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Brendan J. Herger City College of San Francisco Arch 20-4, Spring Semester 13Herger@gmail.com


Inroduction T

hrough this semester, I have had the opportunity to explore a field that had previously left me witless. Drawing, though once a sore spot for me, has become a field of creative and imagination--a way to freely express my thoughts (an amazing development compared to the frustration I once felt). In freehand drawings, I am now comfortable both recreating the world around me, and communicating ideas that I otherwise would be unable to express. Furthermore, in drawings done at the drafting table, I have come to appreciate the accuracy and exactness of my tools, and their ability to guide my creations to anal-retentive bliss.


Visulization & Scaling W

hen this began with drawing a straight line from one edge of the paper to the other (1), I knew I was in trouble. I prefer precision above all else, though as we progressed, I became more and more accustomed to trust my ability to judge, placing the right or left edge of a cube where it seemed to fit, and exploring new concepts. I began on my own in earnest, with small drawings. Once I had mastered a cube (2), and a floating cube (3), I began more interesting concepts, such as a brick façade (4), and eventually buildings (7).

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bove all else, this first exercise provoked me to be creative, though in my attempts at perfection, I too often breezed over the purpose of this exercise: scaling. From the full sized drawing (1), essentially traced onto an image projected on the paper, I did not embrace an opportunity to learn, but rather focused on results. Similarly, my first attempt at scaling (2) was heavily assisted. It was not until my second scaled iteration (3) that I embraced my abilities, and put trust in my measurements. Though rougher than the first attempt, it was fulfilling to create such a representation unaided. In my final iteration (4), I was able to further expand my use of the box method through relative measurements . Though not a perfect reduction, my image bears a strong resemblance to the original. While most of the measured points are correct, I realized that curves will be an issue in the future, and are the largest discrepancies in this project.

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Orthographics, objects in multiple views

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njoying the comfort of a straight edge once again, I found the modelling of orthographic projects somewhat natural. While I had issues rotating an object mentally at first, as I began to understand the faces of a cube in relation to one another (1), I began to further enjoy this mental exercise, and in particular, cube rotations (5-8), and moving between various methods of visualization (3-8). Further expanding my understanding of conceived three dimensional objects, and ability to rotate these objects, and visualize them through various means, I began to play with more interesting shapes (9-10, 11-13).

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s i continued, I decided to begin increasing the scale and complexity of my drawings. From a string of multiplied and divided cubes (8), I furthered my ability to portray depth. Finally, in a larger drawing (9), I explored the relationship between discontinuous objects in a two point perspective, and the effects of spacing between objects (particularly the ‘stepping stones’)

multiple views 2

multiple views 1

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Body Drawing (3) (2) (4)

Two Point Perspective

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multiple views 3

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Visualization & Scaling One Point

Office Method

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hough this technique has been, by far, the most difficult of this class thus far, I enjoy the exactness it provides. In particular, I enjoy this method’s formulated control of perspective (1), ability to exactly draw objects that might have otherwise have been difficult to visualize in a two point (23) (particularly the back cube), and ability to directly address issues in interesting forms, such as planes parallel to the picture plane (4). Finally, I expanded with more intricate building-like forms (5-8)

Relative to the other methods of visualization, one point came much more slowly. Preceding my first decent voyage into the world of one point (1-3), I worked through a number of very distorted drawings. As I continued in this style, however, I began to enjoy the sense of volume that could be attained (5), and the ease with which a daily situation could be recorded, using simple sighting techniques (1-3). Building on my previous method of exploring a method in smaller drawings, and expanding my knowledge in a larger image, I chose to create this slice of the world, roughly modelled after Powell Station (6). As I began to draw, I further questioned and re-evaluated my understanding of relative size (particularly in interior areas), and ability to offset discontinuous surfaces (retaining wall and buildings on the right)

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Grid Method

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ore a tangent off of the office method than its own true method, the grid method allowed for a unique way to interpret visual information, and create 3 dimensional shapes on paper.

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With the inner workings and terminology of this method out of the way (1), I proceeded to try designing objects in the grid, then transferring them into the necessary plan oblique. This method provides ample opportunity to experiment, without the restraints that are central to one points, two points, and the office method, allowing for easier design, particularly of building like forms (3-5),

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Visualization & Scaling Misc. Drawings A

s a whole, my exploits into one point, two point, office method and grid method drawing have been a joy. Though I claim no level of mastery, this endeavour has given me a starting point, from which I can continue to examine the world around me, and finally be able represent it. Though my work has some short comings-line hierarchy and consistency will continue to develop, on the whole I am pleased with my trials. With guidance, I have come to enjoy a new level of understanding and insight in visual communication and furthered it though exploration and the issues I’ve face.


Ferrier Home First Floor- First Draft T

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his assignment, complete with a weight and scale previously unseen provided yet another opportunity- a chance to expand my doodles and sketches into a full sized work- and the difficulties that arise with a full sized work. In particlar, I’ve had issues keeping the entire project consistent. One change to a section changes furniture arrangement in the floor plan, or a section of trusses can completely change a section or elevation. On the whole, however this set of drawings has been a chance to add to my ability to coordinate a number of drawings, and emphasize quality in each.

his first trial at drawing an actual floor plan was a bit more dificult than I expected. Though similar in concept to other work we had done, the scale provided numerous issues. In this first draft, I was rather unhappy with my varrying wall widths, and had issues with curvilinear forms (the dining room wall, staircase wall). Furthermore, as I continued to draw, I found myself unable to commit to the level of quality that I have been accutomed to, and about half way through realized that this draft would simply be an under-lay for a final copy.


Ferrier Home T

hough similar in many aspects to my first draft, this final copy improves on many of the shortcomings of the first draft, while meeting some new issues. In this copy, the outside walls are more uniformly six inches, while the inside are more uniformly five. Furthermore, while in the first draft, I had omitted the rear windows of the garage (who wants to look at a disorganized mess?), I choose to reinstate them in this copy, allowing form some natural light in an otherwise gloomy and large space (and blinds when needed). Moreover, I have included a number of other small changes, such as a piano in the living room, correctly modeled inside doors (without a line that would normally denote a flooring change), and a less ambiguous fireplace. This final copy also includes the title, compass, and denotes the longitudinal and transverse sections, and has some minor corrections to the specifications.


Ferrier Home T

hough the second floor was the last floor plan I completed, and had thought it the easiest, I had a few issues with it. First, there was some ambiguity in the original photocopy, which necessitated some level of interpretation (such as in the shower area). Furthermore, I took some liberties from the original, choosing not to denote the book shelf area (which could instead be used for storage or a large aquarium), and left the inside of the stair column with only a banister, rather than a wall.


Ferrier Home

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he elevations were mostly straigt forward, except for an orientation sisue with the West Elevation, which led me to draw the doors and windows in the mirror image of what they should be. Otherwise, the elevations were a refreshing chance to think, and to some extent experiment with styling and decoration. Though some of my fellow classmates had issues with the heighth of the building, I used proportions for my specifications, and came extremly close to Jerry’s approximation, and well within the range of what is realistic. I did, however, have some issues with spacing and correctly aligning the first and second stories, and correctly placing window.


Ferrier Home T

his section was a chance to explore furnishing a space-an area where i may have gone overboard. Before I poched the walls, the image was overbearingly focused on furniture, but with the walls filled in, I believe that there is a good level of balance between the structural and interior design elements of this drawing. In particular, I feel that my use of furniture helps explain the spaces, and give them scale, while the walls have enough weight to stand high in the hierarchy of information. This exploration, however was not without its drawback. At first, I had neglected to include the trusses that support the floor of the second story, and found myself strained to put them in. Furthermore, I found myself erasing and redrawing the furniture repeatedly, which impacted the quality of the image.


Ferrier Home T

his transverse section has proven to be a bit of a creative challenge, matched only with a no longer extant eraser. Similar to the longitudinal section, the trusses were added after the drawing was complete. On the whole, however, I am very pleased with this drawing, particularly the lights in the family area, and the opening between the master bedroom and the family room.


Ferrier Home With this experience beneath my belt, I feel much more adept and practiced at all of the methods used, and have a much greater sense of overall confidence about drafting a drawing. In particular, I feel that my increased capacity to create uniform, dark lines, navigate dimension, and approach a project of this scale without being overwhelmed by detail.


Conclusion F

or me, the mysterious art of conveying information through images has been divined, and turned into a science. Now, with or without straight edge in hand, I can view or imagine and image, and convey this information through a drawing-a skill of unprecedented value. My explorations and dives into drawing have not been uniformly miraculous, or even for the most part easy, but they have been intriguing, and led to conclusions upon conclusion, and discovery upon discovery. Without being too overzealous about my growth, I believe i can aptly say that my capacity has been greatly increased, in addition to a new-found respect for architecture, and the unsung difficulties it can produce.


Brendan J. Herger | 13Herger@gmail.com


Arch 20 Learning Portfolio