, is essentially one big, quirky apartment that can sleep up to six people. Rates depend on the number of guests. For two, the cost is 60 euros; for six, 120 euros.

WHERE TO FIND THE MUSIC

One can listen to all 175 hours of Bach’s lifelong work or rearrange the instrumentals for one of his hymns at the newly renovated Bach Museum (Thomaskirchhof 15/16; 49.34.191. 37202; www.bach-leipzig.de), which reopened in March on the 325th anniversary of his birth. For less classical melodies, the WERK II, once a large factory that produced industrial testing devices, is a popular multicultural event complex. One of the oldest cinemas in Germany, the UT Connewitz (Wolfgang-Heinze-Strasse West Building 12A; 49.341.462.6776; utconnewitz.de), now hosts alternative film and music events. Conne Island (49.341.301.3028; Koburger Strasse 3; www. conne-island.de) features mostly alternative hardcore, punk, ska and hip-hop bands.

ISS 01> 33 >


ISS 01> 34 >


SM EL “SMELL IS A POTENT WIZARD

THAT

Barcelona's Hidden Courtyards......pg 36 TRANSPORTS US

What's The Smell?.......pg 38 ACROSS THOUSANDS

The Curious Cook: Exploring Alchemy Of Food.......pg 39 OF MILES AND ALL

THE YEARS

WE HAVE LIVED.”

ISS 01> 35 >


Barcelona’s Hidden Courtyards By Gisela Williams May 9, 2010

I F you’ve walked in the creamy Barcelona sunlight through the

ISS 01> 36 >

streets around the Paseo de Gracia, you will be no stranger to the elegant charm of the Eixample, the imposing nineteenth century grid that is the city’s geographical and architectural heart. Magnificent modernist buildings gaze proudly over the tree-lined boulevards. Delights beckon from every shop front: sleek furniture, tapas, chic couture and handmade chocolates. Hidden from view, however, behind the Eixample’s grand facades, is a little-advertised patchwork of public gardens and courtyards that offers refuge from the urban rush and an intimate view of everyday Barcelona life. Many of these green spaces have been carved in recent years from the patios that form the center of each city block, and are reached down narrow passageways or by cutting through a building. They are the ideal place to pause between the sights of the Eixample, which stretches from the old city to neighborhoods like Gracia, especially if you have children in tow. As you stroll around the Quadrat d’Or— the central section of the Eixample known for its modernist gems —step into the gracious garden of the Palau Robert, a late nineteenth century mansion that hosts the Catalan tourist office. Filled with stately palm, cyprus and orange trees, the gardens were part of the estate of Robert i Surís, a Spanish grandee. You can reach the garden through the door of the palace, at Paseo de Gracia, 107, or through two gates around the corner on Diagonal.


LEFT Eixample, Calle Roger de Llúria B ELOW Courtyard at the end of the Pasaje Rector Oliveras

Photos by Stefano Buonamici

This is drought-stricken Barcelona, however, not wellwatered Paris or London, and some of the Eixample’s gardens are paved and spare — more interesting as places to watch people than to spot flora. If you take a few minutes out of your hunt for designer cookware at the popular shop Vinçon (Paseo de Gracia, 96; 34.93.215.6050; www.vincon.com), you can sit in the peaceful courtyard behind the shop and check out the undulating balconies on the rear facade of Antoni Gaudí’s Casa Milà. You may even catch a couple of the residential building’s lucky occupants shooting the breeze. Or for a taste of local life, pop into the courtyard at the end of the Pasaje Rector Oliveras, where children clamber on the climbing frame in the shadow of the Gothic Church of the Immaculate Conception, which was moved stone by stone from the old city in the late 1800s. A local resident said the neighbors use the garden for alfresco dinners in summer, so, you never know, you may even snag an invitation to partake of some pa amb tomaquet. Or cool your heels — literally— in the shallow, turquoise swimming pool reached via a dark passageway at Calle Roger de Llúria, 56, one of the first patios returned to the public by the city in the late 1980s and home to a looming brick water tower. (Entry during summer costs 1.45 euros, about $2.20.) “The patios are like a window onto Barcelona,” said Francesc Muñoz Ramírez, a professor of urban geography at the Barcelona Autonomous University, during a recent afternoon stroll through the Eixample. “You can be an urban voyeur, watch the business of the city from the inside.” This speckle of green in the Eixample’s urban lattice is a nod to the vision of Idelfons Cerdà i Sunyer, the progressive civil engineer whose design for the district marks its 150th anniversary this year. When he submitted his plan in 1859, the city Cerdà had in mind was to be functional rather than flamboyant, a breed of socialist utopia where rich and poor would live side-by-side in city blocks of identical size wrapped around parks and kitchen gardens. Back then, Barcelona was a teeming, disease-ridden warren of streets, clustered around the port and hemmed in by medieval walls beyond which lay the wide expanse that became the Eixample. Life for the working class was grim and short; the average person died before his or her 36th birthday. Onto this squalid, airless muddle, Cerdà grafted his huge, orderly grid, an ambitious expansion that was an heir of Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann’s plan for remodeling the chaotic center of Paris earlier in the decade. Cerdà foresaw the needs of modern life and created a template from which the city has evolved to become one of Europe’s most vibrant and enticing. Thrilled by the potential of railways, he designed wide streets that could handle trains and trams. To help visibility and, some believe, to allow trams to turn, he cut the corner of each block at an angle, creating the graceful chamfered corners so characteristic of the Eixample.

Cerdà’s plan became the DNA of modern Barcelona, but his detractors condemned it as vulgar and monotonous and many of its egalitarian precepts were ignored. “Cerdà’s vision was so avant-garde, so modern that few people at the time recognized his genius,” said Lluís Permanyer, a Catalan journalist who has written books on the Eixample. “It is only today that we are realizing how important he was.” Some streets became more equal than others, with grand avenues sprouting elaborate mansions that made the Eixample a showcase for modernist architects like Gaudí, Lluís Domènech i Montaner and Josep Puig i Cadafalch, while nearby streets languished, unpaved and without sanitation. Greedy developers constructed more, and taller, buildings than Cerdà intended, cutting the light and public space that were supposed to make his city sanitary and pleasant. The patios inside each block became cluttered with warehouses, garages and offices. However, the green spaces that Cerdà believed would define the Eixample prefigured a very contemporary need. As part of an effort to make Barcelona greener, the city has created 40 gardens and plans to add more, as well as create a network of pedestrian-only areas. “We’re returning to Cerdà’s original concept,” said Professor Muñoz. “The vision we have for the city now isn’t very different from the one he had, 150 years ago.”

BEHIND FACADES Through June 2010, the Barcelona Center for Contemporary Culture (www.cccb.org) is organizing exhibitions, walks and seminars to mark Cerdà’s urban design legacy. An extensive list of Barcelona’s often-overlooked public gardens— like the serene grounds of the Barcelona Seminary (Calle Diputación, 231) or the courtyard of the Casa Elizalde cultural center (Calle Valencia, 302), where you can often catch a weekend children’s show — can be found on the website of ProEixample (www.proeixample.cat), a public-private partnership dedicated to revitalizing the Eixample.

ISS 01> 37 >


THIS SPREAD Courtyard at the end of the Pasaje Rector Oliveras,

A LITTLE-ADVERTISED PATCHWORK OF PUBLIC GARDENS AND COURTYARDS THAT OFFERS REFUGE FROM THE URBAN RUSH AND AN INTIMATE VIEW OF EVERYDAY BARCELONA LIFE.

ISS 01> 38 38>>


ISS 01> 39 >


HOW TO FIND LOVE WHILE TRAVELING: TEACH ENGLISH AND BE MORE INTERESTING

ISS 01> 40 >


EX TR "THE BODY IS

THE SOUL'S PRISON

UNLESS

THE FIVE SENSES ARE

OPEN.

Hostel Love: A Practical Guide For Backpackers......pg 42 WHEN SEX

How To Meet A Girl While Traveling.......pg 44 INVOLVES ALL

The Laws Of Love On The Road......pg 46 THE SENSES

INTENSELY, IT CAN BE

A MYSTICAL EXPERIENCE.”

ISS 01> 41 >


ISSUE 01 SIXTH SENSE: LOVE THE Brave New Traveler Guide To Hostel Sex will get you out

of the dorms and into sweaty, awkward bliss faster than you can say “light my fire”. What do you get when you drop a few dozen backpackers into a hostel, soak with beer and mix in a healthy dose of liberation from social norms? A tidal wave of hormones…and one major problem: where to go to get it on? Unless you’re a flamboyant exhibitionist, nothing puts a damper on romantic relations like company. Dorms are almost never empty, and even when they are, the likelihood of someone barging in makes anything more than surreptitious groping an impossibility. If you’re hankering to slide the key into the ignition and get your motor firing on all cylinders, you need to get creative, and get out of the dorms. Unless you’re a flamboyant exhibitionist, nothing puts a damper on romantic relations like company. First of all, let’s consider the options in and around the hostel. Every hostel has hidden nooks and crannies that offer enough space and privacy for at least a hasty knee-trembler. You can be sure the hostel staff know about these spots, but unless you’re hooking up with one of them, asking for directions is bad form. The trick is to know where to look, and to scout locations in advance if you’re feeling lucky. Here are some possibilities:

“LOVE IS

OF ALL

PASSIONS THE STRONGEST,

FOR IT ATTACKS

SIMULTANEOUSLY

THE HEAD, THE HEART AND

THE SENSES.”

ISS 01> 42 >

Hostel Love A Practical Guide For Backpacker

By Brave New Traveler Editors January 31, 2008


e:

OPPOSITE RIGHT The Librarian and the Bartender

T HE L A U N D RY RO O M Most hostels have a laundry room that is abandoned at night. If you’re feeling naughty, the stacks of fresh-smelling sheets and towels make an ideal love-nest. The more considerate and hygienic option is to make use of the sturdy appliances, with the woman sitting on top of the washer / dryer. (Extra points for spin cycle).

T HE R OO F When checking into your next hostel, take a look around and see if there’s any way to access the roof. Overhanging trees are one possibility, as are upstairs windows with broad sills from which you can pull yourself up to the rooftop. Of course safety is important, and you shouldn’t take unnecessary risks, but you’d be surprised at how many hostel roofs are accessible with a little ingenuity. And once you’re up there—well, the sky is the limit.

T HE B AT H RO O M OK, maybe it’s not the most romantic location, but most hostels have bathrooms that lock. As long as the floor and toilet are reasonably clean, you can shut yourselves inside and bump uglies to your heart’s content. Even open bathrooms with several stalls offer the possibility of a quickie—just ask Senator Larry Craig. The best position is for the guy to sit on the toilet while the girl sits in his lap­—this way she can lift her legs off the floor if someone comes in, so that from the outside it looks like just one person is in the stall.

T HE B RO O M CL O SE T

T H E G R EAT O U T D O O R S If your hostel has a backyard, look for a shadowy spot behind a tree. Better yet, if you’re in a semi-rural area, get out of the hostel grounds entirely. A copse of trees can provide all the privacy you need, and a lonesome beach is even more enticing. Just remember to snag a towel or a bed-sheet from the hostel before running naked down the sand.

MARK TWAIN SUMS IT UP BEST, “10 YEARS FROM NOW YOU WILL BE MORE DISAPPOINTED BY THE PEOPLE YOU HAVEN’T DONE THAN BY THE ONES YOU HAVE, SO CAST OFF THE PANTIES, SAIL AWAY FROM THE HOSTEL DORM—EXPLORE, DREAM, GET LAID!” G ET A R O O M A L R EA D Y ! Look, I know you’re on a tight budget. But I guarantee that a few years down the road, when you’re married and have a mortgage, you won’t regret having dropped a couple extra bills for a night of passion. In many countries, like Japan and Taiwan, there is the ‘love-hotel’ option, where you can rent a fantasy-themed room by the hour. Otherwise, just jump in a cab and ask the driver to take you to a guesthouse or motel. ♥

If the laundry room is locked, the roof is inaccessible and the thought of sex in a bathroom stall makes you queasy, the hostel broom closet is a classic option. The main problems with the broom closet are that nothing more than a standing position is possible, mop handles have a way of whacking you in the head at inopportune moments and the smell of high-test floor cleaner can make you pass out. The key is to be quick (if you’re screwing in a broom closet I doubt this will be a problem).

T HE K IT CH E N Don’t have sex in the hostel kitchen. Just don’t. People cook food in the kitchen. No one wants traces of mystery juice in their stir-fry. Plus, hostel kitchens aren’t as private as you might think. Even at 4 am you can bet that someone will be looking for a midnight snack, and nothing ruins an appetite like the sight of bare asses bouncing on the counter. Seriously, don’t have sex in the kitchen.

rs

ISS 01> 43 >


How To Meet A Girl While Traveling By Brave New Traveler Editors January 31, 2008

I suppose one of the best reasons to travel is to find a wife or

husband. Finding a mate, or companion to share your life is normal, please try to look at courtship and finding love as a normal need of humans. I am amazed at the numbers of people that believe my interest in women is bad, or I should hide this, I do not hide normal feelings. This is very sad, love is normal, the idea that I should not put this as a high priority in my life is sad. Family, friends, love, companionship is priority number one. I am I am writing this tip in the perspective of a man, but this applies to women, however maybe different. There is classy or aristocratic girls in all levels of incomes, some very poor girls and girls with zero manners can be very classy people. They may have never learned proper manners however; they do know how to treat people with respect.

HOW TO MEET NICE GIRLS?

1/ Internet Cafe 2/ Any form of transportation 3/ Common area of Hostel 4/ Friend of a friend 5/ Universities of the World or living close 6/ Get email and meet later 7/ Movies in English and girl does not speak English 8/ Internet Exchange services 9/ Exchange emails then meet later 10/Tell couples you want to meet a nice girl 11/ Same restaurant every day 12/ Beach, put your blanket close to girls 13/ Sit in the park 14/ Give the card of hotel to girl 15/ Say hello in English 16/ Airport lounge, Bus Lounge 17/ Receptionist at hotel can fix you up 18/ Say hello, pretend you are best friends with everyone 19/ Yoga class 20/ Language classes 21/ Volunteer 22/ In Dorm Rooms 23/ Television room 24/ In kitchen in Hotel 25/ Tours 26/ Groups of women come up to talk, the quiet one 27/ Have them take a picture of you in front of a tourist attraction 28/ Take their photo and then email them 29/ Ask one to take your photo 30/ Go to their nest.

GERMAN GIRLS—BE VERY DIRECT, SAY WHAT YOU WANT. ISS 01> 44 >

32/ Language School 33/ Teach English 34/ Be more interesting 35/ Learn to ignore reject 36/ Meet more women 37/ Say come, here with a down pull of hands.

WHO IS A NICE GIRL? She should have family, a mother and father, be friendly to children and dogs, cooks, cleans, and helps, and respects the local culture.

POSSIBLE PROBLEMS Divorced parents, chatting on internet, shy or a snob (know the difference), manners, likes dog better than people, starts telling you about how bad your country is immediately, too veggie, too volunteer, too searching for God, too save the planet.


LEFT Jenny and James met at the bus stop

WHO IS NOT A NICE GIRL? 01/ STAYS UP IN BAR EVERY

N IG HT U N TIL 5 AM. 02/ TALKS AB OUT DRUGS OR ALCOH OL ALL THE TI ME. 03/ WILL N OT DO SOMETHI NG DU R IN G T H E DAY HOUR S . 04/ DOESN'T WANT TO INTRODUCE YOU TO HER PARENTS 05/ WORRY IF THE CHATS TOO MUCH ON THE INTERNET. 06/ DOES NOT RETURN EMAILS. 07/ MANNERS, LOOK FOR GOOD MANNERS. 08/ EXCESSIVE TATTOOS, PIERCING, SKIN. 09/ INTOLERANCE OF RELIGION, PEOPLE. OR DECLARES OR LABELS THEMSELVES. I AM VEGGIE, I AM DIFFERENT, I AM ATHEIST... 10/ MAD AT HER PARENTS OR FAMILY BUSINESS. 11/ SHE IS OBSESSIVE.

THE INTERVIEW Ask the following: Where do you live? Are you married? Family and parents? Then exchange of emails, or telephone. No push and push. Are they nice to the waiter?

HIGH SIGNS Hello, ask you to do something, sharing, the wave, following you, preening themselves, ignoring, and stares.

SPOTTING PROSTITUTES OR WANNA BES Buy me a drink, Buy me something, Too much for taxi, No place to stay, Need money, Contra the culture dressing, Tourist bars, They have no job and walk around in the area of foreigner hotels.

NAMES FOR PROSTITUTES Completed Massage (Indonesia), Erotic Massage (Poland), Boom Boom (Thailand), Jiggy Jiggy (Indonesia), Bar Girl (Philippines), Freelance, Lady , Geisha, Courtesans.

THE OWNER GOT A KICK WHEN I SAID THERE ARE NIGHT GIRLS AND DAY GIRLS. DAY GIRLS ARE NICE GIRLS AND NIGHT GIRLS ARE FLOOZIES. GIRLS THAT LOVE YOUR COUNTRY Argentines love Americans, Cubans love Americans, Israel girls love Americans however, you probably will bounce off religion.

CULTURAL DIFFERENCES Latinas will always introduce to family, asians will almost never introduce to family. India, impossible to meet girls unless divorced or lower caste. Hindu— have it arranged.

HOW TO AVOID GIRLS? 1/ Tell them you will not take or help their mother, father and friends go to America. 2/ Tell them you have five girls to marry already. 3/ Tell them you like to have many girlfriends, and like to boom boom them all. (This is what they have now, and they know the white man is different for the most part, so they want a White Man, describe yourself as the same as a local man. 4/ Tell them you never return to America and will live here in Africa, not a sure way. 5/ Be rude, never say hello, go to only the tourist menu restaurants. ♥

ISS 01> 45 >


ISS 01> 46 >


"ALL WE HAVE TO BELIEVE WITH IS OUR SENSES, THE TOOLS WE USE TO PERCEIVE THE WORLD: OUR SIGHT, OUR TOUCH, OUR MEMORY. IF THEY LIE TO US, THEN NOTHING CAN BE TRUSTED. AND EVEN IF WE DO NOT BELIEVE, THEN STILL WE CANNOT TRAVEL IN ANY OTHER WAY THAN THE ROAD OUR SENSES SHOW US; AND WE MUST WALK THAT ROAD TO THE END."


"WE CANNOT TRAVEL IN ANY OTHER WAY THAN THE ROAD OUR SENSES SHOW US; AND WE MUST WALK THAT ROAD TO THE END."


Sensescape Issue 01