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BRENDAN GIRTEN ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO SUMMER 2018


BRENDAN GIRTEN girtenbn@mail.uc.edu 513.293.4872

EDUCATION

UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI | DAAP Expected:

May 2019 BS Architecture Mathematics Minor

GPA:

EXPERIENCE

3.8

RETAIL DESIGN COLLABORATIVE Long Beach, CA Design Intern

August - December 2017 Worked on a design team responsible for: Initial concept design, master planning, design packages, office layouts, physical concept models, redlines, network workflow, construction document setup, and client/department meeting participation.

AL. NEYER | NEYER ARCHITECTS, INC. Cincinnati, OH Architectural Intern

January - May 2017 Worked on design/build team assisting in: construction documents, preliminary site plans, presentation packages, collecting record drawings, permit set assemblage, PM coordination, client/department meeting assistance.

Professional

Rhinoceros 5, VRay 3.0, Adobe Creative Suite, Revit, AutoCAD, Sketchup, Microsoft Office, Hand-Made Models, Design Packages

Academic

Grasshopper, Autodesk Maya, Laser Cutting, Model Making, Hand Drafting/Rendering

SKILLS

RECOGNITIONS

Dean’s List (University of Cincinnati, fall 2013-present) University of Cincinnati Men’s Water Polo Team President (2015-2016) Cincinnatus Scholar |3


TECTONIC STUDIO

6

TECTONIC PROMENADE

8

SITE TECTONICS

10

TECTONIC ART PAVILLION

14

ROWHOUSE

20

PRECEDENT ANALYSIS

22

MORPHOLOGY

24

MODEL ITERATIONS

30

SECTION

32

PLAN

36


TECTONIC STUDIO

6

TECTONIC PROMENADE

8

SITE TECTONICS

10

TECTONIC ART PAVILLION

14


TECTONIC PROMENADE Week 1 in a 7 week tectonic studio, the promenade is an exploration in defining movement through mass, plane, and line. This promenade employs plane as circulation to cut into and elevate above the ground mass. Line defines structure for the plane and implies volume.

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TECTONIC STUDIO | PROFESSOR HAMMAKER | SUMMER 2017


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SITE TECTONICS Week 2-3 of the tectonic studio focused on site. Applying the same principle as in the promenade, the site was a group effort to accomadate individual installations at a water front park in downtown Cincinnati. Using the existing circulation, we abstracted a grid that we could extrapolate to house all three pavillions. Once the grid was established, we set up assocations between the sites so each was related to one another and had nuanced elements; this created a set of rules that influenced our later designs without enforcing hard guidelines about construction. The culmination of our tectonic analysis created a coshesive set of pavillions constructed by three different students.

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TECTONIC STUDIO | PROFESSOR HAMMAKER | SUMMER 2017


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TECTONIC STUDIO | PROFESSOR HAMMAKER | SUMMER 2017


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TECTONIC ART PAVILLION

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TECTONIC STUDIO | PROFESSOR HAMMAKER | SUMMER 2017


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Week 4-7 of the tectonic studio, the pavillion was designed without program. The intention of this project was to examine space and composition through mass, plane, and line. Using the tectonic site and the associations created through our investigation, I designed a site that was elevated. This pavillion builds upon the site parti of bisection by separating mass using line and plane--evident in all elevations, plan, and section. the mass of the pavillion houses the later-added program of an art pavillion. Line is used superstructure and tension to suspend the mass. plane is used to divide mass when applied to the structure.

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TECTONIC STUDIO | PROFESSOR HAMMAKER | SUMMER 2017


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TECTONIC STUDIO | PROFESSOR HAMMAKER | SUMMER 2017


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ROWHOUSE

20

PRECEDENT ANALYSIS

22

MORPHOLOGY

24

MODEL ITERATIONS

30

SECTION

32

PLAN

36


PRECEDENT ANALYSIS

Service Space

Communal Space

Garden

Glazing

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ROW HOUSE | PROFESSOR LUDWIG | WINTER 2018


Private Space

The precedent analysis was a week-long excercise in discovering organzational and conceptual ideas about the rowhouse typology. This analysis is about House Tak by Yoshinori Shioda in Tokyo, Japan. The house makes simple moves that dissociate the communal and private spaces away from the street while simultaneously bringing the users’ attention and experience inward towards a series of gardens.

Porosity

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MORPHOLOGY

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ROW HOUSE | PROFESSOR LUDWIG | WINTER 2018


Pulling the ideas of spatial organization and porosity from the precedent analysis, porosity is used as a cut to place public space under private space. fFom there, the program of cohousing is applied. This program requires 4 separate living areas, 1 per individual occupying the house. Using the individual space, I developed 4 identical cubes that offset and layer to maximize views out towards the river while simultaneously defining the communal space below and between the units.

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ROWHOUSE | PROFESSOR LUDWIG | WINTER 2018


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MORPHOLOGY DIAGRAMS

Site

Site Partition

Vertical Jog

Horizontal Offset

Views Out

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ROW HOUSE | PROFESSOR LUDWIG | WINTER 2018


Porosity

Private Over Public

Circulation Offset

Insert

Program Division

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MODEL ITERATION

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ROWHOUSE | PROFESSOR LUDWIG | WINTER 2018


Using a work flow that works back and forth between model and diagram, the purpose of the iterated model is to exploit the digital diagram. The model layers more infromation onto the existing diagram to further link the isolated units. This space can become breakout space between the individuals that creates a semi-private spcae betwwen the private cubes. Furthermore, the bridge between units doubles as an enclosure for the private space below. The next step in the iterative process is to translate the model into a section drawing. Now the model becomes the new diagram that further iterations will exploit.

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SECTION

1

2

1

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ROW HOUSE | PROFESSOR LUDWIG | WINTER 2018

2


3

3

4

4

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ROWHOUSE | PROFESSOR LUDWIG | WINTER 2018


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PLAN Using the Section and axon to organize and layout space, the plan is choreographing the movement through space. Most of the design happened in the diagrams and the initial massing models. The Section works from those movements and creates thresholds that allow the plan to then create the movements through those zones. The plan also gives a larger context of how the building sits incontext that is not as apparent in the section.

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ROW HOUSE | PROFESSOR LUDWIG | WINTER 2018


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THANK YOU


girtenbn@mail.uc.edu 513.293.4872

Brendan Girten -- Architecture Portfolio  

Selected work processes from my time at the University of Cincinnati.

Brendan Girten -- Architecture Portfolio  

Selected work processes from my time at the University of Cincinnati.

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