Page 1


JEAN SIBELIUS

Works for Male Choir a cappella

Werke für Männerchor a cappella

edited by / herausgegeben von

Sakari Ylivuori

BREITKOPF & HÄRTEL 2015


Contents / Inhalt Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VII Vorwort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VIII Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IX Einleitung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . XXIII Opus 1 Jouluvirsi – Julvisa (Zacharias Topelius) Op. 1/4

3

Opus 18 1 2 3 4 5 6

Sortunut ääni (Kanteletar) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Terve kuu! (Kalevala) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Venematka (Kalevala) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Saarella palaa/Työnsä kumpasellaki (Kanteletar) 13 Metsämiehen laulu (Aleksis Kivi) . . . . . . . . . . 15 Sydämeni laulu (Aleksis Kivi) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Opus 21 Hymn (Fridolf Gustafsson) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

From Opus 27 Finlandia-hymni (Veikko Antero Koskenniemi) . . 27

Opus 84 1 Herr Lager och Skön fager (Gustaf Fröding) . . 31 2 På berget (Bertel Gripenberg) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 3 Ett drömackord (Gustaf Fröding) . . . . . . . . . . . 39 4 Evige Eros (Bertel Gripenberg) . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 5 Till havs! (Jonatan Reuter) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Till havs! (early version) (Jonatan Reuter) . . . . . . 46

Opus 108 1 Humoreski (Larin-Kyösti) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 2 Ne pitkän matkan kulkijat (Larin-Kyösti) . . . . . 56

Works from 1894–1918 Rakastava JS 160a (Kanteletar) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Kuutamolla JS 114 (Aino Suonio) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Har du mod? JS 93 (Josef Julius Wecksell) . . . . . . 71 Veljeni vierailla mailla JS 217 (Juhani Aho) . . . . . . 73

19 24/8 05 [Ej med klagan] (early version of JS 69) . . (Johan Ludvig Runeberg) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Isänmaalle JS 98b (Paavo Cajander) . . . . . . . . . . 78 Isänmaalle (early version) (Paavo Cajander) . . . . 80 Uusmaalaisten Laulu JS 214b (Kaarlo Terhi) . . . . 82 Fridolins dårskap JS 84 (Erik Axel Karlfeldt) . . . 84 Jone havsfärd JS 100 (Erik Axel Karlfeldt) . . . . . 85 Joonaan meriretki JS 100 (transl. Hj. Nortamo) 87

Two works in the memory of Gösta Schybergson JS 224 1 Ute hörs stormen (Gösta Schybergson) . . . . . 91 2 Brusade rusar en våg (Gösta Schybergson) . . . 93

Works from 1920–1929 Viipurin Lauluveikkojen kunniamarssi (1) JS 219 (Eero Eerola) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Likhet JS 121 (Johan Ludvig Runeberg) . . . . . . . 99 Skyddskårsmarsch JS 173 (Nino Runeberg) . . . . 101 Skyddskårsmarsch JS 173 (Piano accompaniment ad lib.) (Nino Runeberg) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Siltavahti JS 170a (Wäinö Sola) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Viipurin Lauluveikkojen kunniamarssi (2) JS 220 (Eero Eerola) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105

An arrangement of a work by Jāzeps Vītols Laulun mahti JS 118 (arr. Sibelius) (Johan Julius Mikkola) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Appendix Athenarnes sång – Ateenalaisten laulu Op. 31 No. 3 (Viktor Rydberg; transl. Yrjö Weijola) . . . . . . 115 Skyddskårsmarsch (early version of JS 173) . . . . . 116 Uusmaalaisten Laulu (early version of JS 214b) 117 Suomenmaa (JS deest) (Aleksis Kivi) . . . . . . . . . 118

Facsimiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Critical Commentary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177


IX

Introduction The seventh series of Jean Sibelius Works (JSW) consists of more than 100 choral works, including both a cappella and accompanied works for mixed choir, male choir, and female choir, as well as for different formations of children’s choir. Some of the works appear in several versions, since Sibelius also published many of his choral works as arrangements, thus leading to a wider circulation. The present volume contains all a cappella works for male choir including the original compositions as well as Sibelius’s own arrangements. The works are organized according to their opus numbers. Works without opus numbers follow these in chronological order, and are indicated by JS numbers. Opus and JS numbering in the present volume essentially follows Fabian Dahlström’s work catalogue.1 In addition to these 32 completed male-choir works, the present volume includes male-choir works that remained uncompleted as well as some early versions either as transcriptions in the Appendix or facsimiled at the end of the volume.2 The present volume also contains the male-choir arrangement of Laulun mahti, written by Sibelius, on Jāzeps Vītols’s (1863–1948) original mixed-choir work. The song texts in Sibelius’s early male-choir output (1893–1905) are mainly in Finnish; only Hymn (Op. 21), Har du mod? (JS 93), and Ej med klagan (the early version of JS 69) stand out as exceptions. The latter part of Sibelius’s male-choir production (from the 1910s onward) is governed by the song texts in Swedish, but he also continued to set Finnish texts. Chronologically, the last male-choir work is Viipurin Lauluveikkojen kunniamarssi (2), which in all likelihood dates from 1929. The vast majority of Sibelius’s male-choir works were originally written for the use of a specific choir or conductor. In most cases, the works were commissioned from Sibelius, the most frequent commissioners being the male choirs Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat, the Helsinki University Male Choir operating in Finnish, and Muntra Musikanter (the male choir “Merry Musicians”), operating in Swedish, as well as the choral conductors Heikki Klemetti (1876–1953) and Olof Wallin (1884–1920). In addition, Sibelius wrote a significant number of his choral works for friends, either as gifts or returned favors. The Finnish choral repertoire during the 1880s and 1890s was largely governed by German Liedertafel music translated into Finnish or Swedish, and Finnish music influenced by that style. Also, folk song arrangements – another important element in the choral repertoire – were written in that style.3 In view of this, it is not surprising that Sibelius’s first publically performed a cappella choral work, Venematka (Op. 18 No. 3), had “a bomb-like effect” on the public in 1893.4 The following year, the success of Venematka was followed by that of Rakastava (JS 160a). In the newspaper reviews, these two works were often grouped together as representing the beginning of an entirely new kind of Finnish choral music. An anonymous critic in the newspaper Wasa Tidning summarized such sentiments thus: “As for their musical spirit and content, both works are the most truly Finnish partsongs we have so far.”5 Another anonymous critic wrote in Pohjalainen that “these [two] songs are, to my knowledge, musically the most significant works ever written for a choir.”6 The idea of Sibelius’s choral music representing a new, truly Finnish music is a recurrent feature throughout the reception of his male-choir works.

Op. 1 No. 4 Jouluvirsi – Julvisa Sibelius originally composed the Christmas song Jouluvirsi – Julvisa for solo voice with piano accompaniment in 1909.7 He later wrote it in four a cappella arrangements for different choral formations, of which the arrangement for male choir is included in the present volume.8 On 16 August 1935, Martti Turunen (1902–1979), the conductor of Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat, wrote a letter to Sibelius asking the composer to arrange Jouluvirsi for their upcoming concert.9 Sibelius agreed and donated the fair copy to the choir, who not only premiered but also printed the arrangement during that year. Although the original Christmas song was composed to Zacharias Topelius’s (1818–1898) poem written in Swedish, Sibelius used the Finnish translation in the choral arrangement; however, the text underlay in the fair copy is only partial. The arrangement was premiered in a concert by Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat on 3 December 1935. Helsingin Sanomat was the only newspaper reviewing Sibelius’s new arrangement: “The commonly-sung Christmas song ‘En etsi valtaa, loistoa’ was now heard for the first time as an arrangement for male choir. In its new form, it sounds pleasingly soft and beautiful, but has perhaps lost some of its sensitivity.”10 Opus 18 Six Part-songs for Male Voices a cappella Sibelius revised the number of included works as well as their reciprocal sequence in Op. 18 several times. Before establishing the final form of the opus, he presented it in public in at least two different forms: In 1905:11 1) Rakastava 2) Venematka 3) Saarella palaa 4) Min rastas raataa 5) Metsämiehen laulu 6) Sydämeni laulu 7) Sortunut ääni 8) Terve kuu! 9) Veljeni vierailla mailla In 1911–1930:12 1) Isänmaalle 2) Veljeni vierailla mailla 3) Saarella palaa 4) Min rastas raataa 5) Metsämiehen laulu 6) Sydämeni laulu 7) Sortunut ääni 8) Terve kuu! 9) Venematka The early history of Op. 18 is intertwined with that of Op. 21. Before Isänmaalle became the opening number of Op. 18, it appeared in the work lists as Op. 21b, and after Rakastava was excluded from Op. 18, it appeared as Op. 21 No. 1 (1909– 1911).13 Confusingly, the choral versions of Rakastava (JS 160a and c) have also been regularly labeled under Op. 14, which Sibelius probably intended only for the string orchestra version.14 Another confusing detail in the history of Op. 18 is the fact that Sibelius never wrote Min rastas raataa for male choir; it exists only as a mixed-choir work. Why Sibelius consistently


X placed it among male-choir works in his work lists remains unknown.15 Around 1930, Sibelius revised the content of Op. 18 for the last time. The new sub numbering in its final form was made public for the first time in 1931 in Cecil Gray’s Sibelius biography, where the opus was titled “Six part-songs for male voices a cappella.”16 1) Sortunut ääni 2) Terve kuu! 3) Venematka 4) Saarella palaa 5) Metsämiehen laulu 6) Sydämeni laulu In the following section, only those works that were included in the final form of the opus are discussed. The works that were excluded from the opus in 1930 are discussed in the section Works without Opus Number. Sibelius set Kanteletar’s rune Sortunut ääni in two versions; one for mixed choir and one for male choir. Based on the sources, the chronology of the two versions cannot be stated with certainty, as no literary documents or manuscript sources for either of the versions have survived. The mixed-choir version was published in print as early as in 1898, whereas the first edition of the male-choir version appeared three years later. The male-choir version was premiered on 21 April 1899; the premiere date of the mixed-choir version remains unknown. The male-choir version of Sortunut ääni was probably commissioned by Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat or their conductor Heikki Klemetti, who premiered it in 1899.17 The premiere concert was a success: the audience demanded every number in the program to be repeated. Critics in both Päivälehti and Hufvudstadsbladet emphasized the quality of the performances and the patriotic atmosphere they created. In neither of the reviews were the compositions reviewed separately; in Hufvudstadsbladet, the critic characterized Sibelius’s works (in addition to Sortunut ääni, also Sydämeni laulu was performed) as “noble.”18 Klemetti commissioned Terve kuu! (the text from Kanteletar) for the male choir Suomen Laulu’s concert tour in Central Europe in the summer of 1901. The purpose of the commissioned work was to display the choir’s exceptionally low basses.19 Sibelius completed the work at the last minute and the choir had just enough time to get the work in performable condition before the farewell concert organized on 30 May 1901 – a couple of days before the departure. Despite the short practice period, the premiere was a success: Terve kuu! was repeated in the concert not just once but twice. The critics also praised the new work. The composer Oskar Merikanto in Päivälehti commented in his review that “as a whole, this composition is artistically one of the most valuable choral compositions here [in Finland].”20 The composition was included in the choral collection Under Sångarfanan – Laulajalippu II published by Westerlund in the following year. Due to the short practice period before the premiere, the choir made use of the boat trip to Tallinn to further rehearse Terve kuu!21 By chance, Martin Wegelius (1846–1906), Sibelius’s former teacher from the Helsinki Music Institute was also aboard. Apparently, Wegelius did not appreciate the new work by his former student, as he remarked to Klemetti, who showed him the manuscript: “Well, truly, what ludicrousness this is again from him!”22 The work, however, fulfilled its purpose, as most of the critics writing about the concerts in various cities praised the choir’s excellent low basses.23

Venematka was commissioned by Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat for their 10-year anniversary concert on 6 April 1893. The conductor Jalmari (Hjalmar) Hahl (1869–1929) had put together an ambitious program, which contained six premieres in total.24 Venematka was Sibelius’s first publically performed a cappella choral work and it garnered immediate success. Oskar Merikanto wrote the review in Päivälehti: “It was very amusing getting to know Sibelius’s Wenematka. […] The song is short, but a real treat. As the other works by Sibelius, it is also clearly based on Finnish rune singing; thus one can recognize its author easily. The travelling by water, the joy at sea, and especially the maidens watching and listening ‘at the tips of the peninsulas’ are depicted in a masterly way.”25 In general, the critics mentioned specifically Sibelius’s and Kajanus’s works. The critic in Hufvudstadsbladet wrote: “J. Sibelius’s Venematka (text from Kalevala) was splendid in every respect, as much by the characteristics as by the musical treatment and contents. […] Though not easy, it was sung with brilliancy by the choir.”26 Saarella palaa was originally entitled Työnsä kumpasellaki in Kanteletar as well as in Sibelius’s composition.27 Sibelius composed it for Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat, who premiered it under Hahl on 7 December 1895. Despite its later premiere, Sibelius may have composed – or at least sketched – it at the same time as Venematka, which was also written for Hahl and Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat: sketches for both works appear in the same sketch book (HUL 1400).28 Saarella palaa and Venematka were published together with Rakastava (JS 160a) in the collection Ylioppilaslauluja 6 (edited by Hahl) in 1895. After the premiere, the critics all praised the originality of the work. The critic in Hufvudstadsbladet wrote: “The latter composition significantly differs from the customary way of composing for male choir and, in all its simplicity, is captivating in its originality and atmosphere.”29 Oskar Merikanto in Päivälehti thought that “‘Työnsä kumpasellaki’ by Sibelius was beautifully vibrating, a great piece of singing, which the audience liked so much that it had to be sung thrice.”30 The critic in Uusi Suometar wrote: “It is a fine, peculiarly beautiful composition […]. It was performed very beautifully. However, we think that the recitative of the first bass should have been sung more ‘parlando’ and not as heavily and stiffly as it was performed. This, however, is the only complaint that can be made regarding this number. Otherwise the performance was astonishingly successful.”31 Heikki Klemetti began his work as the conductor of Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat in the fall season of 1898. For his first concert with the choir, which was to take place on 1 December, he asked Sibelius, his former teacher, to set one of Aleksis Kivi’s (1834–1872) poems to music.32 Sibelius had found the task difficult and time-consuming. However, Klemetti later reminisced that Sibelius gave the manuscript to him with an affectionate remark: “Now it is also the song of my heart.”33 Sibelius’s choice of the poem Sydämeni laulu, taken from the first Finnishlanguage novel Seitsemän veljestä, has often been mystified, as it is a lullaby dealing with the death of a child, and Aino was pregnant at the time with their third child, Kirsti. Kirsti died at the age of 1.34 In the newspaper reviews of the premiere, the main interest was naturally on the new conductor, who was praised by every critic. The only critic describing the premiere performance of Sibelius’s Sydämeni laulu in more than one sentence was Robert Elmgren writing in Uusi Suometar: “Then again, the small song by Sibelius radiates a deep mood and penetrates the heart. The choir sang excellently. The phrasing was correct and the coloring beautiful. The second bass’s pianissimo, in particular, produced a lugubri-


XI ous shining for the entire song. The audience was overwhelmed after listening to it. The applause did not end before the choir had sung it thrice.”35 In other reviews, the work was described with words such as simple, original, and atmospheric.36 Also, Sibelius’s other setting of Kivi, Metsämiehen laulu, was probably commissioned by Klemetti, although the actual commission for the work is not documented.37 Klemetti was an active promoter of Kivi’s art. The exact date of the composition is not known. However, as these two Kivi settings were published together in 1899, but Metsämiehen laulu was not premiered with Sydämeni laulu in 1898, it was in all likelihood composed a little later (in late 1898 or early 1899).38 Metsämiehen laulu was not premiered until 4 April 1900 by Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat. The work was well received; for instance, Oskar Merikanto wrote in Päivälehti one day after the premiere: “The program got a brisk start with Sibelius’s Metsämiehen laulu, which put the roomful of listeners ‘in the mood’.”39 Opus 21 Hymn In 1896, Sibelius wrote Hymn (Op. 21), also known by its initial words Natus in curas, for the unveiling of the sepulchral monument of Josef Pippingsköld (1825–1892), professor of obstetrics at the Imperial Alexander University in Finland (presently the University of Helsinki).40 The Latin text for Hymn was written for the occasion by Fridolf Gustafsson (1853–1924), professor of Roman literature at the University. The unveiling took place on 25 May 1896.41 Sibelius worked as acting music teacher at the University at the time, and as part of his duties at the ceremony he conducted a small ensemble consisting of singers from the male choirs Akademiska Sångföreningen and Muntra Musikanter.42 According to the report in Hufvudstadsbladet on the following day, “the simple unveiling ceremony was given a particularly impressive ending by a hymn composed for the ceremony by Jean Sibelius in an old Italian style.”43 The work was included in the choral collection Laulajalippu – Under Sångarfanan published by Fazer & Westerlund in 1899. For the publication, Sibelius made small revisions to the work, mostly by interchanging the inner-voices in some passages. He also reworked the ending by extending the last phrase.44 In the review of the publication, Sibelius’s work was named as one of the valuable works in the collection, but the critic deemed it – as well as most of the other works in the collection – too difficult, claiming that only a few of the works in the collection were suited to the level of Finnish male choirs.45 From Opus 26 Finlandia-hymni Finnish emigrants in America had sung the hymn section of Finlandia in several different, unauthorized texts and arrangements during the first decades of the 20th century.46 These versions were not generally known in Finland. In 1938, when Yrjö Sjöblom asked Sibelius what he thought of the texts written for his melody, he reacted with reluctance stating that “it [Finlandia] is not intended to be sung. It is written for orchestra. But if the world wants to sing it, there is nothing one can do about it.”47 However, Sibelius wrote the male-choir arrangement after a request by the singer Wäinö Sola (1883–1961) using Sola’s text Oi, Herra annoit uuden päivän koittaa in 1938.48 This version is currently known as a part of The Masonic ritual music (Op. 113 No. 12). The text printed in the present volume stems from the initiative of the male choir Laulu-Miehet, and especially their conductor Martti Turunen, who contacted the poet Veikko Antero Koskenniemi (1885–1962) in 1940 and asked him to write a new poem

for Sibelius’s Finlandia.49 Koskenniemi, despite being reluctant at first to take on the task, wrote a new text to the hymn as part of the publication Latuja lumessa dedicated to the disabled veterans of 1939–1940. The poem published in Latuja lumessa, however, did not fit Sibelius’s melody and it had to be revised in order to be used in the musical edition. Sibelius, who probably participated in the revision process, approved the use of the revised text.50 Finlandia-hymni with the text by Koskenniemi was printed in 1940 by Laulu-Miehet, and premiered at their 25th anniversary concert on 7 December 1940. The concert program contained several male-choir works by Sibelius as the next day was Sibelius’s 75th birthday. Although the concert was reviewed by Uusi Suomi and Helsingin Sanomat on the following day, neither of the newspapers mentioned Finlandia. Opus 84 Five Part-songs for Male Voices a cappella When World War I broke out, Sibelius found himself on opposite sides with his publisher Breitkopf & Härtel, as Germany and Finland (being under Russia) were on different sides. This meant that Sibelius’s income practically dried up.51 For this reason, he had to find local publishers, who would be interested in publishing his works even during the difficult times.52 One such publisher turned out to be the male choir Muntra Musikanter, whose conductor Olof Wallin commissioned five male-choir works during the war years: Herr Lager och Skön fager composed in 1914; På berget, Ett drömackord, and Evige Eros in 1915; and Till havs! in 1917. All the works were premiered and published by Muntra Musikanter, except Till havs!, which was premiered by Akademiska Sångföreningen.53 In addition to these works, Muntra Musikanter commissioned Unge hellener, which Sibelius sketched during this time, but which was never completed.54 The unease caused by the war is tangible in many of Sibelius’s diary entries, even those regarding the choral works of Op. 84. On 30 July 1914, for instance, he wrote: “Shall I be able to compose for these gentlemen of MM in these times? – A rumor has it that German ships are drawing nearer to our shores. And we here in Finland?”55 Despite the feelings of uncertainty, Sibelius started the work with Herr Lager och Skön fager (the poem by Gustaf Fröding, 1860–1911) in July 1914. The first mention of the work in the diary dates from 20 July. He commented on the on-going process on 13 August with a remark that, despite being a commission, the composition would be interesting. The composition process took a rather long time, as Sibelius discarded the original idea on 19 August and started anew. The final fair copy was completed on 28 August. The publication process started immediately, and Sibelius read the proofs as early as 17 September.56 The commission for the second work, På berget, was placed in October 1914, but Sibelius started working on it as late as in January 1915. På berget, set to the poem by Bertel Gripenberg (1878–1947), was completed and sent to the commissioner on 1 February.57 Shortly after delivering the manuscript of Herr Lager och Skön fager to the choir, Sibelius and the representatives of the choir (the chairman Fritiof Gylling in particular) became involved in an altercation. In Sibelius’s opinion, the representatives of the choir had behaved “inappropriately” towards him.58 Although the exact cause as to why Sibelius felt insulted remains unknown, one explanation may be that the delivered work did not meet the expectations of the choristers. This can be deduced, for example, from Sibelius’s diary entry from 29 August, when he writes that his work was “not understood. They had expected something topical and received a humoresque.”59


XII Although the altercation seemed to have been settled during the late summer of 1914, it erupted anew in February 1915 during the publication process of På berget.60 These two works, Herr Lager och Skön fager and På berget, were premiered in the same concert on 27 April 1915. Sibelius had high hopes for the performance: “A good letter from MM’s conductor Dr. Olof Wallin regarding the choral works. I expect a lot from him. I believe he understands the new in my choral works.”61 But despite the high hopes, the performance became a “fiasco.” Sibelius attributed the failure of the performance to the unfavorable placement of his works as the concert’s opening numbers.62 The review in Hufvudstadsbladet was, however, positive. The critic, Karl Wasenius, wrote that the “adopted old style” of På berget was prompted by “raw power that allowed the mountains in the background of the poem to appear with believable effect.” Regarding Herr Lager och Skön fager, the critic acknowledged the work’s skillful partwriting, but commented that “the effect aspired to in the score was not fully attained in the performance, even though all that could be done with the song was done.”63 In other words, the work was too difficult for the choir. Both Sibelius and the critic remarked that the audience did not appreciate these works. The critic, however, speculated that “had the song [På berget] been repeated, I want to believe that the audience would better have understood its magnificent grandeur.”64 As opposed to the first two works in the opus, the composing of Ett drömackord took place in more blissful state of mind. On 26 May 1915, Sibelius wrote in his diary: “Was to see Arvi’s and Eva’s girl. Exceptional. I, a grandfather! – Today I am forging ahead a little with the new things. [I am] also planning for MM.”65 The plans for Muntra Musikanter – i.e., Ett drömackord, set to the poem by Gustaf Fröding – were realized and completed during the following month, and Sibelius sent the fair copy to the choir on 23 June 1915.66 Due to the difficult times, the premiere did not take place until five years later. The concert on 10 December 1920 was one of the first concerts the choir had given in several years, as the choir’s regular activity had ceased after the Finnish Civil War (in 1918).67 The break naturally had an effect on the choir’s level of performance. As the critic Karl Ekman remarked, the fact that MM restarted its activity was a valuable thing in itself, and to critically review their performance would just not be meaningful. However, he still wrote that “for example, Sibelius’s new Fröding setting, ‘Ett drömackord’, became a rather mediocre performance with unclear harmonies and lack of precision in the ensemble singing.”68 Sibelius wrote Evige Eros (the poem by Bertel Gripenberg) for baritone solo and male choir after listening to the baritone Edvin Bäckman in the summer of 1915. Sibelius completed the work on 5 September. As Wallin received the fair copy, he wrote to Sibelius that the solo part “suits both Bäckman’s voice and temperament excellently.”69 The premiere took place on 14 December 1915, and it received a favorable review. In Hufvudstadsbladet, the critic Karl Wasenius wrote: “The first part [of the concert] was concluded by a new song ‘Evige Eros’, set to Bertel Gripenberg’s words, a dithyramb, written in a nobly uplifting manner, additionally lauded by the masterly control and treatment of the media that Sibelius obviously proved to possess here. […] The solo, which dominates the vocal composition, was raised to the enchanting beauty of line. Also, the modulatory changes presented a masterly use of colors.” Even the performance was praised by the critic: “Mr Edvin Bäckman sang the solo from the first to the last note with a wonderful voice and in an uplifting manner that corresponded to the beautiful contents

of the song. The choir also managed its delicate task in a respectable way […].”70 The audience demanded the work to be immediately repeated.71 Till havs! was written as an honorary song (lystringssång) for the male choir Akademiska Sångföreningen. Although the opus otherwise consists of works written for Muntra Musikanter, the commissioner was the common denominator for the works in Op. 84: Olof Wallin, who conducted both choirs.72 Sibelius wrote the fair copy of the first version of the work on 17 April 1917, but did not send it to Wallin. On 19 April, he revised the work, which was then sent to the commissioner on the day of the revision.73 Two days later, Sibelius composed Drömmarna (JS 64) for mixed choir. The texts of Drömmarna and Till havs! are taken from the same collection by the poet Jonatan Reuter (1859–1947). Akademiska Sångföreningen premiered Till havs! within a few weeks on 30 April at a soirée in the restaurant Kaivohuone in Helsinki; due to the civil unrest, the choir could not give a spring concert as they had traditionally done. The soirée was not reviewed in the newspapers.74 Both versions of Till havs! are published in the present volume; the early version appears in print for the first time. Opus 108 Two Part-songs for Male Voices a cappella Not much is known about the origins of the two male-choir works in the opus, Humoreski and Ne pitkän matkan kulkijat, both set to poems by Kyösti Larson (1873–1948), known by his penname Larin-Kyösti. According to the dedication written on the autograph fair copy, Sibelius donated the works, including their copyrights, to Eduard Polón (1861–1930), one of the most important businessmen of his time.75 Sibelius probably composed the works in return for his patronage. The exact time of the composing is not known. The sketched melody of Ne pitkän matkan kulkijat appears in a booklet (currently in NL, HUL 1697, p. [1]) containing Sibelius’s notes concerning his income and expenditure from 1917 and 1918. However, the fair copies of both works would suggest a later time of composing as they are written on the paper type which Sibelius was known to use between 1923 and 1925.76 Furthermore, the postmark in the extant parcel (currently in private possion), in which the fair copy was sent, would suggest that at least Humoreski was sent to Polón during 1924 (the number series in the postmark is not unambiguous; further, whether Ne pitkän matkan kulkijat was in the same parcel cannot, however, be deduced). Thus, 1924 seems the likely year of composition, although Ne pitkän matkan kulkijat is possibly based on a melody sketched earlier and perhaps for another purpose. Both works appeared in print in 1925, published by the male choir Laulu-Miehet. Polón later assigned the rights of Op. 108 to Laulu-Miehet. Laulu-Miehet premiered the works on 23 March 1926. Apparently, the works were difficult for the choir. Although critics unanimously praised the quality of singing in general, the difficulty of Sibelius’s new works caused some problems. The critic Otto Kotilainen wrote the following day in Helsingin Sanomat: “Some of the new works in particular were so close to the boundary of what is possible in choral music that it is no wonder if here and there a discordant sound was audible.” The same critic continued: “Both [works] contain a plentitude of very sensitive chord progressions and melodies, which require time for the singers in order to mature into perfect performances.”77 In Uusi Suomi, the critic complained about the high pitches: “The task of the tenors was not made easier at all by the many new works in the program, which – as accomplished


XIII compositions as they were – invariably climbed to such a register that our Nordic tenors had to excessively exert themselves […].”78 Works without Opus Number from 1894–1918 In addition to the opus-numbered works discussed above, during 1894–1918 Sibelius wrote nine male-choir works that remained without opus number: Rakastava, Kuutamolla, Har du mod?, Veljeni vierailla mailla, Ej med klagan, two versions of Isänmaalle, Uusmaalaisten laulu, Fridolins dårskap, and Jone Havsfärd. Sibelius also wrote two male-choir works for the poems of Gösta Schybergson during the spring of 1918. These two Schybergson settings are discussed separately below. To widen the body of Finnish male-choir works, the male choir Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat (conducted by Jalmari Hahl) organized a composition competition in 1893–1894, in which Sibelius took part by submitting Rakastava (JS 160a, the text from Kanteletar). Based on the surviving sketches, it seems that Sibelius did not generate new material for Rakastava, but took advantage of several of his previously sketched ideas.79 The exact date of composition remains unknown, but the competition was announced in May 1893 and the concert, in which the works to be awarded were performed, took place on 28 April 1894.80 In the concert, Sibelius’s work attracted wide attention. For example, the critic in Hufvudstadsbladet described the performance in these words: “Mr. Sibelius incites in his tone poem surprising scenes, atmospheric and permeated with a breeze of warm feeling, originality and the Finnish spirit in the melodies and in the work’s overall character. We have now no time for a more detailed description, other than just to say that the tone poem had an unparalleled effect. The composer was called forth during the deafening thunder of applause, honestly intended and earned.”81 The jury’s decision astonished many. In the concert, it was announced that a patriotic work Hakkapeliitta by Emil Genetz (1852–1930) was awarded the first prize and Rakastava placed second. The critics voiced their disapproval of the decision unanimously: for example, Karl Flodin in Nya Pressen wrote: “It is not known which points of view were presented in the jury, but Mr. Sibelius’s composition stands without a doubt above that of the winner in regard to originality.”82 Hakkapeliitta was deemed conventional by the critics. Interestingly, one critic returned to the question on 2 May, after the second concert, showing this time also some appreciation of Genetz’s work: “[Regarding Hakkapeliitta] we must admit that this time we got a better conception of this impressive piece of music than last time. We still give preference to ‘Rakastava,’ which in our opinion is the most wonderful Finnish male-choir work we have heard.”83 The jury’s decision has often been explained by the modernity and difficulty of Sibelius’s choral writing.84 When Rakastava was published in the choral collection Suomalaisia ylioppilaslauluja 6 in 1896, Sibelius’s works puzzled an anonymous critic: “The songs by Sibelius [Venematka, Saarella palaa, and Rakastava] are very strange. One gets practically no conception of them at the first playing. But when one becomes better acquainted with them, one notices much beauty in them. […] But the most beautiful [work in the collection] is without a doubt ‘Rakastava,’ though it contains such odd dissonances that one at first doubts whether it is correctly printed. When played, this song feels long and monotonous, but it probably sounds quite varied when sung. The beginning is very pleasing, as the melody is so simple and fine. The baritone solo in the middle

makes a strange impression: a solo which from beginning to end remains on one pitch. The tenor solo at the end is beautiful. The entire song is very Finnish, as most works by Sibelius.”85 On 19 April 1898, the poet and playwright Aino Krohn (1878– 1956), better known by her married name Aino Kallas,86 woke up in the middle of the night to sounds coming from outside; a male-voice quartet was singing a serenade. But it was the song that followed the initial serenade that took Krohn by surprise. As she later reminisced: “My heart was ardently pounding … After that … how – is it possible – why those are my own lines, from the poem ‘Kuutamolla’.”87 Sibelius had composed Krohn’s poem at the request of his friend, the writer and photographer I. K. Inha (1865–1930), originally Konrad Into Nyström, who wanted to propose to Krohn. After the unfortunate first performance – Krohn’s answer to Inha was not affirmative – Sibelius’s Kuutamolla remained in Krohn’s possession.88 The first public performance took place only 18 years later, when Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat (conducted by Heikki Klemetti) performed it on 11 April 1916 in the concert commemorating the 40th anniversary of Finnish-language student-choir activity. Kuutamolla, which was placed in the concert among new works, did not make a favorable impression on the critics. For example, the critic Evert Katila in Uusi Suometar wrote: “The creator of Finnish male-choir composition proper [as a genre] is Sibelius, who was represented in the program this time by a small insignificance from times passed.”89 However, the critic in Helsingin Sanomat gave a favorable review stating that Sibelius’s new work was “atmospheric, harmonized in a way peculiar to the composer.”90 Both Helsingin Sanomat and Hufvudstadsbladet described the work erroneously as a new composition. In the fall of 1991, a previously unknown autograph fair copy of Har du mod? (JS 93) for male choir a cappella surfaced.91 Although it shared the same text by Josef Julius Wecksell (1838–1907) as did the published composition Har du mod? (Op. 31 No. 2, for male choir with orchestral accompaniment), the surfaced composition turned out to be a completely different composition, and not, for example, an arrangement of the previously known work. Very little is known about the origins of the a cappella setting of Har du mod? (JS 93). It has been suggested that the a cappella work preceded the published composition, which was composed and premiered in 1904.92 This hypothesis is supported by the fact that the sketch of the a cappella composition appears on the same folio as sketches for the first act of Kuolema (JS 113), incidental music for the play by Arvid Järnefelt dating from 1903.93 However, an exact date for the composition cannot be deduced. The a cappella composition was neither performed nor published during Sibelius’s lifetime and it appears in print for the first time in the present volume. In 1903, many eminent Finns who had publically opposed the actions to russify Finland were exiled. Some were officially exiled by the General-Governor of Finland Nikolay Bobrikov, but some voluntarily decided to leave Finland to guarantee their safety. Among the voluntarily exiled was also the writer Juhani Aho (1861–1921), who due to his political writings decided to spend 1903–1904 with his family in Italy and Austria.94 The poem Veljeni vierailla mailla is a description of Aho’s arrival back in Finland in spring 1904.95 Aho wrote two versions of the poem: a prose poem, which was published in Helsingin Sanomat on 12 October 1904, and a metrical poem, which Sibelius set to music.96 Aho did not include the metrical version in any of his collections, thus in all likelihood it was specifically intended to be composed by Sibelius and the composer probably received


XIV the text directly from the poet.97 The reciprocal chronology of the poem’s two versions is not known.98 Also, the exact date of the composition is undocumented, but it must have taken place rather soon after Aho’s return, as the male choir Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat (conducted by Heikki Klemetti) premiered the work on 2 December 1904. The composition was received enthusiastically. The critic Karl Flodin in Helsingfors Posten described the work after the premiere in detail: “Jean Sibelius gave a peculiar contribution to the program, a song full of patriotic topicality: parts of Juhani Aho’s touching prose poem ‘Veljeni vierailla mailla’ (My Brothers in Foreign Lands). The composer had solved in a masterly manner the task to rhythmically treat Finnish prose. However, the hopeless melancholy in the refrain ‘veljeni vierailla mailla’ was even more masterfully expressed with a descent into the dark minor sonority, which similarly felt grandiose every time and finally pointed towards destiny and starless space. The song was not of that kind that is immediately appreciated for its purely musical treatment, but by repetition all that was intensively felt and distinctively expressed stood out in a completely different way.”99 Veljeni vierailla mailla was published in the choral collection Suomalaisia ylioppilaslauluja II during 1905.100 Sibelius composed Ej med klagan for the funeral of his friend, Albert Edelfelt (1854–1905), who was one of the most renowned painters in Finland. The unexpected loss of his friend shook Sibelius deeply. He wrote to Axel Carpelan (1858–1919), his friend and benefactor, on 20 August 1905: “I am writing at the moment something for Edelfelt’s funeral. I cannot describe how much I miss him. Life is short!!”101 For the composition, Sibelius chose the last six lines of the poem Molnets broder from Fänrik Ståls sägner by Johan Ludvig Runeberg (1804–1877). He first composed Ej med klagan for male choir, but abandoned this version, and adopted the material for mixed choir. The male-choir version was left unpublished and forgotten and appears printed in the present volume for the first time.102 The present volume contains two versions of Isänmaalle. The exact date of composition of the early version is not documented, but in all likelihood Sibelius did not write it before 1898. The first edition of the patriotic poem by Paavo Cajander (1846–1913) was entitled Maljan-esitys Isänmaalle, but the second edition (published in 1898) contained the title Isänmaalle, also used by Sibelius. Sibelius never made the early version public. Instead, in 1900 he published a slightly revised version of the work for mixed choir.103 In 1908, the male choir Turun Työväen Mieskuoro and its conductor Anders Koskinen commissioned a male-choir arrangement, as no male-choir version of the work was publically available during that time.104 Koskinen’s intention was to perform the new version in the male-choir competition organized by Kansanvalistusseura in Viipuri on 19–21 June 1908. Sibelius sent the arrangement, which is based on the published mixed choir version and thus differs from the first male-choir version, to Koskinen on 8 May 1908. The fair copy of the arrangement, however, contained neither the text underlay nor any dynamic markings, and Sibelius wrote at the end of the fair copy: “This is how the song is to be sung. Please, add the underlay and the dynamic marks in their correct position. In all hurry yours, Jean Sibelius.”105 On 7 July 1908, Koskinen happily informed the composer that Turun Työväen Mieskuoro had won the competition. In the letter, he also complimented the arrangement and apologized that the choir had “no other resources to show their respect” to the composer.106 The choir and the composer continued their cooperation as Sibelius gave the choir permission to publish the

first edition of the work, which already appeared during the same year.107 In October 1911, a few members of Eteläsuomalainen Osakunta visited Sibelius in Ainola. The members enquired whether Sibelius was willing to write music for the poem Uusimaa written in 1896 by Juho Heikki Erkko (1849–1906). The song would become the anthem of the Uusimaa region in Southern Finland, which was also Sibelius’s home region. Sibelius answered that he did not want to write music for Erkko’s poem, which Oskar Merikanto had already composed. He would, however, be willing to compose a regional anthem if the students provided him with a suitable new poem. For this purpose, Eteläsuomalainen Osakunta decided to organize a writing competition, which was won by the pseudonym “1912,” alias Kaarlo Terhi (1872–1921), a singing teacher from Salo.108 Sibelius received the winning poem on 21 December 1911 and began working on it immediately. According to the first plans Sibelius wrote down in his diary, the music was to become “a unison, monumental, one that will travel through the centuries.”109 Sibelius worked on the song intensively for nearly a month. During the composition process, he also expressed feelings of doubt: “Here in my chamber it [the melody] is quite good. But does it also affect [those] out in the broad, cold world? – Is it not too douce? And does it not sound too ‘hausbacken’?”110 The song was still unfinished when the poet himself visited Ainola on 16 January 1912. Four days later, the song was in all likelihood completed, since Sibelius showed it to Kaarle Krohn, a member of the writing competition’s board of examiners, who was visiting Ainola.111 Sibelius fair copied the versions for male choir and mixed choir the next day, on 21 January, but revised the male-choir version on 1 February 1912. The publication process of the mixed-choir version had already begun, since Sibelius read the first proofs for the mixed-choir version on 2 February.112 The first edition was printed as a collaboration between Eteläsuomalainen Osakunta and the publishers WSOY.113 Terhi’s poem became disputed. Some members of Eteläsuomalainen Osakunta disapproved of his poem. Some even suggested that the winning poem should be altogether discarded, and the poet Eino Leino (1878–1926) should be asked to write a new poem for Sibelius’s composition.114 But it was not only the poem that was controversial. When Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat (conducted by Heikki Klemetti) premiered the male-choir version of the work on 20 April 1912, the critic in Helsingin Sanomat commented: “The only thing I can say about Sibelius’s new Uusmaalaisten laulu is that even a great master can sometimes compose without inspiration.”115 The critic Wasenius in Hufvudstadsbladet was also unimpressed: “It [the second part of the concert] began with Uusmaalaisten laulu by Sibelius, a song in which I tried in vain to find ‘was Besonderes’.”116 Despite the reserved reception by the critics, the audience insisted on hearing the song again. Sibelius originally included Uusmaalaisten laulu in Op. 65, entitled Patriotiska sånger (Patriotic songs) as Op. 65b, which he changed in 1914 to Op. 65c. In 1930, the work was eventually excluded from the list of opus-numbered works.117 During the politically turbulent years of 1917 and 1918, a shortage of food was a challenge for many in Finland. On 12 May 1917, Torkel Nordman, an architect and a choral singer from Pori, sent Sibelius the following letter: “To keep my promise, I sent you a smoked ‘lamb fiddle’ [leg of lamb] today. Collect it immediately from the station and store it hanging – May you find it tasty. Schnapps goes well with it.”118 In order to deliver the leg without it being stolen on the way, Nordman placed it in a violin case. If Sibelius, once a violinist himself, was sent a


XV violin, it would not seem too suspicious. The plan worked out and the delivery arrived in Ainola intact.119 The leg of lamb was not the only delicacy sent to Sibelius by Nordman: in 1918, he sent some river lampreys – also with an instruction that they were to be consumed with schnapps.120 As a token of his gratitude, Sibelius composed two humorous male-choir works and sent them to Nordman: Fridolins dårskap on 15 May 1917 and Jone havsfärd on 20 September 1918. Both poems were taken from the same poem collection, Fridolins lustgård och dalmålningar på rim by Erik Axel Karlfeldt (1864–1931). Sibelius’s choice of the poem Fridolins dårskap was very suitable, as the last strophe begins: “Go home and scrape the leg of lamb that hangs on your wall.”121 The text of Jone havsfärd is a humorous drinking-song-like version of Jonah’s story from the Bible. Fridolins dårskap in particular became popular among Finnish male choirs. The popularity of the work that was originally intended as “a joke” (ett skämt) took Sibelius by surprise.122 Otto Andersson wrote in 16 June 1952 after a discussion with Sibelius that the composer could not “understand how it had become as popular as it was and through whom it began circulating in the first place.”123 Although Sibelius originally composed the music for the original Swedish version of the poem, the first edition only contained the Finnish translation. In the present volume, the text is given in both languages. Two compositions in the memory of Gösta Schybergson (JS 224) On 2 February 1918, during the Finnish Civil War, soldiers of the Red army surrounded the Humalisto hospital (Humleberg in Swedish) in Helsinki to search for hidden weapons. After the inspection of the hospital and other buildings in the area, the soldiers captured the 24-year-old doctor Gösta Schybergson. A little later, Schybergson was executed nearby.124 The brutality of the act shocked Finland and was condemned even by the leaders of the Red army. Furthermore, as Schybergson was a member of the Red Cross (he was wearing the Red Cross armband at the time of the execution), the foreign consuls also reacted strongly and pressured the leaders of the Red army. The news of the murder also reached Ainola; Sibelius wrote in his diary on 9 February: “The murder of Dr. Schybergson has deeply shaken me.”125 After the murder, Schybergson’s mother, Johanna, found among Gösta’s possessions some poems written by him. She asked if Sibelius was willing to compose the music for them. Sibelius, who was staying with his family at his brother’s place in Helsinki at the time, visited the Schybergson family in April and selected two of the poems: Ute hörs stormen and Brusande rusar en våg, which he set for male choir, as the young doctor had been an active member of the male choir Akademiska Sångföreningen. Sibelius visited the family again on 30 April and handed over the fair copies of the new works.126 These two works were published by Akademiska Sångföreningen during the fall of 1918 in an edition dedicated to the memory of Gösta Schybergson.127 Ute hörs stormen was premiered during Akademiska Sångföreningen’s concert trip to Viipuri in Karelia (Eastern Finland at that time) on 5 April 1919. Although the Sibelius song was used as an advertisement for the concert (in Wiborgs Nyheter on 4 April), it was not mentioned in the review (on 7 April). In fact, not a single number was specified in the review; based on the writings in Wiborgs Nyheter, it seems that the political gesture of the choir’s trip was considered more important than the musical contents of the concert. This was also stated explicitly in the newspaper: “[…] so should this be greeted with joy and

sympathy by each, who not only sees a musical achievement in the choir’s arrival and performance, but also a signal that we Swedes in Finland’s outermost watch against the East are not forgotten […] Seen from this point of view, the Swedish student choir’s visit has a vital meaning.”128 Brusande rusar en våg was premiered two years later by the same choir during their concert trip in Turku in Western Finland on 19 March 1921. According to the critic in Åbo Underrättelser, the quality of the choir suffered because of the significant number of undeveloped voices. The program consisted mostly of traditional male-choir works. Brusande rusar en våg (as well as another premiere) was performed by a smaller ensemble of “somewhat more developed and equalized voice material.” The critic complained, however, that due to the small number of singers the work lost some of its power and effect. Sibelius’s composition was described as having “a bare and musically meager structure.”129 Works without Opus Number from 1920–1929 During 1920–1929, Sibelius wrote five male-choir works, which remained without opus number: two compositions to the poem Viipurin Lauluveikkojen kunniamarssi, Likhet, Skyddskårsmarsch, and Siltavahti. In October 1919, the male choir originally known as Wiborg Sångarbröder decided to translate his original Swedish name into Finnish, thus becoming Viipurin Lauluveikot.130 The translation of the name aroused the need for a new honorary march with a song text in Finnish – the choir already possessed an honorary march in Swedish composed by Selim Palmgren. During the fall of 1919 and spring of 1920, the choir unsuccessfully sought a suitable Finnish text. Finally, in the fall of 1920, the author Eero Eerola (1884–1939), who was also a member of the choir, wrote the poem Viipurin Lauluveikkojen (WSB:n) kunniamarssi, which was approved by the choir. In order to get Eerola’s poem set to music, the choir’s conductor Allan Schulman (1863–1937) turned to Sibelius and asked him to compose the music. The two men had known each other since childhood as they had both been pupils at the lyceum in Hämeenlinna.131 As time passed and Schulman had not heard from Sibelius, he decided to set the poem to music himself. However, around 10 December 1920, Sibelius informed Schulman by telegram that he had, in fact, completed a composition for his choir.132 At a choir meeting on 13 December 1920, Schulman presented Sibelius’s telegram along with his own composition, causing a misunderstanding; Schulman’s composition, which many of the choristers thought was by Sibelius, was received favorably. The misunderstanding was resolved on 20 December at the latest, when Schulman presented Sibelius’s new composition by playing it through on the piano during the choir rehearsal. Sibelius’s composition did not make as favorable an impression as Schulman’s; the choir thought that the composition was “a little strange, but during the discussion, it was noted that this was only appropriate, as the work was written by Sibelius.”133 The choir, however, decided to make use of both compositions: Sibelius’s composition was nominated as the choir’s honorary march and Schulman’s as a flag song. Earlier in 1920, Viipurin Lauluveikot had announced a malechoir composition competition in order to widen the Finnish male-choir repertoire.134 Because the choir’s funds were tied to the competition, they did not have the resources to pay for Sibelius’s composition. In addition, Sibelius’s composition could not be accepted as a submission to the competition; as Schulman later wrote to Sibelius: “We apologize that it could


XVI not participate in the competition […] as it did not arrive anonymously […].”135 This meant that the choir could not use the prize money to pay for Sibelius’s composition. The problematic situation was solved by a member of the choir, however, who donated a small sum for this purpose.136 Viipurin Lauluveikot performed their new honorary march for the first time as the opening number of concerts on 1 and 2 May 1921. Schulman’s composition was also performed; neither of the works was mentioned by the critics. Sibelius’s work had been printed prior to the premiere. Before the work was printed, Sibelius requested a small emendation in a letter. However, what was emended cannot be deduced, because both the autograph manuscript and Sibelius’s letter, in which he requested the change, have been lost.137 Sibelius completed Likhet to the poem by Johan Ludvig Runeberg on 22 January 1922 for the Turku-based male choir Musices Amantes, whose conductor Werner Karsten (1870–1930) was his friend. Sibelius wrote in his diary on the day of the completion that the new work is “a male-choir work in the good old style – its pathos has appealed to me.”138 The work was sent to the choir on the following day, but Karsten, who was “fettered to the sickbed,” was unable to answer.139 In fact, Karsten soon resigned as the choir’s conductor and the position was taken over by Otto Liukkonen in the following spring season. Sibelius’s composition was not premiered until 1926, when Karsten, having returned to his position, conducted it on 13 March in Turku. The work was apparently too difficult for the choir, as the critic in Åbo Underrättelser bluntly stated: “Sibelius’s Likhet exceeded choir’s capability.”140 The work was performed in Helsinki the following year (13 December) by Muntra Musikanter, conducted by Bengt Carlson (1890–1953). In the program leaflet as well as in some of the reviews, Likhet was annotated as a new composition. The critics acknowledged the difficulty of Sibelius’s work, but complimented the level of performance. The critic in Helsingin Sanomat wrote: “The choir sang several rather difficult compositions, easily tackling them. Such ordeals included […] some tough chord formations in Sibelius’s Runeberg romance ‘Likhet’.”141 In 1925, Sibelius commissioned the poet Nino Runeberg (1874–1934) to write the texts for two patriotic songs he had already composed: Skolsång for the use of schools and Skyddskårsmarsch for the paramilitary national defense organization Suojeluskunta (in Swedish Skyddskår). Sibelius wrote Skolsång for mixed choir (see JSW VII/1) and Skyddskårsmarsch for male choir a cappella. For Skyddskårsmarsch, he additionally provided a piano accompaniment (ad libitum) part, which is also included in the present volume. Runeberg initially found the writing task troubling. He wrote to Sibelius on 19 June 1925: “First, when I realized it was a skyddskår-song, I paled and agonized over it. The commonplace patriotic lyric is a nuisance, and how to avoid its damned mode, when it is a question of such a subject? However, the music showed me the way […]. Skolsång became even more difficult to shape [stylistically].” The poet permitted the composer to alter the text, if needed: “That the texts are written in lead pencil is not flippancy, but on the contrary: the idea is that with gummi elasticum, you will be able to take the necessary measures.”142 Sibelius wrote a new fair copy for both works after making minor changes. Aino Sibelius inserted Runeberg’s text into the new fair copies. Sibelius then offered Skolsång and Skyddskårsmarsch to the publishers Holger Schildts Förlag in 1925, but without success. The rejection was attributed to the company’s lack of

experience in the field of music publishing.143 Whether Sibelius offered the works to any other publisher remains unknown. In any case, they were neither published nor performed during Sibelius’s lifetime.144 In 1927, singer Wäinö Sola was in correspondence with Jallu (John Jalmari) Honkonen, the conductor of New Yorkin Laulumiehet, the Finnish emigrant male choir in New York. The conductor expressed the choir’s hope that the poet Veikko Antero Koskenniemi would write a text for their flag song, which Sibelius would then set to music. When Koskenniemi declined, Sola himself wrote the poem entitled Lippulaulu (Flag song). The original poem consisted of six verses. The members of the choir revised Sola’s poem, reducing the number of verses to three and changing the title to Siltavahti.145 At this point, Sibelius was asked to set the poem to music, to which he agreed.146 In 1928, Sibelius wrote the composition in two versions: one for solo voice with piano accompaniment and one for male choir a cappella. During the same year, Sola visited New York and delivered Sibelius’s composition to the choir.147 The choir expressed their gratitude towards the composer in a letter: “I beg in the most sincere way to thank you, Professor, for your empathy and the honor which you have showed to our choir with your composition. In his concerts here [in New York], artist Sola has entranced his audiences with ‘Siltavahti.’ Our choir has ardently practiced it and I feel that it is even more impressive as a choral composition; the singers are delighted with it from the bottom of their hearts.”148 As described above, Sibelius composed an honorary march for the male choir Viipurin Lauluveikot in 1920. About ten years later, he wrote a new composition using the same poem. The history of this second composition – entitled in the present volume as Viipurin Lauluveikkojen kunniamarssi (2) – is not well documented, as the choir’s possessions were lost during World War II. In addition, the only known documents give contradicting dates for the composition. In one later work list, the work is indicated to as dating from 1929. This date is supported by the National Bibliography of Finland, which dates the first edition to 1930.149 However, Eino Reponen in an article from 1962 dates the work to 1934. According to him, Viipurin Lauluveikot performed the first composition (the one dating from 1920) as the opening number of their concert, which was part of the Karelian art festival in Helsinki (Karjalan taideviikko) in 1934.150 Soon after the performance, the choir received a letter (currently lost) from Sibelius, in which he asked the choir to discard his earlier composition and promised to write a new march for the choir.151 Reponen’s information regarding Sibelius’s request to discard the earlier composition may be correct, but the year he gives (1934) must be erroneous.152 Laulun mahti (JS 118) Laulun mahti is Sibelius’s arrangement of Beverīnas dziedonis (The Bard of Beverīna), ballad for mixed choir a cappella by the Latvian composer Jāzeps Vītols (1863–1948).153 Vītols’s composition originally dates from 1891 and Sibelius’s arrangement (dating from 1895) is based on this original version. However, Vītols revised his composition in 1900, writing it for mixed choir and orchestra. In Sibelius’s arrangement, the text – originally written in Latvian by Miķelis Krogzemis (1850–1879) using the pseudonym Auseklis – was translated into Finnish by Jooseppi Julius Mikkola (1866–1946). The motivation behind Sibelius’s arrangement remains unknown, but it is in all likelihood written for the male choir Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat, who premiered Laulun mahti under


XVII Jalmari Hahl on 7 December 1895 in the same concert as they premiered Saarella palaa (see Opus 18, above). Laulun mahti seemed to attract the most interest in the concert: “From the program, excluding Herää Suomi [by Genetz], we would first and foremost like to mention the Latvian ballad composed by Prof. Vihtol. The work was very dignified, beautiful, and imposing. Its peculiar, original, folkmusic-like basic tone suited the contents of the ballad well, and its musically and harmonically praiseworthy structure was written by an accomplished hand. In addition, the choir performed the work musically and enthusiastically; the best performance by YL we have heard.”154 The critic in Uusi Suometar also remarked that Laulun mahti was the most impressive work in the concert. He, however, questioned one detail in Sibelius’s work: “The only thing that surprised us in the arrangement was that the arrival of ‘the whitebearded’ was announced by the high tenor solo, so high that it seemed almost impossible to be sung in a chest voice. Mr. Floman, who sang this small solo part, carried out the task rather praiseworthily, and we do not blame him that this passage did not make an entirely favorable impression on us. As a whole, the ballad is skillfully arranged and it was sung impressively.”155 Laulun mahti remained in Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat’s repertoire for several years, and was widely acclaimed. For instance, three years later, it was still singled out in Nya Pressen as the high point of a concert in 1898: “The program contained several numbers that through their musical substance rose above the multitude of merely conventionally beautiful male-choir works. Foremost among these was the Latvian ballad by Vihtol, a longish composition rich in changes of mood, which additionally carried very original local color.”156

connected by two other features: firstly, the draft for Heitä, koski, kuohuminen appears in the same manuscript as the draft for Venematka; and secondly, the texts are from the same source (Kalevala, the 40th poem), in which the text of Heitä, koski, kuohuminen follows the text of Venematka. Sibelius composed Athenarnes sång in March 1899. As the work was premiered soon after the “February Manifesto” (announced on 15 February 1899), which significantly reduced the autonomy of Finland, the composition has often been interpreted as a protest against the manifesto.163 In the published version of the work (Op. 31 No. 3), the boys and men sing the melody in unison accompanied by an orchestra. Originally, Sibelius planned the work for an accompanied four-part male choir with the two upper parts for boys and two lower ones for men. Apparently, the decision to change the choral texture to unison singing was due to the tight rehearsal schedule.164 However, as the four-part choral sketch is rather rudimentary in appearance, it is possible that the change was made in a relatively early stage of composing. It should be emphasized that the transcription of the choral parts, as they appear in the Appendix, is not an a cappella version of the work, but is a transcribed sketch for the choral parts of an accompanied work.

Incomplete Works There are two works for male choir, Suomenmaa and Heitä, koski, kuohuminen, which Sibelius began but never completed. In addition, the Appendix contains the draft versions of Athenarnes sång, Uusmaalaisten laulu, and Skyddskårsmarsch. The draft versions were not intended by Sibelius as completed versions, but each of them reveals an interesting phase in the creative process.157 Sibelius’s sketch book contains sketches and drafts for a choral setting of Aleksis Kivi’s poem Suomenmaa.158 The exact date of the sketches for Suomenmaa cannot be deduced, and he never published any setting of Suomenmaa. However, he used the melody composed for it as the concluding theme of Sandels (Op. 28, for male choir and orchestra).159 The fact that Sandels was completed in early 1898 would suggest that the sketches for Suomenmaa date somewhat earlier.160 After the initial melodic sketches with only a hint of its harmonization, Sibelius wrote a draft of a complete verse. The first draft is set for mixed choir (see Facsimile XI). Directly below the mixed-choir draft, however, he wrote a new draft – this time for male choir. Below the male-choir draft, Sibelius wrote revisions for two passages. In the present volume, the two drafted male-choir versions appear transcribed in the Appendix. In 1893, Sibelius planned to compose Heitä, koski, kuohuminen for male choir a cappella, but before completing the choral work, Sibelius discarded the idea and used its melodic material in the slow movement of Piano Sonata (Op. 12, movement II, also from 1893).161 The surviving choral draft appears in the present volume as Facsimiles VIII–X. It has been suggested that Sibelius intended Heitä, koski, kuohuminen as a pair for Venematka, which dates approximately from the same period.162 In addition to the date of composition, these two works are

Helsinki, Autumn 2014

I am grateful to all those whose help contributed to the present volume but especially to my colleagues Kari Kilpeläinen, Anna Pulkkis, Tuija Wicklund, and Timo Virtanen, as well as to Pertti Kuusi, Turo Rautaoja, Joanna Rinne, and Nancy Seidel. I would also like to thank the staffs of the National Library of Finland (Tarja Lehtinen, Petri Tuovinen, Inka Myyry) and the Sibeliusmuseum for their kind help with the sources. Sakari Ylivuori

1 Fabian Dahlström, Jean Sibelius. Thematisch-bibliographisches Verzeichnis seiner Werke (Wiesbaden: Breikopf & Härtel, 2003) [=SibWV]. 2 The two early versions that Sibelius fair copied and most probably considered completed at the time of their composition, Till havs! and Isänmaalle, are placed alongside their published version. 3 For pre-Sibelian choral music in Finland, see Matti Hyökki, Hiilestä timantiksi (Helsinki: Sibelius Akatemia, 2003) pp. 13–59. 4 Sibelius’s description of the reception of Venematka in A. O. Väisänen: “Jean Sibelius vaikutelmistaan.” Kalevala-seuran vuosikirja 1 (Helsinki: Otava, 1921): “[…] vaikutti […] kuin pommi.” 5 Wasa Tidning, 18 June 1894: “Båda twå äro till sin musikaliska anda och sitt innehåll de mest finska kwartettsånger, wi tilswidare hafwa.” In turn-of-the-century Swedish, part-songs were generally called quartets with varying orthography (at least qvartett, kvartett, and kwartett were all in use). Similar reviews were published on several occasions; e.g., K[arl Flodin] wrote in Nya Pressen on 29 April 1894: “It [Rakastava] is Finnish – thoroughly Finnish[.]” (Den är finsk – finsk allt igenom […]). 6 Pohjalainen, 21 June 1894: “[…] nämä laulut owat musikaalisesti merkitsewintä mitä tietääkseni laulukwartetille on kirjoitettu […].” 7 The work was first listed in Op. 4. Op. 1 appeared in its final form in 1913. For more details, see Kari Kilpeläinen Tutkielmia Jean Sibeliuksen käsikirjoituksista. Studia Musicologica Universitatis Helsingiensis III. (Helsinki: Helsingin yliopiston musiikkitieteen laitos, 1992) [=Kilpeläinen 1992], p. 187. 8 For other arrangements, see JSW VII/1, which includes arrangements for four-part and two-part female choirs and an arrangement for three-part boys’ choir. A mixed-choir arrangement in an unknown hand was published in 1920. 9 The letter is in the National Archives of Finland, the Sibelius Family Archive [=NA, SFA], file box 31.


XVIII 10 The arrangement was briefly mentioned by the critic in Uusi Suomi on the same day. Hufvudstadsbladet did not review the concert at all. Helsingin Sanomat, 4 December 1935, U[uno] K[lam]i: “Yleisesti laulettu joululaulu ‘En etsi valtaa, loistoa’ kuultiin nyt ensi kerran mieskuorosovituksena. Uudessa asussaan soi se hivelevän pehmeänä ja kauniina, mutta on ehkä jonkin verran menettänyt herkkyydestään.” 11 Opus number 18 appears in Sibelius’s work lists for the first time in 1905 (the list designated in SibWV p. 693 as “Sib 1905–09,” which is currently missing, and the beginning survives as a photocopy showing only opus numbers 1–21). However, in a work list published in 1902 by Euterpe magazine, the works of Op. 18 already appear in this order (except Veljeni vierailla mailla, which was composed later). 12 In addition, evidence suggests that Sibelius twice planned to include a tenth song in the opus. In the work list “Sib 1905–09,” Op. 18 has at some point appeared as 10 mieskuorolaulua [10 songs for male choir], with Hymn (Op. 21) being number 10. In 1914, Sibelius planned to add Herr Lager och Skön fager as a tenth work (the autograph work list designated in SibWV p. 694 as “Sib 1912–31”). Neither of the works was ever published as part of Op. 18, nor did they appear as Op. 18 in any published catalogue of Sibelius’s œuvre; thus, the plans were never realized. 13 The sub-numbers in Op. 21 were contradictory; in 1905–1909, both Isänmaalle and Hymn were placed second (either as 2 or b). Finally, Op. 21 consisted only of Hymn. 14 Although opus number 14 was intended primarily for the string orchestra version in most of Sibelius’s work lists, Sibelius did mention the choral versions of Rakastava in the context of Op. 14 in one autograph work list (“Sib 1912–31” in SibWV p. 694). 15 Martti Turunen asks about this detail in an undated letter (The National Library of Finland [=NL], Coll.206.31). Sibelius’s answer, however, remains unknown. 16 Cecil Gray, Sibelius (London: Oxford University Press, 1931), p. 207. Although Op. 18 appears in this form in the work lists Sibelius authorized after 1931, the outdated sub-numbers (especially those from 1911–1930) have continued to appear in literature as well as in modern editions and recordings. 17 Klemetti reminisced later that the exceptionally low last note for the B. II (Bb1) was specifically written for John Enckell, a singer in the choir who was famous for his low notes. See Heikki Klemetti, Sata arvostelua, (ed. by Armi Klemetti and Jouko Linjama, Helsinki: WSOY, 1966) [=Klemetti 1966], p. 258. 18 Hufvudstadsbladet, 22 April 1899, A[larik] U[ggla]: “Sibelius’ nobla kompositioner.” The concert was also reviewed by Päivälehti (anonymous critic) on the same day. In the concert, Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat had consciously planned the program so that it pleased both parties of the on-going language dispute. This was acknowledged and appreciated by the critics in both newspapers. 19 Klemetti wanted to display John Enckell’s voice in particular. The early history of Terve kuu! is described in Klemetti 1966, p. 259. 20 Hufvudstadsbladet and Päivälehti, 31 May 1901. Despite the good reviews, according to Klemetti 1966, p. 258, the performance was not very good: “It was sung in the concert, but ‘only passably’.” (Se saatiin konsertissa menemään, tosin “så där.”). Päivälehti, 31 May 1901, O[skar Merikanto]: “Kokonaisuudessaan on tämä sävellys taiteellisesti arvokkaimpia kvartettisävellyksiä meillä.” 21 Helge Virkkunen: Kuisma. Muistikuvia Heikki Klemetistä (Helsinki: Kirjayhtymä, 1973), pp. 52–53. 22 Klemetti 1966, p. 259: “Ja verkligen, va’ ä’ de’ här för tassigheter nu igen uta honom!” 23 The choir gave concerts, for example, in Tallinn, Wiesbaden, Berlin, Dresden, Leipzig, Frankfurt am Main, Düsseldorf, Cologne, Brussels, Den Haag, Amsterdam, Lübeck, Copenhagen, and Helsingborg. The tour was covered in many Finnish newspapers, which also cited the local reviews of the concerts. 24 In addition, the compositions premiered in the concert were: Juhlakantaatti by Richard Faltin, Huutolaistytön kehtolaulu by Robert Kajanus, Se kolmas by Oskar Merikanto, Suksimiesten laulu by Rafael

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34 35

36

37

Laethén, and Mustalaislaulu (folk song arrangement) by Ilmari Krohn. Päivälehti, 13 April 1893, O[skar Merikanto]: “Sibeliuksen Wenematkaan oli erittäin hupaista tutustua. […] Laulu on lyhyt, mutta oikea makupala. Kuten Sibeliuksen muutkin teokset, on tämäkin aiwan suomalaiselle runonuotille perustettu, joten siinä heti tekijän tuntee. Mestarillisesti on itse wesien laskeminen, ilo merellä, ja warsinkin neitosten katseleminen ja kuunteleminen ‘niemien nenistä’ kuwattu.” A review with similar contents was also published in Päivälehti on the same day. Hufvudstadsbladet, 7 April 1893, Bis [Karl Wasenius]: “J. Sibelius’ Venematka (text ur Kalevala) var präktig i alla afseenden, så till karaktäristik, som rent musikalisk behandling och innebörd. […] Ehuru icke lätt sjöngs den med bravur af kören.” Työnsä kumpasellaki is the title of the original poem. It also appears in the context of Sibelius’s composition in the programs of the early performances as well as in its first edition. Sibelius, however, used the title Saarella palaa in his later work lists. In the mixed-choir arrangement (from 1898), the first edition has Saarella palaa instead of Työnsä kumpasellaki. At what point Sibelius changed the title remains unknown. The letter in which Hahl asks if Sibelius has any choral works for his upcoming publication is dated 27 July 1895. Whether Saarella palaa was already composed at that time remains unknown. Hufvudstadsbladet, 8 December 1895, pseudonym H. M.: “Sist nämda composition afviker betydligt från det vanliga kompositionmaneret för mankvartett och är i all sin enkelhet af fängslande originalitet och stämning.” Päivälehti, 8 December, O[skar Merikanto]: “Sibeliuksen ‘Työnsä kumpasellaki’ oli kauniswäreinen, hieno laulunpätkä, johon yleisö oli niin mieltynyt, että se saatiin kolmasti laulaa.” Uusi Suometar, 8 December 1895, R[obert] E[lmgren]: “Se on hieno omituisen kaunis säwellys […]. Se esitettiinkin erinomaisen kauniisti. Ensi basson resitatiiwi kuitenkin olisi mielestämme ollut laulettawa enemmän ‘parlando’ eikä niin raskaasti ja jäykästi kuin se esitettiin. Tämä onkin ainoa muistutus, jonka tämän numeron johdosta woi tehdä. Muuten oli esitys aiwan ihmeteltäwän onnistunut.” Klemetti wrote later (in “Elettiinpä ennenkin”, published in Pilvilaiva. Aleksis Kivi ajan kuvastimessa, [Helsinki: Otava, 1947], pp. 78–85; the quote from p. 81) that “I in particular was interested in commissioning new [works], as I was previously unknown, an unnamed whippersnapper; [I] needed to have at least new songs.” (Minä erityisesti olin uuden hankkimisesta kiinnostunut, kun olin uusi tuntematon, nimetön pojankloppi; piti olla edes uusia lauluja.) Sydämeni laulu is in English The Song of My Heart. Pilvilaiva (1947, pp. 81–82): “Nyt se on minunkin sydämeni laulu.” Sibelius’s remark that the process was time-consuming is from countess Ida Palmén’s (1860–1942) letter (NL, Coll.206.28). E.g., Andrew Barnett (Sibelius [Cambridge: Yale University Press, 2010], p. 120) writes that “that was to prove eerily prophetic.” Uusi Suometar, 2 December 1898, R[obert] E[lmgren]: “Sibeliuksen pieni laulu taas on sywää tunnelmaa uhkuawa säwellys joka tunkee sydämmeen. Kööri sen lauloi erinomaisesti. Fraseeraus oli oikea ja wäritys kaunis. Etenkin toinen basso pianissimossa antoi lugubren loiston koko laululle. Yleisö oli sen kuultuaan haltioissaan. Käsien taputukset eiwät loppuneet ennenkuin kööri sen kolmasti oli laulanut.” Hufvudstadsbladet, 2 December 1898, A[larik] U[ggla]: “Sibelius’s in all its simplicity so original and atmospheric new song” (Sibelius’ i all sin enkelhet så originella och stämningsfulla nya sång). Nya Pressen, the same day, K[arl Flodin]: “made an exceptionally strong effect through its simple, natural beauty” (värkade genom sin enkla, osökta skönhet utomordentligt starkt). As Sibelius and Klemetti met each other frequently, the commission may have been passed on orally. In addition to Klemetti, Ida Palmén asked Sibelius to set Kivi’s texts for male choir, in particular the poem Ikävyys, which she sent to Sibelius in 1901 (Palmén’s


XIX

38

39

40

41

42 43

44 45

46

47

48 49 50

51

letter to Sibelius in NL, Coll.206.28). Sibelius, however, did not fulfil her request. Before the first edition, a typeset edition for performance purposes, including both of Sibelius’s Kivi settings, was produced, binding the history of these two works even more closely (see Source Evaluation). The typeset edition is currently lost; thus the question of whether it dates from 1898 or 1899 remains unsolved. For the lost edition, see Sakari Ylivuori: Jean Sibelius’s Works for Mixed Choir. A Source Study (Helsinki: The University of the Arts Helsinki, 2013) [=Ylivuori 2013], pp. 32–33. Päivälehti, 5 April 1900, O[skar Merikanto]: “Ohjelma alkoi reippaasti Sibeliuksen Metsämiehen laululla, joka heti sai yleisön, jota oli huoneen täydeltä, ‘stemninkiin’.” Pippingsköld was also Member of Parliament in 1863–1885 and the vice-principal at Helsinki University 1882–1884. For a history of the opus number, see section Opus 18. The Swedish translation of the poem was published in newspapers during the next few days (e.g., Hufvudstadsbladet and Nya Pressen on 26 May). In addition to his own work, Sibelius conducted Integer vitae by Friedrich Ferdinand Flemming (1778–1813). Hufvudstadsbladet, 26 May 1896, anon.: “Den enkla invigningsakten fick en synnerligen anslående afslutning genom en för tillfället af Jean Sibelius komponerad hymn i gammal italiensk stil.” The expression “old Italian style” was also used two days later in Åbo Underrättelser. The version published in JSW is the revised version. The differences in the premiered version are listed in the Critical Remarks. Uusi Suometar, 15 November 1899, E[vert] K[atila]: “[...] and surely the collection contains a number of singable songs though not as many as would have been desirable. […] Hopefully, in the future the male-choir collections will also keep an eye on the demand by the numerous Finnish choirs.” ([…] ja warmaan löytyy kokoelmasta joukko laulettawiakin lauluja waikka ei niin paljon kun suotawa olisi ollut. […] Toiwottawa olisi että wastaisuudessa ilmestyisi miesköörikokoelmia, joissa lukuisain suomalaisten lauluseurojenkin tarwetta silmällä pidettäisiin.) Martti Nisonen did ask permission for his male-choir arrangement; however, he requested it after its performance. Nisonen’s arrangement contained the entire tone poem and not just the hymn section (the letter in NL, Coll.206.27). Another arrangement was by Herbert S. Sammond (Yrjö Sjöblom: “Finlandia lauluna” in Suomen kuvalehti 1945, No. 49, p. 1259). For the earlier poems for Finlandia, see also Glenda Dawn Goss: Vieläkö lähetämme hänelle sikareja. Sibelius, Amerikka ja amerikkalaiset (Helsinki: WSOY, 2009), pp. 196–206. Sjöblom (1945, p. 1259): “Ei sitä ole tarkoitettu laulettavaksi. Sehän on tehty orkesteria varten. Mutta jos maailma tahtoo laulaa, niin ei sille mitään mahda.” Yrjö Sjöblom (also known as George Sjöblom) was a Finnish journalist who emigrated to America. He was one of the first who wrote a text to Finlandia (in 1919). Sola refers to the American texts of Finlandia in a letter dated 7 February 1937. Koskenniemi’s reply letter is in private possession; the photocopy is in the Sibelius Museum, Turku [later SibMus]. The revision was made by Koskenniemi with the help of Turunen (and probably also of Sibelius). See the description of the original text in the Critical Commentary. Koskenniemi’s text for Finlandia was based on an earlier poem of his, namely Juhannusvirsi. For details, see Martti Häikiö: V. A. Koskenniemi – suomalainen klassikko 2 (Helsinki: WSOY, 2009), pp. 56–59. On 20 August 1914, Sibelius wrote in his diary that it is “[s]trange that [I] must consider them [B&H] an enemy” (Egendomligt att måste anse dem som fiender). This entry was written in the context of composing Op. 84 No. 1. On 3 August, Sibelius remarked that all communications with the publisher had been broken. Sibelius’s diary is in NA, SFA, file box 37–38. The diary was published by Fabian Dahlström, Jean Sibelius: Dagbok 1909–1944 (Helsinki: Svenska Litteratursällskapet i Finland, 2005).

52 Diary, 20 August 1914: “[I] must find connections to local publishers, although [I am] in a way reliant on B&H.” (Måste finna anknytningspunkter med härvarande förläggare ehuru på visst sätt bunden af B. & H.) 53 However, the first edition of Till havs! was published by Muntra Musikanter [=MM]. The first four works were included in their ninth collection of male-choir works, whereas Till havs! was included in the tenth collection. 54 Sibelius composed the Fifth Symphony at that time. Diary entries show frustration over the fact that he was unable to concentrate on writing the symphony, because he had to compose small-scale works, which he could swiftly sell to Finnish publishers. For example, on 1 August 1914: “Have to set myself in contact with MM and step away from my pedestal. – The new symphony is starting to move within me! Why should I always be disturbed, never get to do what my spirit was created for? Always these business matters!” (Måste sätta mig i förbindelse med M.M. och stiga ned från min piedestal. – Den nya sinfonin börjar röra på sig! Hvarför skall jag alltid bli störd, aldrig få göra det min ande skapades till? Alltid dessa affärer!) 55 Diary, 30 July 1914: “Skall jag kunna i dessa tider komponera för dessa herrar i ‘M.M.’ – Man talar om att tyska skepp närma sig våra kuster. Och vi här i Finland?” 56 All the dates are from the diary. On 13 August 1914: “A commission – but becoming very likely so interesting!” (En beställning – men blir nog så intressant!) 57 All dates are from the diary. 58 Diary, 19 September 1914: “icke korrekt.” 59 Diary, 29 August 1914: “icke begripits. Man hade väntat sig något aktuellt och erhöll en humoresque.” 60 Olof Wallin refers to the altercation in his letter to Sibelius on 28 November 1914 (NL, Coll.206.40), in which he thanks Sibelius for clarifying the “accusation inconsiderately directed to me [Wallin]” (beskyllning som obetänksamt uttalats mot mig). Wallin and Sibelius were on friendly terms throughout these years and they both quarreled with Gylling. 61 “The good letter” probably refers to an undated letter (in NL, Coll.206.40), in which Wallin clarifies some “misunderstandings” concerning the publication process (misförstånd av tryckeriets sida) and praises Sibelius’s new male-choir works, saying that “their originality and completely new style contain a promise of a new phase in male-choir music’s development.” (Dess originella, fullkomligt nya stil innebär löftet om ett nytt skede i manskörsångens utveckling). Diary 9 February 1915: “Af M.Ms dirigent Dr Olof Wallin ett bra bref angående kören. Jag hoppas mycket af honom. Jag tror han förstår detta nya i mina körsånger.” 62 Diary, 28 April 1915: “[I have h]ad a fiasco with the choral works for MM. And [I] expected so much of Wallin’s performance of them.” (Haft fiasco med körerna för M.M. Och hoppades så mycket af Wallin’s framförande af dem.) 63 Hufvudstadsbladet, 28 April 1915, Bis [Karl Wasenius]: “attrapperade gamla stil […] en kärf kraft som lät diktens högfjällsfond framstå med illusorisk verkan.” And: “den i partituret åsyftade verkan ej fullt vunnits vid utförandet, och dock gjordes af sången allt hvad göras kunde.” 64 Diary, 28 April 1915: “But the audience [was] absolutely cold.” (Men publiken absolut kall.) Hufvudstadsbladet, 28 April 1915: “Hade sången omtagits, vill jag tro att publiken bättre fått fatt på dess väldiga resning.” 65 Eva Paloheimo (1893–1978) was Sibelius’s oldest daughter. Diary, 26 May 1915: “Var att se Arvis och Evas flicka. Sällsamt. Jag, morfar! – I dag smider något på de nya sakerna. Planerar äfven för M.M.” 66 Diary, 23 June 1915. Wallin thanked for the fair copy, which he received on 29 June, in a letter dated 30 June 1915 (in NL, Coll.206.40). 67 Fritiof Gylling: “M.M:s dirigenter”, in M.M. 1878–1928 (Helsinki: Muntra Musikanter, 1928), pp. 81–82.


XX 68 Hufvudstadsbladet, 11 December 1920, K[arl] E[kma]n: “[…] blev exempelvis Sibelius’ nya Frödingsång ‘Ett drömackord’ en rätt medelmåttig prestation med oklara harmonier och brist på precision i samsången.” 69 The date of completion is from the diary. Wallin’s letter dated 14 September 1915 (in NL, Coll.206.40): “[…] passar utmärkt för Bäckmans såväl röst som temperament.” 70 In the review, Wasenius told that Sibelius wrote the composition after hearing Edvin Bäckman sing. Hufvudstadsbladet, 15 December 1915, Bis [Karl Wasenius]: “Första afdelningen afslutades med en ny sång ‘Evige Eros’ till ord af Bertel Gripenberg, en dityramb, skrifven med en lyftning af ädelt slag, förhärligad ytterligare af den mästerliga behärskning och behandling af uttrycksmedlen som Sibelius själffallet här visade sig mäktig af. […] Solot, som dominerar sångkompositionen, höjde sig i en linjeskönhet som var betagande. Äfven de modulatoriska växlingarna upptedde en kolorit skapad af mästarhand.”; “Herr Edvin Bäckman sjöng solot från första till sista ton med härlig röst och med en lyftning som motsvarade sångens sköna innebörd. Äfven kören redde sig på hedrande sätt i den ömtåliga uppgiften […].” 71 In this concert, the choir also performed Herr Lager och Skön fager and På berget (premiered half year previously). According to the critic, their performance was more successful than in the premiere, although some amount of nervousness was still visible. The critic attributed this to the fact that the composer himself was present. 72 Wallin’s letters in NL, Coll.206.40. The commission letter of Till havs! is undated. 73 Diary 17 and 20 April 1917. 74 Hufvudstadsbladet only reported that in the soirée Wallin was renominated as the choir’s conductor. 75 Polón is considered as the founder of the Finnish rubber and modern woodworking industries. Due to his political activity for Finnish independence, he was deported to Siberia in 1916–1917. 76 For the paper types, see the Critical Commentary. See also Kilpeläinen 1992, p. 286. 77 Helsingin Sanomat, 24 March 1926, O[tto] K[otilainen]: “Varsinkin toiset uutuuksista olivat niin lähellä kuorotyylin mahdottomuusrajoja, ettei yhtään ihme, jos niissä siellä täällä sorahtava ääni kuuluviin pääsi.” On 25 March: “Kummassakin on viljalti sangen arkoja sointuyhteyksiä ja sävelkulkuja, joten ne vaativat laulajilta aikaa kypsyäkseen täydellisiksi esityksiksi.” 78 According to the unknown critic, the uppermost pitch for the “Nordic tenors” is aj1. Uusi Suomi, 24 March 1926, L. A. P. P.: “Tenorien työtä eivät suinkaan olleet omiaan helpottamaan useat ohjelman uutuudet, jotka – niin ansiokkaita kuin ne sävellyksinä olivatkin – poikkeuksetta kiipesivät sellaisille sävelaloille, että meidän pohjoismaiset tenorimme joutuivat yli voimainsa ponnistamaan.” 79 The ideas included the Kalevala poem Tulen synty, but it was not completed in the 1890s. Also, the melody of Heitä, koski, kuohuminen appears for the first time in these sketches (see below). For details, see Ylivuori 2013, pp. 171–188. 80 For the first performance, Sibelius wrote a string-orchestra accompaniment (JS 160b) for the male-choir work (JS 160a), but it was not used. In fact, Rakastava with string-orchestra accompaniment was not performed during Sibelius’s lifetime. In 1898, Sibelius arranged Rakastava for mixed choir a cappella (JS 160c). In 1912, he published a string orchestra work (Op. 14) using the material of Rakastava. 81 Hufvudstadsbladet, 1 May 1894, Bis [Karl Wasenius]: “Hr Sibelius för i sin tondikt fram öfverraskande scener, stämningsfulla och genomfläktade af varm känsla, originalitet och finsk anda i melodik och styckets totalkaraktär. Vi medhinna ej denna gång en större detaljering, utan nämna blott, att tondikten slog an ofantligt. Under en döfvande åska af applåder, ärligt menade och förtjänade, framkallades komponisten.” 82 Nya Pressen, 29 April 1894, K[arl Flodin]: “Hvilka synpunkter som inom prisnämnden gjort sig gällande är obekant, men hr Sibelius

XIX

83

84 85

86 87

88 89

90 91

92 93

94

95

96 97

98

99

komposition står obetingadt öfver den första pristagarens hvad originaliteten beträffar.” Uusi Suometar, 2 May 1894 R[obert] E[lmgren]: “[…] täytyy myöntää, että tällä kertaa sai paremman käsityksen tästä waikuttawasta säwelteoksesta kuin wiimein. Etusijan kuitenkin aina annamme ‘Rakastawalle’, joka mielestämme on ihanin suomalainen miesääninen laulu, jonka olemme kuulleet.” E.g., Erik Tawaststjerna, Jean Sibelius. Åren 1893–1904 (Helsinki: Söderström, 1993) [=Tawaststjerna 1993], p. 20. The same collection included Venematka, which according to the critic was easy to understand (helpoimmin ymmärrettävä), and Työnsä kumpasellaki (i.e., Saarella palaa), which was deemed “insignificant” (vähäpätöinen). Kaiku, 17 January 1896, pseudonym E-t: “Sibelius’en laulut owat hywin omituisia. Niistä ei saa juuri minkäänlaista käsitystä ensi kerran soittaessaan. Mutta kun niihin enemmän tutustuu, huomaa niissä kauneutta oikein paljo. […] Mutta kaunein on kieltämättä ‘Rakastawa’, waikka se sisältää niin kummallisia epäsointuja, että aluksi epäilee, onko sitä oikein painettu. Pitkältä ja yksitoikkoiselta tuntuu tämä laulu soittaessa, mutta luultawaa on, että se laulettaessa kuuluu hywin waihtelewalta. Alkuosa erittäinkin on miellyttäwä, melodia kun on niin yksinkertainen ja hieno. Omituisen waikutuksen tekee baritoni-soolo keskiosassa, soolo, joka alusta loppuun asti pysyy yhdellä ainoalla äänteellä. Tenorisoolo lopussa on kaunis. Koko laulu on perin suomalainen, niin kuin useimmat Sibelius’en säwellykset.” Before getting married, Krohn published her works under the pseudonym Aino Suonio. Kallas wrote about the serenade in her diary on 20 April and 10 July 1898 (Aino Kallas, Päiväkirja vuosilta 1897–1906 [Helsinki: Otava, 1952]). She later reminisced about the event in the diary entry from 10 May 1950 (Aino Kallas, Vaeltava vieraskirja vuosilta 1946–1956 [Helsinki: Otava, 1957]): “Sydämeni sykki kiivaasti … Senjälkeen … kuinka – onko mahdollista – nuohan ovat omia säkeitäni, runosta ‘Kuutamolla’.” Currently in Suomalaisen kirjallisuuden seura (SKS), the Kallas archive, file box 4. Uusi Suometar 12 April 1916, E[vert] K[atila]: “Varsinaisen uuden suomalaisen mieskuorosävellyksen luoja on Sibelius, jota tällä kertaa ohjelmassa edusti pieni vähäpätöisyys kuluneilta ajoilta.” The review in Hufvudstadsbladet (by Bis [Karl Wasenius]) had similar content. Helsingin Sanomat, 12 April 1916, O[tto] K[otilainen]: “[...] hienotunnelmainen, säweltäjälle ominaisella tawalla soinnutettu.” See Kilpeläinen 1992, pp. 89–90. Only a sketch was previously known. The fair copy was found in the estate of Mikko Slöör (1866–1934), who managed Sibelius’s finances in 1898–1908. Kilpeläinen 1992, p. 90 and SibWV, p. 550. The sketches are in NL under signum HUL 1160. According to Kilpeläinen, the paper type and ink suggest the years 1903–1905 (Kilpeläinen 1992, pp. 89–90). Among Aho’s political writings were, for example, the two volumes of openly patriotic short stories called Katajainen kansani (Porvoo: WSOY, 1899 and 1900). The poem contains several autobiographical references. In the first publication, the poem was indicated to date from “last spring after I had returned from Italy” (viime kevännä Italiasta palattuani). The prose poem was included in the revised edition of Katajainen kansani in 1909 (pp. 247–249). Aho’s home Ahola is located close to Sibelius’s home Ainola. Veljeni vierailla mailla is one of the first compositions written in Ainola, where the Sibelius family moved in 1904. It has been repeatedly stated (e.g., in SibWV) that Sibelius made significant changes to Aho’s poem. However, Aho’s manuscript, which resurfaced during the preparation of the present volume, undoubtedly shows that the changes were made by Aho himself. For the manuscript, see the Critical Commentary. It is noteworthy that also the critic made the interpretation that the poem was emended by Sibelius and not by the poet himself; thus the misapprehension described above may derive from the review


XXI

100

101

102 103

104

105

106

107

108

109 110

111

112 113

114

(see the previous endnote). Helsingfors Posten, 4 December 1904, K[arl Flodin]: “Jean Sibelius gaf ett säreget bidrag till programmet, en sång full af fosterländsk aktualitet: delar af Juhani Ahos gripande prosadikt ‘Veljeni vierailla mailla’ (Mina bröder i främmande land). Uppgiften att rytmiskt behandla finsk prosa hade tonsättaren löst på ett mästerligt sätt. Men än mästerligare var det hopplösa tungsinnet i refrängen ‘veljeni vierailla mailla’ uttryckt, med en fördjupning i den mörka mollklangen, som för hvar gång verkade lika storslaget och till sist pekade ut mot öde och stjärnlösa rymder. Sången var ej af den art att den genast senterades till den rent musikaliska behandlingen, men vid bisseringen trädde allt det intensivt kända och egenartadt uttryckta på ett helt annat sätt fram.” Veljeni vierailla mailla appeared in America in 1915 as it was included in the collection Ten Student Songs from Finland (New York: The H. W. Gray Co.) entitled Song of Exile. The letter dated 20 August 1905 is in NA, SFA, file box 120: “Håller som bäst på att skrifva någonting till Edelfelts begrafning. Jag kan ej säga huru jag saknar honom. Lifvet är kort!!” The correspondence between Sibelius and Carpelan is published in Fabian Dahlström (ed.), Högtärade Maestro! Högtärade Herr Baron! Korrespondensen mellan Axel Carpelan och Jean Sibelius 1900–1919 (Helsingfors: Svenska Litteratursällskapet i Finland, 2010). For the relationship between the mixed-choir and male-choir versions, see Ylivuori: 2013, pp. 160–170. According to oral tradition, Sibelius composed the work immediately after reading the poem (the information is written down in Carol Hedberg’s unpublished work Observationer beträffande kompositioner av Jean Sibelius, p. 46; the manuscript is in SibMus). The early version of Isänmaalle resurfaced in 1960. The mixed-choir version was written for the singing festival organized by Kansanvalistusseura in Helsinki. For details, see JSW VII/1. Selim Palmgren arranged Isänmaalle for the use of Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat as early as in 1902. As Palmgren’s arrangement does not contain the arranger’s name, it has often been erroneously attributed to Sibelius. The fair copy is currently in SibMus. “Laulu on näin laulettava. Pankaappa sanat ynnä voimamerkit paikalleen. Kaikessa kiireessä teidän Jean Sibelius.” Sibelius addressed the above-cited writing to R. [sic] Koskinen. A short description of the competition by Heikki Klemetti was published in Säveletär 1908, pp. 120–121. Letter in NL, Coll.206.52: “[…] eikä varoja muulla tavalla osoittaa kunnioitustamme […].” Sibelius read the proofs for the publication. He returned to the material of Isänmaalle in the late 1940s or 1950s, but the sketches from that time (HUL 1034/1) are so rudimentary that even the planned ensemble cannot be deduced. Kaarlo Terhi had translated his name; his original name was Karl Hammer. The early history of Uusmaalaisten laulu appears in Aarne Rahunen: “Uusmaalaisten laulun syntyvaiheet”, in Opettajan lehti No. 34, 1957, pp. 16–17. Diary, 21 December 1911: “En unisono, monumental, en som går genom sekler.” Diary, 12 January 1912: “Här i min kammare är den nog så bra. Men skall den värka äfven ute i den vida, kalla verlden? – Är den ej för douce? Samt klinga den ej alltför ‘hausbacken’?” Diary, 16 and 20 January 1912. The other members of the board were Sibelius and Professor Tudeer. The deputy members were writers Aukusti Valdemar Koskimies and Juhani Aho. Diary, 21 January; 1 and 2 February 1912. The work was printed both as a separate edition and as part of WSOY’s publication Nuori Voima. See the Critical Commentary, Sources. Rahunen 1957, p. 17. Evidently Leino accepted the assignment, since his new poem for Sibelius’s melody was published in Helsingin Sanomat on 12 March 1912. However, Leino’s poem entitled Sukuvirsi does not appear in any edition, nor is there docu-

115

116

117

118

119 120 121 122

123

124

125 126 127

128

129

130

131

mentation that it would have been used in any performance. In fact, Leino’s poem does not fit Sibelius’s melody perfectly (e.g., the number of syllables is not optimal). Helsingin Sanomat, 21 April 1912, W.: “Sibeliuksen uudesta Uusmaalaisten laulusta en osaa sanoa muuta kuin että suuri mestarikin voi joskus säveltää ilman inspiratsionia.” Hufvudstadsbladet, 21 April 1912 Bis [Karl Wasenius]: “Den begynte med Uusmalaisten [sic] laulu af Sibelius, i hvilken sång jag förgäfves sökte finna ‘was Besonderes’.” Confusingly, Uusmaalaisten laulu was included in one autograph work list (designated in SibWV p. 694 as “Sib 1912–31”) in Op. 7 with the mixed-choir versions of Ej med klagan and Juhlamarssi (see also Kilpeläinen, 1992, pp. 169 and 178–179). For the history of Op. 65, see the Introduction of JSW VII/1. It remains unknown, to which promise Nordman refers. Letter in NL, Coll.206.27: “Mitt löft[e] trogen, sände jag Dig i dag en palvad ‘fårfiol’. Tag ut den från station strax och förvara den hängande – Måtte den smaka Dig. Brännvin passar nog till den.” According to Hedberg (unpublished), p. 71, Nordman had bought the leg of lamb on the black market. The letter dated 19 September 1918 is in NL, Coll.206.27. “Gå hem och gnid det fåralår som hänger på din vägg.” The poem also makes a reference to violin. The diary, 17 May 1917. Whether the similarities with a well-known hymn by Rudolf Lagi (Jag lyfter ögat i himmelen /Mä silmät luon ylös taivaaseen) are a humorous reference or a coincidence, remains unknown. Otto Andersson planned a biography on Sibelius, for which he interviewed him many times. The unpublished notes are in SibMus. The interview was on 16 June 1952: “[…] begripa huru den blivit så allmän som den är och genom vem den har kommit i svang från början.” Gösta Schybergson’s sister, Gerda, documented the events of spring 1918. Her notes draw forth a rather detailed picture of her brother’s murder. The notes were published in Terror och tragik. Helsingfors och Sibbo våren 1918, antecknigar av Gerda Schybergson (Helsinki: Schildts förlags Ab, 2003) (ed. Per Schybergson). Diary, 9 February 1918. “Mordet på Dr Schybergson har djupt uppskakat mig.” Diary and Gerda Schybergson’s notes from 14 May 1918. According to the diary, Sibelius read the proofs on 28 July 1918. The works in the edition were dedicated to Akademiska Sångföreningen. The dedication, however, did not stem from Sibelius, but from the Schybergson family (Hedberg, unpubl., p. 75; see also Gerda Schybergson’s notes from 14 May 1918). Wiborgs Nyheter, 7 April 1919: “[…] så skall detta hälsas med glädje och sympati av envar, som i körens hitkomst och uppträdande ser ej blott en musikalisk prestation utan även ett tecken på att vi svenskar i Finlands yttersta utpost mot öster icke äro bortglömda. […] Det är ur denna synpunkt sedd den svenska studentsångarskarans besök eger en vital betydelse.” Åbo Underrättelser, 21 March 1921, I–n: “något mera utvecklat och egaliserat röstmaterial […] sin karga, musikaliskt knappa struktur.” The review was published in Finnish on the same day in Turun Sanomat (under the pseudonym J. J.). Despite the translated name, the choir retained the original abbreviation WSB, which is often given in parentheses after the Finnish title (see, e.g., the description of the first edition). After the translation, the choir officially continued as a bilingual organization until 1929. After the decision to only use Finnish as the official language (on 21 October 1929), all 19 Swedish-speaking members of the choir (of 50 singers in total) resigned. See Eino Reponen, Viipurin Lauluveikot 1897–1967 (Helsinki: Viipurin Lauluveikot, 1967) [=Reponen 1967], pp. 11–14 and Hedberg, unpubl., pp. 79–80. Sometimes the Finnish name appears spelled Viipurin Laulu-Veikot. Sibelius studied at the lyceum in 1876–1885. The letters from Schulman to Sibelius are currently in NL, Coll.206.34. The first


XXII

132 133

134 135

136

137

138

139

140

141

142

143

144

145

146

letter of the correspondence is missing, but the second is dated 5 August 1920. The telegram has not survived. According to Sibelius’s diary, he was working on the march on 10 December. Reponen 1967, p. 70: “[...] hieman omituiselta, mutta keskustelussa todettiin, että tämä kuuluikin asiaan, koska työ oli Sibeliuksen kynästä lähtenyt.” According to Hedberg (unpubl., p. 80), one reason as to why Sibelius’s composition did not make a favorable impression on the singers was that in their opinion it lacked the march-like character typical of an honorary march. The competition was won by Felix Krohn’s (1898–1963) composition Pan. Schulman to Sibelius on 14 January 1921 (in NL, Coll.206.34): “Vi beklaga att den icke kunnat deltaga i den tävlan […], enär den icke ankom anonymt […].” The incident is described in Schulman’s letter to Sibelius (see the endnote above). The donator and the size of the small sum remain unknown. Practically all of the choir’s possessions were lost during World War II. In a letter on 14 January 1921, Schulman asked Sibelius if he really intended the change to take place in the eighth bar from the end instead of the sixth. No further information on the emendation has survived. In the entry, Sibelius refers to the work with an erroneous title Liknelse, which, however, has approximately the same meaning. According to Sibelius’s oral statement, he wrote the work while visiting Turku (see Hedberg, unpubl., p. 80). Based on the diary entry and the fact that the fair copy was sent to the choir on 23 January from Järvenpää, Sibelius in all likelihood remembered incorrectly. Diary 22 January 1922: “En manskvartett i den gamla goda stilen – den har tilltalat mig i dess patos.” As Karsten was unable to answer Sibelius’s letter, the representative of the choir sent Sibelius a thank-you letter for the work on Karsten’s behalf. The letter dated 28 January 1922 is in NL, Coll.206.47: “[f]jättrad vid sjukbädden.” Åbo Underrättelser, 14 March 1926: “Sibelius’ Likhet översteg körens förmåga.” The same review was published in Finnish in Turun Sanomat. Helsingin Sanomat, 14 December 1927, anon.: “Kuoro lauloi useita varsin vaikeita sävellyksiä, selviytyen niistä keveästi. Tällaisia koetuskiviä olivat […] eräät kiperät sointumuodostelmat Sibeliuksen Runeberg-romanssissa ‘Likhet’.” A review with similar contents was published also in Hufvudstadsbladet (by K[arl] E[kman]) on the same day. Letter dated 19 June 1925 in NL, Coll.206.23: “Först då jag märkte att det gällde en skyddskårs-sång, bleknade jag och våndades svårligen. Den patentpatriotiska lyriken är en landsplåga, och huru undgå dess förb. tonart, då det gällde ett sådant ämne? Musiken visade emellertid vägen, […] Skolsången blev ännu svårare att få fason på […]. Att texterna äro skrivna med blyerts är icke respektlöshet utan tvärtom: det är meningen att Du skall kunna med gummi elasticum vidtaga nödiga åtgärder […].” Sibelius’s letter to Holger Schildt Förlag, dated 23 November 1925 (in the archives of Holger Schildt Förlag, currently in the Library of Åbo Akademi). The rejection letter, dated 27 November 1925, is in NL, Coll.206.46. In 1930, Sibelius used the musical material of Skyddskårsmarsch in his work Karjalan osa (JS 108) for unison male voices with piano accompaniment. The choir approved verses 4–6 from the original poem, but changed their order so that the original verse 5 became the first, and verses 4 and 6 became verses 2 and 3 respectively. The original poem is published in Wäinö Sola, Wäinö Sola kertoo, II (Porvoo: Werner Söderström, 1952) [=Sola 1952], pp. 225–226. Sola mediated the request to Sibelius. In a letter dated 7 August 1928, Sibelius promised to complete the work before Sola’s trip to America. The letter is facsimiled in Sola (1952, pp. [260–261]).

XXI

147

148

149

150

151 152

153

154

155

156

157

Letters from Jallu Honkonen in the archives of Wäinö Sola (NL, Coll. 449.1) dated 22 February 1927; 1 February, 25 April, and 11 September 1928. Wäinö Sola’s manuscript of his memoires with a clipping from his untitled article in New Yorkin Uutiset, 8 May 1929 (NL, Coll.449.6). According to the article, the manuscript of Siltavahti was donated to the choir on 25 October 1928 after Sola’s concert, at which he sang the solo-song version as an encore. Letter from New Yorkin Laulumiehet (signed by J[allu] Honkonen) to Sibelius dated 9 November 1928 in NL, Coll.206.47: “Pyydän mitä vilpittömämmin kiittää Teitä, hra professori, myötätunnostanne ja siitä kunniasta, jonka sävellyksellänne olette suoneet kuorollemme. Taiteilija Sola on täkäläisissä konserteissaan haltioittanut kuulijansa ‘Siltavahdilla.’ Kuoromme on sitä harjoitellut innokkaasti ja tuntuukin minusta, että kuorosävellyksenä se on vieläkin valtaavampi; laulajat siihen ovat ihastuneet sydänjuuriaan myöten.” The work list is designated in SibWV, p. 695, as “Sib 1952.” The publication year of the second march is not printed in the edition, but the edition is listed in the National Bibliography of Finland: Simo Pakarinen, Suomalainen kirjallisuus 1930–1932: aakkosellinen ja aineenmukainen luettelo (Helsinki: Suomalaisen kirjallisuuden seura, 1934). In Viipurin Lauluveikot 1897–1947 (Helsinki: Viipurin Lauluveikot, 1947), p. 30, the pseudonym A.A.L. also writes about the festival, but erroneously gives the year 1933. Reponen 1967, p. 70. Viipurin Lauluveikot did, in fact, perform at the first Karelian festival, which took place on 11–17 February 1934, but at that time the second composition had already been printed four years previously. Where Sibelius heard the performance of his first march remains unknown. One such occasion could be the choir’s first performance on the radio, which was broadcast on 19 April 1929. Jāzeps Vītols studied at the Conservatory of Saint Petersburg under Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908). After graduation in 1886, Vītols taught in Saint Petersburg until 1918, whereafter he moved back to Latvia. He founded the Conservatory of Riga in 1919 (currently known as Jāzepa Vītola Latvijas Mūzikas akadēmija). Vītols was also known as a pianist, conductor, and critic. In 1944, Vītols moved to Lübeck, Germany, where he lived until his death. Vītols is spelled in German ortography as Vihtol. Päivälehti, 8 December 1895, O[skar Merikanto]: “Itse ohjelmasta tahdomme, Herää Suomea lukuun ottamatta, etusijassa mainita prof. Vihtolin säweltämän lättiläisen ballaadin. Tämä teos oli erittäin arwokas, kaunis ja mahtawa. Sen omituinen[,] originelli, kansanmusiikintapainen pohja[-]säwel oli mainiosti ballaadin sisältöön sattuwa ja sen musikaalisesti ja harmoonisesti ansiokas rakenne oli taitawasta kädestä lähtenyt. Tämän lisäksi tuli wielä laulukunnan musikaalinen ja innostunut esitys tässä kappaleessa, esitys, joka oli parasta, mitä Y. L:lta olemme kuulleet.” Uusi Suometar, 8 December 1895, R[obert] E[lmgren]: “Ainoa mitä meitä sowituksessa kummastutti oli, että ‘walkopartaisen’ tuloa ilmoitettiin korkean tenoorisoolon kautta, jopa niin korkean että se tuntui miltei mahdottomalta laulaa rinta-äänessä. Hra Floman, joka tämän pienen soolopartian lauloi, teki tehtäwänsä warsin ansiokkaasti, emmekä hänen syykseen laske sitä että tämä kohta laulussa ei meihin aiwan edullista waikutusta tehnyt. Kokonaisuudessaan kuitenkin on tämä ballaadi etewästi sowitettu ja laulettiin waikuttawasti.” Nya Pressen, 2 December 1898, K[arl Flodin]: “Programmet innehöll flere nummer, som genom sin musikaliska halt höjde sig öfver mängden af endast konventionelt vackra mankvartetter. Främst anföra vi i sådant afseende den lettiska balladen af Vihtol, en längre, på växlande stämningar rik tonsättning, som därtill bar en mycket originell lokalfärg.” In addition to Nya Pressen, also other newspapers especially mentioned Laulun mahti in their reviews of the concert (e.g., Uusi Suometar on the same day). Uusmaalaisten laulu and Skyddskårsmarsch are discussed above.


XXIII

XXIII

158 The sketches for Suomenmaa are in NL, HUL 1472a/7. For the description, see the Critical Remarks. 159 Sibelius apparently returned to the poem Suomenmaa in 1919, planning to use that text in the cantata commissioned by the mixed choir Suomen Laulu (Diary, 20 October 1919). He finally chose the text Maan virsi by Eino Leino instead. Sibelius’s composition is known as Op. 95. 160 Sandels was written for a composition competition organized by MM. The deadline for the submissions was 20 April 1898.

161 The melody appears for the first time in the sketches for Tulen synty. See Ylivuori 2013, pp. 172–174. See also Rakastava above. For Sonata, see JSW V/1. 162 E.g., Erik Bergman 1960. Bergman published a completed version of Sibelius’s incomplete composition. 163 See, e.g., Tawaststjerna. See also SibWV. 164 See Jalmari Finne: “Muistelmia Sibeliuksen töistä” in Aulos, säveltaiteellis-kirjallinen julkaisu. Edited by Lauri Ikonen (Suomen Musiikkilehti, 1925), p. 20.

Einleitung Die Serie VII der Jean Sibelius Werke (JSW) enthält mehr als einhundert Chorwerke – sowohl a cappella als auch mit Begleitung – für gemischten Chor, Männerchor und Frauenchor sowie für verschiedene Kinderchorbesetzungen. Einige Werke liegen in verschiedenen Fassungen vor, weil Sibelius viele seiner Chorwerke auch in eigenen Bearbeitungen veröffentlicht hat, um ihnen eine größere Verbreitung zu sichern. Der vorliegende Band enthält sämtliche a cappella-Werke für Männerchor, und zwar sowohl die Originalkompositionen als auch Sibelius’ eigene Bearbeitungen. Die Werke sind nach ihren Opuszahlen angeordnet. Werke ohne Opuszahlen sind mit JSNummern versehen und erscheinen danach in chronologischer Folge. Die Opuszahlen und JS-Nummern im vorliegenden Band folgen prinzipiell Fabian Dahlströms Werkverzeichnis.1 Über die 32 vollständigen Männerchorwerke hinaus enthält dieser Band Werke, die unvollständig geblieben sind, und Frühfassungen – entweder transkribiert im Appendix oder als Faksimile am Ende des Bandes.2 Der vorliegende Band enthält auch Laulun mahti, eine Komposition von Jāzeps Vītols (1863–1948) für gemischten Chor, die Sibelius für Männerchor bearbeitet hat. Die Gesangstexte in Sibelius’ frühen Männerchorwerken (1893–1905) sind überwiegend in Finnisch – außer Hymn op. 21, Har du mod? JS 93 und Ej med klagan, die Frühfassung von JS 69. Der spätere Teil der Männerchorwerke (nach den 1910er Jahren) ist durch Gesangstexte in schwedischer Sprache geprägt, wobei Sibelius auch weiter finnische Texte vertonte. Das chronologisch letzte Männerchorwerk ist Viipurin Lauluveikkojen kunniamarssi (2), das aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach 1929 entstand. Die überwiegende Mehrheit von Sibelius’ Männerchorwerken entstand ursprünglich zum Gebrauch eines bestimmten Chores oder Dirigenten. In den meisten Fällen wurden die Werke bei Sibelius bestellt – die häufigsten Auftraggeber waren die Männerchöre Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat, der finnischsprachige Chor der Universität Helsinki, und Muntra Musikanter („Muntere Musiker“), der schwedischsprachige Männerchor, sowie die Chordirigenten Heikki Klemetti (1876–1953) und Olof Wallin (1884–1920). Darüber hinaus schrieb Sibelius eine beträchtliche Zahl seiner Chorwerke für Freunde – entweder als Geschenke oder als Gegenleistungen. Das finnische Chorrepertoire war in den 1880er und 1890er Jahren stark durch die ins Finnische oder Schwedische übersetzte Musik der deutschen Liedertafel geprägt sowie durch finnische Musik, welche durch diesen Stil beeinflusst war. Auch Volksliedbearbeitungen – ebenfalls ein wichtiger Faktor des Chorrepertoires – wurden in diesem Stil geschrieben.3 Aus dieser Perspektive ist es nicht erstaunlich, dass das erste a cap-

pella-Chorwerk von Sibelius, das öffentlich aufgeführt wurde, Venematka op. 18 Nr. 3, 1893 im Publikum wie eine „Bombe einschlug“.4 Im darauffolgenden Jahr löste Rakastava JS 160a den Erfolg von Venematka ab. In den Zeitungskritiken wurden diese beiden Werke häufig gemeinsam als Beispiele für den Beginn einer komplett neuen Art der finnischen Chormusik betrachtet. Ein anonymer Rezensent der Zeitung Wasa Tidning fasste diesen Eindruck wie folgt zusammen: „Was den musikalischen Geist und Gehalt angeht, so sind dies die wahrhaftigsten finnischen Chorsätze, die wir bislang haben.“5 Ein anderer anonymer Kritiker schrieb in Pohjalainen, „diese [beiden] Lieder sind, meiner Kenntnis nach, die musikalisch bedeutendsten Werke, die jemals für einen Chor geschrieben wurden“.6 Die Vorstellung, dass Sibelius’ Chormusik eine neue, wahrhaft finnische Musik darstellt, ist ein wiederkehrendes Merkmal bei der Aufnahme seiner Männerchorwerke. Op. 1 Nr. 4 Jouluvirsi – Julvisa Das Weihnachtslied Jouluvirsi – Julvisa komponierte Sibelius ursprünglich 1909 für Sologesang mit Klavierbegleitung.7 Später schrieb er vier a cappella-Bearbeitungen für verschiedene Chorbesetzungen, von denen die Männerchorfassung in den vorliegenden Band aufgenommen wurde.8 Am 16. August 1935 schrieb Martti Turunen (1902–1979), der Dirigent von Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat, Sibelius einen Brief und bat ihn, Jouluvirsi für das kommende Konzert zu bearbeiten.9 Sibelius sagte zu und vermachte dem Chor die Reinschrift, dieser bestritt nicht nur die Uraufführung der Bearbeitung, sondern druckte sie auch im Lauf desselben Jahre. Obwohl das Weihnachtslied ursprünglich auf das schwedische Gedicht von Zacharias Topelius (1818–1898) komponiert war, verwendete Sibelius bei der Chorfassung die finnische Übersetzung, wobei der Text in der Reinschrift jedoch nur teilweise unterlegt ist. Die Uraufführung der Bearbeitung fand am 3. Dezember 1935 im Konzert von Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat statt. Helsingin Sanomat war die einzige Zeitung, die über Sibelius’ neue Bearbeitung berichtete: „Das häufig gesungene Weihnachtslied ,En etsi valtaa, loistoa‘ war nun erstmals in einer Bearbeitung für Männerchor zu hören. In seiner neuen Form klingt es einschmeichelnd sanft und schön, aber es hat vielleicht etwas von seiner Sensibilität verloren.“10 Opus 18: Sechs mehrstimmige Lieder für Männerchor a cappella Bei op. 18 revidierte Sibelius mehrfach die Zahl der integrierten Werke und ihre Aufeinanderfolge. Bevor er seinem Opus die endgültige Form gab, zeigte er es nach außen in mindestens zwei verschiedenen Formen:


XXIV 1905:11 1) Rakastava 2) Venematka 3) Saarella palaa 4) Min rastas raataa 5) Metsämiehen laulu 6) Sydämeni laulu 7) Sortunut ääni 8) Terve kuu! 9) Veljeni vierailla mailla 1911–1930:12 1) Isänmaalle 2) Veljeni vierailla mailla 3) Saarella palaa 4) Min rastas raataa 5) Metsämiehen laulu 6) Sydämeni laulu 7) Sortunut ääni 8) Terve kuu! 9) Venematka Die Frühgeschichte von Opus 18 ist mit der von Opus 21 verwoben. Bevor Isänmaalle das Anfangsstück von Opus 18 wurde, erschien es in den Werklisten als op. 21b, und nachdem Rakastava aus Opus 18 entfernt worden war, tauchte es als op. 21 Nr. 1 auf (1909–1911).13 Verwirrenderweise finden sich die Chorfassungen von Rakastava (JS 160a und c) auch unter Opus 14, was Sibelius wahrscheinlich nur für die Streicherfassung beabsichtigte.14 Ein weiteres verwirrendes Detail bei Opus 18 ist die Tatsache, dass Sibelius Min rastas raataa niemals für Männerchor einrichtete; es gibt dieses Werk nur für gemischten Chor. Weshalb Sibelius es in seinen Werklisten dauerhaft bei den Männerchorwerken beließ, bleibt unbekannt.15 Um 1930 änderte Sibelius den Inhalt von Opus 18 zum letzten Mal. Die neue Unternummerierung wurde in ihrer endgültigen Form erstmals 1931 in Cecil Grays Sibelius-Biographie veröffentlicht, wo das Opus den Titel „Sechs mehrstimmige Lieder für Männerchor a cappella“ erhielt.16 1) Sortunut ääni 2) Terve kuu! 3) Venematka 4) Saarella palaa 5) Metsämiehen laulu 6) Sydämeni laulu Der folgende Abschnitt betrachtet nur die Werke, die in die endgültige Fassung der Sammlung aufgenommen sind. Die um 1930 ausgeschlossenen Werke sind in dem Abschnitt „Werke ohne Opuszahlen“ behandelt. Sibelius komponierte die Kanteletar-Rune Sortunut ääni in zwei Fassungen: für gemischten Chor und für Männerchor. Aus den Quellen geht keine gesicherte Chronologie hervor, da zu keiner Fassung Textdokumente oder Handschriften überliefert sind. Die Fassung für gemischten Chor erschien bereits 1898 im Druck, wohingegen die Erstausgabe der Männerchorfassung drei Jahre später herauskam. Diese Fassung wurde am 21. April 1899 uraufgeführt; das Uraufführungsdatum der Fassung für gemischten Chor ist nicht bekannt. Die Männerchorfassung von Sortunut ääni war wahrscheinlich ein Auftrag von Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat oder dessen Chorleiter Heikki Klemetti, der 1899 die Uraufführung

dirigierte.17 Dieses erste Konzert war ein Erfolg: das Publikum erreichte bei jeder Nummer des Programms, dass sie wiederholt wurde. Die Kritiker sowohl in Päivälehti als auch in Hufvudstadsbladet rühmten die Qualität der Aufführungen und die patriotische Atmosphäre, die von ihnen ausging. Die Kompositionen wurden jedoch in beiden Besprechungen nicht einzeln bewertet; in Hufvudstadsbladet charakterisierte der Kritiker Sibelius’ Werke (außer Sortunut ääni war auch Sydämeni laulu aufgeführt worden) als „edel“.18 Terve kuu! (auf einen Text aus dem Kanteletar) wurde von Klemetti für die Konzerttournee des Männerchors Suomen Laulu nach Mitteleuropa in Auftrag gegeben, die im Sommer 1901 stattfand. Zweck des Auftragswerks war es, die außergewöhnlich tiefen Bässe des Chores herauszustellen.19 Sibelius vollendete das Werk in letzter Minute, und der Chor hatte gerade noch genug Zeit, um das Werk vor dem Abschiedskonzert, das für den 30. Mai 1901 organisiert war, in aufführbare Form zu bringen – wenige Tage vor der Abreise. Trotz der kurzen Probenzeit war die Uraufführung ein Erfolg: Terve kuu! wurde im Konzert nicht nur einmal, sondern sogar zweimal wiederholt. Auch die Kritiker lobten das Werk. Der Komponist Oskar Merikanto urteilte in seinem Bericht in Päivälehti, dass „diese Komposition alles in allem in künstlerischer Hinsicht eine der wertvollsten hiesigen [finnischen] Chorkompositionen ist“.20 Das Werk wurde in die Chorsammlung Under Sångarfanan – Laulajalippu II aufgenommen, die Westerlund im darauffolgenden Jahr veröffentlichte. Wegen der kurzen Studienphase vor der Uraufführung nutzte der Chor die Bootsfahrt nach Tallinn, um Terve kuu! weiterzuproben.21 Martin Wegelius (1846–1906), Sibelius’ ehemaliger Lehrer am Musikinstitut Helsinki, war zufällig auch an Bord. Offenbar schätzte Wegelius das neue Werk seines ehemaligen Schülers nicht, da er Klemetti gegenüber bemerkte, als ihm dieser die Partitur zeigte: „Ja, wahrhaftig, was ist das wieder für eine Absurdität von ihm!“22 Seinen Zweck erfüllte das Werk jedoch, da die meisten Kritiker, die in verschiedenen Städten über die Konzerte schrieben, die ausgezeichneten tiefen Bässe des Chors lobten.23 Venematka wurde von Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat für das Konzert am 6. April 1893 in Auftrag gegeben, als der Chor sein zehnjähriges Bestehen beging. Der Dirigent Jalmari (Hjalmar) Hahl (1869–1929) hatte ein anspruchsvolles Programm mit insgesamt sechs Uraufführungen zusammengestellt.24 Venematka war dabei Sibelius’ erstes öffentlich aufgeführtes a cappella-Chorwerk; es erzielte einen unmittelbaren Erfolg. Oskar Merikanto schrieb den Bericht in Päivälehti: „Es war sehr unterhaltsam, Sibelius’ Wenematka kennenzulernen. […] Das Lied ist kurz, aber eine wahres Vergnügen. Wie die anderen Werke von Sibelius geht es auch deutlich auf den finnischen Runengesang zurück; daran kann man den Autor leicht erkennen. Die Fahrt auf dem Wasser, das Vergnügen am Meer und vor allem die Mädchen, die ,an der Spitze der Halbinseln‘ zuschauen und zuhören, sind meisterhaft porträtiert.“25 Allgemein erwähnten die Kritiker besonders die Werke von Sibelius und Kajanus. Der Rezensent in Hufvudstadsbladet schrieb: „J. Sibelius’ Venematka (Text aus dem Kalevala) war in jeder Hinsicht glänzend, sowohl was den Charakter als auch was die musikalische Behandlung und den Inhalt angeht. […] Obwohl es nicht leicht ist, wurde es vom Chor brillant gesungen.“26 Saarella palaa trug ursprünglich sowohl im Kanteletar als auch bei Sibelius den Titel Työnsä kumpasellaki.27 Sibelius komponierte das Werk für Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat, der es am 7. Dezember 1895 unter der Leitung Hahls uraufführte. Trotz des


XXV späteren Uraufführungsdatums könnte Sibelius es gleichzeitig mit Venematka komponiert – oder zumindest skizziert – haben, da auch dieses Werk für Hahl und Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat entstand: Skizzen für beide Werke finden sich im selben Skizzenbuch (HUL 1400).28 Saarella palaa und Venematka wurden zusammen mit Rakastava (JS 160a) in der von Hahl herausgegebenen Sammlung Ylioppilaslauluja 6 1895 veröffentlicht. Nach der Uraufführung lobten alle Kritiker die Originalität des Werks. Im Hufvudstadsbladet schrieb der Kritiker: „Die zweite Komposition unterscheidet sich deutlich von der herkömmlichen Art, für Männerchöre zu komponieren, und sie ergreift bei aller Schlichtheit durch ihre Originalität und Atmosphäre.“29 Oskar Merikanto äußerte in Päivälehti, dass „Sibelius’ ,Työnsä kumpasellaki‘ aufs Schönste bewegend ist, ein großartiges Vokalstück, das beim Publikum so sehr ankam, dass es dreimal gesungen werden musste.“30 In Uusi Suometar schrieb der Kritiker: „Es ist eine feine und besonders schöne Komposition […]. Sie wurde sehr gut dargeboten. Dennoch denken wir, dass das Rezitativ in Bass 1 mehr ,parlando‘ gesungen werden sollte und nicht so schwer und steif, wie es aufgeführt wurde. Dies ist jedoch der einzige Vorbehalt gegenüber dieser Nummer. Ansonsten war die Aufführung erstaunlich erfolgreich.“31 Heikki Klemetti nahm seine Arbeit als Chorleiter von Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat in der Herbstsaison 1898 auf. Für das erste Konzert, das am 1. Dezember stattfinden sollte, bat er Sibelius, seinen ehemaligen Lehrer, ein Gedicht von Aleksis Kivi (1834– 1872) zu vertonen.32 Sibelius hatte die Aufgabe als schwierig und zeitraubend eingeschätzt. Klemetti erinnerte sich jedoch später, dass Sibelius ihm das Manuskript mit einer liebevollen Anmerkung überreichte: „Jetzt ist es doch ein Lied meines Herzens.“33 Sibelius’ Wahl des Gedichts Sydämeni laulu aus dem ersten finnischsprachigen Roman Seitsemän veljestä ist oft verklärt worden, da es sich um ein Wiegenlied über den Tod eines Kindes handelt und Aino in dieser Zeit mit ihrem dritten Kind (Kirsti) schwanger war. Kirsti starb, als sie ein Jahr alt war.34 Das Hauptinteresse der Uraufführungsberichte in den Zeitschriften galt natürlich dem neuen Dirigenten, der von jedem Kritiker gelobt wurde. Die Uraufführung von Sibelius’ Sydämeni laulu wurde nur von Robert Elmgren mit mehr als einem Satz bedacht. Er schrieb in Uusi Suometar: „Dann überstrahlt das kleine Lied von Sibelius die dunkle Stimmung und berührt die Herzen. Der Chor sang ausgezeichnet. Die Phrasierung war korrekt und die Farbgebung schön. Besonders das Pianissimo von Bass 2 verlieh dem ganzen Lied einen dunklen Glanz. Das Publikum war nach dem Hören überwältigt. Der Applaus hörte nicht auf, bevor der Chor das Lied dreimal gesungen hatte.“35 In anderen Besprechungen wird das Werk als schlicht, originell und stimmungsvoll beschrieben.36 Metsämiehen laulu, Sibelius’ andere Kivi-Vertonung, wurde wohl von Klemetti in Auftrag gegeben, obwohl der Auftrag selbst nicht nachzuweisen ist.37 Klemetti setzte sich aktiv für Kivis Dichtkunst ein. Das genaue Kompositionsdatum ist nicht bekannt. Mit aller Wahrscheinlichkeit entstand Metsämiehen laulu etwas später (Ende 1898 oder Anfang 1899), weil es nicht zusammen mit Sydämeni laulu 1898 uraufgeführt, wohl aber mit diesem Stück zusammen 1899 veröffentlicht wurde.38 Die Uraufführung von Metsämiehen laulu fand erst am 4. April 1900 durch Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat statt. Das Werk wurde gut aufgenommen; so schrieb beispielsweise Oskar Merikanto in Päivälehti: „Das Programm erhielt durch Sibelius’ Metsämiehen laulu einen flotten Start, was das raumfüllende Publikum ,in Stimmung‘ brachte.“39

XXV Hymn op. 21 1896 komponierte Sibelius Hymn op. 21, auch bekannt durch die Anfangsworte Natus in curas, für die Enthüllung des Grabmals von Josef Pippingsköld (1825–1892), dem Professor für Geburtshilfe an der Kaiserlichen Alexander-Universität in Finnland (heute: Universität Helsinki).40 Den lateinischen Text für Hymn hatte Fridolf Gustafsson (1853–1924), Professor für romanische Literatur an der Universität, eigens zu diesem Anlass geschrieben. Die Enthüllung fand am 25. Mai 1896 statt.41 Sibelius arbeitete zu dieser Zeit vertretungsweise als Musiklehrer an der Universität, und als Teil seiner Dienstpflichten bei der Zeremonie leitete er ein kleines Ensemble, das aus Sängern der Männerchöre Akademiska Sångföreningen und Muntra Musikanter bestand.42 Dem Bericht in Hufvudstadsbladet am nächsten Tag zufolge „erhielt die schlichte Enthüllungszeremonie ein besonders eindrucksvolles Ende durch eine Hymne, die Jean Sibelius für diesen Anlass in einem alten italienischen Stil komponiert hatte“.43 Das Werk wurde in die Chorsammlung Laulajalippu – Under Sångarfanan aufgenommen, die 1899 bei Fazer & Westerlund erschien. Für die Veröffentlichung nahm Sibelius kleine Änderungen vor, wobei er vor allem in einigen Passagen die Mittelstimmen austauschte. Er überarbeitete auch den Schluss, bei dem er die letzte Zeile erweiterte.44 In der Besprechung der Publikation wurde Sibelius’ Werk als eines der wertvollsten der Sammlung bezeichnet; der Kritiker erachtete es jedoch – wie auch die meisten anderen Werke des Bandes – als zu schwer, wohingegen nur wenige Werke der Sammlung für das Niveau der finnischen Männerchöre geeignet seien.45 Finlandia-hymni aus op. 26 Finnische Auswanderer sangen während der ersten Jahrzehnte des 20. Jahrhunderts in den USA den hymnischen Abschnitt aus Finlandia mit verschiedenen, nicht autorisierten Texten und Bearbeitungen.46 Diese Fassungen waren nicht allgemein in Finnland bekannt. Als Yrjö Sjöblom 1938 Sibelius zu seiner Meinung zu den Texten fragte, die auf seine Melodie geschrieben wurden, reagierte dieser mit Widerwillen und sagte dass „es [Finlandia] nicht zum Singen gedacht ist. Es ist für Orchester geschrieben. Aber wenn die Welt dazu singen will, kann man nichts dagegen tun.“47 Dennoch schrieb 1938 Sibelius auf Anfrage des Sängers Wäinö Sola (1883–1961) die Männerchorbearbeitung und verwendete dabei Solas Text Oi, Herra annoit uuden päivän koittaa.48 Diese Fassung ist derzeit bekannt als Teil (Nr. 12) der Rituellen Freimaurer-Musik op. 113. Der in der vorliegenden Ausgabe veröffentlichte Text geht zurück auf die Initiative des Männerchors Laulu-Miehet und insbesondere auf dessen Leiter Martti Turunen, der sich 1940 an den Dichter Veikko Antero Koskenniemi (1885–1962) wandte und ihn bat, ein neues Gedicht zu Sibelius’ Finlandia zu schreiben.49 Obwohl Koskenniemi die Aufgabe zunächst widerwillig übernahm, verfasste er zu der Hymne einen neuen Text als Teil der Veröffentlichung Latuja lumessa, die den Kriegsinvaliden von 1939/40 gewidmet war. Das in Latuja lumessa gedruckte Gedicht passte jedoch nicht auf Sibelius’ Melodie. Es musste geändert werden, um in der Notenausgabe Verwendung zu finden. Sibelius, der wohl am Umarbeitungsprozess beteiligt war, stimmte der Verwendung des revidierten Textes zu.50 Mit dem Text von Koskenniemi wurde Finlandia-hymni 1940 von LauluMiehet gedruckt und beim Jubiläumskonzert zu dessen 25. Jahrestag am 7. Dezember 1940 uraufgeführt. Das Konzertprogramm enthielt einige Männerchorwerke von Sibelius, weil dieser am folgenden Tag seinen 75. Geburtstag hatte. Obwohl


XXVI das Konzert von Uusi Suomi und Helsingin Sanomat besprochen wurde, fand Finlandia in beiden Zeitungen keine Erwähnung. Fünf Lieder für Männerchor op. 84 Als der Erste Weltkrieg ausbrach, fand Sibelius seinen Verleger Breitkopf & Härtel auf der gegnerischen Seite wieder, weil Deutschland und Finnland (unter russischer Herrschaft) einander feindlich gegenüberstanden. Für Sibelius bedeutete dies, dass seine Einkünfte praktisch wegfielen.51 Aus diesem Grund musste er regionale Verleger finden, die trotz der schwierigen Zeiten daran interessiert waren, seine Werke herauszubringen.52 Als ein solcher Verlag erwies sich der Männerchor Muntra Musikanter, dessen Leiter Olof Wallin in den Kriegsjahren fünf Werke für Männerchor bestellte: Herr Lager och Skön fager, komponiert 1914, På berget, Ett drömackord und Evige Eros 1915 sowie Till havs! 1917. Alle Werke wurden durch Muntra Musikanter uraufgeführt und veröffentlicht – mit Ausnahme von Till havs!, das durch Akademiska Sångföreningen uraufgeführt wurde.53 Darüber hinaus gab Muntra Musikanter auch Unge hellener in Auftrag, das Sibelius in dieser Zeit entwarf, aber nie vollendete.54 Die durch den Krieg verursachte Ungemach ist in vielen Tagebucheinträgen von Sibelius spürbar, auch im Hinblick auf die Chorwerke op. 84. Am 30. Juli 1914 schrieb er beispielsweise: „Werde ich imstande sein, in diesen Zeiten für die Herren von MM zu komponieren? – Man sagt, dass die deutsche Flotte unserer Küste näher kommt. Und wir hier in Finnland?“55 Trotz des Gefühls der Unsicherheit begann Sibelius im Juli 1914 die Komposition von mit Herr Lager och Skön fager (Gedicht von Gustaf Fröding, 1860–1911). Die erste Erwähnung im Tagebuch erfolgt am 20. Juli. Er kommentierte das Voranschreiten am 13. August mit der Bemerkung, dass die Komposition interessant werde, obwohl sie ein Auftrag sei. Der Entstehungsphase dauerte lange, weil Sibelius die ursprüngliche Idee am 19. August verwarf und neu begann. Die endgültige Reinschrift wurde am 28. August abgeschlossen. Der Veröffentlichungsprozess begann umgehend, und Sibelius las die Korrekturabzüge schon am 17. September.56 Der Auftrag für das zweite Werk, På berget, wurde im Oktober 1914 erteilt, Sibelius nahm die Arbeit aber erst im Januar 1915 auf. På berget, auf ein Gedicht von Bertel Gripenberg (1878– 1947), wurde am 1. Februar fertig und an diesem Tag dem Auftraggeber zugeschickt.57 Kurz nachdem Sibelius dem Chor das Manuskript von Herr Lager och Skön fager geliefert hatte, wurde er mit dem Chorvorstand (insbesondere dem Vorsitzenden Fritiof Gylling) in einen heftigen Streit verwickelt. Nach Sibelius’ Meinung hatte der Vorstand sich ihm gegenüber „unangemessen“ verhalten.58 Obwohl der genaue Grund, weshalb Sibelius sich verletzt fühlte, nicht bekannt ist, könnte eine Erklärung dafür sein, dass das gelieferte Werk den Erwartungen der Chormitglieder nicht entsprach. Dies kann zum Beispiel Sibelius’ Tagebucheintrag vom 29. August entnommen werden, als er schreibt, dass das Werk „nicht verstanden wurde. Sie hatten etwas Aktuelles erwartet und erhielten eine Humoreske.“59 Obwohl die Auseinandersetzung offenbar im Spätsommer 1914 beigelegt worden war, brach sie im Februar 1915 während des Veröffentlichungsprozesses von På berget erneut aus.60 Diese beiden Werke, Herr Lager och Skön fager und Herr Lager och Skön fager und På berget, wurden am 27. April 1915 im selben Konzert uraufgeführt. Sibelius blickte der Aufführung mit großen Hoffnungen entgegen: „Ein guter Brief zu den Chorwerken von Dr. Olof Wallin, dem Chorleiter von MM. Ich erwarte von

XXVI ihm viel. Ich glaube, dass er das Neue in meinen Chorwerken versteht.“61 Die Aufführung wurde jedoch trotz der großen Hoffnungen ein „Fiasko“. Sibelius schrieb das Misslingen der Aufführung der ungünstigen Platzierung seiner Werke als Anfangsnummern des Konzerts zu.62 Der Bericht in Hufvudstadsbladet war indes positiv. Der Kritiker Karl Wasenius schrieb, der „übernommene alte Stil“ von På berget sei veranlasst durch die „raue Kraft, die es den Bergen im Hintergrund des Gedichts erlaubte, mit glaubhafter Wirkung zu erscheinen“. Bei Herr Lager och Skön fager lobte der Kritiker die geschickte Stimmbehandlung, merkte aber an, dass „die in der Partitur angestrebte Wirkung bei der Aufführung nicht vollständig erreicht wurde, obwohl mit dem Lied alles getan wurde, was getan werden konnte.“63 Mit anderen Worten: das Werk war zu schwer für den Chor. Sowohl Sibelius als auch die Kritiker merkten an, dass das Publikum die Werke nicht geschätzt habe. „Wäre das Lied [På berget] wiederholt worden“, so vermutete jedoch der Kritiker, „möchte ich glauben, dass das Publikum dessen hervorragende Größe besser verstanden hätte“.64 Im Gegensatz zu den ersten beiden Werken in diesem Opus fand die Entstehung von Ett drömackord in einem glücklicheren Gemütszustand statt. Sibelius schrieb am 26. Mai 1915 in sein Tagebuch: „Habe Arvis und Evas Tochter gesehen. Merkwürdig. Ich, Großvater! – Heute schmiede ich ein bisschen an den neuen Sachen. [Ich] plane auch für MM.“65 Die Pläne für Muntra Musikanter – d. h. Ett drömackord auf ein Gedicht von Gustaf Fröding – wurden im darauffolgenden Monat umgesetzt und abgeschlossen; Sibelius schickte dem Chor die Reinschrift am 23. Juni 1915.66 Durch die schwierigen Zeitumstände fand die Uraufführung erst fünf Jahre später statt. Das Konzert am 10. Dezember 1920 war eines der ersten, die der Chor seit einigen Jahren gegeben hatte, da dessen regelmäßige Aktivität nach dem finnischen Bürgerkrieg (1918) aufgehört hatte.67 Der Einschnitt wirkte sich auf das Niveau des Chores bei der Aufführung aus. Der Kritiker Karl Ekman bemerkte, der Umstand, dass der Chor seine Tätigkeit wieder aufgenommen habe, sei an sich wertvoll, und es sei gerade nicht wesentlich, die Aufführung kritisch zu bewerten. Er schrieb dennoch, dass „[…] zum Beispiel Sibelius’ neuer Chorsatz, ,Ett drömackord‘ von Fröding, eine eher mittelmäßige Aufführung mit unsauberen Harmonien und unpräzisem Zusammenklang erfuhr.“68 Sibelius schrieb Evige Eros auf ein Gedicht von Bertel Gripenberg für Bariton solo und Männerchor, nachdem er im Sommer 1915 den Bariton Edvin Bäckman gehört hatte. Sibelius schloss das Werk am 5. September ab. Als Wallin die Reinschrift erhielt, schrieb er Sibelius, der Solopart „passt sowohl zu Bäckmans Stimme als auch zu seinem Temperament ganz hervorragend“.69 Die Uraufführung fand am 14. Dezember 1915 statt und erhielt eine günstige Besprechung. Karl Wasenius schrieb in Hufvudstadsbladet: „Der erste Teil [des Konzerts] wurde durch das neue Lied ,Evige Eros‘ auf Worte von Bertel Gripenberg abgeschlossen – ein Dithyrambos, in edel erbaulicher Art geschrieben und zusätzlich hervorgehoben durch die meisterhafte Kontrolle und Behandlung des Mediums, über die Sibelius hier nachweislich verfügt. […] Das Solo, das die Vokalkomposition dominiert, wurde auf die bezaubernde Schönheit der Linie emporgehoben. Die Übergänge zeigten eine meisterhafte Verwendung der Klangfarben.“ Sogar die Ausführung lobte der Kritiker: „Herr Edvin Bäckman sang das Solo von der ersten bis zur letzten Note mit wundervoller Stimme und auf eine erbauliche Art, die dem schönen Inhalt des Lieds entspricht. Auch der Chor bewältigte seine heikle


XXIX Aufgabe auf respektable Weise […].“70 Das Publikum verlangte, dass das Werk sofort wiederholt wurde.71 Till havs! entstand als Ehrenlied (lystringssång) für den Männerchor Akademiska Sångföreningen. Obwohl Opus 84 sonst aus Werken besteht, die für Muntra Musikanter geschrieben wurde, war der Auftraggeber der gemeinsame Nenner für die Werke in op. 84: Olof Wallin, der beide Chöre leitete.72 Sibelius schrieb die Reinschrift der ersten Version des Werks am 17. April 1917, schickte sie Wallin aber nicht zu. Am 19. April überarbeitete er das Werk, das am selben Tag dem Auftraggeber zuging.73 Zwei Tage später komponierte Sibelius Drömmarna JS 64 für gemischten Chor. Die Texte zu Drömmarna und Till havs! sind derselben Sammlung des Dichters Jonatan Reuter (1859–1947) entnommen. Akademiska Sångföreningen studierte das Werk innerhalb weniger Wochen ein und gab die Uraufführung am 30. April in Helsinki während einer Soirée im Restaurant Kaivohuone; wegen der bürgerlichen Unruhen konnte der Chor sein traditionelles Frühjahrskonzert nicht veranstalten. Die Zeitungen berichteten nicht über die Soirée.74 Beide Fassungen von Till havs! sind im vorliegenden Band abgedruckt; die Frühfassung erscheint hier erstmals im Druck. Zwei Lieder für Männerstimmen op. 108 Über die beiden Männerchorwerke von Opus 108, Humoreski und Ne pitkän matkan kulkijat, ist wenig bekannt. Sie sind nach Gedichten von Kyösti Larson (1873–1948), der unter dem Künstlernamen Larin-Kyösti schrieb, entstanden. Der Widmung in der autographen Reinschrift zufolge übereignete Sibelius die Werke mit ihren Copyrights Eduard Polón (1861–1930), einem der erfolgreichsten Geschäftsleute seiner Zeit.75 Sibelius komponierte die Werke wohl als Gegenleistung für dessen Schirmherrschaft. Der genaue Kompositionszeitpunkt ist nicht bekannt. Die Melodie von Ne pitkän matkan kulkijat taucht skizziert in einem Büchlein auf (derzeit in NL, HUL 1697, S. [1]), das auch Sibelius’ Notizen zu seinen Einkünften und Ausgaben in den Jahren 1917 und 1918 enthält. Die Reinschrift beider Werke lassen jedoch ein späteres Kompositionsdatum vermuten, da sie auf einer Papiersorte geschrieben sind, von der bekannt ist, dass Sibelius sie zwischen 1923 und 1925 benutzte.76 Außerdem legt der Poststempel des betreffenden Päckchens (derzeit in Privatbesitz), in dem die Reinschrift verschickt wurde, nahe, dass zumindest Humoreski Polón im Laufe des Jahres 1924 geschickt wurde (die Nummernserie des Poststempels ist nicht eindeutig, und ob Ne pitkän matkan kulkijat im selben Päckchen war, geht daraus auch nicht hervor). 1924 scheint das Kompositionsjahr zu sein, obwohl Ne pitkän matkan kulkijat womöglich auf eine Melodie zurückgeht, die früher und vielleicht für einen anderen Zweck skizziert worden war. Beide Werke erschienen 1925 im Druck, veröffentlicht durch den Männerchor Laulu-Miehet. Polón übertrug Laulu-Miehet später das Coypright von Opus 108. Laulu-Miehet bestritt die Uraufführung der Werke am 23. März 1926. Offenkundig fielen die Werke dem Chor schwer. Obwohl Kritiker allgemein die Qualität des Gesangs lobten, sorgte die Schwierigkeit der neuen Sibelius-Werke für einige Probleme. Der Kritiker Otto Kotilainen schrieb am nächsten Tag in Helsinigin Sanomat: „Gerade einige der neuen Werke waren so nach an der Grenze dessen angesiedelt, was in der Chormusik möglich ist, dass es nicht verwundert, wenn hier und da ein dissonanter Klang hörbar war.“ Derselbe Kritiker fuhr fort: „Beide [Werke] enthalten eine Fülle sehr sensibler Akkordfortschreitungen und Melodien, die von den Sängern Zeit erfor-

XXVII dern, um zu perfekten Aufführungen zu reifen.“77 Der Kritiker in Uusi Suomi klagte über die hohen Töne: „Die Aufgabe der Tenöre wurde im Programm durch die vielen neuen Werke nicht einfacher, die – wie gelungene Kompositionen eben sind, ausnahmslos zu einem Register emporsteigen, in dem unsere nordischen Tenöre sich übermäßig anstrengen mussten.“78 Werke ohne Opuszahl zwischen 1894 und 1918 Über die zuvor vorgestellten Werke mit Opuszahlen hinaus schrieb Sibelius zwischen 1894 und 1918 neun Männerchor werke, die ohne Opuszahl blieben: Rakastava, Kuutamolla, Har du mod?, Veljeni vierailla mailla, Ej med klagan, Isänmaalle in zwei Fassungen, Uusmaalaisten laulu, Fridolins dårskap und Jone Havsfärd. Außerdem entstanden im Frühjahr 1918 zwei Männerchorwerke auf Gedichte von Gösta Schybergson. Diese beiden Schybergson-Vertonungen werden weiter unten getrennt behandelt. Um das finnische Männerchorrepertoire zu erweitern, veranstaltete der (von Jalmari Hahl geleitete) Männerchor Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat 1893/94 einen Kompositionswettbewerb, an dem Sibelius teilnahm, indem er Rakastava JS 160a (Text aus dem Kanteletar) einreichte. Legt man die überlieferten Skizzen zugrunde, scheint Sibelius für Rakastava kein neues Material entwickelt, sondern von bereits skizzierten Ideen profitiert zu haben.79 Das genaue Kompositionsdatum ist unbekannt; der Wettbewerb wurde jedoch im Mai 1893 angekündigt, und das Konzert, in dem die zu prämierenden Werke aufgeführt wurden, fand am 28. April 1894 statt.80 Sibelius’ Werk zog in diesem Konzert breite Aufmerksamkeit auf sich. Der Kritiker in Hufvudstadsbladet beschrieb die Aufführung folgendermaßen: „Herr Sibelius evoziert in seinem Tongedicht überraschende Szenen, atmosphärisch und durchtränkt von einer Brise warmen Gefühls, Originalität und finnischem Geist in den Melodien und im gesamten Charakter des Werks. Wir haben hier keine Zeit für eine detailliertere Beschreibung außer geradeheraus zu sagen, dass das Tongedicht eine unvergleichliche Wirkung hatte. Der Komponist wurde unter ohrenbetäubendem, donnerndem Applaus hervorgerufen, der ehrlich zugedacht und verdient war.“81 Die Entscheidung der Jury erstaunte viele. Im Konzert wurde bekannt gegeben, dass das patriotische Werk Hakkapeliitta von Emil Genetz (1852–1930) den ersten Preis errungen habe und Rakastava den zweiten. Die Kritiker artikulierten einmütig ihre Unzufriedenheit mit der Entscheidung: so schrieb Karl Flodin in Nya Pressen: „Es ist unbekannt, welche Gesichtspunkte in der Jury vorgebracht wurden, aber Herrn Sibelius’ Komposition steht unter dem Aspekt der Originalität zweifellos über der des Gewinners.“82 Hakkapeliitta wurde von den Kritikern als konventionell eingeschätzt. Nach dem zweiten Konzert kam ein Kritiker am 2. Mai interessanterweise auf die Frage zurück und zeigte nun auch eine gewisse Wertschätzung für Genetz’ Werk: „[Was Hakkapeliitta angeht,] müssen wir zugeben, dass wir diesmal eine bessere Vorstellung von diesem eindrucksvollen Musikstück bekamen als zuletzt. Wir ziehen noch immer ,Rakastava‘ vor, das unserer Meinung nach das wunderbarste finnische Männerchorwerk ist, das wir je gehört haben.“83 Die Juryentscheidung ist oft mit der Modernität und Schwierigkeit von Sibelius’ Chorsätzen erklärt worden.84 Als Rakastava 1896 in der Chorsammlung Suomalaisia ylioppilaslauluja 6 veröffentlicht wurde, verwirrten Sibelius’ Werke einen anonymen Kritiker: „Die Lieder von Sibelius [Venematka, Saarella palaa und Rakastava] sind sehr seltsam. Man bekommt beim ersten Durchspielen praktisch keine Vorstellung von


XXVIII ihnen. Aber wenn man sie besser kennt, bemerkt man in ihnen viel Schönheit. […] Das schönste [Werk in der Sammlung] aber ist zweifellos ,Rakastava‘, obwohl es so merkwürdige Dissonanzen enthält, dass man zunächst daran zweifelt, ob es korrekt gedruckt ist. Gespielt wirkt das Lied lang und monoton, aber es klingt gesungen wahrscheinlich ziemlich abwechslungsreich. Der Anfang ist sehr angenehm, da die Melodie so einfach und schön ist. Das Bariton-Solo in der Mitte hinterlässt einen außergewöhnlichen Eindruck: ein Solo, das vom Anfang bis zum Ende auf einer Tonhöhe bleibt. Das Tenor-Solo am Ende ist schön. Das ganze Lied ist sehr finnisch – wie die meisten Werke von Sibelius.“85 Am 19. April 1898 wachte die Dichterin und Stückeschreiberin Aino Krohn (1878–1956), besser bekannt unter ihrem Ehenamen Aino Kallas,86 mitten in der Nacht auf, weil Klänge von draußen kamen; ein Männerchorquartett sang eine Serenade. Überrascht aber wurde Krohn von dem Lied, das auf das Eröffnungsstück folgte, wie sie sich später erinnerte: „Mein Herz klopfte heftig … Nach allem … wie – ist es möglich – wie können das meine eigenen Verse aus dem Gedicht ,Kuutamolla‘ sein.“87 Sibelius hatte das Gedicht auf Bitten eines Freundes, des Schriftstellers und Photographen I. K. Inha (eigentlich Konrad Into Nyström, 1865–1930) vertont, der Krohn einen Heiratsantrag machen wollte. Nach der missglückten Uraufführung – Krohns Antwort an Inha war nicht zustimmend – blieb Sibelius’ Kuutamolla in ihrem Besitz.88 Die erste öffentliche Aufführung fand erst achtzehn Jahre später statt, als Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat es am 11. April 1916 unter der Leitung von Heikki Klemetti in einem Konzert zum 40. Jahrestag der Aktivitäten des finnischsprachigen Studentenchors darbot. Kuutamolla, das inmitten neuer Werke platziert war, machte auf die Kritiker keinen vorteilhaften Eindruck. Evert Katila schrieb beispielsweise in Uusi Suometar: „Sibelius, der Schöpfer der wahren finnischen Männerchorkomposition [als Gattung], war diesmal in dem Programm durch eine kleine Belanglosigkeit vergangener Zeiten vertreten.“89 Der Kritiker in Helsingin Sanomat legte einen günstigen Bericht ab und konstatierte, dass Sibelius’ neues Werk „atmosphärisch und auf eine dem Komponisten eigene Art und Weise harmonisiert“ sei.90 Sowohl Helsingin Sanomat als auch Hufvudstadsbladet beschrieben das Werk irrtümlich als neue Komposition. Im Herbst 1991 tauchte eine bis dahin unbekannte autographe Reinschrift von Har du mod? JS 93 für Männerchor auf.91 Obwohl das neu entdeckte Stück auf denselben Text von Josef Julius Wecksell (1838–1907) zurückgreift wie die veröffentlichte Komposition Har du mod? op. 31 Nr. 2 für Männerchor mit Orchesterbegleitung, entpuppte es sich als eine völlig unterschiedliche Vertonung und nicht z. B. als Bearbeitung des schon bekannten Werks. Über den Ursprung des a cappella-Satzes von Har du mod? JS 93 weiß man nur sehr wenig. Es wurde vermutet, dass das a cappella-Stück der veröffentlichten Komposition, die 1904 entstand und uraufgeführt wurde, vorausging.92 Diese Hypothese wird durch die Tatsache unterstützt, dass die Skizze der a cappella-Komposition auf demselben Blatt auftaucht wie Skizzen zum ersten Akt von Kuolema JS 113, der Bühnenmusik zu Arvid Järnefelts Schauspiel von 1903.93 Ein genaues Entstehungsdatum lässt sich daraus jedoch nicht ableiten. Die a cappella-Komposition wurde zu Sibelius’ Lebzeiten weder aufgeführt noch veröffentlicht; sie erscheint im vorliegenden Band erstmals im Druck. Im Jahr 1903 gingen viele hochangesehene Finnen, die öffentlich gegen die Aktionen zur Russifizierung Finnlands protestiert hat-

XXIII ten, ins Exil. Einige wurden offiziell durch den finnischen Generalgouverneur Nikolai Bobrikow exiliert, andere entschlossen sich um ihrer Sicherheit willen freiwillig dazu, das Land zu verlassen. Unter diesen befand sich der Schriftsteller Juhani Aho (1861–1921), der sich wegen seiner politischen Schriften entschied, die Jahre 1903/04 mit seiner Familie in Italien und Österreich zu verbringen.94 Das Gedicht Veljeni vierailla mailla ist eine Beschreibung von Ahos Rückkehr nach Finnland im Frühjahr 1904.95 Aho schrieb das Gedicht in zwei Fassungen: eine in Prosaform, veröffentlicht am 12. Oktober 1904 in Helsingin Sanomat, und eine Fassung in Versform, die Sibelius vertonte.96 Aho nahm diese Versfassung in keine seiner Sammlungen auf; daher ist sie aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach speziell für die Vertonung durch Sibelius gedacht, und der Komponist erhielt wohl den Text direkt von dem Dichter.97 Die chronologische Aufeinanderfolge der beiden Fassungen des Gedichts ist nicht bekannt.98 Auch das genaue Entstehungsdatum ist nicht belegt, der Kompositionsprozess muss jedoch ziemlich bald nach Ahos Rückkehr stattgefunden haben, da der Männerchor Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat das Werk am 2. Dezember 1904 uraufführte. Die Komposition wurde enthusiastisch aufgenommen. Karl Flodin beschrieb das Werk nach der Uraufführung detailliert in Helsingfors Posten: „Jean Sibelius bereicherte das Programm mit einem besonderen Beitrag, einem Lied voller patriotischer Aktualität: Teile von Juhani Ahos bewegendem Prosagedicht ,Veljeni vierailla mailla‘ (Meine Brüder in fremdem Land). Der Komponist hat die Aufgabe, die finnische Prosa rhythmisch zu behandeln, meisterlich gelöst. Die hoffnungslose Melancholie im Refrain ,veljeni vierailla mailla‘ fand jedoch einen noch meisterhafteren Ausdruck durch den Abstieg in die dunklen Mollklänge, die jederzeit als grandios empfunden wurden und schließlich auf Schicksal und sternlosen Raum wiesen. Das Lied ist nicht so, dass es wegen der rein musikalischen Behandlung sofort geschätzt wird, bei der Wiederholung aber ragte alles, was intensiv aufgenommen und unverwechselbar ausgedrückt war, auf völlig andere Art heraus.99 Veljeni vierailla mailla erschien 1905 in der Chorsammlung Suomalaisia ylioppilaslauluja II.100 Ej med klagan komponierte Sibelius zur Trauerfeier für seinen Freund Albert Edelfelt (1854–1905), einen der berühmtesten finnischen Maler. Der unerwartete Verlust traf Sibelius tief. Seinem Freund und Förderer Axel Carpelan (1858–1919) teilte er am 20. August 1905 mit: „Im Augenblick schreibe ich etwas für Edelfelts Beisetzung. Ich kann nicht beschreiben, wie sehr ich ihn vermisse. Leben ist kurz!!“101 Für die Komposition wählte Sibelius die letzten sechs Zeilen des Gedichts Molnets broder aus Fänrik Ståls sägner von Johan Ludvig Runeberg (1804–1877). Er komponierte Ej med klagan zunächst für Männerchor, verzichtete dann auf diese Fassung und verwendete das Material für gemischten Chor. Die Männerchorfassung blieb unveröffentlicht und geriet in Vergessenheit. Sie erscheint im vorliegenden Band erstmals im Druck.102 Isänmaalle ist im vorliegenden Band in zwei Fassungen enthalten. Das genaue Kompositionsdatum der frühen Fassung ist nicht belegt, aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach aber schrieb Sibelius sie nicht vor 1898. Die Erstausgabe des patriotischen Gedichts von Paavo Cajander (1846–1913) trug den Titel Maljan-esitys Isänmaalle, die (1898 gedruckte) Zweitausgabe den auch von Sibelius verwendeten Titel Isänmaalle. Sibelius veröffentlichte seine Erstfassung nicht; er ließ stattdessen 1900 eine leicht überarbeitete Fassung für gemischten Chor erscheinen.103 Der Männerchor Turun Työväen Mieskuoro und dessen Leiter


XXIX Anders Koskinen bestellten 1908 eine Bearbeitung für Männerchor, weil zu dieser Zeit offiziell keine Männerchorfassung dieses Werks erhältlich war.104 Koskinens Absicht war es, die neue Fassung in dem Männerchorwettbewerb aufzuführen, den Kansanvalistusseura in Viipuri für den 19.–21. Juni 1908 ausgeschrieben hatte. Sibelius schickte die Bearbeitung, die auf der veröffentlichten Fassung für gemischten Chor basiert und sich daher von der ersten Männerchorfassung unterscheidet, am 8. Mai 1908 an Koskinen. Die Reinschrift der Bearbeitung enthielt jedoch weder eine Textunterlegung noch irgendein dynamisches Zeichen, und Sibelius schrieb am Ende des Manuskripts: „So sollte das Lied gesungen werden. Ergänzen Sie bitte die Textunterlegung und die dynamischen Zeichen an den korrekten Stellen. In aller Eile der Ihre, Jean Sibelius.“105 Am 7. Juli 1908 informierte Koskinen den Komponisten erfreut darüber, dass Turun Työväen Mieskuoro den Wettbewerb gewonnen hatte. In diesem Brief lobte Koskinen auch die Bearbeitung und entschuldigte sich dafür, dass der Chor „keine andere Mittel“ habe, um dem Komponisten seine Verehrung zu zeigen.106 Chor und Komponist setzten ihre Zusammenarbeit fort, da Sibelius dem Chor die Erlaubnis gab, die Erstausgabe des Werks zu veröffentlichen, die schon im selben Jahr herauskam.107 Im Oktober 1911 besuchten einige Mitglieder von Eteläsuomalainen Osakunta Sibelius in Ainola. Sie fragten ihn, ob er bereit sei, Musik zu dem 1896 entstandenen Gedicht Uusimaa von Juho Heikki Erkko (1849–1906) zu schreiben. Das Lied solle die Hymne der Uusima-Region in Südfinnland werden, aus der auch Sibelius kam. Sibelius antwortete, dass er zu Erkkos Gedicht, das schon Oskar Merikanto vertont hatte, keine Musik schreiben wolle. Er wäre jedoch bereit, eine regionale Hymne zu komponieren, wenn ihm die Studenten ein passendes neues Gedicht liefern würden. Zu diesem Zweck beschloss Eteläsuomalainen Osakunta, einen Schreibwettbewerb zu organisieren, der von dem Pseudonym „1912“ – alias Kaarlo Terhi (1872–1921), einem Gesangslehrer aus Salo – gewonnen wurde.108 Sibelius erhielt das prämierte Gedicht am 21. Dezember 1911 und begann sofort, daran zu arbeiten. Nach den ersten Plänen, die Sibelius in seinem Tagebuch notierte, sollte die Musik „ein Unisono, monumental“ werden, „eines, das sich durch die Jahrhunderte ziehen wird“.109 Sibelius arbeitete fast einen Monat lang intensiv an dem Lied. Während des Kompositionsprozesses äußerte er jedoch auch Zweifel: „Hier in meiner Kammer ist sie [die Melodie] ganz gut. Aber wird sie auch draußen gut wirken, in der weiten, kalten Welt? – Ist sie nicht zu süß? Und klingt sie nicht zu ,hausbacken‘?“110 Das Lied war noch nicht fertig, als der Dichter selbst am 16. Januar 1912 Ainola besuchte. Vier Tage später war das Lied aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach fertig, da Sibelius es Kaarle Krohn zeigte, einem Mitglied der Jury des Schreibwettbewerbs, der nach Ainola gekommen war.111 Sibelius schrieb die Fassungen für Männerchor und gemischten Chor am nächsten Tag (21. Januar) ins Reine, überarbeitete aber die Männerchorfassung am 1. Februar 1912. Der Veröffentlichungsprozess der Fassung für gemischten Chor hatte bereits begonnen, da Sibelius am 2. Februar die ersten Korrekturfahnen dieser Fassung las.112 Die Erstausgabe erschien in Zusammenarbeit von Eteläsuomalainen Osakunta und dem Verlag WSOY.113 Terhis Gedicht blieb nicht unangefochten. Einigen Mitgliedern von Eteläsuomalainen Osakunta missfiel sein Gedicht. Einige regten sogar an, das prämierte Gedicht fallen zu lassen und den Dichter Eino Leino (1878–1926) zu bitten, ein neues Gedicht für

XXIX Sibelius’ Vertonung zu schreiben.114 Aber nicht nur das Gedicht war umstritten. Als Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat unter der Leitung von Heikki Klemetti am 20. April 1912 die Männerchorfassung uraufführte, kommentierte der Kritiker in Helsingin Sanomat: „Ich kann über Sibelius’ neues Uusmaalaisten laulu nur sagen, dass sogar ein großer Meister manchmal ohne Inspiration komponieren kann.“115 Der Kritiker Wasenius war in Hufvudstadsbladet auch nicht beeindruckt: „Er [der zweite Teil des Konzerts] begann mit Uusmaaslaisten laulu von Sibelius, ein Lied, in dem ich vergeblich versuchte, ,was Besonderes‘ zu finden.“116 Trotz der reservierten Aufnahme durch die Kritiker verlangte das Auditorium, das Lied noch einmal zu hören. Sibelius nahm Uusmaalaisten laulu in Opus 65 auf, das als Opus 65b den Titel Patriotiska sånger (Patriotische Lieder) trug, und änderte dies 1914 in Opus 65c. 1930 wurde das Werk schließlich aus der Liste der Werke mit Opuszahlen entfernt.117 Während der politisch turbulenten Jahre 1917 und 1918 waren die Nahrungsmittel für viele Finnen knapp. Am 12. Mai 1917 richtete Torkel Nordman, Architekt und Chorsänger aus Pori, folgenden Brief an Sibelius: „Um mein Versprechen zu halten, habe ich Ihnen heute eine geräucherte ,Lammgeige‘ [Lammkeule] geschickt. Holen Sie sie sofort vom Bahnhof ab und bewahren Sie sie hängend auf – Möge sie Ihnen schmecken. ,Schnapps‘ passt gut dazu.“118 Um die Keule zu überbringen, ohne dass sie unterwegs gestohlen wurde, platzierte Nordman sie in einen Geigenkasten. Wenn Sibelius, der selbst Geiger war, eine Violine erhielte, würde das nicht allzu verdächtig aussehen. Der Plan ging auf und die Lieferung kam unversehrt in Ainola an.119 Die Lammkeule war nicht die einzige Delikatesse, die Sibelius von Nordman erhielt: 1918 schickte dieser einige Flussneunaugen – ebenfalls mit dem Hinweis, dass sie mit Branntwein verzehrt werden sollten.120 Als Zeichen seiner Dankbarkeit komponierte Sibelius zwei humorvolle Männerchorwerke und schickte sie Nordman: Fridolins dårskap am 15. Mai 1917 und Jone havsfärd am 20. September 1918. Beide Gedichte waren der Sammlung Fridolins lustgård och dalmålningar på rim von Erik Axel Karlfeldt (1864– 1931) entnommen. Sibelius’ Wahl des Gedichts Fridolins dårskap war äußerst passend, denn die letzte Strophe beginnt so: „Geh heim und bearbeite die Lammkeule, die an deiner Wand hängt“.121 Der Text von Jone havsfärd ist eine Version von Jonas’ Geschichte aus der Bibel in der Art eines Trinklieds. Gerade Fridolins dårskap wurde ein beliebtes finnisches Männerchorstück. Die Popularität des Werks, das ursprünglich als „ein Ulk“ (ett skämt) gedacht war, überraschte Sibelius.122 Otto Andersson schrieb am 16. Juni 1952 nach einer Diskussion mit Sibelius, dass der Komponist nicht verstehen konnte, „wie es so populär werden konnte, wie es war, und durch wen es anfing, sich auf den ersten Platz zu bewegen“.123 Obwohl Sibelius die Musik ursprünglich auf die originale schwedische Fassung des Gedichts geschrieben hatte, enthielt die Erstausgabe nur die finnische Übersetzung. Der vorliegende Band präsentiert den Text in beiden Sprachen. Zwei Kompositionen in Erinnerung an Gösta Schybergson JS 224 Am 2. Februar 1918 umzingelten die Soldaten der Roten Armee während des finnischen Bürgerkriegs das Humalisto (schwedisch: Humleberg)-Krankenhaus in Helsinki, um nach versteckten Waffen zu suchen. Nach der Untersuchung des Krankenhauses und anderer Gebäude auf dem Gelände nahmen die Soldaten den 24-jährigen Arzt Gösta Schybergson fest. Kurz darauf wurde Schybergson in der Nähe exekutiert.124 Die


XXX Brutalität dieser Tat schockierte Finnland – sie wurde selbst von den Führern der Roten Armee verurteilt. Da Schybergson darüber hinaus Mitglied des Roten Kreuzes war (er trug das Armband bei seiner Erschießung), reagierten die Auslandsvertretungen ebenfalls mit aller Entschiedenheit und bedrängten die Führer der Roten Armee. Die Nachricht von der Hinrichtung erreichte auch Ainola, und Sibelius schrieb am 9. Februar in sein Tagebuch: „Der Mord an Dr. Schybergson hat mich tief betroffen.“125 Nach der Tat fand Schybergsons Mutter Johanna in Göstas Nachlass einige Gedichte aus seiner Feder. Sie fragte Sibelius, ob er bereit wäre, daraus etwas zu vertonen. Sibelius, der sich mit seiner Familie bei seinem Bruder in Helsinki aufhielt, besuchte die Familie Schybergson im April und wählte zwei Gedichte aus: Ute hörs stormen und Brusande rusar en våg, die er für Männerchor setzte, weil der junge Arzt ein aktives Mitglied des Männerchors Akademiska Sångföreningen gewesen war. Am 30. April besuchte Sibelius die Familie erneut und überreichte die Reinschrift der neuen Werke.126 Diese wurden im Herbst 1918 durch Akademiska Sångföreningen in Gedenken an Gösta Schybergson veröffentlicht.127 Ute hörs stormen wurde am 5. April 1919 von Akademiska Sångföreningen während einer Konzertreise des Chors nach Viipuri in Karelien (damals in Ost-Finnland gelegen) uraufgeführt. Obwohl das Sibelius-Lied in Wiborgs Nyheter vom 4. April als eine Ankündigung für das Konzert verwendet worden war, erwähnt es der Bericht am 7. April nicht. Im Grunde wurde keine einzige Nummer in dem Bericht einzeln betrachtet; legt man die Texte in Wiborgs Nyheter zugrunde, so hat es den Anschein, als habe man die politische Geste der Chorreise für wichtiger erachtet als die musikalischen Inhalte des Konzerts. Dies wurde in der Zeitung auch so explizit erwähnt: „[…] so sollte dies mit Freude und Sympathie von allen begrüßt werden, die in der Anreise und der Aufführung des Chors nicht nur eine musikalische Leistung sehen, sondern auch ein Signal, dass wir Schweden am äußersten Wachposten Finnlands gen Osten nicht vergessen sind. […] Aus dieser Sicht hat der Chor der schwedischen Studenten eine vitale Bedeutung.“128 Brusande rusar en våg wurde zwei Jahre später, am 19. März 1921, durch denselben Chor während dessen Konzertreise nach Turku in West-Finnland uraufgeführt. Dem Kritiker in Åbo Underrättelser zufolge litt die Qualität des Chors unter der beträchtlichen Anzahl unentwickelter Stimmen. Das Programm enthielt überwiegend traditionelle Männerchorwerke. Brusande rusar en våg wurde ebenso wie eine andere Uraufführung von einem kleineren Ensemble mit „etwas besser geschultem und ausgeglichenerem Stimmenmaterial“ präsentiert. Der Kritiker beklagte jedoch, dass durch die geringe Anzahl an Sängern das Werk an Kraft und Wirkung eingebüßt habe. Sibelius’ Komposition wurde eine „nackte und musikalisch magere Struktur“ bescheinigt.129 Werke ohne Opuszahl zwischen 1920 und 1929 Zwischen 1920 und 1929 verfasste Sibelius fünf Männerchor werke, die ohne Opuszahlen blieben: zwei Kompositionen zu dem Gedicht Viipurin Lauluveikkojen kunniamarssi sowie Likhet, Skyddskårsmarsch und Siltavahti. Im Oktober 1919 entschloss sich der ursprünglich unter dem Namen Wiborg Sångarbröder bekannte Männerchor, seinen schwedischen Namen ins Finnische zu übersetzen und sich Viipurin Lauluveikot zu nennen.130 Die Übersetzung des entstandenen Namens zog die Notwendigkeit eines neuen Ehrenmarschs mit einem finnischen Liedtext nach sich – der

XXV Chor besaß bereits einen Ehrenmarsch auf Schwedisch, komponiert von Selim Palmgren. Im Herbst 1919 und Frühjahr 1920 suchte der Chor erfolglos nach einem passenden finnischen Text. Im Herbst 1920 schrieb schließlich der Schriftsteller Eero Eerola (1884–1939), der auch Chormitglied war, das Gedicht Viipurin Lauluveikkojen (WSB:n) kunniamarssi, das vom Chor gutgeheißen wurde. Um Eerolas Gedicht vertonen zu lassen, wandte sich der Chorleiter Allan Schulman (1863–1937) an Sibelius und bat ihn, die Musik zu komponieren. Die beiden kannten sich seit ihrer Kindheit, als sie Schüler am Lyzeum in Hämeenlinna gewesen waren.131 Als die Zeit verging und Schulman nichts von Sibelius gehört hatte, entschloss er sich, das Gedicht selbst zu vertonen. Um den 10. Dezember 1920 informierte Sibelius Schulman jedoch durch ein Telegramm, er habe tatsächlich eine Komposition für dessen Chor abgeschlossen.132 Bei einem Chortreffen am 13. Dezember 1920 präsentierte Schulman das Telegramm zusammen mit seiner eigenen Komposition, wodurch er ein Missverständnis verursachte; Schulmans Komposition, die viele Choristen für ein Werk von Sibelius hielten, wurde günstig aufgenommen. Das Missverständnis wurde spätestens am 20. Dezember aufgelöst, als Schulman Sibelius’ neue Komposition vorstellte, indem er sie während der Chorprobe am Klavier durchspielte. Sibelius’ Komposition schnitt dabei nicht so vorteilhaft ab wie die Schulmans; der Chor fand die Komposition „etwas seltsam, aber während der Diskussion wurde angemerkt, dass nur dies passend sei, da das Werk von Sibelius stammte“.133 Der Chor entschied indes, beide Werke zu verwenden: Sibelius’ Komposition wurde zum Ehrenmarsch des Chors ernannt, Schulmans zur Hymne. Viipurin Lauluveikot hatte schon früher im Jahr 1920 einen Kompositionswettbewerb für Männerchor ausgerufen, um das finnische Männerchor-Repertoire zu erweitern.134 Da der Choretat an den Wettbewerb gebunden war, hatte der Chor keine Ressourcen, um für Sibelius’ Komposition zu bezahlen. Darüber hinaus konnte diese nicht als Beitrag zu dem Wettbewerb anerkannt werden, wie Schulman Sibelius später schrieb: „Wir bedauern, dass das Stück nicht an dem Wettbewerb teilnehmen konnte [...], da es nicht anonym eintraf […].“135 Dies bedeutete, dass der Chor das Preisgeld nicht verwenden konnte, um Sibelius’ Komposition zu bezahlen. Die problematische Situation wurde jedoch durch ein Chormitglied gelöst, der für diesen Zweck eine kleine Summe spendete.136 Viipurin Lauluveikot führte den neuen Ehrenmarsch als Eröffnungsstück der Konzerte am 1. und 2. Mai 1921 erstmals auf. Schulmans Komposition wurde ebenfalls aufgeführt; keines der beiden Werke wurde von den Kritikern erwähnt. Sibelius’ Werk war vor der Uraufführung gedruckt worden. Bevor dies geschah, verlangte Sibelius in einem Brief eine kleine Änderung. Was verändert wurde, kann nicht ermittelt werden, weil sowohl das autographe Manuskript als auch Sibelius’ Brief, in dem er die Änderung forderte, verloren sind.137 Sibelius schrieb Likhet für den aus Turku kommenden Männerchor Musices Amantes, dessen Leiter Werner Karsten (1870– 1930) mit ihm befreundet war, auf ein Gedicht von Johan Ludwig Runeberg und schloss es am 22. Januar 1922 ab. Sibelius schrieb am Tag der Fertigstellung in sein Tagebuch, das neue Werk sei „ein Männerchorwerk im guten alten Stil – sein Pathos reizte mich“.138 Das Werk wurde am folgenden Tag an den Chor geschickt, Karsten indes, „ans Krankenbett gefesselt“, war unfähig zu antworten.139 Tatsächlich zog sich Karsten bald als Leiter des Chors zurück, Otto Liukkonen übernahm die


XXVI Aufgabe in der folgenden Frühjahrssaison. Sibelius’ Komposition wurde erst 1926 uraufgeführt, als Karsten, der auf die Position zurückgekehrt war, sie am 13. März in Turku vorstellte. Das Werk war offenbar zu schwierig für den Chor, da der Kritiker in Åbo Underrättelser unverblümt feststellte: „Sibelius’ Likhet überstieg die Fähigkeiten des Chors.“140 Das Werk wurde am 13. Dezember des folgenden Jahres in Helsinki von Muntra Musikanter unter Leitung von Bengt Carlson (1890–1953) aufgeführt. Auf dem Programmzettel und auch in einigen Berichten wurde Likhet als neues Werk bezeichnet. Die Kritiker erkannten den hohen Schwierigkeitsgrad von Sibelius’ Werk, lobten aber auch das Niveau der Darbietung. In Helsingin Sanomat schrieb der Kritiker: „Der Chor sang einige ziemlich schwierige Kompositionen und bewältigte sie leicht. Solche Zerreißproben beinhalteten […] einige harte Akkordbildungen in Sibelius’ Runeberg-Romanze ,Likhet‘.“141 1925 beauftragte Sibelius den Dichter Nino Runeberg (1874– 1934), Texte zu zwei patriotischen Liedern zu schreiben, die er schon komponiert hatte: Skolsång zum Gebrauch in Schulen und Skyddskårsmarsch für die paramilitärische nationale Verteidigungsorganisation Suojeluskunta (auf Schwedisch Skyddskår). Sibelius schrieb Skolsång für gemischten Chor (siehe JSW VII/1) und Skyddskårsmarsch für Männerchor a cappella. Bei Skyddskårsmarsch fügte er zusätzlich eine Klavierbegleitung (ad libitum) hinzu, die auch im vorliegenden Band enthalten ist. Runeberg empfand die Aufgabe zunächst als verwirrend. Er schrieb Sibelius am 19. Juni 1925: „Als ich bemerkte, dass es ein skyddskår-Lied ist, war ich zuerst blass und habe mir den Kopf zermartert. Das allgemeine patriotische Lied ist eine Plage, und wie soll man dessen verdammte Art vermeiden, wenn nach so einem Thema gefragt wird? Die Musik hat mir jedoch den Weg gezeigt […]. Skolsång ließ sich sogar [stilistisch] noch schwieriger formen.“ Der Dichter gestattete dem Komponisten, den Text, falls erforderlich, zu ändern: „Dass die Texte mit Bleistift geschrieben sind, ist keine Respektlosigkeit, eher im Gegenteil: die Idee ist, dass Sie mit dem Radiergummi die nötigen Maßnahmen ergreifen können.“142 Nachdem Sibelius kleine Änderungen vorgenommen hatte, fertigte er neue Reinschriften der beiden Werke an. Aino Sibelius trug in diese Runebergs Text ein. Danach bot Sibelius 1925 dem Verlag Holger Schildt Skolsång und Skyddskårsmarsch an, allerdings ohne Erfolg. Die Ablehnung wurde mit der Unerfahrenheit der Firma auf dem Gebiet der Musikedition begründet.143 Ob Sibelius die Werke anderen Verlegern anbot, ist unbekannt; jedenfalls wurden die Werke zu Lebzeiten des Komponisten weder veröffentlicht noch aufgeführt.144 1927 korrespondierte der Sänger Wäinö Sola mit Jallu (John Jalmari) Honkonen, dem Leiter von New Yorkin Laulumiehet, dem Männerchor der finnischen Emigranten in New York. Honkonen äußerte die Hoffnung des Chors, der Dichter Vaikko Antero Koskenniemi werde einen Text für deren Hymne schreiben, der dann von Sibelius in Musik gesetzt werde. Als Koskenniemi ablehnte, schrieb Sola selbst ein Gedicht mit dem Titel Lippulaulu (Fahnenlied). Das originale Gedicht hatte sechs Strophen. Die Chormitglieder überarbeiteten Solas Gedicht, reduzierten die Strophen auf drei und änderten den Titel in Siltavahti.145 Zu diesem Zeitpunkt wurde Sibelius gebeten, das Gedicht zu vertonen – und er stimmte zu.146 Sibelius schrieb die Komposition 1928 in zwei Fassungen: eine für Singstimme und Klavierbegleitung, die andere für Männerchor a cappella. Im selben Jahr besuchte Sola New York und übergab dem Chor Sibelius’ Komposition.147 Der Chor sprach dem Komponisten in einem Brief seinen Dank aus: „Ich bitte

XXXI Sie, Professor, in aufrichtigster Art, unseren Dank entgegenzunehmen für Ihr Mitfühlen und die Ehre, die Sie unserem Chor mit Ihrer Komposition erwiesen haben. Maestro Sola hat in seinen hiesigen Konzerten [in New York], die Hörer mit ,Siltavahti‘ entzückt. Unser Chor hatte es eifrig einstudiert, und ich spüre, dass es als Chorkomposition sogar eindrucksvoller ist; die Sänger sind aus der Tiefe ihres Herzens hocherfreut.“148 Wie oben beschrieben, hatte Sibelius 1920 für Viipurin Lauluveikot einen Ehrenmarsch komponiert. Etwa zehn Jahre später schrieb er eine neue Komposition auf dasselbe Gedicht. Die Geschichte dieser zweiten Komposition, die im vorliegenden Band den Titel Viipurin Lauluveikkojen kunniamarssi (2) trägt, ist nicht gut belegt, da die Chorakten im Zweiten Weltkrieg verlorengegangen sind. Darüber hinaus liefern die einzigen bekannten Unterlagen widersprüchliche Daten zur Komposition. In einer späteren Werkliste wird das Werk auf 1929 datiert. Dies wird gestützt durch die Finnische Nationalbibliographie, die die Erstausgabe auf 1930 datiert.149 Eino Reponen datiert 1962 jedoch in einem Artikel das Werk auf das Jahr 1934. Ihm zufolge führte Viipurin Lauluveikot 1934 die erste Komposition (von 1920) als Eröffnungsnummer seines Konzerts als Beitrag zum Karelischen Kunstfestival „Karjalan taideviikko“ in Helsinki auf.150 Kurz nach der Aufführung erhielt der Chor einen (heute verlorenen) Brief von Sibelius, in dem dieser den Chor bat, seine frühere Komposition wegzulegen, und gleichzeitig versprach, ihm einen neuen Marsch zu schreiben.151 Reponens Information mit Hinsicht auf Sibelius’ Bitte, die frühere Komposition ad acta zu legen, mag richtig sein, aber das Jahr (1934) dürfte ein Irrtum sein.152 Laulun mahti JS 118 Laulun mahti ist Sibelius’ Bearbeitung von Beverīnas dziedonis (Der Barde von Beverīna), eine Ballade für gemischten Chor a cappella des lettischen Komponisten Jāzeps Vītols (1863– 1948).153 Vītols’ Komposition entstand 1891, und Sibelius’ Bearbeitung von 1895 geht auf diese Erstfassung zurück. Vītols erweiterte jedoch 1900 seine Komposition, und zwar für Chor und Orchester. In Sibelius’ Bearbeitung ist der ursprünglich lettische Text von Auseklis (Pseudonym für Miķelis Krogzemis, 1850–1879), von Jooseppi Julius Mikkola (1866–1946) ins Finnische übersetzt. Der Beweggrund für Sibelius’ Bearbeitung ist nicht bekannt, aber aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach entstand sie für den Männerchor Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat, der Laulun mahti unter der Leitung von Jalmari Hahl am 7. Dezember 1895 in demselben Konzert uraufführte, in dem auch Saarella palaa (siehe oben zu Opus 18) erstmals zu hören war. Laulun mahti schien im Konzert die meiste Aufmerksamkeit auf sich zu ziehen: „Aus dem Programm – nehmen wir einmal Herää Suomi [von Genetz] aus – würden wir zuerst und vor allem die lettische Ballade von Prof. Vihtol erwähnen. Das Werk war sehr würdevoll, schön und beeindruckend. Sein besonderer, origineller, volksmusikalischer Grundton passte gut zum Inhalt der Ballade, und seine musikalisch und harmonisch lobenswerte Struktur stammt von versierter Hand. Zusätzlich führte der Chor das Werk musikalisch und enthusiastisch auf; die beste Aufführung durch YL, die wir gehört haben.“154 Auch der Kritiker in Uusi Suometar merkte an, dass Laulun mahti das eindrucksvollste Werk in dem Konzert war. Er fragte jedoch nach einem Detail in Sibelius’ Werk: „Nur eins überraschte uns in der Bearbeitung – die Ankunft des ,Weißbärtigen‘ wurde durch einen hohen Solo-Tenor angekündigt, und zwar so hoch, dass es fast unmöglich schien, mit Bruststimme zu


XXXII singen. Herr Floman, der das kleine Solo sang, führte die Aufgabe ziemlich lobenswert aus, und wir machen ihn nicht verantwortlich dafür, dass diese Stelle uns keinen ganz so günstigen Eindruck vermittelte. Als Ganzes ist die Ballade gekonnt bearbeitet, und sie wurde beeindruckend gesungen.“155 Laulun mahti blieb für mehrere Jahre im Repertoire von Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat und fand breite Zustimmung. Noch drei Jahre später, 1898, wurde es beispielsweise von Nya Pressen als Höhepunkt eines Konzerts herausgestellt: „Das Programm enthielt einige Nummern, die sich durch ihre musikalische Substanz von der Vielzahl der eher konventionell schönen Männerchorwerke abhoben. Unter diesen fiel Vihtols lettische Ballade auf, eine umfangreiche Komposition mit Stimmungswechseln, die außerdem sehr originelles Lokalkolorit mitbrachte.“156 Fragmentarische Werke Es gibt zwei Werke für Männerchor, Suomenmaa und Heitä, koski, kuohuminen, die Sibelius begann, aber nie abschloss. Darüber hinaus enthält der Anhang die Entwurfsfassungen von Athenarnes sång, Uusmaalaisten laulu und Skyddskårsmarsch. Sibelius verstand diese nicht als vollständige Fassungen, aber jede enthüllt eine interessante Phase des kreativen Prozesses.157 Sibelius’ Notizbuch enthält Skizzen und Entwürfe zu einem Chorsatz zu Aleksis Kivis Gedicht Suomenmaa.158 Das genaue Datum dieser Skizzen kann nicht ermittelt werden, und Suomenmaa wurde als Chorsatz auch nie veröffentlicht. Sibelius nutzte die dort verwendete Melodie jedoch als Schlussthema von Sandels op. 28 für Männerchor und Orchester.159 Da Sandels 1898 abgeschlossen wurde, liegt die Vermutung nahe, dass die Skizzen zu Suomenmaa etwas früher entstanden sind.160 Nach der einleitenden Skizze zur Melodie und nur einem Hinweis auf deren Harmonisierung notierte Sibelius den Entwurf einer vollständigen Strophe. Dieser erste Entwurf ist für gemischten Chor gesetzt (vgl. Faksimile XI). Direkt darunter schrieb er einen neuen Entwurf – und diesmal für Männerchor. Unter diesem Entwurf wiederum finden sich Revisionen von zwei Passagen. Im vorliegenden Band sind die beiden Männerchorfassungen transkribiert in den Anhang aufgenommen. 1893 beabsichtigte Sibelius, Heitä, koski, kuohuminen für Männerchor a cappella zu komponieren, aber bevor er das Chorwerk abschloss, verwarf er diese Idee wieder und verwendete das melodische Material im langsamen Satz der Klaviersonate op. 12 (dieser zweite Satz entstand ebenfalls 1893).161 Der überlieferte Chorentwurf erscheint im vorliegenden Band als Faksimiles VIII–X. Es wurde vermutet, dass Sibelius Heitä, koski, kuohuminen zusammen mit Venematka konzipiert hatte – ein Werk, das aus derselben Zeit stammt.162 Über das Entstehungsdatum hinaus sind diese beiden Werke durch zwei andere Merkmale miteinander verbunden: zum einen taucht der Entwurf zu Heitä, koski, kuohuminen im selben Manuskript auf wie der Entwurf zu Venematka, und zum anderen entstammen die Texte derselben Quelle (Kalevala, 40. Gedicht), in der zudem der Text von Heitä, koski, kuohuminen auf den Text von Venematka folgt. Im März 1899 komponierte Sibelius Athenarnes sång. Da das Werk kurz nach dem „Februar-Manifest“ (proklamiert am 15. Februar 1899), das die Autonomie Finnlands deutlich beschnitt, uraufgeführt wurde, interpretierte man die Komposition oft als Protest gegen das Manifest.163 In der veröffentlichten Fassung des Werks (op. 31 Nr. 3) singen die Knaben und Männer die Melodie unisono, begleitet von einem Orchester. Sibelius plante ursprünglich das Werk für vierstimmigen Männerchor mit

XXVII Begleitung, wobei die oberen beiden Stimmen für die Knaben, die unteren beiden für die Männer gedacht waren. Die Entscheidung, die Chortextur in den Unisono-Gesang zu ändern, war offenbar dem engen Zeitplan geschuldet.164 Da die vierstimmige Chorskizze ziemlich rudimentär erscheint, erfolgte die Änderung möglicherweise in einem relativ frühen Kompositionsstadium. Es sei betont, dass die Transkription der Chorstimmen, wie sie im Anhang erscheint, keine a cappellaFassung des Werks darstellt, sondern eine Skizzenübertragung der Chorstimmen eines Werks mit Begleitung. Ich danke all denen, deren Hilfe zu dem vorliegenden Band beigetragen hat, insbesondere aber meinen Kollegen Kari Kilpeläinen, Anna Pulkkis, Tuija Wicklund und Timo Virtanen, darüber hinaus Pertti Kuusi, Turo Rautaoja, Joanna Rinne und Nancy Seidel. Den Mitarbeitern der Finnischen Nationalbibliothek (Tarja Lehtinen, Petri Tuovinen, Inka Myyry) und des Sibelius-Museums sei für ihre freundliche Unterstützung hinsichtlich der Quellen ebenfalls gedankt. Helsinki, Herbst 2014

Sakari Ylivuori (Übersetzung: Frank Reinisch)

1 Fabian Dahlström, Jean Sibelius. Thematisch-bibliographisches Verzeichnis seiner Werke, Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Härtel 2003 [=SibWV]. 2 Die beiden Frühfassungen, die Sibelius ins Reine schrieb und zu dieser Zeit aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach als vollständig erachtete – Till havs! und Isänmaalle –, sind neben der veröffentlichten Fassung platziert. 3 Zur Chormusik in Finnland vor Sibelius vgl. Matti Hyökki, Hiilestä timantiksi, Helsinki: Sibelius Akatemia 2003, S. 13–59. 4 Sibelius’ Beschreibung der Aufnahme von Venematka findet sich bei A. O. Väisänen, Jean Sibelius vaikutelmistaan, in: Kalevala-seuran vuosikirja 1, Helsinki: Otava 1921: „[…] vaikutti […] kuin pommi.“ 5 Wasa Tidning vom 18. Juni 1894: „Båda twå äro till sin musikaliska anda och sitt innehåll de mest finska kwartettsånger, wi tilswidare hafwa.“ Im Schwedisch der Jahrhundertwende wurden Chorsätze generell – in verschiedener Orthographie – als „Quartette“ bezeichnet (zumindest wurden die Bezeichnungen qvartett, kvartett und kwartett verwendet). Vergleichbare Besprechungen wurden bei verschiedenen Gelegenheiten veröffentlicht. So schrieb K[arl Flodin] am 29. April 1894 in Nya Pressen: „Es [Rakastava] ist Finnisch – komplett Finnisch.“ (Den är finsk – finsk allt igenom […].) 6 Pohjalainen vom 21. Juni 1894: „[…] nämä laulut owat musikaalisesti merkitsewintä mitä tietääkseni laulukwartetille on kirjoitettu […].“ 7 Das Werk gehörte ursprünglich zu op. 4. Seine endgültige Form erhielt op. 1 1913. Zu weiteren Details siehe Kari Kilpeläinen, Tutkielmia Jean Sibeliuksen käsikirjoituksista (Studia Musicologica Universitatis Helsingiensis 3), Helsinki: Helsingin yliopiston musiikkitieteen laitos 1992 [=Kilpeläinen 1992], S. 187. 8 Zu weiteren Bearbeitungen siehe JSW-Band VII/1, der die Bearbeitungen für vierstimmigen und zweistimmigen Frauenchor sowie eine dreistimmige Fassung für Knabenchor enthält. Eine Bearbeitung für gemischten Chor von unbekannter Hand wurde 1920 veröffentlicht. 9 Der Brief befindet sich im Nationalarchiv Finnland, SibeliusFamilienarchiv [=NA, SFA], Kasten 31. 10 Der Kritiker in Uusi Suomi erwähnte die Bearbeitung am selben Tag kurz. Hufvudstadsbladet besprach das Konzert gar nicht. U[uno] K[lam]i in Helsingin Sanomat vom 4. Dezember 1935: „Yleisesti laulettu joululaulu ,En etsi valtaa, loistoa‘ kuultiin nyt ensi kerran mieskuorosovituksena. Uudessa asussaan soi se hivelevän pehmeänä ja kauniina, mutta on ehkä jonkin verran menettänyt herkkyydestään.“


XXXIII 11 Die Opuszahl 18 erscheint erstmals 1905 in Sibelius’ Werklisten. (In SibWV, S. 693, ist die Liste als „Sib 1905–09“ bezeichnet; sie ist jedoch derzeit nicht auffindbar. Von deren Anfang, der die Opuszahlen 1 bis 21 zeigt, ist eine Fotokopie erhalten.) Eine Werkliste, die 1902 in der Zeitschrift Euterpe veröffentlicht wurde, zeigt jedoch schon die Werke in op. 18 in der genannten Reihenfolge (Veljeni vierailla mailla wurde später komponiert). 12 Darüber hinaus erscheint offenkundig, dass Sibelius zweimal plante, ein zehntes Lied in die Konzeption aufzunehmen. In der Werkliste „Sib 1905–09“ erscheint op. 18 an einer Stelle als 10 mieskuorolaulua [10 Lieder für Männerchor], wobei Hymn op. 21 als Nr. 10 fungiert. 1914 beabsichtigte Sibelius Herr Lager och Skön fager als zehntes Stück aufzunehmen (die autographe Werkliste ist in SibWV, S. 694, als „Sib 1912–31“ bezeichnet). Alle diese Werke wurden weder als Teil von Opus 18 veröffentlicht, noch tauchen sie unter Opus 18 in irgendeinem veröffentlichten Sibelius-Werkverzeichnis auf; die Pläne wurden also nie umgesetzt. 13 Die Unternummern in Opus 21 sind widersprüchlich; zwischen 1905 und 1909 tauchen sowohl Isänmaalle als auch Hymn an zweiter Stelle auf (entweder als „2“ oder „b“). Letztlich besteht Opus 21 nur aus Hymn. 14 Obwohl die Opuszahl 14 in den meisten der Werklisten von Sibelius vorwiegend für die Streichorchesterfassung gedacht war, erwähnte Sibelius die Chorfassungen von Rakastava im Zusammenhang mit Opus 14 in einer autographen Werkliste („Sib 1912–31“ in SibWV, S. 694). 15 Martti Turunen fragt nach diesem Detail in einem undatierten Brief (Finnische Nationalbibliothek [=NL], Coll.206.31). Sibelius’ Antwort ist jedoch nicht bekannt. 16 Cecil Gray, Sibelius, London: Oxford University Press 1931, S. 207. Obwohl Opus 18 in dieser Form in den Werklisten erscheint, die Sibelius nach 1931 genehmigte, tauchten die veralteten Unternummern (vor allem diejenigen von 1911 bis 1930) in der Literatur wie in modernen Ausgaben und Aufnahmen immer wieder auf. 17 Klemetti erinnerte sich später daran, dass die außergewöhnlich tiefe Schlussnote im 2. Bass (B1 ) speziell für John Enckell geschrieben war – ein Chorsänger, der für seine tiefen Noten bekannt war. Vgl. Heikki Klemetti, Sata arvostelua, hrsg. von Armi Klemetti und Jouko Linjama, Helsinki: WSOY 1966 [=Klemetti 1966], S. 258. 18 Hufvudstadsbladet vom 22. April 1899. A[larik] U[ggla]: „Sibelius’ nobla kompositioner.“ Das Konzert wurde am selben Tag auch in Päivälehti (von einem anonymen Kritiker) besprochen. Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat hatte das Programm des Konzerts bewusst so geplant, dass es beiden Parteien der laufenden Sprachdebatte gefiel. Dies wurde von den Kritikern in beiden Zeitungen anerkannt und gewürdigt. 19 Klemetti wollte vor allem John Enckells Stimme herausstellen. Er beschreibt die Vorgeschichte von Terve kuu! in Klemetti 1966, S. 259. 20 Hufvudstadsbladet und Päivälehti vom 31. Mai 1901. Trotz der guten Besprechungen war die Aufführung laut Klemetti (1966, S. 258) nicht sehr gut: „Es wurde im Konzert gesungen, aber, nur passabel‘.“ (Se saatiin konsertissa menemään, tosin „så där.“). O[skar Merikanto] in Päivälehti: „Kokonaisuudessaan on tämä sävellys taiteellisesti arvokkaimpia kvartettisävellyksiä meillä.“ 21 Helge Virkkunen, Kuisma. Muistikuvia Heikki Klemetistä, Helsinki: Kirjayhtymä 1973, S. 52f. 22 Klemetti 1966, S. 259. „Ja verkligen, va’ ä’ de’ här för tassigheter nu igen uta honom!“ 23 Der Chor gab z. B. Konzerte in Tallinn, Wiesbaden, Berlin, Dresden, Leipzig, Frankfurt am Main, Düsseldorf, Köln, Brüssel, Den Haag, Amsterdam, Lübeck, Kopenhagen und Helsingborg. Viele finnische Zeitungen berichteten über die Tournee und zitierten dabei auch die örtlichen Konzertbesprechungen. 24 Darüber hinaus wurden im Konzert folgende Kompositionen uraufgeführt: Richard Faltins Juhlakantaatti, Robert Kajanus Huutolaistytön kehtolaulu, Oskar Merikantos Se kolmas, Rafael Laethéns Suksimiesten laulu und Ilmari Krohns Mustalaislaulu (Volksliedbearbeitung).

XXXIII 25 O[skar Merikanto] in Päivälehti vom 13. April 1893: „Sibeliuksen Wenematkaan oli erittäin hupaista tutustua. […] Laulu on lyhyt, mutta oikea makupala. Kuten Sibeliuksen muutkin teokset, on tämäkin aiwan suomalaiselle runonuotille perustettu, joten siinä heti tekijän tuntee. Mestarillisesti on itse wesien laskeminen, ilo merellä, ja warsinkin neitosten katseleminen ja kuunteleminen ‘niemien nenistä’ kuwattu.“ 26 Ein Bericht mit ähnlichem Inhalt erschien am selben Tag auch in Päivählehti. Bis [Karl Wasenius] in Hufvudstadsbladet vom 7. April 1893: „J. Sibelius’ Venematka (text ur Kalevala) var präktig i alla afseenden, så till karaktäristik, som rent musikalisk behandling och innebörd. […] Ehuru icke lätt sjöngs den med bravur af kören.“ 27 Työnsä kumpasellaki ist der Originaltitel des Gedichts. Er erscheint im Zusammenhang mit Sibelius’ Komposition sowohl in den Programmen der ersten Aufführungen als auch in der Erstausgabe. Sibelius selbst verwendete jedoch den Titel Saarella palaa in seinen späteren Werklisten. Bei der Bearbeitung für gemischten Chor (1898) heißt das Werk in der Erstausgabe Saarella palaa statt Työnsä kumpasellaki. Wann Sibelius den Titel änderte, ist nicht bekannt. 28 Der Brief, in dem Hahl Sibelius fragt, ob er irgendwelche Chor werke für seine bevorstehende Publikation habe, stammt vom 27. Juli 1895. Ob Saarella palaa zu dieser Zeit schon komponiert war, ist nicht bekannt. 29 H. M. in Hufvudstadsbladet vom 8. Dezember 1895: „Sist nämda composition afviker betydligt från det vanliga kompositionmaneret för mankvartett och är i all sin enkelhet af fängslande originalitet och stämning.“ 30 O[skar Merikanto] in Päivälehti vom 8. Dezember: „Sibeliuksen ‘Työnsä kumpasellaki’ oli kauniswäreinen, hieno laulunpätkä, johon yleisö oli niin mieltynyt, että se saatiin kolmasti laulaa.“ 31 R[obert] E[lmgren] in Uusi Suometar vom 8. Dezember 1895: „Se on hieno omituisen kaunis säwellys […]. Se esitettiinkin erinomaisen kauniisti. Ensi basson resitatiiwi kuitenkin olisi mielestämme ollut laulettawa enemmän ‘parlando’ eikä niin raskaasti ja jäykästi kuin se esitettiin. Tämä onkin ainoa muistutus, jonka tämän numeron johdosta woi tehdä. Muuten oli esitys aiwan ihmeteltäwän onnistunut.“ 32 Klemetti schrieb später – in „Elettiinpä ennenkin“, veröffentlicht in Pilvilaiva. Aleksis Kivi ajan kuvastimessa, Helsinki: Otava 1947, S. 78–85, Zitat von S. 81 –, dass „ich vor allem interessiert war, neue [Werke] in Auftrag zu geben, da ich zuvor als namenloser Frechdachs unbekannt war. [Ich] brauchte zumindest neue Lieder.“ (Minä erityisesti olin uuden hankkimisesta kiinnostunut, kun olin uusi tuntematon, nimetön pojankloppi; piti olla edes uusia lauluja.) 33 Sydämeni laulu heißt auf deutsch „Lied meines Herzens“. Pilvilaiva (1947, S. 81f.): „Nyt se on minunkin sydämeni laulu.“ Sibelius’ Bemerkung, der Kompositionsprozess sei zeitaufwändig, ist dem Brief der Freiherrin Ida Palmén (1860–1942) (NL, Coll.206.28) entnommen. 34 Andrew Barnett (Sibelius, Cambridge: Yale University Press 2010, S. 120) schreibt z. B., dass „sich dies auf unheimliche Art prophetisch erweisen sollte“ (that was to prove eerily prophetic). 35 R[obert] E[lmgren] in Uusi Suometar vom 2. Dezember 1898: „Sibeliuksen pieni laulu taas on sywää tunnelmaa uhkuawa säwellys joka tunkee sydämmeen. Kööri sen lauloi erinomaisesti. Fraseeraus oli oikea ja wäritys kaunis. Etenkin toinen basso pianissimossa antoi lugubren loiston koko laululle. Yleisö oli sen kuultuaan haltioissaan. Käsien taputukset eiwät loppuneet ennenkuin kööri sen kolmasti oli laulanut.“ 36 A[larik] U[ggla] in Hufvudstadsbladet vom 2. Dezember 1898: „das in all seiner Einfachheit so originelle und atmosphärische neue Sibelius-Lied“ (Sibelius’ i all sin enkelhet så originella och stämningsfulla nya sång). Am selben Tag schrieb K[arl Flodin] in Nya Pressen: „es übte durch seine schlichte, natürliche Schönheit eine außergewöhnlich starke Wirkung aus“ (värkade genom sin enkla, osökta skönhet utomordentligt starkt). 37 Da Sibelius und Klemetti sich häufig trafen, könnte der Auftrag mündlich zustande gekommen sein. Außer Klemetti bat auch Ida


XXXIV

38

39

40

41

42 43

44

45

46

47

48 49 50

51

Palmén Sibelius, er solle Kivis Texte für Männerchor vertonen, vor allem das Gedicht Ikävyys, das sie ihm 1901 zuschickte (Palmén an Sibelius in NL, Coll.206.28). Sibelius erfüllte ihr die Bitte jedoch nicht. Vor dem Erstdruck wurde zu Aufführungszwecken eine maschinengeschriebene Ausgabe mit beiden Kivi-Vertonungen von Sibelius hergestellt und damit die Genese dieser beiden Werke noch mehr miteinander verbunden (vgl. “Source Evaluation”). Diese Ausgabe ist nicht erhalten; die Frage, ob sie 1898 oder 1899 herauskam, bleibt folglich unbeantwortet. Vgl. zu dieser Ausgabe Sakari Ylivuori, Jean Sibelius’s Works for Mixed Choir. A Source Study, Helsinki: The University of Arts Helsinki 2013 [=Ylivuori 2013], S. 32f. O[skar Merikanto] in Päivälehti vom 5. April 1900: „Ohjelma alkoi reippaasti Sibeliuksen Metsämiehen laululla, joka heti sai yleisön, jota oli huoneen täydeltä, ,stemninkiin‘.“ Pippingsköld war von 1863 bis 1885 auch Mitglied des Parlaments und von 1882 bis 1884 Vizekanzler der Universität Helsinki. Zur Geschichte der Opuszahl s. den Abschnitt zu Opus 18. Die schwedische Übersetzung des Gedichts wurde in den folgenden Tagen in den Zeitschriften veröffentlicht (z. B. am 26. Mai in Hufvudstadsbladet und Nya Pressen). Außer seinem eigenen Werk dirigierte Sibelius Integer vitae von Friedrich Ferdinand Flemming (1778–1813). Anonymus in Hufvudstadsbladet vom 26. Mai 1896: „Den enkla invigningsakten fick en synnerligen anslående afslutning genom en för tillfället af Jean Sibelius komponerad hymn i gammal italiensk stil.“ Der Begriff „alter italienischer Stil“ fand zwei Tage später auch in Åbo Underrättelser Verwendung. In den JSW wird die revidierte Fassung veröffentlicht. Die Abweichungen von der Erstfassung sind in den Critical Remarks aufgelistet. E[vert] K[atila] in Uusi Suometar vom 15. November 1899: „[...] und sicher enthält die Sammlung eine Anzahl singbarer Lieder, wenn auch nicht so viele, wie es wünschenswert wäre. […] Hoffentlich behalten künftige Männerchorsammlungen auch die Nachfrage der zahlreichen finnischen Chöre im Blick.“ ([…] ja warmaan löytyy kokoelmasta joukko laulettawiakin lauluja waikka ei niin paljon kun suotawa olisi ollut. […] Toiwottawa olisi että wastaisuudessa ilmestyisi miesköörikokoelmia, joissa lukuisain suomalaisten lauluseurojenkin tarwetta silmällä pidettäisiin.) Martti Nisonen bat um die Genehmigung für seine Männerchorbearbeitung – allerdings fragte er nach der Aufführung an. Nisonens Bearbeitung umfasste die vollständige Tondichtung und nicht nur den Hymnenabschnitt (Brief in NL, Coll.206.27). Eine andere Bearbeitung stammt von Herbert S. Sammond (Yrjö Sjöblom, „Finlandia lauluna” in Suomen kuvalehti, 1945, Nr. 49, S. 1259). Zu früheren Gedichten zu Finlandia vgl. auch Glenda Dawn Goss, Vieläkö lähetämme hänelle sikareja. Sibelius, Amerikka ja amerikkalaiset, Helsinki: WSOY 2009, S. 196–206. Sjöblom 1945, S. 1259: „Ei sitä ole tarkoitettu laulettavaksi. Sehän on tehty orkesteria varten. Mutta jos maailma tahtoo laulaa, niin ei sille mitään mahda.“ Yrjö Sjöblom (auch als George Sjöblom bekannt) war ein finnischer Journalist, der nach Amerika ausgewandert war. Er war einer der ersten, die einen Text auf Finlandia schrieben (1919). Sola bezieht sich in einem Brief vom 7. Februar 1937 auf die amerikanischen Texte zu Finlandia. Koskenniemis Antwortbrief ist in Privatbesitz; eine Fotokopie befindet sich im Sibelius-Museum, Turku [=SibMus]. Die Überarbeitung erfolgte durch Koskenniemi, dem Turunen (und wohl auch Sibelius) zur Seite standen. Vgl. die Beschreibung des Originaltextes im Critical Commentary. Koskenniemis Text zu Finlandia geht auf sein Gedicht Juhannusvirsi zurück. Zu Details vgl. Martti Häikiö, V. A. Koskenniemi – suomalainen klassikko 2, Helsinki: WSOY 2009, S. 56–59. Am 20. August 1914 schrieb Sibelius in seinem Tagebuch: „Eigentümlich, dass ich sie [Breitkopf & Härtel] als Feind ansehen muss“ (Egendomligt att måste anse dem som fiender). Der Eintrag

XXIX

52

53

54

57 58 59 60

61

62

63

64

65

66

entstammt dem Umfeld der Komposition von op. 84/1. Am 3. August hatte Sibelius notiert, dass alle Verbindungen mit dem Verlag unterbrochen seien. Sibelius’ Tagebuch wird aufbewahrt in NA, SFA, Kasten 37/38. Es wurde von Fabian Dahlström veröffentlicht: Jean Sibelius: Dagbok 1909–1944, Helsinki: Svenska Litteratursällskapet i Finland 2005. Tagebuch, 20. August 1914: „[Ich] Muss Verbindungen zu regionalen Verlagen finden, dennoch [bin ich] in gewisser Weise von B. & H. abhängig.“ (Måste finna anknytningspunkter med härvarande förläggare ehuru på visst sätt bunden af B. & H.) Dennoch wurde die Erstausgabe von Till havs! von Muntra Musikanter [=MM] veröffentlicht. Die ersten vier Werke wurden in deren neunte Männerchorsammlung aufgenommen, Till havs! indes in die zehnte. Sibelius arbeitete in dieser Zeit an seiner 5. Symphonie. Die Tagebucheinträge zeigen seine Unzufriedenheit über die Tatsache, dass er nicht imstande war, sich darauf zu konzentrieren, die Symphonie zu schreiben, weil er klein besetzte Werke komponieren musste, die er den finnischen Verlagen rasch verkaufen konnte. So am 1. August 1914: „Muss mich selbst mit MM in Kontakt setzen und von meinem Sockel heruntersteigen. – Die neue Symphonie beginnt in mir zu arbeiten! Warum werde ich immer gestört und kann niemals tun, wofür mein Geist geschaffen ist? Immer diese Geschäfte!“ (Måste sätta mig i förbindelse med M.M. och stiga ned från min piedestal. – Den nya sinfonin börjar röra på sig! Hvarför skall jag alltid bli störd, aldrig få göra det min ande skapades till? Alltid dessa affärer!) Alle Datierungen sind dem Tagebuch entnommen. Tagebuch, 19. September 1914: „icke korrekt.“ Tagebuch, 29. August 1914: „icke begripits. Man hade väntat sig något aktuellt och erhöll en humoresque.“ In dem Brief Olof Wallins an Sibelius vom 28. November 1914 (NL, Coll.206.40), in dem er Sibelius für die Klärung der „unbedacht an mich gerichteten Anschuldigung“ (beskyllning som obetänksamt uttalats mot mig) dankt, spielt er auf die heftige Auseinandersetzung an. Wallin und Sibelius standen in diesen Jahren auf freundschaftlichem Fuß und waren mit Gylling zerstritten. Mit „guter Brief“ ist wahrscheinlich ein undatierter Brief (in NL, Coll.206.40) gemeint, in dem Wallin einige „Missverständnisse“ beim Veröffentlichungsprozess (misförstånd av tryckeriets sida) klärt und Sibelius’ neue Männerchorwerke lobt, indem er schreibt, dass „deren Originalität und völlig neuer Stil das Versprechen auf eine neue Phase für die Entwicklung der Musik für Männerchor enthält“ (Dess originella, fullkomligt nya stil innebär löftet om ett nytt skede i manskörsångens utveckling). Tagebuch, 9. Februar 1915: „Af M.Ms dirigent Dr Olof Wallin ett bra bref angående kören. Jag hoppas mycket af honom. Jag tror han förstår detta nya i mina körsånger.“ Tagebuch, 28. April 1915: „[Ich hatte] ein Fiasko mit den Chorwerken für MM gehabt. Und [ich] erwartete so viel von Wallins Aufführung.“ (Haft fiasco med körerna för M.M. Och hoppades så mycket af Wallin’s framförande af dem.) Bis [Karl Wasenius] in Hufvudstadsbladet vom 28. April 1915: „attrapperade gamla stil […] en kärf kraft som lät diktens högfjällsfond framstå med illusorisk verkan.“ Und: „den i partituret åsyftade verkan ej fullt vunnits vid utförandet, och dock gjordes af sången allt hvad göras kunde.“ Tagebuch, 28. April 1915: „Aber das Publikum [war] absolut kalt.“ (Men publiken absolut kall.) Hufvudstadsbladet vom 28 April 1915: „Hade sången omtagits, vill jag tro att publiken bättre fått fatt på dess väldiga resning.“ Eva Paloheimo (1893–1978) war Sibelius’ älteste Tochter. Tagebuch, 26. Mai 1915: „Var att se Arvis och Evas flicka. Sällsamt. Jag, morfar! – I dag smider något på de nya sakerna. Planerar äfven för M.M.“ Tagebuch, 23. Juni 1915. Wallin dankte für die Reinschrift, die er am 29. Juni erhalten hatte, in einem Brief vom 30. Juni 1915 (in NL, Coll.206.40).


XXXV 67 Fritiof Gylling, M.M:s dirigenter, in: M.M. 1878–1928, Helsinki: Muntra Musikanter 1928, S. 81f. 68 K[arl] E[kman], in Hufvudstadsbladet vom 11. Dezember 1920: „[…] blev exempelvis Sibelius’ nya Frödingsång ,Ett drömackord‘ en rätt medelmåttig prestation med oklara harmonier och brist på precision i samsången.“ 69 Das Datum des Abschlusses der Komposition steht im Tagebuch. Wallins Brief vom 14. September 1915 (in NL, Coll.206.40): „[…] passar utmärkt för Bäckmans såväl röst som temperament.“ 70 In der Kritik erwähnt Wasenius, Sibelius habe die Komposition geschrieben, nachdem er Edvin Bäckman habe singen hören. Bis [KarlWasenius] in Hufvudstadsbladet vom 15. Dezember 1915: „Första afdelningen afslutades med en ny sång ,Evige Eros‘ till ord af Bertel Gripenberg, en dityramb, skrifven med en lyftning af ädelt slag, förhärligad ytterligare af den mästerliga behärskning och behandling af uttrycksmedlen som Sibelius själffallet här visade sig mäktig af. […] Solot, som dominerar sångkompositionen, höjde sig i en linjeskönhet som var betagande. Äfven de modulatoriska växlingarna upptedde en kolorit skapad af mästarhand.“; „Herr Edvin Bäckman sjöng solot från första till sista ton med härlig röst och med en lyftning som motsvarade sångens sköna innebörd. Äfven kören redde sig på hedrande sätt i den ömtåliga uppgiften […].“ 71 In dem Konzert sang der Chor auch die beiden Lieder Herr Lager och Skön fager und På berget, die ein halbes Jahr zuvor uraufgeführt worden waren. Dem Kritiker zufolge war die Darbietung erfolgreicher als bei der Uraufführung, obwohl noch eine Menge Nervosität spürbar war. Der Kritiker schrieb dies dem Umstand zu, dass der Komponist anwesend war. 72 Wallins Briefe in NL, Coll.206.40. Der Auftragsbrief zu Till havs! ist nicht datiert. 73 Tagebuch vom 17. und 20. April 1917. 74 Hufvudstadsbladet berichtete nur, dass Wallin in der Soirée zum Leiter des Chores ernannt wurde. 75 Polón gilt als der Begründer der finnischen Gummi- und der modernen Holzindustrie. Wegen seiner politischen Aktivitäten für die finnische Unabhängigkeit wurde er 1916/17 nach Sibirien deportiert. 76 Zu den Papiersorten vgl. den Critical Commentary und auch Kilpeläinen 1992, S. 286. 77 O[tto] K[otilainen] in Helsingin Sanomat vom 24. März 1926: „Kummassakin on viljalti sangen arkoja sointuyhteyksiä ja sävelkulkuja, joten ne vaativat laulajilta aikaa kypsyäkseen täydellisiksi esityksiksi.“ 78 Dem unbekannten Kritiker (L. A. P. P. in Uusi Suomi vom 24. März 1926) zufolge ist as¹ der höchste Ton der „nordischen Tenöre“: „Tenorien työtä eivät suinkaan olleet omiaan helpottamaan useat ohjelman uutuudet, jotka – niin ansiokkaita kuin ne sävellyksinä olivatkin – poikkeuksetta kiipesivät sellaisille sävelaloille, että meidän pohjoismaiset tenorimme joutuivat yli voimainsa ponnistamaan.“ 79 Die Ideen umfassten das Kalevala-Gedicht Tulen synty, das in den 1890er Jahren nicht vollendet worden war. Auch die Melodie von Heitä, koski, kuohuminen taucht zum ersten Mal in diesen Skizzen auf (siehe unten). Zu Details vgl. Ylivuori 2013, S. 171–188. 80 Für die Uraufführung schrieb Sibelius zu dem Männerchorwerk JS 160a eine Streichorchesterbegleitung JS 160b, die aber nicht benutzt wurde. Tatsächlich wurde Rakastava mit Streichorchesterbegleitung zu Sibelius’ Lebzeiten nicht aufgeführt. 1898 bearbeitete Sibelius Rakastava für gemischten Chor a cappella (JS 160c). 1912 veröffentlichte er ein Streichorchesterwerke (op. 14), in dem das Rakastava-Material Verwendung fand. 81 Bis [Karl Wasenius] in Hufvudstadsbladet vom 1. Mai 1894: „Hr Sibelius för i sin tondikt fram öfverraskande scener, stämningsfulla och genomfläktade af varm känsla, originalitet och finsk anda i melodik och styckets totalkaraktär. Vi medhinna ej denna gång en större detaljering, utan nämna blott, att tondikten slog an ofantligt. Under en döfvande åska af applåder, ärligt menade och förtjänade, framkallades komponisten.“

82 K[arl Flodin] in Nya Pressen vom 29. April 1894: „Hvilka synpunkter som inom prisnämnden gjort sig gällande är obekant, men hr Sibelius komposition står obetingadt öfver den första pristagarens hvad originaliteten beträffar.“ 83 R[obert] E[lmgren] in Uusi Suometar vom 2. Mai 1894: „[…] täytyy myöntää, että tällä kertaa sai paremman käsityksen tästä waikuttawasta säwelteoksesta kuin wiimein. Etusijan kuitenkin aina annamme ,Rakastawalle‘, joka mielestämme on ihanin suomalainen miesääninen laulu, jonka olemme kuulleet.“ 84 Vgl. z. B. Erik Tawaststjerna, Jean Sibelius. Åren 1893–1904, Helsinki: Söderström 1993 [= Tawaststjerna 1993], S. 20. 85 Diese Sammlung enthält auch das Lied Venematka, das laut Kritiker „leicht zu verstehen war“ (helpoimmin ymmärrettävä), und Työnsä kumpasellaki (also Saarella palaa), das als „belanglos“ (vähäpätöinen) eingeschätzt wurde. E-t [anonymes Kürzel] in Kaiku vom 17. Januar 1896: „Sibelius’en laulut owat hywin omituisia. Niistä ei saa juuri minkäänlaista käsitystä ensi kerran soittaessaan. Mutta kun niihin enemmän tutustuu, huomaa niissä kauneutta oikein paljo. […] Mutta kaunein on kieltämättä ,Rakastawa‘, waikka se sisältää niin kummallisia epäsointuja, että aluksi epäilee, onko sitä oikein painettu. Pitkältä ja yksitoikkoiselta tuntuu tämä laulu soittaessa, mutta luultawaa on, että se laulettaessa kuuluu hywin waihtelewalta. Alkuosa erittäinkin on miellyttäwä, melodia kun on niin yksinkertainen ja hieno. Omituisen waikutuksen tekee baritoni-soolo keskiosassa, soolo, joka alusta loppuun asti pysyy yhdellä ainoalla äänteellä. Tenorisoolo lopussa on kaunis. Koko laulu on perin suomalainen, niin kuin useimmat Sibelius’en säwellykset.“ 86 Vor ihrer Heirat veröffentlichte Krohn ihre Werke unter dem Pseudonym Aino Suonio. 87 Kallas berichtet über die Serenade in ihrem Tagebuch am 20. April und 10. Juli 1898 (Aino Kallas, Päiväkirja vuositta 1897–1906, Helsinki: Otava 1952). In ihrem Tagebucheintrag vom 10. Mai 1950 erinnerte sie sich an dieses Ereignis (Aino Kallas, Vaeltava vieraskirja vuosilta 1946–1956, Helsinki: Otava 1957): „Sydämeni sykki kiivaasti … Senjälkeen … kuinka – onko mahdollista – nuohan ovat omia säkeitäni, runosta ,Kuutamolla‘.“ 88 Derzeit aufbewahrt in Suomalaisen kirjallisuuden seura (SKS), Kallas-Archiv, Kasten 4. 89 E[vert] K[atila] in Uusi Suometar vom 12. April 1916: „Varsinaisen uuden suomalaisen mieskuorosävellyksen luoja on Sibelius, jota tällä kertaa ohjelmassa edusti pieni vähäpätöisyys kuluneilta ajoilta.“ Der Bericht in Hufvudstadsbladet (von Bis [Karl Wasenius]) hat ähnlichen Inhalt. 90 O[tto] K[otilainen] in Helsingin Sanomat vom 12. April 1916: „[...] hienotunnelmainen, säweltäjälle ominaisella tawalla soinnutettu.“ 91 Vgl. Kilpeläinen 1992, S. 89f. Bislang war nur eine Skizze bekannt. Die Reinschrift wurde im Nachlass von Mikko Slöör (1866–1934) gefunden. Slöör kümmerte sich zwischen 1898 und 1908 um Sibelius’ Finanzangelegenheiten. 92 Kilpeläinen 1992, S. 90, und SibWV, S. 550. 93 Die Skizzen befinden sich unter der Signatur HUL 1160 in NL. Laut Kilpeläinen lassen Papiersorte und Tinte die Jahre 1903 bis 1905 vermuten (Kilpeläinen 1992, S. 89f.). 94 Unter Ahos politischen Schriften befinden sich beispielsweise zwei Bände von offenkundig patriotischen Kurzgeschichten mit dem Titel Katajainen kansani (Porvoo: WSOY 1899 und 1900). 95 Das Gedicht enthält verschiedene autobiographische Anspielungen. In der Erstausgabe war das Gedicht auf „vergangenes Frühjahr, nachdem ich aus Italien zurückgekommen war“ datiert (viime kevännä Italiasta palattuani). 96 Die Prosafassung wurde 1909 in die revidierte Ausgabe von Katajainen kansani aufgenommen (S. 247–249). 97 Ahos Wohnsitz Ahola liegt benachbart zu Sibelius’ Ainola. Veljeni vierailla mailla ist eine der ersten Kompositionen, die in Ainola entstanden; die Sibelius-Familie zog 1904 dorthin. 98 Es wurde wiederholt behauptet (z. B. in SibWV), dass Sibelius Ahos Gedicht entscheidend veränderte. Ahos Manuskript, das während der Vorbereitung des vorliegenden Bandes wieder auftauchte, zeigt


XXXVI|

99

100

101

102 103

104

105

106

107

108

109 110

111

112

jedoch eindeutig, dass Aho das vertonte Gedicht selbst geschrieben hat. Vgl. zum Manuskript den Critical Commentary. Bemerkenswerterweise geht auch der Kritiker davon aus, dass das vertonte Gedicht von Sibelius und nicht durch den Dichter selbst geändert worden sei; das oben beschriebene Missverständnis kann daher aus dem Bericht hervorgegangen sein (vgl. die vorige Anmerkung). K[arl Flodin] in Helsingfors Posten vom 4. Dezember 1904: „Jean Sibelius gaf ett säreget bidrag till programmet, en sång full af fosterländsk aktualitet: delar af Juhani Ahos gripande prosadikt ,Veljeni vierailla mailla‘ (Mina bröder i främmande land). Uppgiften att rytmiskt behandla finsk prosa hade tonsättaren löst på ett mästerligt sätt. Men än mästerligare var det hopplösa tungsinnet i refrängen ,veljeni vierailla mailla‘ uttryckt, med en fördjupning i den mörka mollklangen, som för hvar gång verkade lika storslaget och till sist pekade ut mot öde och stjärnlösa rymder. Sången var ej af den art att den genast senterades till den rent musikaliska behandlingen, men vid bisseringen trädde allt det intensivt kända och egenartadt uttryckta på ett helt annat sätt fram.“ Veljeni vierailla mailla erschien 1915 in den USA, als das Lied unter dem Titel Song of Exile in die Sammlung Ten Student Songs from Finland (New York: The H. W. Gray Co.) aufgenommen wurde. Brief vom 20. August 1905 in NA, SFA, Kasten 120: „Håller som bäst på att skrifva någonting till Edelfelts begrafning. Jag kan ej säga huru jag saknar honom. Lifvet är kort!!“ Die Korrespondenz zwischen Sibelius und Carpelan ist veröffentlicht in Högtärade Maestro! Högtärade Herr Baron! Korrespondensen mellan Axel Carpelan och Jean Sibelius 1900–1919, hrsg. von Fabian Dahlström, Helsingfors: Svenska Litteratursällskapet i Finland 2010. Zu der Beziehung zwischen der Fassung für gemischten Chor und der Männerchorfassung vgl. Ylivuori 2013, S. 160–170. Nach mündlicher Überlieferung komponierte Sibelius das Werk unmittelbar nach Lektüre des Gedichts (diese Information findet sich in Carol Hedbergs unveröffentlichtem Werk Observationer beträffande kompositioner av Jean Sibelius, S. 46; das Manuskript befindet sich in SibMus). Die frühe Fassung von Isänmaalle tauchte 1960 wieder auf. Die Fassung für gemischten Chor entstand für das Gesangsfestival, das Kansanvalistusseura in Helsinki organisierte. Zu Details vgl. JSW VII/1. Selim Palmgren bearbeitete schon 1902 Isänmaalle zum Gebrauch für Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat. Da die Bearbeitung nicht mit Palmgrens Namen versehen war, wurde sie oft irrtümlicherweise Sibelius zugeschrieben. Die Reinschrift befindet sich derzeit in SibMus. „Laulu on näin laulettava. Pankaappa sanat ynnä voimamerkit paikalleen. Kaikessa kiireessä teidän Jean Sibelius.“ Sibelius richtete das oben zitierte Schriftstück an R. [sic] Koskinen. Eine kurze Beschreibung des Wettbewerbs durch Heikki Klemetti ist veröffentlicht in Säveletär 1908, S. 120f. Brief in NL, Coll.206.52: „[…] eikä varoja muulla tavalla osoittaa kunnioitustamme […].“ Sibelius las die Korrekturfahnen für die Veröffentlichung. Er kam auf das Material zu Isänmaalle in den späten 1940er oder in den 1950er Jahren zurück, aber die Skizzen aus dieser Zeit (HUL 1034/1) sind so rudimentär, dass noch nicht einmal die geplante Besetzung daraus hervorgeht. Kaarlo Terhi hatte seinen Namen übersetzt; er hieß ursprünglich Karl Hammer. Die Frühgeschichte von Uusmaalaisten laulu findet sich in Aarne Rahunen, Uusmaalaisten laulun syntyvaiheet, in: Opettajan lehti, Nr. 34 (1957), S. 16f. Tagebuch, 21. Dezember 1911: „En unisono, monumental, en som går genom sekler.“ Tagebuch, 12. Januar 1912: „Här i min kammare är den nog så bra. Men skall den värka äfven ute i den vida, kalla verlden? – Är den ej för douce? Samt klinga den ej alltför ,hausbacken‘?“ Tagebuch, 16. und 20. Januar 1912. Die anderen Mitglieder der Kommission waren Sibelius und Professor Tudeer. Stellvertretende Mitglieder waren die Schriftsteller Aukusti Valdemar Koskimies und Juhani Aho. Tagebuch, 21. Januar, 1. und 2. Februar 1912.

113 Das Werk erschien sowohl als Einzelausgabe als auch in der Publikation Nuori Voima, die bei WSOY herauskam. Vgl. den Critical Commentary, Sources. 114 Rahunen 1957, S. 17. Offenbar akzeptierte Leino den Auftrag, denn sein neues Gedicht für Sibelius’ Melodie wurde am 12. März 1912 in Helsingin Sanomat veröffentlicht. Dennoch erscheint Leinos Sukuvirsi betiteltes Gedicht weder in einer Ausgabe noch ist dokumentiert, dass es bei einer Aufführung verwendet wurde. In der Tat passt Leinos Gedicht nicht ganz zu Sibelius’ Melodie (so ist z. B. die Silbenzahl nicht optimal). 115 Helsingin Sanomat vom 21. April 1912: „Sibeliuksen uudesta Uusmaalaisten laulusta en osaa sanoa muuta kuin että suuri mestarikin voi joskus säveltää ilman inspiratsionia.“ 116 Bis [Karl Wasenius] in Hufvudstadsbladet vom 21. April 1912: „Den begynte med Uusmalaisten [sic] laulu af Sibelius, i hvilken sång jag förgäfves sökte finna ,was Besonderes‘.“ 117 Verwirrenderweise wurde Uusmaalaisten laulu in einer autographen Werkliste (in SibWV, S. 694, als „Sib 1912–31“ bezeichnet) zusammen mit den Fassungen für gemischten Chor von Ej med klagan und Juhlamarssi in Opus 7 aufgenommen, vgl. auch Kilpeläinen 1992, S. 169 und 178f. Zur Geschichte von Opus 65 vgl. die Einleitung zu JSW VII/1. 118 Es ist unklar, auf welches Versprechen Nordman anspielt. Der Brief befindet sich in NL, Coll.206.27: „Mitt löft[e] trogen, sände jag Dig i dag en palvad ,fårfiol‘. Tag ut den från station strax och förvara den hängande – Måtte den smaka Dig. Brännvin passar nog till den.“ 119 Hedberg (unveröffentlicht), S. 71, zufolge hatte Nordman die Lammkeule auf dem Schwarzmarkt gekauft. 120 Brief vom 19. September 1918 in NL, Coll.206.27. 121 „Gå hem och gnid det fåralår som hänger på din vägg.“ Das Gedicht spielt auch auf eine Violine an. 122 Tagebuch, 17. Mai 1917. Ob die Ähnlichkeiten mit einer gut bekannten Hymne von Rudolf Lagi (Jag lyfter ögat i himmelen / Mä silmät luon ylös taivaaseen) eine lustige Anspielung oder zufällig sind, ist nicht bekannt. 123 Otto Andersson plante eine Biographie über Sibelius, für die er viele Gespräche mit ihm führte. Die unveröffentlichten Notizen befinden sich in SibMus. Das Gespräch fand am 16. Juni 1952 statt: „[…] begripa huru den blivit så allmän som den är och genom vem den har kommit i svang från början“. 124 Gösta Schybergsons Schwester Gerda hielt die Ereignisse des Frühjahrs 1918 fest. Ihre Notizen liefern ein ziemlich genaues Bild vom Mord an ihrem Bruder. Die Aufzeichnungen wurden veröffentlicht in Terror och tragik. Helsingfors och Sibbo våren 1918, antecknigar av Gerda Schybergson, hrsg. von Per Schybergson, Helsinki: Schildts förlags Ab 2003. 125 Tagebuch, 9. Februar 1918: „Mordet på Dr Schybergson har djupt uppskakat mig.“ 126 Tagebuch und die Notizen von Gerda Schybergson vom 14. Mai 1918. 127 Dem Tagebuch zufolge las Sibelius am 28. Juli 1918 Korrektur. Die Werke in der Ausgabe waren der Akademiska Sångföreningen zugeeignet. Die Widmung stammte jedoch nicht von Sibelius, sondern von der Familie Schybergson (Hedberg, unveröffentlicht, S. 75; vgl. auch Gerda Schybergsons Notizen vom 14. Mai 1918). 128 Wyborgs Nyheter vom 7. April 1919: „[…] så skall detta hälsas med glädje och sympati av envar, som i körens hitkomst och uppträdande ser ej blott en musikalisk prestation utan även ett tecken på att vi svenskar i Finlands yttersta utpost mot öster icke äro bortglömda. […] Det är ur denna synpunkt sedd den svenska studentsångarskarans besök eger en vital betydelse.“ 129 I-n [anonymes Kürzel] in Åbo Underrättelser vom 21. März 1921: „något mera utvecklat och egaliserat röstmaterial […] sin karga, musikaliskt knappa struktur“. Der Bericht wurde unter dem Pseudonym „J. J.“ am selben Tag in finnischer Sprache in Turun Sanomat veröffentlicht. 130 Trotz des übersetzten Namens behielt der Chor die ursprüngliche Abkürzung WSB bei, die oft in Klammern nach dem finnischen


XXXVII

131

132 133

134 135

136

137

138

139

140

141

142

143

Namen erschien (vgl. beispielsweise die Beschreibung der Erstausgabe). Nach der Übersetzung setzte der Chor seine Tätigkeit offiziell als zweisprachige Organisation bis 1929 fort. Nach der Entscheidung (am 21. Oktober 1929), nur noch Finnisch als offizielle Sprache einzusetzen, kündigten alle schwedischsprachigen (19 der ingesamt 50) Mitglieder des Chors. Vgl. Eino Reponen, Viipurin Lauluveikot 1897–1967, Helsinki: Viipurin Lauluveikot 1967 [=Reponen 1967], S. 11–14, und Hedberg, unveröffentlicht, S. 79f. Zuweilen wird der finnische Name „Viipurin Laulu-Veikot“ geschrieben. Sibelius besuchte das Lyzeum von 1876 bis 1885. Die Briefe von Schulman an Sibelius befinden sich derzeit in NL, Coll.206.34. Der erste Brief der Korrespondenz ist verloren, der zweite stammt vom 5. August 1920. Das Telegramm ist nicht erhalten. Sibelius arbeitete laut Tagebuch am 10. Dezember an dem Marsch. Reponen 1967, S. 70: „[...] hieman omituiselta, mutta keskustelussa todettiin, että tämä kuuluikin asiaan, koska työ oli Sibeliuksen kynästä lähteny“. Hedberg (unveröffentlicht, S. 80) zufolge gab es einen Grund für den ungünstigen Eindruck, den Sibelius’ Komposition auf den Chor gemacht hatte; ihr fehlte nach dessen Auffassung der marschähnliche Charakter, der für einen Ehrenmarsch typisch war. Den Wettbewerb gewann die Komposition Pan von Felix Krohn (1898–1963). Schulman an Sibelius am 14. Januar 1921 (in NL, Coll.206.34): „Vi beklaga att den icke kunnat deltaga i den tävlan […], enär den icke ankom anonymt […].“ Der Vorfall ist in Schulmans Brief an Sibelius (siehe Fußnote 135) beschrieben. Der Spender und die Größe der Summe sind unbekannt. Im zweiten Weltkrieg gingen praktisch alle Chorbesitztümer verloren. Im genannten Brief fragte Schulman Sibelius, ob er statt im sechsten Takt wirklich im achten Takt vor Schluss etwas ändern wolle. Über diese Änderung hat sich weiter keine Information erhalten. In diesem Eintrag erwähnt Sibelius ein Werk mit dem falschen Titel Liknelse, was jedoch ungefähr dieselbe Bedeutung hat. Nach seiner eigenen mündlichen Auskunft schrieb er das Werk, als er sich in Turku aufhielt (vgl. Hedberg, unveröffentlicht, S. 80). Geht man von dem Tagebucheintrag und von der Tatsache aus, dass die Reinschrift dem Chor am 23. Januar aus Järvenpää geschickt wurde, erinnerte sich Sibelius aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach nicht genau. Tagebuch, 22. Januar 1922: „En manskvartett i den gamla goda stilen – den har tilltalat mig i dess patos.“ Da Karsten auf Sibelius’ Brief nicht antworten konnte, schickte der Vertreter des Chors im Auftrag Karstens Sibelius für das Werk einen Dankesbrief. Der Brief vom 28. Januar 1922 befindet sich in NL, Coll.206.47: „[f]jättrad vid sjukbädden“. Åbo Underrättelser vom 14. März 1926: „Sibelius’ Likhet översteg körens förmåga.“ Derselbe Bericht wurde auf Finnisch in Turun Sanomat veröffentlicht. Anonymus in Helsingin Sanomat vom 14. Dezember 1927: „Kuoro lauloi useita varsin vaikeita sävellyksiä, selviytyen niistä keveästi. Tällaisia koetuskiviä olivat […] eräät kiperät sointumuodostelmat Sibeliuksen Runeberg-romanssissa ,Likhet‘.“ Ein Bericht mit ähnlichem Inhalt erschien am selben Tag auch in Hufvudstadsbladet (von K[arl] E[kman]). Brief vom 19. Juni 1925 in NL, Coll.206.23: „Först då jag märkte att det gällde en skyddskårs-sång, bleknade jag och våndades svårligen. Den patentpatriotiska lyriken är en landsplåga, och huru undgå dess förb. tonart, då det gällde ett sådant ämne? Musiken visade emellertid vägen, […] Skolsången blev ännu svårare att få fason på […]. Att texterna äro skrivna med blyerts är icke respektlöshet utan tvärtom: det är meningen att Du skall kunna med gummi elasticum vidtaga nödiga åtgärder […].“ Sibelius an Holger Schildt Förlag am 23. November 1925 (im Archiv des Holger-Schildt-Verlags, derzeit in der Bibliothek der

144

145

146

147

148

149

150

151 152

153

154

155

Åbo Akademi). Der Ablehnungsbrief vom 27. November 1925 befindet sich in NL, Coll.206.46. 1930 verwendete Sibelius musikalisches Material aus Skyddskårsmarsch in seinem Werk Karjalan osa JS 108 für einstimmigen Männerchor mit Klavierbegleitung. Der Chor übernahm die ursprünglichen Strophen 4 bis 6 des Gedichts, änderte aber deren Reihenfolge, so dass die ursprüngliche fünfte Strophe an den Anfang kam; die Strophen 4 und 6 wurden zu den Strophen 2 und 3. Das ursprüngliche Gedicht ist veröffentlicht in Wäinö Sola, Wäinö Sola kertoo II, Porvoo: Werner Söderström 1952 [=Sola 1952], S. 225f. Sola vermittelte die Anfrage an Sibelius. In einem Brief vom 7. August 1928 versprach Sibelius, das Werk abzuschließen, bevor Sola nach Amerika aufbrechen würde. Der Brief findet sich faksimiliert bei Sola 1952, S. [260f.]. Briefe von Jallu Honkonen vom 22. Februar 1927 sowie vom 1. Februar, 25. April und 11. September 1928 befinden sich im Archiv Wäinö Solas (NL, Coll.449.1). Wäinö Solas Manuskript seiner Erinnerungen – mit einem Ausschnitt seines titellosen Artikels in New Yorkin Uutiset vom 8. Mai 1929 (NL, Coll.449.6). Dem Artikel zufolge war das Manuskript von Siltavahti dem Chor am 25. Oktober 1928 nach Solas Konzert übergeben worden, in dem er die Solofassung als Zugabe gesungen hatte. Brief von New Yorkin Laulumiehet, unterzeichnet von J[allu] Honkonen, an Sibelius vom 9. November 1928 (in NL, Coll.206.47): „Pyydän mitä vilpittömämmin kiittää Teitä, hra professori, myötätunnostanne ja siitä kunniasta, jonka sävellyksellänne olette suoneet kuorollemme. Taiteilija Sola on täkäläisissä konserteissaan haltioittanut kuulijansa ,Siltavahdilla‘. Kuoromme on sitä harjoitellut innokkaasti ja tuntuukin minusta, että kuorosävellyksenä se on vieläkin valtaavampi; laulajat siihen ovat ihastuneet sydänjuuriaan myöten.“ Die Werkliste ist in SibWV, S. 695, als „Sib 1952“ bezeichnet. Das Veröffentlichungsjahr des zweiten Marschs ist in der Ausgabe nicht gedruckt, die Edition ist aber in der Finnischen Nationalbibliographie gelistet: Simo Pakarinen, Suomalainen kirjallisuus 1930–1932: aakkosellinen ja aineenmukainen luettelo, Helsinki: Suomalaisen kirjallisuuden seura 1934. In Viipurin Lauluveikot 1897–1947, Helsinki: Viipurin Lauluveikot 1947, S. 30; das Pseudonym A.A.L. schreibt auch über das Festival, nennt dazu aber irrtümlicherweise das Jahr 1933. Reponen 1967, S. 70. Viipurin Lauluveikot trat tatsächlich beim ersten Karelischen Festival auf, das vom 11. bis 17. Februar 1934 stattfand; zu dieser Zeit war die zweite Komposition jedoch bereits vier Jahre zuvor gedruckt worden. Wo Sibelius die Aufführung des ersten Marschs hörte, ist nicht bekannt. Eine Gelegenheit könnte die Übertragung der Erstaufführung durch den Chor im Radio gewesen sein, die am 19. April 1929 gesendet worden war. Jāzeps Vītols studierte am Konservatorium in St. Petersburg bei Nikolaj Rimskij-Korsakow (1844–1908). Nach dem Abschluss 1886 unterrichtete Vītols bis 1918 in St. Petersburg und ging danach nach Lettland zurück. Er gründete 1919 das Konservatorium in Riga (heute Jāzepa Vītola Latvijas Mūzikas akadēmija). Vītols war auch als Pianist, Dirigent und Kritiker bekannt. 1944 ging er nach Lübeck, wo er bis zu seinem Tod lebte. Vītols wird in deutscher Ortographie Vihtol geschrieben. O[skar Merikanto] in Päivälehti vom 8. Dezember 1895: „Itse ohjelmasta tahdomme, Herää Suomea lukuun ottamatta, etusijassa mainita prof. Vihtolin säweltämän lättiläisen ballaadin. Tämä teos oli erittäin arwokas, kaunis ja mahtawa. Sen omituinen[,] originelli, kansanmusiikintapainen pohja[-]säwel oli mainiosti ballaadin sisältöön sattuwa ja sen musikaalisesti ja harmoonisesti ansiokas rakenne oli taitawasta kädestä lähtenyt. Tämän lisäksi tuli wielä laulukunnan musikaalinen ja innostunut esitys tässä kappaleessa, esitys, joka oli parasta, mitä Y. L:lta olemme kuulleet.“ R[obert] E[lmgren] in Uusi Suometar vom 8. Dezember 1895: „Ainoa mitä meitä sowituksessa kummastutti oli, että ,walkopartaisen‘ tuloa ilmoitettiin korkean tenoorisoolon kautta, jopa niin


XXXVIII korkean että se tuntui miltei mahdottomalta laulaa rinta-äänessä. Hra Floman, joka tämän pienen soolopartian lauloi, teki tehtäwänsä warsin ansiokkaasti, emmekä hänen syykseen laske sitä että tämä kohta laulussa ei meihin aiwan edullista waikutusta tehnyt. Kokonaisuudessaan kuitenkin on tämä ballaadi etewästi sowitettu ja laulettiin waikuttawasti.“ 156 Auch weitere Zeitungen erwähnen in ihren Konzertberichten explizit Laulun mahti (z. B. Uusi Suometar am selben Tag). K[arl] Flodin] in Nya Pressen vom 2. Dezember 1898: „Programmet innehöll flere nummer, som genom sin musikaliska halt höjde sig öfver mängden af endast konventionelt vackra mankvartetter. Främst anföra vi i sådant afseende den lettiska balladen af Vihtol, en längre, på växlande stämningar rik tonsättning, som därtill bar en mycket originell lokalfärg.“ 157 Uusmaalaisten laulu und Skyddskårsmarsch werden oben besprochen. 158 Die Skizzen zu Suomenmaa befinden sich in NL, HUL 1472a/7. Zur Beschreibung vgl. die Critical Remarks.

XXXV 159 Sibelius kam offenbar 1919 auf das Gedicht Suomenmaa zurück, als er den Text in der Kantate verwenden wollte, die der gemischte Chor Suomen Laulu in Auftrag gegeben hatte (Tagebuch, 20. Oktober 1919). Letztlich wählte er stattdessen den Text Maan virsi von Eino Leino. Sibelius’ Werk trägt die Opuszahl 95. 160 Sandels entstand für einen Kompositionswettbewerb, den MM veranstaltete. Die Einreichfrist endete am 20. April 1898. 161 Die Melodie erscheint erstmals in den Skizzen zu Tulen synty. Vgl. Ylivuori 2013, S. 172–174. Vgl. auch zuvor zu Rakastava. Zur Sonate vgl. JSW V/1. 162 Vgl. z. B. Erik Bergman 1960. Er veröffentlichte eine vervollständigte Fassung von Sibelius’ Fragment. 163 Vgl. z. B. Tawaststjerna 1993 und SibWV. 164 Vgl. Jalmari Finne, Muistelmia Sibeliuksen töistä, in: Aulos, säveltaiteellis-kirjallinen julkaisu, hrsg. von Lauri Ikonen, Suomen Musiikkilehti 1925, S. 20.


20

3

Jouluvirsi – Julvisa (Zacharias Topelius)

Op.1 No. 4

Lento Tenore

I II 8

Basso

1. En et si val taa, lois to a, en kai paa kul taa kaan; mä pyy dän tai vaan va lo a ja 1. Giv mig ej glans, ej guld, ej prakt i sig nad ju le tid. Giv mig Guds ä ra, äng la vakt och

I II

solo* on glä

8

7

nen der

tuo ja nos taa ko nung, jag har

Luo bett

jan till

8

rau haa pääl le maan! ö ver jor den frid!

8

13

8

Se jou lu suo, mi Giv mig en fest som

luo gäst

on nen tuo ja mie let nos taa Luo jan luo! Ei glä der mest den ko nung, jag har bett till gäst! Giv

1. 2.

val taa ei kä kul taa kaan, vaan rau haa pääl mig ej glans, ej guld, ej prakt, giv mig en äng

3.

le maan. la vakt.

2. Suo 2. Giv

loi nen jou lus tuo! glad och hjär te varm!

2. Suo mulle maja rauhaisa ja lasten joulupuu! Jumalan sanan valoa, joss’ sieluin kirkastuu! Tuo kotihin, jos pieneenkin, nyt joulujuhla suloisin! Jumalan sanan valoa ja mieltä jaloa!

2. Giv mig ett hem på fosterjord, en gran med barn i ring, en kväll i ljus med Herrens ord och mörker däromkring! Giv mig ett bo, med samvetsro, med glad förtröstan, hopp och tro. Giv mig ett hem på fosterjord och ljus av Herrens ord!

3. Luo köyhän niinkuin rikkahan saa joulu ihana! Pimeytehen maailman tuo taivaan valoa! Sua halajan, sua odotan, sä Herra maan ja taivahan! Nyt köyhän niinkuin rikkaan luo suloinen joulus tuo!

3. Till hög, till låg, till rik, till arm kom helga julefrid, kom barnaglad, kom hjärtevarm i världens vintertid! Du ende, som ej skiftar om min Herre och min Konung, kom! Till hög, till låg, till rik, till arm kom glad och hjärtevarm!

* Solo in verses 2 and 3: 8

2. pie neen 2. ro 3. oo 3. du

kin med tan min

jou glad Her Her

lu juh la för trös tan, ra maan ja re och min

jou hopp tai Ko

lu och

su [loisin] tro vaan nung, kom

©1913 A. E. Lindgren, Helsingfors © Fennica Gehrman Oy, Helsinki Printed with permission.


20

7

Sortunut ääni (Kanteletar)

Op.18 No.1

Ei liian hitaasti* Tenore

I II 8

Basso

Mi kä sor ti ää

nen suu ren, ää nen suu ren ja so ri an,

ää nen kau ni hin ka ot ti,

I II

3

4

8

3

jok’ en nen jo ke na juok si,

ve si vir

ta na vi la si,

lam mik ko na lai

lat te li?

3

3

7

8

Su ru sor ti ää

nen suu ren, ää nen suu ren ja so ri an,

ää nen ar

ma han a len ti;

poco a poco cresc. 3

10

8

3

jott’ ei nyt jo ke na juok

se,

ve si vir

ta na vi la ja,

lam mik ko na

lai

lat te le.

3

3

poco a poco cresc. molto largamente e forte

dolce e dim.

13

8

Su

ru

sor

ti

molto largamente e forte

ää

nen

suu

ren,

ää

nen suu

ren

ja

so

ri

an.

dolce e dim.

* Not too slowly. © by Breitkopf & Härtel, Leipzig Revised edition © 2015 by Breitkopf & Härtel, Wiesbaden


20

21

Hymn (Fridolf Gustafsson)

Op. 21

Moderato Tenore

I II 8

Na

Basso

tus

in

cu

ras

ho mo,

so

lis

ae

stu

I II

8

8

hau

rit

ex

cel

sus

ca

li

dum

la

bo

rem;

non

o

non o

16

[] 8

pem

fes

suus

mi

se

ris

re

cu

sat,

pem

fes

cresc.

23

[] 8

suus mi

se

ris

re

cu

sat,

non

o

pem

fes

suus

mi

se

cresc. dim.

30

8

ris

re

cu

sat,

no cte qui

e

ta.

dim.

* See the Critical Remarks.

© by Breitkopf & Härtel, Leipzig Revised edition © 2015 by Breitkopf & Härtel, Wiesbaden


20

27

Finlandia-hymni (Veikko Antero Koskenniemi) from Op. 26

Ei hidastellen* Tenore

I II 8

Basso

1. Oi, Suo mi, 2. Oi nou se,

kat Suo

so, mi,

Si nun päi väs koit taa, nos ta kor ke al le

yön uh ka pääs sep pe

kar löi

koi mä

I II

6

tet tu on suur ten muis

jo to

pois jen,

ja aa mun oi nou se,

kiu Suo

ru mi,

kirk kau des näy tit maa

sa soit il mal

taa le

12

kuin it sa et

se tä

tai kar

va koi

han kan tit or

si juu

sois, den

18

yön val lat ja et tet

aa tai

mun pu

** val ke us nut sa sor

jo voit taa, ron al le,

sun päi väs on aa mus

koit al

taa, ka

oi syn nut, syn

nyin maa. nyin maa.

** Not dragging. In Eh, “M = noin [circa]104” by an unknown hand. ** In Ch, changed by Sibelius: 8

oi syn nut, syn

nyin maa. nyin maa.

© by Breitkopf & Härtel, Leipzig Revised edition © 2015 by Breitkopf & Härtel, Wiesbaden


20

31

Herr Lager och Skön fager (Gustaf Fröding)

Op. 84 No.1

Lätt och med humor* Tenore I 8

Tenore II 8

Jung

fru,

sen,

jung

fru,

sen,

Baritono I 8

Skön

Baritono II 8

sen,

Basso Skön fa

ger, I

sen,

hur de blom ster och bla

der, Skön jung fru, de lil

jor så

4

8

Och

8

8

gö ken han ga

sen!

sen,

sen,

8

[

ljuv

ler!

li ga stå,

]

“Herr

nöj der och gla

La

ger, Herr La

der,

ger, I

Jung

fru

sen,

Jung

fru

sen,

fru

sen!

[ ] sen,

Jung

* Lightly and with humor.

Courtesy of Muntra Musikantes, Helsingfors


20

49

Humoreski (Larin-Kyösti) Op.108 No.1

Nopeaan ja paatoksella* poco Tenore I 8

E

lä mä vei tik ka

vii sas ja nuo

ri

mun i

loi sen

pil li

ni lait

toi,

lä mä vei tik ka

vii sas ja nuo

ri

mun i

loi sen

pil li

ni lait

toi,

poco Tenore II E

8

poco Basso I Vii

sas,

nuo

ri,

sas,

nuo

ri,

poco Basso II Vii

5

2

8

soin tu van ok san se lem mes sä löy si ja

tait

toi.

Soi tin pil lil lä

2

8

soin tu van ok san se lem mes sä löy si ja

tait

2

soin

tu

va,

vii

va,

tait

ni puu sta sen tait

toi.

2

toi.

Soi tin pil lil lä

Soi tin pil lil lä

2

soin

tu

2

toi.

Soi

* Fast and with pathos.

© 1926 by Laulu-Miehet ry. Printed with permission.


20

61

Rakastava (Kanteletar) JS 160 a

Rauhallisesti*

3

dolce Tenore

I II 3

8

Miss’ on, kus sa mi nun hy vä ni, miss’

a su vi ar

ma

ha

ni,

mis sä is tu vi

3

Basso

I II 3

dolce

6

T.

I II 8

B.

i

lo

ni, kul la maal la

mar

ja

se

ni?

lu

I II

ään tä vän a hoil la, [

]

3

11

T.

Ei kuu

I II 3

8

lyö vän leik ki ä

le hois sa, ei

kuu

lu

sa loil ta soit

to,

ku kun ta ei kun na

3

B.

I II 3

* Calmly.

© by Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat Printed with permission.


20

91

Ute hörs stormen (Gösta Schybergson)

JS 224 No.1

Commodo (ma un poco agitato) poco Tenore

I II 8

Basso

U

te hörs

stor

men

då nan de

tju

ta

reg net

slår

smat tran de

I II

poco

7

meno

8

dovt mot min

ru

ta,

mör ker är

u

te

mör ker

är

in

ne,

sjä

len är

meno dolce

14

[] 8

höst

likt

dy ster och

grå.

O,

hu

ru

gär

na

jag

vil

le

dock

[]

[] dolce

poco piano

20

8

lu

ta

hu

vu det

där

i

ditt

knä

för att

nju

ta

blick en, som

poco piano

26

8

der

sin

ne vid

sin

ne,

blick en från

tro

fas ta

ö

gon

blå,

vid

* See the Critical Remarks.

©1918 A. E. Lindgren, Helsingfors © Fennica Gehrman Oy, Helsinki Printed with permission.


20

97

Viipurin Lauluveikkojen kunniamarssi (1) (Eero Eerola) JS 219

Reippaasti* Tenore

Sy dän lau lu jen

I II 8

Lau

Basso

lu

kai ku ma han nyt, Lau lu

vei

kot, hei!

lau

lut lai nei

na

I II lai

kul tai

nei

na

set sie lus sa

5

8

läik kyy. Taas

mie lem me toi

vei den ken til le vei, ku vat

sie

lus

sa

väik kyy.

Me

ja

10

[] 8

lau

lam me rin tam me rik kaak si taas

suu rek si maail man

pie nen.

Mur he men nä saa, huo let

* Briskly.

©1920 by Viipurin lauluveikot Printed with permission.


20

109

Laulun mahti ( Johan Julius Mikkola) JS 118

Andante tranquillo Tenore

I II 8

Kuu rin maa ta kun

Basso

ni

al

la

Kau ko val ta

val

lit

see.

Sii

tä mai ne

I II

6

cresc.

8

kau as, kau as kaut ta mai den

mai nit

see.

Vi

ro lai sen vi haks’ käy pi

Lä tin kan san

cresc.

cresc.

12

8

kun

ni

a.

So

ta

syt tyy, kal

vat kals kaa,

jou si nuol

ta

jou

dut

taa.

cresc.

17

Allegro

cresc. molto

[

]

8

oi,

[ ]

oi,

oi, oi, oi,

cresc. molto Tais

to tui ma, tais to

* See the Critical Remarks.

tui ma

sor taa, sur maa kau pun gin

© by Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat Printed with permission.


Profile for Breitkopf & Härtel

SON 624 - Sibelius, Sämtliche Werke, Serie VII, Bd. 2  

SON 624 - Sibelius, Sämtliche Werke, Serie VII, Bd. 2  

Profile for breitkopf