Page 1


JEAN SIBELIUS

Concerto

Konzert

for Violin and Orchestra

für Violine und Orchester

in D minor

d-moll

Early version [Op. 47/1904] Op. 47

edited by / herausgegeben von

Timo Virtanen

BREITKOPF & HÄRTEL WIESBADEN · LEIPZIG · PARIS

2014


VIII

Introduction

Jean Sibelius’s compositions for violin include two sonatas, two suites, one sonatina, several collections and individual compositions for violin and piano, as well as one suite, two serenades, and six humoresques for violin and orchestra. Sibelius’s largest work for his own main instrument is the Violin Concerto, which has survived as two versions for violin and orchestra and a version for violin and piano by the composer. The present volume of the JSW contains the two versions of the Concerto for violin and orchestra, namely, the original version of 1904 and the version of 1905.1 The latter of these versions was published under opus number 47 during Sibelius’s lifetime, while the early version of the work appears for the first time in the present volume.2

Genesis and Completion of the Version of 1904 Sibelius’s earliest reference to a sketch for a violin concerto appears in a letter he wrote to his fiancée, Aino Järnefelt (1871–1969), in Vienna in October 1890.3 In 1898, Sibelius returned to the plan of composing a concerto for violin in a letter to his friend, writer Adolf Paul (1863–1943). Two years later, in June 1900, Sibelius’s patron and friend Axel Carpelan (1858–1919), writing under the pseudonym X, enquired the composer about a violin concerto: “Does one dare to hope for a violin concerto or a fantasy with orchestra in the future?”4 Carpelan’s hope began to materialize two years later. Sibelius spent the late summer and early fall of 1902 on the seashore in Tvärminne, on the Hanko (Hangö) peninsula on the southern coast of Finland. Although he had an opportunity to rest – and fish – in Tvärminne, his stay there was not entirely vacation time. He worked on the revision of En saga (Op. 9) for upcoming performances in November in Berlin and composed songs (later published in Opp. 37 and 38). In addition, Sibelius first mentions his new large-scale composition plan in a letter he wrote to Aino, in Tvärminne in September 1902: “I have got wonderful themes for a Violin Concerto.”5 Perhaps one of these themes is an idea dated 23 Sept. that appears in manuscript HUL 0450 and features – in Ej minor and accompanied by a drawing by the composer – material from the first movement of the Concerto (see Facsimile A, staves 3–6; cf. bb. 158ff. in the version of 1904).6 Sibelius’s correspondence and other literary documentation sparsely describe the compositional process of the Concerto. The surviving musical manuscript material for the work, however, is extensive.7 The materials for the Concerto comprise a variety of manuscripts from preliminary thematic sketches and elaborated drafts to score fragments both for violin and piano and for violin and orchestra. Yet the manuscripts provide no overall picture of the development of the musical ideas or of the compositional process as a whole. As is typical of Sibelius’s large-scale works, the Violin Concerto belongs to a group of compositions planned in parallel and completed over a period of several years, either before or after the Concerto; indeed, musical materials for the Concerto can be found intermingled with those of several other works. The manuscripts reveal that some ideas appearing in the Concerto were written down years before Sibelius’s stay in Tvärminne in fall 1902. The earliest sketch for the opening theme of the Concerto’s first movement probably originates from 1901 (HUL 1550), and preparatory ideas for the third-movement themes appear in the memoranda (HUL 1507, 1508, and 1510) including thematic ideas appearing in the Music for the Press Celebration Days (JS 137, 1899), the Second Symphony (Op. 43, 1902), and Cassazione (Op. 6, 1904), as well as Kyllikki (Op. 41, 1904) and Air varié for piano (Op. 58 No. 3, completed at the latest 1909), and the song Vilse (Op. 17 No. 4, 1898/1904). Thus, the earliest ideas apparently date back to 1898 or 1899.8 Manuscript HUL 0477, p. [1], annotated Violin Concerto | Finale by Sibelius’s son-in-law, conductor Jussi Jalas (1908–1985), who identified a large number of the composer’s sketches, reveals a

IX

direct connection between the finale movements of the Concerto and the Second Symphony. After three measures of ostinato accompaniment, the draft begins with the opening theme of the Concerto’s third movement, in B major (see Facsimile B). At this stage, nothing refers to solo violin writing. The draft, however, contains several references to orchestration: Trä (“woods”) and Str. (on staff 5), Corno (staff 7/8), Pauke ( staff 10/11), and Arpa (staff 12). The idea annotated for strings and horn(s) in the last bar of staves 5 and 6 refers to the fanfare-like passage in the horns in the Finale of the Symphony (for the first time in bb. 9–12). In addition, the ostinato accompaniment at the opening, in 3/2 meter ($5qwqw 5. $ &), is related to the corresponding accompaniment in the Symphony’s Finale. In the light of the sketches, the first movement in particular saw considerable elaboration. The draft in manuscript HUL 0477, in B major, is not the only manuscript featuring material for the Concerto’s first or third movement in a key different from the final D minor/major. In HUL 0444, the opening theme of the first movement is cast in Gk minor, and the same material also occurs in Ck minor (HUL 1580) and E minor (HUL 0445 and 0465). Both keys are present in HUL 1580, where Sibelius first notated his opening ideas for the Concerto in Ck minor, then continued in E minor with material that ended up in the Symphonic Fantasy Pohjola’s Daughter (Pohjolan tytär) Op. 49, bb. 9–12, in 1906. The chordal writing in the Pohjola’s Daughter passage (marked with strong red/ orange pencil lines) is entirely playable as multiple stops of the violin (Facsimile C, staves 10 and 11).9 The connection between the Concerto and Cassazione appears to be especially close; the two works were composed in parallel and first performed in the same concert in 1904 (for the genesis of Cassazione, see JSW, vol. I/11). The draft HUL 0471 reveals that Sibelius planned to use material that appears in Cassazione in the second movement of the Concerto (Facsimile D). In this draft, labeled with the tempo marking Adagio sostenuto, the slow movement material of the Concerto is cast in A major (p. [1]), followed by the Cassazione idea after a key change to Ck minor (p. [2]).10 Cassazione ideas also occur in connection with materials for the third movement of the Concerto. HUL 0470 (pp. [2]–[4]) is an extensive continuity draft featuring the opening theme of the Concerto’s third movement accompanied by an ostinato polonaise rhythm ($ 5as 5qw 5qw ) and leading to another dance-like passage (p. [2]). Material from this passage appears for the first time in bb. 68–70 and is followed by an idea which can be found in bb. 19–29 in Cassazione. In addition to the works discussed above, in manuscript HUL 0472, ideas which appear in Cortège (JS 54, 1906; bb. 9ff., cf. bb. 3ff. on staff 5 in Facsimile E), The Captive Queen (Vapautettu kuningatar, Op. 48; bb. 96ff., cf. staff 7 in Facsimile E) and in the last movement of the Fourth Symphony (Op. 63, 1911; bb. 159–167, cf. staff 1 in Facsimile E) appear on the manuscript pages containing material for the Concerto.11 The Violin Concerto was completed, first as a version for violin and piano, in the late summer of 1903. Even before its completion, Sibelius seems to have planned performances for the work with violinist Willy Burmester (1869–1933).12 However, whether Sibelius composed the Concerto from the beginning specifically with Burmester in mind remains unclear. On 22 July, Burmester wrote to the composer: “I hardly believe my ears! Is it true what I have been told that you really are working on the long-discussed Violin Concerto and that it will soon be complete? It would be wonderful indeed! Next winter will provide opportunities enough to present it to the public. From you I await something entirely special.”13 On 8 August, Sibelius replied to Burmester: “I shall soon send you the Violin Concerto as an acceptable ‘Klavierauszug’ with a separate and clear main [i.e., the violin] part. I can only dream how it might sound in your masterful hands. […] I shall write the slurs temporarily in lead so you can erase those you want.”14


X After having completed the version for violin and piano, Sibelius continued working on the orchestral score and, on 19 December, he declared to Carpelan: “The Concerto (Violin) is complete. Two movements already orchestrated. Beginning to orchestrate the last movement.”15 Thus, the orchestration of the third movement was probably completed at the turn of the year 1903/1904. Ernst Röllig (1858–1928) copied the orchestral parts for the upcoming first performance, which took place in February 1904 (see the Critical Commentary, source B1P). Today the autograph orchestral score (source A1O) is preserved in the National Library of Finland, and the parts in the Sibelius Museum in Turku.

Preparations for the First Performances of the Version of 1904 Sibelius initially promised the first performance and also the dedication of the Concerto to Burmester. In October 1903, however, Carpelan proposed another violinist as the dedicatee: “Instead [of Richard Sahla], I would most warmly recommend sending the piano score to Ysaÿe in Brussels, probably the greatest violin artist today. He has a grand and, in addition, wonderfully beautiful tone (he plays a Stradiv. ‘Hercules’); a dazzling, captivating temperament and a great recreative fantasy. He should have received the dedication. Through him you would be played everywhere, even in France. Thus, [send] the piano score to Burmester, Ysaÿe, and Marteau. Do not let second-rate virtuosos get hold of the manuscript; it hurts you –.”16 At the same time, the plans concerning the performances as well as the alliance between the violinist and the composer seem to have become complicated, as Burmester’s letter to Sibelius reveals: “I have heard from different quarters that you want [Henri] Marteau to play your Violin Concerto in Stockholm and elsewhere. If this is true, I shall never play the Concerto. You would make me happy with a couple of lines of explanation.”17 Sibelius wrote the lines of explanation in a postcard: “The Concerto indeed is dedicated to you and will therefore be played by you alone. […] [I] have thought of no one but you. Who the hell has ravelled now?!”18 The dedication to Burmester was even publicized in the newspapers. Hufvudstadsbladet announced: “Jean Sibelius has, as known, completed a Violin Concerto, which the composer has dedicated to Mr. Willy Burmester. Mr. Burmester intends to visit Finland in the beginning of March to play the Concerto here.”19 Because Burmester in the end could not promise to give the first performance of the Concerto before March of the following year, by the end of October 1903, the newspapers announced another violinist, Viktor Novác`´ek (1873–1914): “Jean Sibelius’s profile concert will take place on 14 January. The composer’s new Violin Concerto will be performed by Mr. V. Novác`´ek, because Willy Burmester cannot come here until March.”20 Sibelius had probably hoped to have the Concerto premiere in the same year 1903, but soon had to renounce his hope for the performance, explaining to Carpelan: “My concert is on 11 [sic] Jan. The postponement is due to Novác`´ek, who will not be ready with the Violin C. before Jan. He is going to study it twice. He will be good. So, it is not my fault, because I had everything ready.”21 According to Otto Andersson (1879–1969), Sibelius later stated: “N.[ovác`´ek] hesitated in the beginning; he complained about the quick passages, which he could hardly work out.”22 If Sibelius had already given a copy of the Klavierauszug and a “separate and clear main part” to Burmester, he probably ordered new copies for Novác`´ek. The surviving copies of the version of 1904 include a piano score fragment from the first movement and a fragment of the solo part of the third movement (sources B1Pf.F and B1Vl.F). Sibelius’s use in 1905 of the piano score of the second and third movements as a template for the revised score also enables a reconstruction of the 1903/1904 version for violin and piano of these movements (see source B1Pf.; cf. source A2Pf. for the version of 1905).

IX Although Novác`´ek was appointed as the soloist of the first performance, Burmester also studied the Concerto. By the end of the year 1903, he praised the work to Sibelius: “Only in recent days have I been able to play through your Concerto with a pianist. […] I can say to you only one thing: ‘Wonderful!’ Rocky nature! I can roughly imagine the effect with the orchestra. It must sound colossal. I am convinced of the future of this Concerto.” However, in the same letter, Burmester backed down on the earlier plans for performances in the late winter or spring of 1904: “Now, the main thing is that we also bring it [the Concerto] out with the effect needed. Our plan to bring the Concerto ad auris to the Berliners in February or March must be ceased for good reason. […] The best option is and will remain that I play your work in this summer’s music festival. There it will be heard and reviewed by the whole press and may at one stroke become popular all over the world.”23 Burmester’s promise to perform the Concerto in the summer of 1904 could not be realized, for at that time, the composer already had decided to withdraw the work for revision. After having completed the orchestration of the first two movements of the Concerto in December 1903, Sibelius evidently sent the autograph piano score of the two movements to Carpelan, who could then acquaint himself with the work. At the end of December, Carpelan wrote: “Today I went through your V. Concerto and was happy and pleased with it. One remark (of a blind one), however: Is the concluding cadenza of the Adagio really motivated, are the difficult 128th notes necessary after this heaven flight? The impression may become entirely different when you hear the violin perform these rapid arpeggios, ‘veloce,’ while the orchestra sustains the chord, but for the piano accompaniment, the cadenza looks too virtuoso after the heavenly thoughts of the movement. […] – Yes, the Concerto is really lovely; I showed it to W[ester]lind, who visited me the other day. He had it with him for one day; he was enthusiastic and said that everything sounds divinely good, ‘Vieuxtempsian technique,’ ‘the Finnish orchestral tutti divine,’ the second cadenza [of the first movement] ‘wonderful,’ etc.”24 In his reply, Sibelius defended the “concluding cadenza of the Adagio” and judged it to be motivated after all: “After careful consideration, I have retained the concluding cadenza of the second movement. Notice the figures of the accompaniment in the subsidiary theme!! Then it proves to be motivated enough.”25 Nevertheless, Carpelan’s opinion about the cadenza apparently had its effect: in the autograph scores of both the version for violin and piano and the orchestral version, Sibelius crossed out the cadenza in pencil (see Facsimile VIII), presumably before the first performances of the Concerto. Consequently, the cadenza was apparently never performed.

First Performances and Reception of theVersion of 1904 The Violin Concerto was premiered on 8 February 1904 in Sibelius’s profile concert in the University of Helsinki Solemnity Hall with the composer conducting the Helsinki Philharmonic Society Orchestra. The other works in the concert program were Cassazione (Op. 6), Har du mod? (Op. 31 No. 2), for male choir and orchestra, and Tulen synty (Op. 32) for baritone, male choir, and orchestra.26 In addition to the Violin Concerto, Cassazione and Har du mod? were performed for the first time in the concert. The program was repeated twice: on 10 and 14 February. In their newspaper reviews after the first concert, the critics were restrained but in general rather positive. On 9 February, Oskar Merikanto wrote in Päivälehti that the Concerto “indeed met the great expectations.” According to Merikanto, “the last movement requires a perfect Burmester technique (the concerto is dedicated to Burmester). In the whole Concerto, the role of the orchestra is, by the way, rather strange and exceptional,” whereas “the artistic peak” of the Concerto was set in the “simple, but almost supernaturally wonderful Adagio movement.” Merikanto’s opinion about the soloist was equally positive: “Mr. V. Novác`´ek deserves full


XI

X recognition for his masterly performance of the difficult task; moreover, he played the Concerto by heart. The lovely Adagio movement had to be repeated.”27 After the first performance, Alarik Uggla in Hufvudstadsbladet was convinced of the significance of the Concerto: “[The Concerto is] a composition which shall without any doubt become a cherished repertoire number for outstanding violin virtuosos.”28 By contrast, Karl Flodin’s critique in Helsingfors-Posten was rather abrupt and harsh. He complained about the Concerto’s overflow of musical ideas and technical difficulties – which Novác`´ek, the writer noted, could barely overcome – and compared the work to five well-known concertos from the 19th century in a rather unfavorable light: “Whichever famous violin concerto we may take – Beethoven’s, Mendelssohn’s, Bruch’s, Brahms’s, Tchaikovsky’s – all of which contain one or more melodic shapes which give the concertos their characteristic charm, indeed, their full profile of properties, so that these melodic motives immediately come back to mind when one recalls one of the above-mentioned violin concertos. But Mr. Sibelius has no such individual tone, which would become the noble coat of arms of the composition.” In conclusion, Flodin characterized the Concerto on the whole as “boring” (“tråkig”) and Novác`´ek’s performance as “a mass of unenjoyable things” (“en massa av onjutbara saker”).29 After the second performance, the third movement polarized the critics’ opinions. According to Merikanto, the movement appeared “weaker as an artistic work,” while Evert Katila wrote in Uusi Suometar: “The last, Allegro giusto [sic], however, in our opinion is the most unbroken, ingenious movement of the Concerto.”30 Merikanto was also more reserved about Novác`´ek’s abilities as the soloist of the Concerto than after the premiere; in addition, he saw a danger in the technical challenges of the solo part: “The technical difficulty of the work will probably mean that this Concerto will seldom be part of the violin artists’ programs.”31 Already on the day following the second performance, Katila wrote about the excessive use of “virtuoso elements” in the Concerto, and after the third performance (in the building of the Helsinki Fire Brigade) he offered the composer his direct advice: “After some small revisions, it shall become a virtuoso number with a worthy position in the new violin repertoire. Perhaps the orchestration should be thinned here and there, and the outline of the first movement straightened.”32 Katila also summarized the Concerto’s reception and responded Flodin’s critique in Euterpe without mentioning his opponent by name: “Different thoughts about the Violin Concerto have emerged. With all due respect for the private opinion of the esteemed critic, who claims that the D-minor Concerto is a ‘single mistake’, one must strongly suspect whether this, in the signatory’s mind in many respects ingenious work can be passed off in such a cavalier way. […] It also feels strange that the same critic, who has hardly looked with tender eyes at such works by Sibelius, where the genuine Finnish character is evident, now demands that from the Violin Concerto (cf. the last [issue of] Euterpe) where the genre has the least potential.”33 Apparently Sibelius was not very satisfied with the reception of the Concerto. He wrote to Carpelan on the day of the first performance, after the concert: “Soon I shall travel to Åbo [Turku]. If only I get an audience now. Here [in Helsinki], it has been worse than bad. […] Here the audience is so shallow and smug.”34 In his letter, Sibelius referred to the upcoming performances of the Violin Concerto on 26 and 27 March in Turku. After the first concert in Turku,35 pseudonym –f. explained in Åbo Underrättelser that many of the listeners probably did not understand the Concerto because it belonged to the concertos composed “in the hypermodern style” (“i den hypermoderna stilen”). On the whole, however, the reviews of the Concerto – as well as of Novác`´ek’s performance – were favorable. According to Åbo Underrättelser, Sibelius’s wish for a broad audience was also fulfilled, at least in the second concert.36

Revision and Publication Already in 1904, Sibelius planned to get the piano score of the Violin Concerto published (probably by Fazer & Westerlund/ Breitkopf & Härtel); Carpelan’s letter to Aino Sibelius, dated January 1904, reveals: “If Österberg has managed to copy the Finale of the V. Concerto, I mean the copy of which I have the two first movements and which shall then be sent to Leipzig, then I would be endlessly happy to have the Finale here. Now I almost know the two first movements by heart and am in veritable ecstasy: Aino therefore understands my vivid interest in the last movement. […] I only mention this in case the piano version is complete, but the Finale is left lying in Janne’s work room.”37 The correspondence between Sibelius and Carpelan in the months following the first performances of the Concerto sheds additional light on the publication plan. In March, Sibelius wrote: “Today the third movement of the V. Concerto and the proofs to The Swan of Tuonela will be sent.”38 Nevertheless, by June 1904, he seems to have buried the publication plan: “I shall withdraw the Concerto; it will appear only after two years. My secret grave sorrow these times. The first movement shall be revised, as shall the middle part of the Andante [Adagio di molto], etc.”39 The revision work began in early 1905, during Sibelius’s stay in Berlin (from January to March). On 12 January, he performed his Second Symphony with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra. Evidently, he also began revising the Concerto in January. On 24 January, Sibelius wrote to Aino: “I am improving the Concerto quite a lot.”40 Concluded from Aino’s letters dated 25 and 27 January, the (autograph) orchestral score and the copy of the piano arrangement were kept by copyist Röllig, who was later asked to send the scores to Berlin.41 Even before receiving the materials from Röllig, Sibelius told to his wife about the progress of the revision work: “The first movement makes me conflicted. The others were just so clear to me.” In the same letter, Sibelius compared his Concerto with that of Brahms: “I have listened to Brahms’s Violin Concerto, which is good. But so different (too much [sic] symphonic) from mine.”42 On 22 February 1905, Sibelius finalized a contract with the publisher Robert Lienau (1866–1949), whom he then met for the first time. The contract stipulated that Sibelius commit to composing four large-scale works a year for Lienau. The Violin Concerto was included in the first year’s quota, even though the revision of the work was unfinished. In addition, Sibelius explained to Lienau that the revision of the Concerto was going to be thorough.43 Carpelan actively commented on Sibelius’s revision plans. In the beginning of February, in reference to the two cadenzas in the first movement, he wrote: “You are probably busy with the Violin Concerto, among others. Sorry to bother you about it! You wrote two cadenzas, but are about to abandon one of them. Would it not be possible to save them both by putting an ‘alternative’; in other words, labeling them both ad libitum? Several V. Concertos have been supplied with alternative cadenzas.”44 The composer did not follow his friend’s advice, but excluded the latter cadenza. In the beginning of April, Sibelius reported to Carpelan that the first movement in particular still caused him trouble: “The second theme in the [first movement of the] Concerto is now clear. If I can just get past the first movement, everything will proceed by itself.”45 Indeed, the formal design and the solo part of the first movement were the most thoroughly revised of the three movements, although the number of bars in the third movement was changed more than in the first movement; on the whole, Sibelius reduced the first movement by 41 bars and the last movement by 54 bars. In the score of the version for violin and piano (source A2Pf.), in the second movement, Sibelius had just replaced the original solo violin part by pasting the revised part over the original one. In the third movement, the changes are for the most part omissions made


XII in pencil (for the sketches related to the revised version, see the “List of Sketches”).46 Evidently, Sibelius again prepared the version for violin and piano first and then sent the revised piano score to the copyist Österberg bit by bit in April and May 1905. In the beginning of May, the copyist reported to the composer: “Cortège and that [part] which I have of the Violin Concerto is written. Send at your earliest convenience as much as you have ready. […] Shall the solo part also be written?”47 By 5 May, Sibelius had already undertaken to send the Violin Concerto to his publisher soon.48 The next day, Sibelius explained to Carpelan that the Concerto is going to “become good” and will soon be finished.49 In addition, Aino wrote to Carpelan in an equally optimistic tone: “The part of the first movement of the Violin Concerto, which J. has finished, is already at the copyist to be faircopied, and J. can say that he is nearly finished with the Concerto, so not too much work is left.”50 However, completion of the revision and copying work still took two more months; not until the beginning of July could Sibelius send the piano score and the solo violin part (sources B2Pf. and B2Vl.) to Lienau. The Österberg copy of the orchestral score, which served as the Stichvorlage (source B2O) was sent even later.51 To this day, the whereabouts of Sibelius’s autograph orchestral score remains unknown; only the last six pages of the third movement, with Österberg’s page layout markings, can be found in the National Library of Finland (source A2OF). Sibelius had also promised Burmester the premiere of his revised Concerto. However, because Burmester would hold no concert in the fall of 1905 in Berlin nor anywhere else, Lienau in his letter to Sibelius in June already mentioned another violinist; the publisher recommended Carl Halir`´ (1859–1909).52 The same letter mentioned Richard Strauss as a possible conductor for the premiere. In July, Lienau had already given the Concerto to Halir`´ and Paul Juon (1872–1940) for a “trial play”, and in the beginning of August Sibelius seems to have accepted Lienau’s suggestion; the premiere of the Concerto could not be postponed indefinitely.53 Finally, Lienau reported to Sibelius: “The thing with the Violin Concerto is in order. Halir`´ will play it on 19 October under the baton of Rich. Strauss. Burmester has resigned.”54 In August, the publication process proceeded quickly. The surviving proofs of the piano score (source CPf.) were stamped with the date 12 August. In the beginning of September, Sibelius rejoiced to Carpelan: “The Violin Concerto is being printed; [I] am in a brilliant working mood.”55 The first set of proofs of the orchestral score (source CO1) were stamped with the date 29 September and sent on the same day to Sibelius from R. v. Waldheim – Jos. Eberle & Co. in Vienna.56 And some days later, the composer’s mood was far from brilliant. Probably referring to the Concerto’s proofs, Sibelius unleashed his anger to Lienau: “I have had a lot to do with the orchestra and know what kind of laughter there will be when, for example, con sordino appears for the double basses. Now, put your hand on your heart and please promise that you will never release anything if I have not submitted faultless proofs. This is after all the least that must be due to an artist. I am terribly worried about the parts.”57 Three days later, the publisher placated and reassured the composer: “You can totally calm down! The score and the string parts of the Concerto will be printed only after the [first] performance, once you have checked the corrections again yourself! Only the wind parts must be printed as a small impression in advance. If errors still remain, I will print a Fehlerverzeichnis to be attached to each copy. The score will be absolutely correct! Halir`´ will, of course, play from the corrected copy [of the solo part].”58 For the first performance, Lienau prepared a score for Strauss by pasting together leaves of printed second proofs (source CO2); at the time of the first performance, the composer was still keeping the set of (first) proofs, sent to him at the end of September.59 Lienau was eager to introduce the Concerto to a wider circle of violinists, including the leading virtuosos. Sibelius wrote to Carpelan

XI in the beginning of October: “Dear friend, Lienau et consortes enthusiastic about the Violin Concerto. Really ‘enormous.’ Halir`´ is going to play it ‘mit Freude und gut.’ Rich. Strauss conducts it. […] To which virtuosos shall I send the Concerto? Lienau asks me. I think of all those of importance.”60 Once again, Carpelan had an opinion to present: “Concerning the virtuosos who should receive the Concerto, for lack of catalogues and lexicons I cannot give a more precise guidance. Of course, above all ‘Reisevirtuosen,’ such as Ysaÿe, Thomson, the master of octave playing (if I remember correctly), Marteau, Kreisler, Kubelik, Petschikoff, Serato. Those who are fashionable in England and America above all.”61 Sibelius probably also conveyed these names to the publisher.62 Burmester’s name was no longer linked to the Concerto, and the first edition of the work was published with no dedication. The precise date of publication of the orchestral score of the Concerto remains unknown. In November 1905, Sibelius left for a long journey in Europe, giving his first concerts in England and spending time in Paris before returning home in the beginning of February 1906. Not until four months after the premiere, on 23 February 1906, did Lienau write to Sibelius: “The score of the Violin Concerto is now finished. Today I’ll send you two scores, three piano versions of the Concerto […].”63 Although the publisher had guaranteed that the score would be “absolutely correct,” the first edition of the score was not entirely without fault. Corrections were made by hand in the later edition.

The Early Performances and Reception of the Version of 1905 The revised version of the Concerto was first performed on 19 October 1905 in the Berlin Singakademie in a concert “given by Mr. Carl Halir`´” and, as planned, with Strauss conducting the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra. According to Berliner Lokal-Anzeiger, the other works performed in the concert were Beethoven’s Violin Concerto and Charles Martin Loeffler’s (1861–1935) La villanelle du Diable for orchestra, as well as Eclogue and Carnaval des morts from his Divertimento for violin and orchestra.64 The surviving sources contain no correspondence between Sibelius and Strauss or Halir`´, and whether the composer wrote to the conductor or the soloist about any performance issues before the premiere remains unknown. Sibelius’s friend, German businessman Georg Boldemann (1865– 1946), who had attended at the concert, reported to the composer immediately after the premiere that Halir`´ was a “magnificent violinist” and that the Concerto received “an excellent performance,” although the soloist was “much better suited to other things than Sibelius.” According to Boldemann, the success was great: “At the end, Halir`´ had to show up three times, and after each movement he was loudly applauded. […] Mr. Lienau opined that one could be very satisfied, but the reviews would be very split, as he had heard that during the intermission, the critics were strongly discordant.”65 According to the reviews in Berlin newspapers, the audience applauded mostly after the performance of the Beethoven Concerto, which Leopold Schmidt in Berliner Tageblatt considered as a “refreshment” after Sibelius’s new work.66 Schmidt’s short critique on the whole was rather negative. He opined that Halir`´’s beautiful violin sound came into its own only in the second movement, “which really cannot be claimed about the other movements wallowing in cacophony.”67 The review in Berliner Lokal-Anzeiger was both more verbose and more positive, although the “extremely original and fascinating work” was not “entirely satisfying.”68 The reviewers also heard Finnish national tones in the harmonic features and orchestration of the work, and according to Berliner Lokal-Anzeiger, the “melancholy atmosphere” in the first movement was “as dark, yet as appealing, as the character of the Finnish folk.”69 In Musikalisches Wochenblatt, Adolf Schulze described the Concerto as “written with fantasy, an immediately captivating work in


XV

XII drawing and in color.” His characterization of the work as a whole was the most positive of all German reviews: “A gloomy, melancholy atmosphere dominates the first, in its thematic design somewhat loosely assembled, movement. More tasteful, more clearly outlined and therefore more appealing in effect is the Adagio, with its wonderfully beautiful, subtly melodic cantilena; imposing the briskly developing, rhythmically sometimes very intricate Finale movement. The orchestration is extremely skillful, always lifting and supporting the difficult, yet gratifying, solo part.”70 Robert Lienau explained to Sibelius that the reception of the audience was much more favorable than that of the critics, to say nothing of the violinist Joseph Joachim (1831–1907): “Joachim, by the way, ‘bashed’ – ‘awful and tedious’ was the judgement, which he told me; and when I said to him that I was the ‘unlucky publisher,’ he exclaimed ‘Anyway, awful!’ Funny, isn’t it? Well – you will laugh at it with me.”71 Sibelius’s answer to Lienau was pungent: “I am sorry about Joachim, whom I like very much. Namely, for his sake. He no longer seems to understand the emotional life of the time. Geriatric – undeniably.”72 According to Lienau, the conductor Strauss stated that the Concerto was “poorly orchestrated” (“schlecht instrumentiert”).73 In Finland, the first performance of the revised version of the Concerto took place five months later, on 12 March 1906, in the University of Helsinki Solemnity Hall during a benefit concert for the pension fund of the Helsinki Philharmonic Society Orchestra. The soloist was the German violinist Hermann Grevesmühl (1878–1954), and Robert Kajanus (1856–1933) conducted the Philharmonic Orchestra. The reviews of the Concerto were essentially no more enthusiastic than two years earlier; the Second Symphony and the suite from the incidental music Pelléas et Mélisande, Op. 46, the latter of which was performed for the first time in concert, drew the most laudatory appreciation. Karl Fredrik Wasenius (1850– 1920), writing under the pseudonym Bis., stated that the Concerto “undeniably profited from revision and deletion”, but on the whole, his review of the Concerto performance was slim and focused much more on Grevemühl’s playing than on the work.74 In Nya Pressen, Flodin was equally as unappreciative as in his earlier critics: “Despite its revised form, the Concerto will not, I believe, win more general sympathy.” Flodin described the work as “too complicated, too restless, kept grey in grey, rhapsodic despite its drawn-out form, and laden with all kinds of technical and rhythmic difficulties.”75 Having returned home from his trip to Europe in February 1906, Sibelius could read from Lienau’s letter that the German violinist Max Lewinger (1870–1908) was studying the Concerto and planned to perform it the following fall in Berlin and “other big cities.”76 Sibelius wrote optimistically to Carpelan: “The Violin Concerto wins more and more terrain. Many [violinists] study it, and Lewinger among others plays it next season in Berlin and other ‘big’ cities. […] Do you want to have the score to the Concerto? I shall receive it tomorrow.”77 Before Lewinger, who indeed performed the Concerto in Berlin though not until January 1907, the Russian violinist Lev Zeitlin (1881–1930) played the Concerto as early as April 1906 in Helsinki, and the American violinist Maud Powell (1867–1920) gave the first performances of the work in the United States in New York and Chicago in the late 1906 and early 1907.78 In January 1907 Sibelius told Lienau about a – probably private – performance of the Concerto in Saint Petersburg, where Ysaÿe played the work “at Professor [Leopold] Auer.” According to Sibelius, “the composer Lyadov Taneiev accompanied at the piano. All spoke very positively of it. They also said, as you did, that it generally takes a long time for a Violin Concerto to show its advantage.”79 The reception of the Concerto was generally tepid. Lienau reported to Sibelius after the Lewinger performance in January 1907, comparing the Concerto’s reception to that of the Orchestral Suite Pelléas et Mélisande: “By contrast, the Violin Concerto, which Lewinger recently played, did nothing. This is simply a piece that

will only conquer the world slowly.”80 Despite the auspicious performances of the Concerto in 1906–1909 in Europe and the U.S.A., Sibelius seems to have expressed mainly doubt about the success of “his child of sorrow” (as he called the Concerto in his dedication of the score copy to Carpelan), and for many years after the first performances, his comments were chiefly pessimistic. In October 1910, after having heard Franz von Vécsey’s (1893–1935) performance of the Concerto, he wrote in his diary: “– v. Veczey [sic] played the Concerto. A fine musician. But the Concerto can still wait! It will probably be torn to shreds. Or, even worse, be mentioned out of pity.”81 And in February 1914: “Again the Violin Concerto ‘torn to shreds.’ It is as if Burmester’s ‘es schadet deinen [sic] Ruf’ [‘it damages your reputation’] would come true.”82 In February 1915, however, after Polish-American violinist Richard Burgin’s (1892–1981) performance of the Concerto in Helsinki, Sibelius wrote a somewhat optimistic diary entry about the Concerto: “Burgin had great success with the Violin Concerto. It is as if Bis’s [Wasenius’s] and the others’ ears had adjusted to it little by little.”83 After 1910, von Vécsey was probably the keenest champion of Sibelius’s Concerto, which the composer also acknowledged with gratitude as early as 1910 by dedicating the work to the then 17-yearold virtuoso. Von Vécsey included the Concerto in the programs of his concert tours, and informed Sibelius about the success of the performances: “Greetings from Vécsey, with a notification that the Violin Concerto has found resonance everywhere in South America and Europie [sic].”84 Sibelius himself conducted the published version of the Concerto only once, in March 1924 in Stockholm, with Julius Ruthström (1877–1944) as the soloist. In the same concert, Sibelius conducted both his First Symphony and the premiere of his new work, Fantasia sinfonica, which was later known as his Seventh – and last – Symphony.

The Schnirlin Edition of the Solo Violin Part In the spring of 1929, Lienau wrote to Sibelius: “Recently, many have complained about the lack of fingerings, bowings, and performance indications in the violin part of your Violin Concerto. As far as I remember, you yourself, in connection with the first printing, once expressed your desire not to present such indications and to leave them to the artists. Because your masterpiece has since spread everywhere and has served in Musikhochschulen as worthy study material, remedying this shortage should now be discussed and the task of amending work assigned to an excellent virtuoso or pedagogue. Presumably we must print a new edition during the summer, so now would be a .suitable time for preparation.” Lienau asked Sibelius to accept the proposal, but the publisher had apparently already made the decision, given the tight schedule and likely counting on the composer’s tolerance towards such arrangements: “From my part, I would like to recommend Mr. Professor Ossip Schnirlin for this work. He has very much occupied himself with the Concerto and is established as editor of violin concertos. Please let me know soon what you think about this; perhaps I could also per Juon get the fingerings and indications used by Franz v. Vécsey.”85 Whether von Vécsey, the dedicatee of the Concerto, had some special “fingerings and indications,” either his own or from the composer, remains unknown, and whether and what Sibelius replied to the publisher also remains uncertain. Lienau’s letter of the end of May fails to clarify this matter: “As I told to you some time ago, I now let Mr. Professor Ossip Schnirlin go through the solo violin part of the Violin Concerto and label it with fingerings and other indications.”86 The letter includes two questions to Sibelius concerning suggestions for enharmonic changes to notes in two passages of the cadenza and metronome indications. Sibelius’s answers to these questions also remain unknown. Neither of the enharmonic changes suggested appear in the violin part, but the Schnirlin edition does include metronome indications (for the suggested changes and additions, see the Critical


XVI Commentary). As a whole, the Schnirlin edition of the violin part contains hundreds of added fingerings, up-bow and down-bow signs, and various ossia readings in footnotes, whereas the original print of the part contains only fingerings in four bars – each of them in the cadenza – and around 50 bowing signs. The new edition of the violin part was printed in the summer or early fall of 1929. At the end of September, Lienau again wrote to Sibelius: “The new edition of the violin part of the Violin Concerto is now ready, and I am sending you herewith one copy. I have already heard excellent appraisals of Schnirlin’s work from violinists and especially from violin teachers.” At the end of his letter, Lienau posed a question, surely as a reaction to Sibelius’s earlier comment: “By the way, why should Mr. Vécsey be angry?”87 Perhaps Sibelius would have preferred the “fingerings and indications used by F. von Vécsey” or even recommended that the dedicatee of the Concerto – if anyone – edit the violin part.

Later Revision Plans and Reception In 1930, the year after publication of the Schnirlin edition of the solo violin part, Lienau planned revisions to the orchestral score as well. In December, Lienau wrote to Sibelius: “Over the course of time, several conductors have reported to me that in orchestral rehearsals of your Violin Concerto, the rhythmics in the last movement is often problematic for the musicians (particularly in smaller orchestras), namely because in the score and in the parts, the notes are incorrectly written in 3/4 meter. Would you please inform me whether you agree if, in possible new editions in the future, I print the notes as they appear on the second staff of the attached slip. I believe that the small change will be worthwhile in practice and facilitate the rehearsal work.”88 The “attached slip” has not survived, but Lienau probably referred to the notation of the rhythms in bb. 45ff. Sibelius accepted Lienau’s suggestion without question, but the composer’s reply also opened new aspects for the publisher: “Many thanks for your friendly writing from 17 [December]. Naturally, I agree with the suggested changes. I would still like to alter the orchestral accompaniment. It is too heavy. Like a symphony. Please write to me what you think about it.”89 In his reply, Lienau agreed about the “symphonic” character of the orchestral accompaniment in the Concerto: “Now, concerning the ‘Violin Concerto’, I entirely share your opinion that the orchestral accompaniment is, in fact, somewhat too heavy. I have often heard complaints from conductors that the whole beautiful work is more like a symphony, and that the violin part cannot often enough show its advantage. Mr Prof. Schnirlin, who has indeed thoroughly occupied himself with the Violin Concerto, would also find it very welcome and extremely useful in propagating the Violin Concerto should you decide to change the orchestral accompaniment. I therefore ask that you kindly undertake this work and send you herewith a score copy. When do you think you would have time for the doubtlessly not very easy re-orchestration? I would like to know in order not to continue unnecessarily producing corrected copies from the old edition.”90 Sibelius seems to have used the words “too heavy” and “like a symphony” as synonyms in his letter to Lienau, and earlier had judged Brahms’s Violin Concerto as “too much symphonic.” In 1943, however, he still seems to have recognized the “symphonic” characteristics in the orchestration of his own Concerto: “The accompaniment of the Violin Concerto shall be rehearsed like a symphony […]”91 Although Sibelius’s correspondence with his publisher sheds no light on the revision plan, Jussi Jalas later wrote: “Sibelius seems to have thought about revising the final version [of the Concerto], not exactly in a composition-technical manner, but in a manner focused on the orchestral appearance of the work. Pencilled markings, appearing namely in his own score, reveal that the composer evidently intended to omit the heavy brass instruments from the first and second movements, [i.e.,] the trombones and trumpets.

XIII Around these parts, in every passage, he drew a dividing line and lightly assigned their tasks to other instruments. This supposedly derives from his own experiences as a conductor of the work, because at that time, with the exception of elite orchestras, the brasses tended to overpower the rest of the orchestra and drown out the soloist. Because of the general development in the skills of the wind players in the orchestras, which improved the balance between instruments, he no longer needed to follow through with his revision plan.”92 Sibelius donated his “own score” containing the pencilled markings (see source E) to Jalas, who also referred to the markings, or “sketches,” in December 1943: “[…] author’s change – sketches in my score.”93 In the score (possibly the copy which Lienau sent to Sibelius for the revision) Sibelius indeed pencilled circles not only around some passages in the trumpet and trombone parts, but also around some passages in woodwinds and horns, and in the first two movements, outlined woodwind and horn parts for the (first) violins and clarinet(s) (see Facsimiles XXII and XXIII; for the score owned by Jalas, and for Sibelius’s markings and performance instructions in the score, see the Critical Commentary). However, because the composer circled only some of the passages in the trumpets and trombones, whether he actually intended to completely exclude the instruments from the score, as Jalas assumed, remains unclear. On several occasions in the 1930s and 1940s, Sibelius’s correspondence with Lienau discussed metronome indications and other performance instructions to be included in the Concerto’s later editions (see the Critical Commentary). In particular, the question of the tempo of the third movement had divided the performers. Nils-Eric Ringbom wrote in his biography of Sibelius published in 1948: “One hears this movement understood in very different ways. Some soloists play it very quickly, others almost in polonaise tempo. As for the question of which tempo is correct, the master answers: ‘It shall be played quite sovereignly. Quickly, of course, but not quicker than if it were played completely ‘von oben.’ – Besides, giving exact tempo instructions is not among Sibelius’s habits. He believes to be able to depend on a good artist’s intuitive ability to hit the right nuance within the limits given for the tempo indications in the scores and does not wish to overly restrict the interpreter’s imagination.”94 In addition to successful performances, the earliest sound recordings of the Concerto (with Jascha Heifetz and Guila Bustabo as the soloists) in the 1930s and 1940s spread the reputation of the work worldwide. The first recording of the Concerto by a Finnish violinist, Anja Ignatius (1911–1995), was made in January 1943 in Germany with the Städtisches Orchester Berlin conducted by Sibelius’s brother-in-law, Armas Järnefelt (1869–1958). In his letter to Lienau, in October 1942, Sibelius nominated these performers for the recording: “Today I would like to inform you about the following: if the Deutsche Grammophon-Gesellschaft were inclined to record my Violin Concerto, I would most warmly propose that my compatriots, the violin virtuoso Ms Anja Ignatius and my brother-in-law, Court Kapellmeister, Professor Armas Järnefelt execute the work. I would be very delighted, if it would be possible for you to impact on this.”95 The last mentions known today of the Violin Concerto in Lienau’s letters to Sibelius, dated in the early 1940s, imply that the work had also already found widespread appreciation in Germany.96 In February 1943, the publisher informed the composer about the “tremendous” success of the Concerto, which was performed four times, each time for over 2 000 listeners, in the Berlin Philharmonie by the violinist Georg Kulenkampff (1898–1948) and the conductor Wilhelm Furtwängler (1886–1954).97 Included in Sibelius’s publishing contract with Lienau in 1905, the Violin Concerto had a long and eventful history, even from the publisher’s perspective. In his memoires, Robert Lienau described the difficult early steps and the later success of the Concerto: “The reception by the audience [in 1905] was indifferent. […] The Concerto then conquered


XVII

XIV the world very slowly, first in England. As with all great masterworks, it was ahead of its time, and only the following generation acknowledged its worth.”98 I owe special thanks to my colleagues Kari Kilpeläinen, Anna Pulkkis, Tuija Wicklund, and Sakari Ylivuori, for our many valuable exchanges of ideas. My correspondence with Jonathan Del Mar about details in the score was highly rewarding, and violinists and maestros Tuomas Haapanen, Tuomas Hannikainen, Pekka Helasvuo, Jaakko Ilves, Tero Latvala, Kaija Saarikettu, and John Storgårds have kindly offered their expertise. Satu Jalas Risito supported my research by making time for inspiring discussions and making available to me the tremendously interesting score owned by her father Jussi Jalas. I am also grateful to Rolando Pieraccini for the opportunity to examine the Sibelius letters in his possession, and Markku Hartikainen, who kindly informed me about various biographical sources. I would like to thank Pertti Kuusi and Turo Rautaoja for their painstaking proofreading, and Stephen Stalter for revising the English texts. I also extend my special thanks to Judith Picard and Berndt Schuff in the Archives of Robert Lienau Music Publishers and Hilkka Helminen in Ainola for their kind help and hospitality. Tarja Lehtinen, Inka Myyry, Kari Timonen, and Petri Tuovinen at the National Library of Finland, Inger Jakobsson-Wärn and Sanna Linjama at the Sibelius Museum, and the staff of the National Archives of Finland were of great assistance in researching the various sources. I offer my thanks to all of them. Helsinki, Autumn 2013

11

12

13

Timo Virtanen

1 The incomplete version of 1903/1904 and the complete version of 1905 for violin and piano appear in JSW II/1A. 2 For further reading about Sibelius as a violinist and the Violin Concerto, see Erkki Salmenhaara, “Violin Concerto” (Wilhelmshaven: Florian Noetzel Verlag, 1996) [= Salmenhaara 1996]. 3 Sibelius’s letter to Aino Järnefelt, dated 29 October 1890 (National Archives of Finland, Sibelius Family Archive [= NA, SFA], file box 94). The surviving manuscripts shed no light on this, yet many of the unidentified sketches since the 1880s on feature writing for (solo) violin. 4 Sibelius’s letter to Adolf Paul, dated 2 September 1898 (photocopy in the National Library of Finland [= NL], Coll. 206.62). Carpelan’s letter to Sibelius, dated 7 June 1900 (NA, SFA, file box 18): “Vågar man i en framtid hoppas på en violinkonsert l. fantasi med orkester? –” 5 Sibelius’s letter to Aino Sibelius, dated 18 September 1902 (NA, SFA, file box 95): “Olen saanut ihania teemoja viulukonserttiin.” 6 The sketch is written in blue ink and crossed out in lead pencil. The year 1902 can be concluded from the annotation T[vär]minne 22 Okt[ober] written on the other side of the folio, in connection with a draft notated in the same blue ink as the sketch for the Violin Concerto theme. 7 See also Tiilikainen, Jukka, “The genesis of the Violin Concerto” in The Cambridge Companion to Sibelius, ed. Daniel M. Grimley (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004) [= Tiilikainen 2004], pp. 66–80. For a survey of the sketches identified for the Violin Concerto hitherto, see the “List of Sketches” in the present volume. 8 For the opening theme of the first movement (HUL 1550, p. [4]), see also Tiilikainen 2004, pp. 68–69. On the same manuscript page, Sibelius has notated a sketch for the opening of the second movement of the Second Symphony, as well as an annotation Allegretto Klockorna i Rapallo (“Bells in Rapallo”) above a fragment, probably featuring a tune played by church bells. The piano pieces Op. 58 were published in 1909, but were likely composed from materials deriving partly from the turn of the century. 9 The connection between the Concerto and “Pohjola’s Daughter” is also illustrated in HUL 0449, p. [2]. 10 After the cadence in A major in the last bar of p. [1], Sibelius drew a line leading to staves 5 and 6 on p. [2], where the Ck minor key signature appears, but he later crossed out the planned continuation on p. [2]. Many of the early sketches and drafts for the second movement are in A major (see also HUL 1562, p. [1], as well as HUL 1563, pp. [1] and [4]). HUL 0471, p. [1] and HUL 0473, p. [1] also suggest that the

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

passage beginning in b. 102 in the first movement of the Concerto (version of 1905) derived from the second-movement material (see bb. 5 and 15 in Facsimile D). In HUL 0473, p. [1], the original version (similar to that in HUL 0471) in ink is replaced with a pencilled version corresponding with that in the completed version(s). If one can assume that Sibelius at some stage planned the first movement of the Concerto in Ck minor, then the key of the second movement (A major) would have had the same (major) third key relationship that prevails in the completed Concerto in D minor (second movement in Bj major). Moreover, the same relationship would be between the sketches for the first movement in E minor and the sketches for the second movement in C major (see HUL 0448, p. [2]). The Roman numerals II and IV, added on p. [1] in red pencil, probably imply that Sibelius planned to use the ideas within the same compositional plan. In addition to Cortège, The Captive Queen, and the Fourth Symphony, manuscript bifolio HUL 0472 contains ideas for Cassazione and Pan und Echo (Op. 53a, 1906), and Roman numerals I and III (also in red pencil) appear in connection with the Cassazione materials. Burmester was a German violinist and a pupil of Joseph Joachim. In 1892–1895, he was employed as the concertmaster of the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra. According to Tawaststjerna: “It is not unlikely that Burmester urged Sibelius to compose a violin concerto as early as spring 1902 in Berlin.” See Erik Tawaststjerna, Sibelius. Åren 1893– 1904 (Helsingfors: Söderströms & Co., 1994 [= Tawaststjerna 1994]), p. 206: “Det är inte uteslutet att han våren 1902 i Berlin hade uppfordrat Sibelius att skriva en violinkonsert.” Tawaststjerna offers no further evidence for this assumption. Burmester’s letter to Sibelius, dated 22 July 1903 (NA, SFA, file box 17): “Ich will meinen Ohren nicht trauen! Ist es war [sic], was man mir sagt, dass Du wirklich an dem so lange besprochenen Violinconzerte arbeitest, und dass es bald fertig ist? Das wäre ja herrlich! Gelegenheit bietet sich nächsten Winter genug es in die Oeffentlichkeit zu tragen. Von Dir erwarte ich etwas ganz besonderes.” Sibelius’s letter to Burmester, dated 8 August 1903 (post stamp dated 13 August; photocopy in NL, Coll. 206.61): “Violinkonserten skall jag snart sända Dig i ett acceptabelt ‘Klavierauszug’ med skild tydlig hufvudstämma. Jag drömmer bara huru den må låta under dina mästarehänder. […] Die Bindungen schreibe ich vorläufig mit Blei so Du nach Belieben streichen kannst.” Sibelius’s letter to Carpelan, dated 19 December 1903 (NA, SFA, file box 120): “Konserten (violin) är färdig. Tvenne satser redan instrumenterade. Börjar att instr. den sista satsen.” Carpelan’s letter to Sibelius, dated 2 October 1903 (NA, SFA, file box 18): “Däremot skulle jag på det varmaste rekommendera tillsändandet på kl.utdraget till Ysaye i Brüssel, väl den största konstnären på violin f. n. Han har stor ton, och därtill underskön (han spelar på Stradiv. ‘Herkules’), ett glödande medryckande temperament och stor reproducerande fantasi. Han skulle bort få dedikationen. Genom honom blefve du spelad öfveralt [sic], äfven i Frankrike. Således klav.utdrag åt Burmester, Ysaye och Marteau. Låt ej andra rangens virtuoser få manuskriptet, det skadar dig –” Burmester’s postcard to Sibelius, dated 4 October 1903 (NA, SFA, file box 17): “Von verschiedenen Seiten erfahre ich, dass Du Dein Violinconcert in Stockholm und auch anderswo von Marteau spielen lassen willst. Wenn dieses der Fall werde ich dass [sic] Concert nie spielen, Du würdest mich durch ein paar erklärende Zeilen erfreuen.” Sibelius’s postcard to Burmester, stamped 7 [?] October 1903 (photocopy, NA, Erik Tawaststjerna Archive [= ETA], file box 38): “Konserten är ju Dig tillegnad och således spelas den endast af Dig. […] Har ej tänkt på andra än Dig. Hvem fan har nu roddat?!” Hufvudstadsbladet, 5 October 1903: “Jean Sibelius har, som bekant, fulländat en violinkonsert, som komponisten tillegnat hr Willy Burmester. Hr Burmester har för afsikt att i början af mars komma öfver till Finland för att här spela konserten.” Päivälehti, 24 October 1903: “Jean Sibeliuksen sävellyskonsertti on tammik. 14 pnä. Säveltäjän uuden viulukonsertin esittää hra V. Novacek, sillä Villy [sic] Burmester voi tänne saapua vasta maaliskuulla.” Sibelius’s postcard to Carpelan, dated 30 October 1903 (NA, SFA, file box 120): “Min konsert är den 11 Jan. Uppskjutandet sker på grund af Novaçek [sic] som ej blir färdig med violin k. förrän i Jan. Han skall studera den tvenne gånger. Han blir bra. Således är det ej min skuld ty jag hade blifvit färdig.” Andersson’s notes from discussions with Sibelius (undated, Sibelius Museum [Turku], Otto Andersson collection, notebook 9): “N. drog


XIV

23

24

25

26 27

28 29

30

31 32

33

sig till en början; han beklagade sig över de snabba gångarna, som han inte ville få ut.” Burmester’s letter to Sibelius, dated 28 December 1903 (NA, SFA, file box 17): “Erst während der letzten Tage bin ich dazugekommen Dein Concert mit einem Pianisten durchzuspielen. […] Ich kann Dir nur Eines sagen: ‘Wundervoll!’ Felsennatur! Ungefähr kann ich mir die Wirkung mit Orchester vorstellen. Es muss kolossal klingen. Von der Zukunft dieses Concertes bin ich überzeugt. […] Die Hauptsache ist nun, dass wir es auch mit dem nöthigen Effekt herausbringen. Unser Plan das Concert im Februar oder März den Berlinern ad auris zu führen muss aus guten Gründen unterbleiben. […] Das Beste ist und bleibt jetzt, dass ich Dein Werk im Musikfest dieses Sommers spiele. Dort wird es von der ganzen Presse gehört und kritisiert und kann mit einem Schlage populär über die ganze Welt werden.” Carpelan’s letter to Sibelius, dated 26 December 1903 (NA, SFA, file box 18): “Jag genom gick i dag din v-konsert och var uppspelt och belåten. Dock en anmärkning (den blindes): är väl adagiots slutkadans [sic] motiverad, är efter denna himmelsflykt dessa svåra 128de dels noter på sin plats? Det är möjligt att intrycket blir helt annat då man hör violinen under orkesterns uthållande ackord utföra dessa rapida arpeggier ‘veloce,’ men till pianoackompagnemang synes mig kadensen väl virtuos efter satsens himmelska tankar. […] – Ja, nog är konserten härlig, jag visade den åt W[ester]lind, som var hos mig en dag; hade den hos sig ett dygn, han var hänförd, sade att allt klingar gudomligt bra, ‘Vieuxtempsk teknik,’ ‘Det finska orkestertuttit gudomligt,’ kadens II ‘underbar’ o.s.v.” Axel Emanuel Westerlind (1844– 1919) was a violinist and conductor. By the “Finnish orchestral tutti” Carpelan probably refers to the Allegro passage in the first movement, bb. 138ff. (in the version of 1904). Sibelius’s letter to Carpelan, undated, probably end of December 1903 (NA, SFA, file box 120): “Andra satsens slut kadens har jag låtit kvarstå efter moget öfvervägande. Observera accompagnements figuren i sidotemat!! Då framstår den nog motiverad.” The baritone soloist in the concert was Abraham Ojanperä (1856– 1916), and the male choir Muntra Musikanter. O.[skar Merikanto] in Päivälehti, 9 February 1904: “[…] viulukonsertti todellakin vastasi suuria odotuksia […] [T]äydellistä Burmesterin tekniikkaa kysyy loppuosa (konsertti onkin Burmesterille omistettu), ja teoksen taiteellinen huippu on yksinkertaisessa, mutta melkein ylimaallisen ihanassa Adagio-osassa […] Koko konsertissa on muuten orkesterin tehtävä sangen omituinen ja tavallisuudesta poikkeava […] Hra V. Novacek ansaitsee täyden tunnustuksen mestarillisesta suorituksestaan tässä vaikeassa tehtävässä; hän soitti sitäpaitsi konsertin ulkoa. Ihana Adagio-osa oli toistettava.” A.[larik] U.[ggla] in Hufvudstadsbladet, 9 February 1904: “[…] en komposition, som utan tvifvel kommer att blifva ett kärkommet repertoarnummer för framstående violinvirtuoser.” K.[arl Flodin] in Helsingfors-Posten, 9 February 1904: “Må man taga hvilken berömd violinkonsert som helst, Beethovens, Mendelssohns, Bruchs, Brahms[,] Tschaikovskys – i dem alla finnes ett eller flere melodiska gestaltningar, hvilka skänka konserterna deras karaktäristiska behag, ja hela deras lynnesmärke, så att dessa melodiska motiv genast framstå för minnet, då man erinrar sig en af de nämda violinkonserterna. Men hr Sibelius har ingen dylik personlig not, som skulle bli till kompositionens adliga vapenmärke.” Flodin’s article of 13 February in the periodical Euterpe (1904, vol. 7), though somewhat softer in tone, directed harsh criticism towards the orchestration in the Concerto. Flodin was the editor-in-chief of Euterpe. O. in Päivälehti, 11 February 1904: “Konsertin loppuosa sen sijaan tuntuu taiteellisena työnä heikommalta.” E.[vert] K.[atila] in Uusi Suometar, 11 February 1904: “Wiimeinen, Allegro giusto, on meidän mielestämme kuitenkin konsertin ehjin, nerokkain osa.” O. in Päivälehti, 11 February 1904: “Teoksen teknillinen vaikeus tuleekin luultavasti vaikuttamaan, että tätä konserttia hyvin harvoin saa viulutaiteilijain ohjelmissa nähdä.” E. K. in Uusi Suometar, 16 February 1904: “Pienillä muutoksilla on siitä tulewa wirtuoosinumero, jolla on arwokas asema uudessa wiulukirjallisuudessa. Instrumentationia on ehkä paikoin ohennettawa ja ensi osan ulkopiirteitä oijottawa.” Ibid.: “Wiulukonsertista on ilmennyt eroawia ajatuksia. Kaikella kunnioituksella sen arw. arwostelijan yksityistä mielipidettä kohtaan, joka wäittää d-molli-konsertin olewan ‘yhden ainoan erehdyksen’ täytyy wahwasti epäillä, tokko tätä, allekirjoittaneen mielestä monessa suhteessa nerokasta säwellystä woi näin ylimalkaisella tawalla kuitata. […] Omituiselta myöskin tuntuu että sama arwostelija, joka ei juuri

XV

34 35

36 37

38

39

40 41

42 43 44

45 46

47

48 49

lempein silmin ole katsellut sellaisia Sibeliuksen säwelteoksia, joissa aito-suomalainen luonne selwänä esiintyy, nyt waatii sitä wiulukonsertilta (wrt. wiime Euterpeä), missä genrellä on wähimmät mahdollisuudet.” Cf. Flodin in Euterpe of 13 February 1904, p. 77: “Man hade framför alt väntat en finsk, sibeliansk violinkonsert, någonting alldeles nytt i formen, i behandlingen af det tekniska, i hela uppfattningen af genren.” (“One had above all expected a Finnish, Sibelian Violin Concerto, something entirely new in form, in the treatment of the technical means, in the whole concept of the genre.”) Sibelius’s letter to Carpelan, undated, after 8 February 1904 (NA, SFA, file box 120): “Snart reser jag till Åbo. Måtte jag nu få åhörare. Här var det mera än dåligt. […] Publiken här är så ytlig och inbilsk.” The other works in the Turku concerts were “Andante” for string instruments (Romanze, Op. 42), Cassazione, En saga, and the Finale from the Second Symphony. The orchestra in the Turku concerts consisted of members from the Turku Musical Society orchestra, which was reinforced with players from the Tampere orchestra and amateurs. Pseudonym “–f.” in Åbo Underrättelser, 27 and 28 March 1904. Carpelan’s letter to Aino Sibelius, dated 11 January 1904 (NA, SFA, file box 98): “Ifall Österberg skulle hunnit kopiera Finalen till V.konserten, jag menar det exemplar, hvaraf jag eger de två första satserna, och som sedan skall sändas till Leipzig, så ville jag oändligt gärna ha denna Final här. Jag kan nu nästan utantill de första satserna och är i värklig extas: Aino förstår då mitt lifliga intresse för sista satsen. […] Jag nämner nu detta blott för det fall att klaverutdraget vore komplett, men Finalen blifvit liggande i Jannes arbetsrum.” Sibelius’s letter to Carpelan, dated 8 March 1904 (NA, SFA, file box 120): “I dag afgå III satsen ur V.Conserten samt korrekturet till Tuonelas Svan.” What Sibelius meant with the “proofs” to The Swan of Tuonela remains unclear. The Lemminkäinen movement was published in 1901. Sibelius’s letter to Carpelan, dated 3 June 1904 (NA, SFA, file box 120): “Min Violin konsert drager jag tillbaka; först om 2 år utkommer den. Min hemliga stora sorg dessa tider. Första satsen skall omarbetas, andantets midt äfven m.m.” Sibelius’s letter to Aino, dated 24 January 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 96): “Viulukonserttia parantelen aika lailla.” Aino’s letters to Sibelius, dated 25 and 27 January 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 27). Before the first performance, Röllig copied the orchestral parts from the autograph score, and Österberg copied the solo violin part from the score of the piano arrangement. Why the materials were left at Röllig, remains unknown. Sibelius’s correspondence mentions no other copies of the scores. Sibelius’s letter to Aino, dated 26 January 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 96): “Olen kuullut Brahms’in viulu konserttia joka on hyvä. Mutta niin toista (sinfoniskt för mycket) kun minun.” Sibelius’s letter draft to Lienau, undated, but probably from early 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 46): “Das Violinconzert mache ich fast neu.” (“I shall make the Violin Concerto almost anew.”) Carpelan’s letter to Sibelius, dated 6 February 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 18): “Du torde hålla på med violinkonserten m.m. Förlåt att jag tar den till tals! Du skref två kadenser och torde kassera den ena. Vore ej möjligt bevara bägge genom att lägga ett ‘alternatift’ d.v.s. bifoga hvardera med ett ad libitum? Flere v.konserter äro ju försedda med alternatifva kadenser.” Sibelius’s letter to Carpelan, dated 6 April 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 120): “Andra temat i konserten är nu klart. Bara jag kommer öfver 1sta satsen går allt af sig sjelft.” Only a little more than five pages of the first movement’s early version have survived as a setting for violin and piano (see the Critical Commentary, source B1Pf.F). The first cadenza of the first movement (bb. 206ff. in the version of 1904) was simply cut off from the piano score and placed in the revised version, as is evident from the types of paper in the autograph score of the revised version (see the Critical Commentary, source A2Pf.). Österberg’s postcard to Sibelius, dated 7 May 1905 (NL, Coll. 206.42): “Cortégen och det jag har af Violinkonserten är skrifvet. Sänd med det snaraste så mycket Du har färdigt. […] Skall solostämman också skrifvas?” Sibelius’s letter to Lienau, dated 5 May 1905; the whereabouts of the original letter are unknown, quotation by Tawaststjerna (NA, ETA, file box 38). Sibelius’s letter to Carpelan, dated 6 May 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 120): “Violinkonserten blifver bra. Snart färdig.”


XVI 50 Aino Sibelius’s letter to Carpelan, dated 8 May 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 120): “Den del som J. har färdig af violinkonsertens I del är redan hos kopisten för att renskrifvas, och J. kan säga att han har konserten nästan klar redan, så att där ej återstår alltför mycket arbete mera.” 51 Sibelius’s letter to Lienau, dated 12 July 1905; quotation (partly translated into Swedish from German) by Tawaststjerna (NA, ETA, file box 38): “Sände för några dagar sedan VK, Klavierauszug nebst Solostimme. […] Snart kommer VK partitur.” (“Sent Violin Concerto, piano score and solo part, some days ago. […] The Violin Concerto score will come soon.”) 52 Lienau’s letter to Sibelius, dated 28 June 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 46). Carl (Karel) Halir`´ was a pupil of Joseph Joachim, the second violinist of the Joachim Quartet and the concertmaster of the Court Opera in Berlin. 53 Lienau’s letter to Sibelius, dated 17 July 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 46): “Halir und Juon wollen es mir in einigen Tagen vorspielen – ich bin sehr gespannt!” (“ Halir`´ and Juon want to trial play it for me in a few days – I am very excited!”) Sibelius’s letter to Lienau, dated 2 August 1905; quotation by Tawaststjerna (NA, ETA, file box 38): “Zwar habe ich Burmester das Konzert versprochen ab[e]r wenn er im Herb[st] kein Konzert in Ber[l]in giebt ist es ja unmöglich weiter zu warten.” (“Admittedly I promised the Concerto to Burmester, but if he does not give a concert in the fall in Berlin, it is just impossible to wait any longer.”) 54 Lienau’s postcard to Sibelius, dated 7 August 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 46): “Die Sache mit dem Violinkonzert ist in Ordnung. Halir spielt es am 19. Oktober unter Leitung v. Rich. Strauss. Burmester hat verzichtet.” Burmester never performed Sibelius’s Concerto in public. He still appeared with the Helsinki City Orchestra (previously the Helsinki Philharmonic Society Orchestra) in 1919 and 1920, but as a soloist for the Mendelssohn and Bruch concertos. The correspondence between Burmester and Sibelius sheds no additional light on Burmester’s attitude toward Sibelius or the Concerto, nor do his memoirs Fünfzig Jahre Künstlerleben (Berlin: August Scherl, 1926) even mention the work. 55 Sibelius’s letter to Carpelan, dated 7 September 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 120): “Håller på trycka violin-konserten, är på ett brillant arbetshumör.” 56 See source CO1 and a postcard from R. v. Waldheim – Jos. Eberle & Co. to Sibelius, dated 29 September 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 46). 57 Sibelius’s letter to Lienau, dated 4 October 1905; quotation by Tawaststjerna (NA, ETA, file box 38): “Ich habe viel mit Orchester zu thun gehabt und weiss was für ein Lachen es giebt wenn z.B. die Bässe con sordino da stehen. Nun, Hand aufs Herz, versprechen Sie bitte nie etwas auszugeben ohne dass ich ein fehlerfreies Correktur geliefert habe. Das ist ja doch das wenigste was Sie einem Künstler zustehen müssen. Wegen die Stimmen bin ich furchtbar unruhig.” Indeed, one 'con sordino' instruction for double basses in the first set of proofs of the orchestral score was omitted in accordance with Sibelius’s request. A letter draft from Sibelius to Lienau (undated, probably from October 1905; NL, Coll. 206.48) reveals other faults in the proofs sent to the composer. 58 Lienau’s letter to Sibelius, dated 7 October 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 46): “Sie können sich ganz beruhigen! Die Partitur und die Streichstimmen des Konzertes werden erst nach der Aufführung gedruckt, sobald Sie selbst die genauen Korrekturen nochmals durchgesehen haben! Nur die Harmoniestimmen müssen in einer kleinen Auflage vorher gedruckt werden. Wenn noch Fehler stehen bleiben, lasse ich ein Fehlerverzeichnis drucken und jedem Exemplar beilegen. Die Partitur wird ganz korrekt! Halir spielt natürlich nach dem korrigierten Exemplar.” 59 The score still exists today (in the Archives of Robert Lienau Music Publishers, Erzhausen) and contains a few pencilled conductor’s markings, including changes in dynamics, in the hand of Strauss (see the Critical Commentary, source CO2). 60 Sibelius’s letter to Carpelan, dated 2 October 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 120): “Kära vän, Lienau et consortes förtjusta i violin konserten. Rigtigt ‘enormous.’ Halir skall spela den ‘mit Freude und gut.’ Rich. Strauss dirigerar den. […] Till hvilka virtuoser skall jag sända Conserten? Lienau frågar mig. Jag tänker alla af betydenhet.” 61 Carpelan’s letter to Sibelius, undated, (October) 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 18): “Beträffande virtuoser som böra få conserten sig tillsänd kan jag i saknad af kataloger och lexika ej ge närmare anvisning. Naturligtvis främst ‘Reisevirtuosen’ s.s. Ysaye, Thomson, mästaren i oktavspel (om jag minns rätt) Marteau, Kreisler, Kubelik, Petschikoff,

62 63

64

65

66

67 68

69

70

71

72

73

74 75

76

77

78

Serato[.] Sådana, som äro på modet i England och Amerika framför allt.” Sibelius’s incomplete letter draft to Lienau, undated, (October?) 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 46). Lienau’s letter to Sibelius, dated 23 February 1906 (NA, SFA, file box 46): “Die Partitur des Violinconcertes ist soeben fertig geworden. Ich schicke Ihnen heute 2 Partituren, 3 Klavierausgaben des Concertes […]” Concert announcement in Berliner Lokal-Anzeiger, 19 October 1905. In his review of 20 October 1905 in Musikalisches Wochenblatt, in addition to the two concertos, Adolf Schulze mentioned only Loeffler’s Eclogue and Carnaval des morts (Variations on “Dies irae”). Boldemann’s letter to Sibelius, dated 19 October 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 17): “[…] eine ausgezeichnete Wiedergabe, obwohl Halir für andere Sachen viel besser passt, als für Sibelius. Er ist ein prachtvoller Geiger. Halir musste 3mal zum Schluss erscheinen und nach allen Sätzen wurde stark applaudirt. […] Der Herr Lienau meinte, man könne sehr zufrieden sein. Die Kritiken würden aber wohl sehr getheilt sein, denn er habe gehört, dass sich die Kritiker in der Zwischenpause stark uneinig gewesen seien.” Leopold Schmidt in Berliner Tageblatt, 21 October 1905: “Wie eine Erfrischung wirkte herauf das Beethovensche Violinkonzert […]” Schmidt did not write about any of Loeffler’s works. Ibid.: “[…] was man von den anderen, in Kakophonien schwelgenden Sätzen nicht eben behaupten kann.” Unidentified writer in Berliner Lokal-Anzeiger, 20 October 1905: “Ein höchst eigenartiges und fesselndes, wenn auch nicht durchaus Befriedigung hervorrufendes Werk.” Ibid.: “[…] so düster und doch anziehend wie der Charakter des finnischen Volkes.” Finnish newspapers, such as Helsingfors-Posten (23 October), Uusi Suometar (24 October), Helsingin Sanomat (25 October), and Tampereen Sanomat (26 October), summarized some of the Berlin reviews. Adolf Schulze in Musikalisches Wochenblatt, 26 October 1905: “Ein mit Fantasie geschriebenes, in Zeichnung und Farbe gleich fesselndes Werk. […] Eine düstere, melankolische Stimmung beherrscht den ersten, in seiner thematischen Ausgestaltung etwas lose gefügten Satz. Geschmackvoller, klarer gestaltet und daher eindringlicher in der Wirkung ist das Adagio mit seiner wunderschönen, weich-melodischen Kantilene; prächtig der flott sich entwickelnde, im Rhythmus stellenweise sehr intricate Finalsatz. Äusserst geschickt, das Soloinstrument stets gut hebend und unterstützend, ist die Instrumentierung, schwierig doch dankbar die Solopartie.” Lienau’s letter to Sibelius, dated 20 October 1905 (NA, SFA, file box 46): “Joachim hat übrigens ‘geschimpft’ – ‘scheußlich und langweilig’ war sein mir ausgesprochenes Urtheil; und als ich ihm sagte, ich sei der ‘unglückliche Verleger’, rief er: ‘trotzdem scheußlich!’ Lustig, nicht wahr? Na – Sie werden mit mir darüber lachen.” Sibelius’s letter to Lienau, dated 23 October 1905; quotation by Tawaststjerna (NA, ETA, file box 38): “Es thut mir sehr Leid wegen Joachim, den ich sehr liebe. Nämlich seinetwegen. Er scheint nicht mehr das Gefühlleben der Zeit zu verstehen. Ein Greis – unwiderruflich.” Robert Lienau, Ich erzähle. Erinnerungen eines alten Musikverlegers (unpublished manuscript dated “Christmas 1942,” Lienau Archives [= Lienau 1942]), p. 44. Bis. in Hufvudstadsbladet, 13 March 1906: “Konserten har onekligen vunnit på omarbetning och strykning.” K.[arl Flodin] in Nya Pressen, 13 March 1906: “Oaktadt sin omarbetade form skall, tror jag, konserten ej vinna en allmännare förståelse. […] alltför komplicerad, alltför orolig, hållen grått i grått, rapsodisk, trots sin uttänjda form, och belastad med tekniska och rytmiska svårigheter af alla slag […]” Lienau’s letter to Sibelius, dated 23 February 1906 (NA, SFA, file box 46): “Er studiert es jetzt und wird es sicher im Herbst hier in Berlin und in anderen grossen Städten aufführen.” (“He [Lewinger] is studying it now and will surely perform it next fall here in Berlin and in other big cities.”) Sibelius’s letter to Carpelan, undated, (end of February?) 1906 (NA, SFA, file box 120): “[…] Violin konserten vinner mer och mer terrain. Flera studera den och Levinger [sic] bl.a. spelar den nästa saison i Berlin och i andra ‘stora’ städer. […] Will Du ha orkesterpartituret till Conserten? Jag erhåller det i morgon.” The performances in New York took place on 30 November and 1 December, with Wassily Safonoff conducting the New York


XIV

79

80

81

82

83 84

85

86

Philharmonic Orchestra. According to Powell’s letter to Sibelius, she also played the Concerto “in private, before critics, musicians etc.” in December 1906 in New York, but performances of the work were poorly received. The performance of the Concerto in January 1907 in Chicago, in contrast, was a “triumph” (Powell’s letters to Sibelius, dated 14 December 1906 and 1 February 1907; NA, SFA, file box 26). W. L. Hubbard’s positive review of the Concerto was published in the Chicago Daily Tribune, 26 January 1907. For a survey of the performances of the Concerto from 1906 to the 1940s and their reception, see also Salmenhaara 1996, pp. 39–42. Sibelius’s letter to Lienau, dated 18 January 1907 (private collection of Rolando Pieraccini, Helsinki): “In Petersburg hat Eug. Ysaye mein Violin Consert [sic] gespielt beim Professor Auer. Der Componist Liadoff Taneieff hat auf Piano accompagniert. Alle haben sehr annerkennend [sic] darüber gesprochen. Die sagten auch, wie Sie, dass es lange dauert für Geigen Conzerte überhaupt zur Geltung zu kommen.” In December 1906, Sibelius visited Saint Petersburg, and according to Tawaststjerna 1994 (p. 212) and Salmenhaara 1996 (p. 39), Sibelius was present at the performance. However, the letter does not directly reveal, whether this was the case, nor do the writers offer further evidence for their assumption. Lienau’s letter to Sibelius, dated 12 January 1907 (NA, SFA, file box 46): “Das Violinkonzert hingegen, welches Lewinger neulich spielte, hat nichts gemacht. Das ist eben ein Stück, welches sich erst langsam die Welt erobern wird.” Diary, 29 October 1910 (NA, SFA, file box 37): “– v. Veczey [sic] spelat konserten. En fin musiker. Men nog får konserten vänta ännu! Utskälld skall den väl bli. Eller hvad ännu värre, att omnämnas af medlidande.” Franz (Ferenc) von Vécsey was a Hungarian-born violinist, and a pupil of Jenö Hubay and Leopold Auer. He performed Sibelius’s Violin Concerto already in late 1909 in Berlin. Diary, 7 February 1914: “Återigen violinkonserten ‘nedskälld.’ Det är som om Burmesters ‘es schadet deinen Ruf’ sannades.” What Sibelius exactly referred to with Burmester’s statement, remains unknown. Diary, 2 February 1915: “Burgin haft stor framgång med violinkonserten. Det är som Bis’ och andras öron småningom anpassades för den.” Diary, 27 November 1920: “Af Vecsey hälsning med underrättelse att violinkonserten slagit alla med an öfverallt i Syd Amerikat och Europien [sic].” Sibelius referred to Vécsey’s greeting (undated, probably from November 1920; NL, Coll. 206.40), pencilled on the reverse side of a concert programme (concert held on 3 November 1920 in Stockholm): “Ihr Violinconcert hat überall in Südamerika wie in Europa Begeisterung hervorgerufen!” (“Your Violin Concerto has drawn admiration everywhere in South America as well as in Europe!”) Lienau’s letter to Sibelius, dated 18 April 1929 (NA, SFA, file box 46): “Es wird in letzter Zeit häufiger darüber geklagt, dass in der Violinstimme Ihres Violin-Konzertes keine Fingersätze, Stricharten und Vortragsbezeichnungen angegeben sind. Soweit ich mich erinnere, haben Sie seinerzeit bei der ersten Drucklegung selbst den besonderen Wunsch geäussert, keine derartigen Bezeichnungen anzubringen und dies den Künstlern selbst zu überlassen. Da aber dieses Meisterstück von Ihnen sich mittlerweile überall eingebürgert hat und an den Musikhochschulen als wertvolles Studienmaterial benutzt wird, dürfte es wohl jetzt angebracht sein, diesem Mangel abzuhelfen und einen hervorragenden Virtuosen oder Pädagogen mit der Ergänzungsarbeit zu beauftragen. Wir müssen voraussichtlich im Laufe des Sommers eine neue Auflage drucken, und es wäre also jetzt der gegebene Zeitpunkt für die Vorbereitung. […] Ich möchte meinerseits empfehlen, Herrn Professor Ossip Schnirlin mit der Arbeit zu betrauen. Er hat sich sehr viel mit dem Konzert beschäftigt und ist ja als Herausgeber von Violinkonzerten anerkannt. Lassen Sie mich bald wissen, wie Sie über vorstehendes denken; vielleicht könnte ich auch durch Vermittlung von Juon die Fingersätze und Bezeichnungen erhalten, die Franz v. Vecsey benutzt.” Ossip Schnirlin (d. 1937) was a German violinist and pedagogue, as well as a pupil of Joseph Joachim. Lienau’s letter to Sibelius, dated 31 May 1929 (NA, SFA, file box 46): “Wie ich Ihnen vor einiger Zeit mitteilte, lass ich jetzt von Herrn Prof. Ossip Schnirlin die solo [sic] Violinstimme des Violinkonzertes durchsehen und mit Fingersätzen und sonstigen Bezeichnungen versehen.” Schnirlin had probably “gone through” the solo violin part even earlier. In the beginning of 1920s, he included two excerpts from Sibelius’s Concerto as examples of “difficult passages in the most important violin concertos” (arpeggios and double stops in octaves) in his anthology Der neue Weg zur Beherrschung der gesamten Violinliteratur (Berlin:

XVII

87

88

89

90

91

92

93

Schlesinger’sche Buch- und Musikhandlung, Rob. Lienau, 1921), and even then added some fingerings. Lienau’s letter to Sibelius, dated 25 September 1929 (NA, SFA, file box 46): “Die neue Ausgabe der Violinstimme des Violin-Konzertes ist jetzt fertig und ich schicke Ihnen gleichzeitig 1 Exemplar. Ich habe schon von vielen Geigern und insbesondere Geigenlehrern ausgezeichnete Urteile über die Schnirlinsche Arbeit bekommen. […] Uebrigens warum sollte Herr Veczey [sic] böse sein?” Due to the absence of Sibelius’s letter of 9 September 1929 (mentioned in Lienau’s letter), nothing specific is known about Lienau’s reference to von Vécsey. Sibelius may have suggested asking von Vécsey for the indications. Lienau’s letter to Sibelius, dated 17 December 1930 (NA, SFA, file box 46): “Es ist mir im Laufe der Zeit von mehreren Kapellmeistern berichtet worden, dass in den Orchesterproben zu Ihrem Violinkonzert häufig die Rhythmik im letzten Satze bei den Musikern (namentlich bei kleineren Orchestern) Schwierigkeiten macht und zwar deswegen, weil in der Partitur und den Stimmen die Noten nicht korrekt im 3/4 Takt geschrieben stehen. Wollen Sie mir bitte mitteilen, ob Sie damit einverstanden sind, wenn ich in Zukunft bei etwaigen Neuauflagen die Noten so drucken lasse, wie auf beifolgendem Zettel in der 2. Zeile angegeben. Die kleine Aenderung wird, glaube ich, in der Praxis von Wert sein und die Probenarbeit erleichtern.” Sibelius’s letter to Lienau, dated 22 December 1930 (private collection of Rolando Pieraccini, Helsinki): “Besten Dank für Ihr freundliches Schreiben von dem 17. Selbstverständlich bin ich einverstanden mit den vorgeschlagenen Aenderungen. Die Orchesterbegleitung möchte ich doch anders machen. Die ist zu schwer. Wie eine Symphonie. Bitte mir zu schreiben was Sie darüber denken.” Sibelius’s draft of the above letter (undated, probably from December 1930; NA, SFA, file box 46) contains the same information, but with somewhat different nuances: “Die Orchester-Begleitung möchte ich doch neu machen – vereinfachen – weil die in diesem Form zu schwer ist. Man muss das Stück wie eine Symphoni [sic] [uncertain word]. Bitte mir zu schreiben was Sie darüber denken.” (“I would still like to make the orchestral accompaniment new – simplified – because it is too heavy in its current form. One must [uncertain word] the piece like a symphony. Please write to me what you think about that.”) Lienau’s letter to Sibelius, dated 7 January 1931 (NA, SFA, file box 46): “Was nun das ‘Violinkonzert’ betrifft, so kann ich mich ganz Ihrer Auffassung anschliessen, dass die Orchesterbegleitung tatsächlich etwas zu schwer ist. Ich habe schon öfter von Dirigenten Klagen darüber gehört, dass das ganze schöne Werk mehr einer Sinfonie ähnlich ist und die Violinsolostimme oft nicht genug zur Geltung kommen kann. Auch Herr Prof. Schnirlin, der sich ja sehr eingehend mit dem Violinkonzert beschäftigt hat, hält es für sehr begrüssenswert und für die Verbreitung des Violinkonzerts für äusserst nützlich, wenn Sie sich entschliessen könnten, die Orchesterbegleitung anders zu machen. Ich bitte Sie daher, sich mit dieser Arbeit freundlichst zu beschäftigen zu wollen und schicke Ihnen gleichzeitig eine Partitur. Wann glauben Sie, dass Sie Zeit haben werden, die gewiss nicht ganz leichte Neuinstrumentation auszuführen? Ich möchte das gern wissen, damit wir nicht unnötig von der alten Ausgabe noch korrigierte Exemplare herstellen lassen.” Jalas’s note, dated 12 December 1943, from a discussion with Sibelius (NA, SFA, file box 1): “Viulukonserton säestys on harjoiteltava niin kuin sinfonia […]” Jussi Jalas, Kirjoituksia Sibeliuksen sinfonioista. Sinfonian eettinen pakko (Helsinki: Fazer, 1988), p. 113: “Vielä lopulliseenkin versioon Sibelius näyttää ajatelleen muutoksia, ei tosin varsinaisesti sävellysteknillisiä, mutta teoksen orkesteriasuun kohdistuvia. Hänen omassa partituurissaan nimittäin on lyijykynämerkintöjä, jotka kertovat, että säveltäjä nähtävästi aikoi jättää ensimmäisestä ja toisesta osasta pois raskaat vaskipuhaltimet, pasuunat ja trumpetit. Näiden osuuden ympärille hän on joka kohdassa aina piirtänyt rajan ja kevyesti hahmotellut niiden tehtäviä muille soittimille. Arvatenkin tämä johtuu hänen omista kokemuksistaan teosta johtaessaan, sillä niinä aikoina, valio-orkestereita lukuunottamatta, vasket pyrkivät dominoimaan muuta orkesteria ja saattamaan solistin peittoonsa. Orkestereiden puhallinsoittajen taidoissa tapahtuneen yleisen kehityksen vähitellen korjatessa soitinten välistä tasapainoa hänen ei enää tarvinnut toteuttaa muutossuunnitelmaansa.” Jalas’s note, dated 12 December 1943, from a discussion with Sibelius (NA, SFA, file box 1): “[…] Tekijän muutos – skitseerausta minun partituurissani.”


XVIII 94 Nils-Eric Ringbom, Sibelius (Stockholm: Albert Bonniers förlag, 1948), p. 88: “Denna sats hör man uppfattas mycket olika. En del solister spelar den snabbt, andra nästan i polonästempo. På frågan vilket tempo som är riktigt svarar mästaren: ‘Den skall spelas alldeles suveränt. Snabbt, ja visst, men inte mer än att den kan tas fullkomligt ‘von oben’.’ – Att ge exakta tempoanvisningar hör för övrigt inte till Sibelius’ vanor. Han anser sig kunna lita på en god konstnärs intuitiva förmåga att träffa den rätta nyansen inom gränserna för de i noterna angivna tempobeteckningarna, och vill inte lägga några ytterligare band på tolkarens uppfattning.” 95 Sibelius’letter to Lienau, dated 12 October 1942 (private collection of Rolando Pieraccini): “Heute möchte ich Ihnen folgendes mitteilen: Wenn die Deutsche Grammophon-Gesellschaft geneigt wäre, mein Violinkonzert einzuspielen, so möchte ich auf das wärmste vorschlagen, dass meine Landsleute, die Violinvirtuosin Frau Anja Ignatius und mein Schwager, Hofkapellmeister, Prof. Armas Järnefelt das Werk

ausführten. Ich wäre sehr glücklich, wenn es Ihnen möglich wäre, dies auszuwirken.” 96 In April 1941, the publisher wanted to confirm the metronome indications for the first and third movements of the Concerto and asked whether Max Strub (1900–1966), who intended to perform the work in the following fall (also in Helsinki), could visit Sibelius and work out the Concerto with the composer. Lienau’s letters to Sibelius, dated 9 and 24 April 1941 (NA, SFA, file box 46). 97 Lienau’s letter to Sibelius, dated 11 February 1943 (NA, SFA, file box 46). The performance was also broadcast and later released as a sound recording. 98 Lienau 1942, p. 44.: “Die Aufnahme bei den Zuhörern war lau. […] Sehr langsam eroberte sich das Konzert dann die Welt, zuerst in England. Es ging, wie alle großen Meisterwerke, seiner Zeit voraus, und erst die folgende Generation erkannte seinen Wert.”

Einleitung Die Kompositionen von Jean Sibelius für Violine umfassen zwei Sonaten, zwei Suiten, eine Sonatine sowie verschiedene Sammelwerke und Einzelstücke für Violine und Klavier – und darüber hinaus eine Suite, zwei Serenaden und sechs Humoresken für Violine und Orchester. Sibelius’ umfangreichstes Werk für sein Hauptinstrument ist das Violinkonzert, das in zwei Fassungen für Violine und Orchester und in der Fassung des Komponisten für Violine und Klavier überliefert ist. Der vorliegende JSW-Band enthält die beiden Fassungen des Konzerts für Violine und Orchester, die 1904 entstandene Urfassung sowie die Fassung von 1905.1 Die spätere Fassung wurde mit der Opuszahl 47 zu Sibelius’ Lebzeiten gedruckt, wohingegen die frühe Fassung des Werks in diesem Band zum ersten Mal veröffentlicht wird.2

Entstehung und Vollendung der Fassung von 1904 Die erste Erwähnung einer Skizze zu einem Violinkonzert taucht in einem Brief auf, den Sibelius im Oktober 1890 in Wien an seine Verlobte Aino Järnefelt (1871–1969) schrieb.3 1898 kam Sibelius in einem Brief an den befreundeten Schriftsteller Adolf Paul (1863– 1943) auf sein Vorhaben zurück, ein Violinkonzert zu komponieren. Und zwei Jahre später, im Juni 1900, fragte Sibelius’ Förderer und Freund Axel Carpelan (1858–1919) unter dem Pseudonym X den Komponisten: „Darf man in der Zukunft auf ein Violinkonzert oder eine Fantasie mit Orchester hoffen?“4 Carpelans Hoffnung begann zwei Jahre später Gestalt anzunehmen. Sibelius verbrachte den Spätsommer und Frühherbst 1902 an der Ostsee in Tvärminne, das auf der Halbinsel Hanko (Hangö) an der Südküste Finnlands liegt. Obwohl er in Tvärminne die Gelegenheit hatte, sich auszuruhen – und zu angeln –, war sein Aufenthalt nicht nur Ferienzeit. Er überarbeitete En saga op. 9 für bevorstehende Aufführungen im November in Berlin und schrieb Lieder, die später als op. 37 und op. 38 veröffentlicht wurden. Darüber hinaus erwähnt Sibelius in einem Brief aus Tvärminne an Aino im September 1902 erstmals den neuen großen Kompositionsplan: „Ich habe wundervolle Themen für ein Violinkonzert bekommen.“5 Vielleicht ist eines dieser Themen ein Gedanke, der mit 23 Sept. datiert ist und im Manuskript HUL 0450 auftaucht. Er enthält – in es-moll und mit einer beigefügten Zeichnung des Komponisten – Material aus dem ersten Satz des Konzerts (siehe Faksimile A, Systeme 3–6; vgl. T. 158ff. in der Fassung von 1904).6 Sibelius’ Korrespondenz und andere Textdokumente beschreiben den Kompositionsprozess des Konzerts nur spärlich. Das überlieferte handschriftliche Notenmaterial zu diesem Werk ist indes umfangreich.7 Es umfasst zahlreiche Manuskripte von vorläufigen

thematischen Skizzen und ausgearbeiteten Entwürfen bis zu Partiturfragmenten sowohl für Violine und Klavier als auch für Violine und Orchester. Dennoch liefern die Manuskripte kein Gesamtbild der Entwicklung der musikalischen Ideen oder des ganzen Kompositionsprozesses. Wie es für Sibelius bei groß angelegten Werken typisch ist, gehört das Violinkonzert zu einer Gruppe von Kompositionen, die über eine Zeitspanne von mehreren Jahre parallel geplant und vollendet wurden, teils vor und teils nach dem Konzert; tatsächlich findet sich musikalisches Material zum Konzert vermischt mit Material zu verschiedenen anderen Werken. Die Manuskripte lassen erkennen, dass einige Ideen zu diesem Konzert schon Jahre vor Sibelius’ Aufenthalt im Herbst 1902 in Tvärminne niedergeschrieben wurden. Die früheste Skizze für das Eröffnungsthema des ersten Satzes geht wohl auf 1901 zurück (HUL 1550), und vorbereitende Ideen für die Themen von Satz III tauchen im Notizbuch auf (HUL 1507, 1508 und 1510), das auch thematische Gedanken enthält, die sich dann in der Musik zu den Pressefeiern JS 137 (1899), der 2. Symphonie op. 43 (1902), Cassazione op. 6 (1904), in den Klavierwerken Kyllikki op. 41 (1904) und Air varié op. 58 Nr. 3 (vollendet spätestens 1909) sowie in dem Lied Vilse op. 17 Nr. 4 (1898/1904) finden. Die frühesten Ideen gehen daher offenbar auf die Jahre 1898 oder 1899 zurück.8 Das Manuskript HUL 0477 ist von Sibelius’ Schwiegersohn, dem Dirigenten Jussi Jalas (1908–1985), der eine Vielzahl der Skizzen des Komponisten identifizierte, mit Violin Concerto | Finale bezeichnet. Es weist auf der ersten Seite eine direkte Verbindung zwischen den Schlusssätzen des Konzerts und der 2. Symphonie auf. Nach drei Takten einer Ostinatobegleitung beginnt der Entwurf mit dem Eröffnungsthema aus dem dritten Satz des Konzerts in der Tonart H-dur (siehe Faksimile B). Zu diesem Zeitpunkt weist nichts auf eine Solo-Violine hin. Der Entwurf enthält vielmehr einige Hinweise zur Orchestrierung: Trä („Holzbläser“) und Str. (im 5. System), Corno (System 7/8), Pauke (System 10/11) und Arpa (System 12). Der für Streicher und Horn (Hörner) notierte Gedanke im letzten Takt der Systeme 5 und 6 entspricht der fanfarenähnlichen Passage der Hörner im Finale der Symphonie (zuerst in T. 9–12). Darüber hinaus weist die Ostinatobegleitung zu Beginn im 3/2-Takt ($5qwqw 5. $ &) Ähnlichkeiten mit der entsprechenden Begleitung im Finale der Symphonie auf. Im Lichte der Skizzen erscheint, dass besonders Satz I erheblich ausgearbeitet wurde. Der Entwurf im Manuskript HUL 0477 in H-dur ist nicht die einzige Quelle, die Material für den ersten oder den dritten Satz des Konzerts in einer anderen als der endgültigen Tonart d-moll/D-dur enthält. In HUL 0444 steht das Eröffnungs-


XVI thema des ersten Satzes in gis-moll, und dasselbe Material erscheint auch in cis-moll (HUL 1580) und e-moll (HUL 0445 und 0465). Beide Tonarten finden sich in HUL 1580, wo Sibelius die Eröffnungsgedanken zum Konzert zunächst in cis-moll notiert und dann in e-moll mit Material fortsetzt, das schließlich 1906 in die symphonische Fantasie Pohjolas Tochter (Pohjolan tytär) op. 49, T. 9–12 gelangt. Die akkordische Schreibweise in der Passage zu Pohjolas Tochter (mit dickem, orange-rotem Stift markiert) ist von der Violine mit Mehrfachgriffen vollständig spielbar (Faksimile C, System 10 und 11).9 Die Verbindung zwischen dem Konzert und Cassazione scheint besonders eng zu sein; die beiden Werke entstanden parallel und wurden 1904 im selben Konzert uraufgeführt (zur Entstehung von Cassazione, s. JSW I/11). Der Entwurf HUL 0471 verdeutlicht, dass Sibelius plante, Material, das in Cassazione erscheint, im zweiten Satz des Konzerts zu verwenden (Faksimile D). In diesem Entwurf, der mit der Tempoangabe Adagio sostenuto überschrieben ist, erscheint das Material für den langsamen Satz des Konzerts in A-dur (S. [1]); es folgt nach einem Tonartwechsel zu cis-moll ein Gedanke zu Cassazione (S. [2]).10 Cassazione-Motive tauchen auch in Verbindung mit Material zu Satz III des Konzerts auf. HUL 0470 (S. [2]–[4]) ist ein umfangreicher, durchgehender Entwurf, in dem das Eröffnungsthema von Satz III des Konzerts mit der Begleitung von einem ostinaten Polonaisenrhythmus vorgestellt wird ($ 5as 5qw 5qw ) und der zu einer anderen tanzähnlichen Passage führt (S. [2]). Material aus dieser Passage erscheint erstmals in T. 68–70, darauf folgt ein Gedanke, der sich in T. 19–29 in Cassazione findet. Ergänzend zu den erwähnten Werken tauchen in Manuskript HUL 0472 auf den Seiten mit Material für das Konzert Motive auf, die in Cortège JS 54 (1906), T. 9ff. (vgl. T. 3ff. in System 5 im Faksimile E), in Die gefangene Königin (Vapautettu kuningatar) op. 48, T. 96ff. (vgl. System 7 im Faksimile E) und im letzten Satz der 4. Symphonie op. 63 (1911), T. 159–167 (vgl. System 1 im Faksimile E) erscheinen.11 Das Violinkonzert wurde im Spätsommer 1903 vollendet, zunächst in der Fassung für Violine und Klavier. Schon vor der Fertigstellung scheint Sibelius Aufführungen mit dem Geiger Willy Burmester (1869–1933) geplant zu haben.12 Ob Sibelius jedoch das Konzert von Anfang mit Blick auf Burmester komponiert hat, bleibt unklar. Am 22. Juli schrieb Burmester dem Komponisten: „Ich will meinen Ohren nicht trauen! Ist es war [sic], was man mir sagt, dass Du wirklich an dem so lange besprochenen Violinconzerte arbeitest, und dass es bald fertig ist? Das wäre ja herrlich! Gelegenheit bietet sich nächsten Winter genug es in die Oeffentlichkeit zu tragen. Von Dir erwarte ich etwas ganz besonderes.“13 Am 8. August antwortete Sibelius Burmester: „Ich werde Dir das Violinkonzert bald als akzeptablen ,Klavierauszug‘ mit einer separaten und sauberen Haupt[= Violin]stimme senden. Ich kann nur davon träumen, wie es in Deinen meisterhaften Händen erklingen mag. […] Die Bindungen schreibe ich vorläufig mit Blei so Du nach Belieben streichen kannst.“14 Nach Fertigstellung der Fassung für Violine und Klavier arbeitete Sibelius an der Orchesterpartitur weiter und erklärte Carpelan am 19. Dezember: „Das (Violin-)Konzert ist fertig. Zwei Sätze schon orchestriert. Beginne den letzten Satz zu orchestrieren.“15 Folglich war der letzte Satz wahrscheinlich zum Jahreswechsel 1903/1904 fertig instrumentiert. Ernst Röllig (1858–1928) schrieb die Orchesterstimmen für die bevorstehende Uraufführung, die im Februar 1904 stattfand (vgl. den Critical Commentary, Quelle B1P). Heute wird die autographe Orchesterpartitur (Quelle A1O) in der Nationalbibliothek Finnland aufbewahrt, die Stimmen im Sibelius-Museum in Turku.

Vorbereitungen für die ersten Aufführungen der Fassung von 1904 Ursprünglich versprach Sibelius Burmester die Uraufführung und auch die Widmung des Konzerts. Im Oktober 1903 schlug

XIX Carpelan indes einen anderen Geiger als Widmungsträger vor: „Statt [Richard Sahla] würde ich wärmstens empfehlen, den Klavierauszug an Ysaÿe nach Brüssel zu schicken, den heute wohl größten Geigenkünstler. Er hat einen großen und, darüber hinaus, wunderbar schönen Ton (er spielt eine Stradiv. ,Herkules‘), ein funkelndes, bezauberndes Temperament und eine große nachschöpferische Fantasie. Er sollte die Widmung bekommen. Durch ihn würdest Du überall, sogar in Frankreich, gespielt. Also, [schicke] den Klavierauszug an Burmester, Ysaÿe und Marteau. Überlass das Manuskript nicht zweitklassigen Virtuosen – es verletzt Dich –.“16 In dieser Zeit wurden offenbar sowohl die Aufführungspläne als auch die Beziehung zwischen dem Geiger und dem Komponisten kompliziert, wie Burmesters Brief an Sibelius zeigt: „Von verschiedenen Seiten erfahre ich, dass Du Dein Violinconcert in Stockholm und auch anderswo von Marteau spielen lassen willst. Wenn dieses der Fall werde ich dass [sic] Concert nie spielen, Du würdest mich durch ein paar erklärende Zeilen erfreuen.“17 Sibelius schrieb diese Zeilen auf eine Postkarte: „Das Konzert ist wirklich Dir gewidmet und wird daher nur von Dir gespielt werden. […] Habe an keinen anderen als an Dich gedacht. Wer zum Teufel hat das jetzt durcheinandergebracht?!“18 Die Widmung an Burmester wurde sogar in den Zeitungen bekanntgemacht. Das Hufvudstadsbladet kündigte an: „Jean Sibelius hat bekanntlich ein Violinkonzert vollendet, das der Komponist Herrn Willy Burmester gewidmet hat. Herr Burmester beabsichtigt, Anfang März nach Finnland zu reisen und hier das Konzert zu spielen.“19 Da Burmester letztlich nicht versprechen konnte, die Uraufführung des Konzerts vor dem März des folgenden Jahres zu spielen, kündigten die Zeitungen Ende Oktober 1903 einen anderen Geiger, Viktor Novác`´ek (1873–1914), an: „Das Jean Sibelius-Porträtkonzert wird am 14. Januar stattfinden. Das neue Violinkonzert des Komponisten wird durch Herrn V. Novác`´ek aufgeführt, weil Willy Burmester nicht vor März hier herkommen kann.“20 Sibelius hatte wohl gehofft, die Konzertpremiere noch im Jahr 1903 zu erleben, musste aber bald seine Hoffnung auf diese Aufführung begraben, wie er Carpelan erklärt: „Mein Konzert ist am 11. [sic] Jan. An der Verschiebung ist Novác`´ek schuld, der nicht vor Jan. mit dem Violink. fertig ist. Er ist dabei, es zweimal einzustudieren. Er wird gut sein. Also ist es nicht mein Fehler, weil ich alles fertig hatte.“21 Laut Otto Andersson (1879–1969) bemerkte Sibelius später: „N.[ovác`´ek] zögerte anfangs; er beklagte sich über die schnellen Passagen, die er kaum ausarbeiten konnte.“22 Sollte Sibelius Burmeister bereits ein Exemplar des Klavierauszugs und eine „separate und klare Hauptstimme“ gegeben haben, dann bestellte er wohl neue Abschriften für Novác`´ek. Die überlieferten Abschriften der Version von 1904 beinhalten ein Fragment des Klavierauszugs von Satz I und ein Fragment der Solostimme von Satz III (Quellen B1Pf.F und B1Vl.F). Die Tatsache, dass Sibelius 1905 den Klavierauszug von Satz II und III als Vorlage für die überarbeitete Partitur verwendete, erlaubt auch eine Rekonstruktion dieser Sätze in der Fassung für Violine und Klavier von 1903/04 (siehe Quelle B1Pf.; vgl. für die Fassung von 1905 Quelle A2Pf.). Obwohl Novác`´ek als Solist der Uraufführung benannt war, studierte auch Burmester das Konzert ein. Ende 1903 lobte er gegenüber Sibelius das Werk: „Erst während der letzten Tage bin ich dazugekommen Dein Concert mit einem Pianisten durchzuspielen. […] Ich kann Dir nur Eines sagen: ,Wundervoll!‘ Felsennatur! Ungefähr kann ich mir die Wirkung mit Orchester vorstellen. Es muss kolossal klingen. Von der Zukunft dieses Concertes bin ich überzeugt.“ Im selben Brief indes geht Burmester erneut auf die ursprünglichen Aufführungspläne für den späten Winter oder das Frühjahr 1904 ein: „Die Hauptsache ist nun, dass wir es auch mit dem nöthigen Effekt herausbringen. Unser Plan das Concert im Februar oder März den Berlinern ad auris zu führen muss aus guten Gründen unterbleiben. […] Das Beste ist und bleibt jetzt, dass ich Dein Werk im Musikfest dieses Sommers spiele. Dort


XX wird es von der ganzen Presse gehört und kritisiert und kann mit einem Schlage populär über die ganze Welt werden.“23 Burmesters Ankündigung, das Konzert im Sommer 1904 aufzuführen, wurde nicht realisiert, weil der Komponist zu dieser Zeit bereits entschieden hatte, das Werk einer Revision zu unterziehen. Nach der Fertigstellung der Orchestrierung der ersten beiden Sätze des Konzerts im Dezember 1903 schickte Sibelius offenbar den autographen Klavierauszug der beiden Sätze an Carpelan, der sich so selbst mit dem Werk vertraut machen konnte. Ende Dezember schrieb Carpelan: „Heute bin ich Dein V.-Konzert durchgegangen und war darüber glücklich und erfreut. Eine Anmerkung (eines Blinden) jedoch: Ist die Schlusskadenz des Adagios wirklich motiviert? Sind nach diesem himmlischen Flug die schwierigen 128-tel Noten notwendig? Der Eindruck kann ganz anders sein, wenn wir hören, wie die Violine die schnellen Arpeggien ,veloce‘ spielt, während das Orchester den Akkord aushält, für die Klavierbegleitung aber sieht die Kadenz nach den himmlischen Gedanken in diesem Satz zu virtuos aus. […] – Ja, das Konzert ist wirklich herrlich; ich zeigte es W[ester]lind, der mich neulich besuchte. Er nahm es einen Tag mit; er war enthusiastisch und sagte, alles klinge göttlich gut, ,Vieuxtemps’sche Technik‘, ,Das finnische Orchester-Tutti göttlich‘, die zweite Kadenz [von Satz I] ,wundervoll‘ etc.“24 In seiner Antwort verteidigte Sibelius die „abschließende Kadenz im Adagio“ und hielt sie trotz allem für angebracht: „Nach reiflicher Überlegung habe ich die abschließende Kadenz des zweiten Satzes beibehalten. Beachte die Begleitfiguren im Nebenthema!! Dann zeigt sich, dass sie genügend motiviert ist.“25 Gleichwohl zeigte Carpelans Ansicht über die Kadenz offenbar Wirkung: sowohl in der autographen Partitur der Fassung für Violine und Klavier als auch in der der Orchesterfassung strich Sibelius die Kadenz mit Bleistift (vgl. Faksimile VIII), wahrscheinlich vor den ersten Aufführungen des Konzerts. Folglich wurde die Kadenz anscheinend nie gespielt.

Die ersten Aufführungen und die Rezeption der Fassung von 1904 Die Uraufführung des Violinkonzerts fand am 8. Februar 1904 im Festsaal der Universität Helsinki im Rahmen des SibeliusPorträtkonzerts statt – der Komponist dirigierte das Orchester der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft Helsinki. Die anderen Werke im Konzertprogramm waren Cassazione op. 6, Har du mod? op. 31 Nr. 2 für Männerchor und Orchester sowie Tulen synty op. 32 für Bariton, Männerchor und Orchester.26 Außer bei dem Violinkonzert handelte es sich in diesem Konzert auch bei Cassazione und Har du mod? um Uraufführungen. Das Konzertprogramm wurde am 10. und 14. Februar wiederholt. In den Zeitungsberichten nach dem ersten Konzert waren die Kritiker zurückhaltend, aber allgemein ziemlich positiv. Am 9. Februar schrieb Oskar Merikanto in Päivälehti, das Konzert habe „in der Tat die großen Erwartungen erfüllt“. Merikanto zufolge „verlangt der letzte Satz eine perfekte Burmester-Technik (das Konzert ist Burmester gewidmet). Die Rolle des Orchesters ist übrigens im ganzen Konzert ziemlich merkwürdig und außergewöhnlich“, wohingegen sich „der künstlerische Gipfel“ des Konzerts im „einfachen, aber fast übernatürlich wundervollen Adagio-Satz“ befände. Merikantos Meinung über den Solisten war ebenfalls positiv: „Herr V. Novác`´ek verdient volle Anerkennung für seine meisterliche Bewältigung der schwierigen Aufgabe; mehr noch, er spielte das Konzert auswendig. Der herrliche AdagioSatz musste wiederholt werden.“27 Nach der ersten Aufführung war Alarik Uggla im Hufvudstadsbladet von der Bedeutung des Konzerts überzeugt: „[Das Konzert ist] eine Komposition, die für herausragende Violinvirtuosen ohne jeden Zweifel eine geschätzte Repertoirenummer werden wird.“28 Karl Flodins Kritik in der Helsingfors Posten war dagegen brüsk und harsch. Er beklagte den Überfluss an musikalischen Ideen und technischen Schwierigkeiten, die Novác`´ek, so merkte der Schreiber an, kaum bewältigen könne – und stellte das Werk im Vergleich mit

XVII fünf wohlbekannten Konzerten des 19. Jahrhunderts in ein ziemlich unvorteilhaftes Licht: „Welches berühmte Violinkonzert wir auch nehmen – von Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Bruch, Brahms, Tschaikowsky –, alle enthalten sie eine oder mehrere melodische Gestalten, die diesen Konzerten ihren charakteristischen Charme, ihr in der Tat volles Profil an Reichtümern geben, so dass diese melodischen Motive sofort erinnert werden, wenn jemand auf eines der oben erwähnten Konzerte zu sprechen kommt. Aber Herr Sibelius hat keinen so individuellen Ton, der zum edlen Adelswappen der Komposition werden würde.“ Letztlich charakterisierte Flodin das Konzert insgesamt als „langweilig“ („tråkig“) und Novác`´eks Darbietung als „eine Masse unerfreulicher Dinge“ („en massa av onjutbara saker“).29 Nach der zweiten Aufführung polarisierte der dritte Satz die Meinungen der Kritiker. Merikanto erschien der Satz „als Kunstwerk schwächer“, wohingegen Evert Katila in Uusi Suometar schrieb: „Das letzte, Allegro giusto [sic], jedoch, ist nach unserer Meinung der unversehrteste, genialste Satz des Konzerts.“30 Merikanto war auch Novác`´eks Fähigkeiten als Solist gegenüber reservierter als bei der Uraufführung; außerdem sah er in den technischen Herausforderungen des Soloparts eine Gefahr: „Die technische Schwierigkeit des Werks bedeutet wohl, dass dieses Konzert selten auf den Programmen der Violinkünstler erscheinen wird.“31 Schon am Tag nach der zweiten Aufführung schrieb Katila über den exzessiven Gebrauch „virtuoser Elemente“ in dem Konzert, und nach der dritten Aufführung (im Gebäude der Feuerwehr von Helsinki) bot er dem Komponist seinen direkten Rat an: „Nach einigen kleineren Überarbeitungen wird es ein Virtuosenstück mit einer wertvollen Rolle im neuen Violinrepertoire werden. Vielleicht sollte die Orchestrierung hier und da ausgedünnt und die Kontur des ersten Satzes begradigt werden.“32 Katila fasste auch die Rezeption des Konzerts zusammen und ging auf Flodins Kritik in der Euterpe ein, ohne seinen Gegner beim Namen zu nennen: „Das Violinkonzert hat unterschiedliche Gedanken erzeugt. Bei allem gehörigen Respekt für die private Meinung des geschätzten Kritikers, der behauptet, das d-moll-Konzert sei ein ,einziger Fehler‘, muss stark bezweifelt werden, ob dieses, nach der Meinung des Unterzeichnenden, in vielerlei Hinsicht geniale Werk in so oberflächlicher Art abgespeist werden kann. […] Es mutet auch seltsam an, dass derselbe Kritiker, der die Sibelius-Werke, in denen der genuine finnische Charakter offenkundig ist, kaum je wohlwollend betrachtet hat, jetzt dies von dem Violinkonzert verlangt (vgl. die letzte Euterpe[-Ausgabe], wo diese Gattung das wenigste Potential hat.“33 Sibelius war mit der Rezeption des Konzerts offenkundig nicht sehr zufrieden. Er schrieb Carpelan am Tag der Uraufführung nach dem Konzert: „Ich werde bald nach Åbo [Turku] reisen. Wenn ich nur jetzt ein Publikum bekomme. Hier [in Helsinki] war es schlechter als schlecht. […] Hier ist das Publikum so flach und eingebildet.“34 In seinem Brief verweist Sibelius auf die für den 26. und 27. März in Turku bevorstehenden Aufführungen des Konzerts. Nach dem ersten Konzert in Turku35 erläuterte der Kritiker (mit dem Kürzel „-f.“) in Åbo Underrättelser, dass viele Zuhörer das Konzert wohl nicht verstanden hätten, weil es zu den Werken gehöre, die „im hypermodernen Stil“ („i den hypermoderna stilen“) komponiert seien. Insgesamt jedoch waren die Berichte über das Konzert wie auch über die Darbietung Novác`´eks freundlich. Laut Åbo Underrättelser wurde auch Sibelius’ Wunsch nach einem ansehnlich großen Publikum zumindest im zweiten Konzert erfüllt.36

Überarbeitung und Veröffentlichung Schon 1904 plante Sibelius die Veröffentlichung des Klavierauszugs des Violinkonzerts (wahrscheinlich bei Fazer & Westerlund/Breitkopf & Härtel), wie Carpelans Brief an Aino Sibelius im Januar 1904 zeigt: „Wenn Österberg es geschafft hat, das Finale


XVIII des V.-Konzerts abzuschreiben, ich meine die Kopie, von der ich die ersten beiden Sätze habe und welche dann nach Leipzig geschickt werden soll, dann wäre ich unendlich glücklich, das Finale hier zu haben. Nun kenne ich die ersten beiden Sätze fast auswendig und bin in wahrer Ekstase. Aino, Sie verstehen daher mein lebhaftes Interesse an dem letzten Satz. […] Ich erwähne das nur für den Fall, dass die Klavierfassung komplett ist, aber das Finale noch in Jannes Arbeitszimmer liegt.“37 Die Korrespondenz zwischen Sibelius und Carpelan in den Monaten nach den ersten Aufführungen des Konzerts wirft zusätzliches Licht auf den Veröffentlichungsplan. Im März schrieb Sibelius: „Heute werden der Satz III des V.-Konzerts und die Korrekturabzüge zum Schwan von Tuonela geschickt.“38 Dennoch scheint er im Juni 1904 die Veröffentlichung begraben zu haben: „Ich werde das Konzert zurückziehen; es wird erst in 2 Jahren erscheinen. Derzeit mein schweres geheimes Leid. Der erste Satz soll überarbeitet werden, der Mittelteil des Andante [Adagio di molto] auch etc.“39 Die Überarbeitung begann Anfang 1905 in Berlin, wo Sibelius sich von Januar bis März aufhielt. Am 12. Januar führte er mit den Berliner Philharmonikern seine 2. Symphonie auf. Offenbar fing er auch im Januar mit der Revision des Konzerts an. Am 24. Januar schrieb er Aino: „Ich verbessere das Konzert ganz beträchtlich.“40 Aus Ainos Briefen vom 25. und 27. Januar lässt sich schließen, dass die (autographe) Orchesterpartitur und die Abschrift der Klavierfassung bei dem Kopisten Röllig geblieben waren, der später gebeten wurde, die Partituren nach Berlin zu schicken.41 Noch bevor er die Materialien von Röllig erhalten hatte, berichtete Sibelius seiner Frau über den Fortschritt der Überarbeitung: „Der erste Satz bringt mich in Konflikte. Die anderen waren mir so klar.“ Im selben Brief vergleicht Sibelius sein Konzert mit Brahms: „Ich habe Brahms’ Violinkonzert gehört – es ist gut. Aber so anders als meines (zu sehr symphonisch).“42 Am 22. Februar 1905 unterzeichnete Sibelius einen Vertrag mit dem Verleger Robert Lienau (1866–1949), den er zu diesem Zeitpunkt zum ersten Mal traf. Der Vertrag sah vor, dass Sibelius sich verpflichtete, jährlich vier groß besetzte Werke für Lienau zu komponieren. Das Violinkonzert war im ersten Jahreskontingent enthalten, auch wenn die Überarbeitung des Werks noch nicht abgeschlossen war. Sibelius erklärte dazu Lienau, dass die Revision des Konzerts grundlegend sei.43 Carpelan kommentierte Sibelius’ Überarbeitungspläne aktiv. Anfang Februar schrieb er mit Bezug auf die beiden Kadenzen in Satz I: „Du bist neben anderem wahrscheinlich mit dem Violinkonzert beschäftigt. Tut mir Leid, Dich damit zu belästigen! Du schriebst zwei Kadenzen, willst aber eine davon aufgeben. Wäre es nicht möglich, beide zu retten, indem man sie als ,alternativ‘ bezeichnet; mit anderen Worten, beide ad libitum nennt? Zu manchen V.-Konzerten werden alternative Kadenzen angeboten.“44 Der Komponist folgte dem Rat des Freundes nicht, sondern ließ die zweite Kadenz weg. Anfang April berichtete Sibelius Carpelan, dass besonders der erste Satz ihm noch Sorgen mache: „Das zweite Thema [in Satz I] im Konzert ist jetzt klar. Wenn ich nur den ersten Satz hinter mich bringe, geht alles wie von selbst.“45 In der Tat wurden die formale Anlage und die Solopartie von Satz I am intensivsten überarbeitet, obwohl sich die Zahl der Takte im dritten Satz mehr änderte als im ersten; insgesamt kürzte Sibelius den ersten Satz um 41 und den letzten um 54 Takte. In der Partitur der Fassung für Violine und Klavier (Quelle A2Pf.) ersetzte er in Satz II einfach die originale Solo-Violinstimme, indem er die revidierte Stimme darüberklebte. In Satz III handelt es sich bei den Änderungen zumeist um Kürzungen, die in Bleistift eingetragen sind (zu den Skizzen für die überarbeitete Fassung vgl. die „List of Sketches“).46 Offensichtlich richtete Sibelius die Fassung für Violine und Klavier wieder zuerst ein und schickte dann dem Kopisten Österberg im April und Mai 1905 den überarbeiteten Klavierauszug Stück für Stück. Anfang Mai berichtete der Kopist dem Komponisten: „Cortège und das, was ich von dem Violinkonzert habe, sind

XXI geschrieben. Schick, sobald möglich, so viel, wie Du fertig hast. […] Soll die Solopartie auch geschrieben werden?“47 Am 5. Mai hatte Sibelius sich schon darauf eingestellt, das Violinkonzert bald seinem Verleger zuzusenden.48 Am nächsten Tag erklärte er Carpelan, dass das Konzert „gut wird“ und bald fertig sei.49 Zusätzlich schrieb Aino Carpelan in einem ähnlich optimistischen Ton: „Der Teil des ersten Satzes des Violinkonzerts, den J. abgeschlossen hat, ist schon beim Kopisten zur Reinschrift, und J. kann sagen, dass er mit dem Konzert fast fertig ist; daher ist nicht mehr so viel Arbeit übrig.“50 Dennoch nahmen die Fertigstellung der Überarbeitung und die Abschrift noch zwei Monate in Anspruch; Sibelius konnte Lienau den Klavierauszug und die Solostimme (Quellen B2Pf. und B2Vl.) nicht vor Anfang Juli zusenden. Die Österberg-Abschrift der Orchesterpartitur, die als Stichvorlage diente (Quelle B2O), wurde noch später geschickt.51 Bis zum heutigen Tag ist der Verbleib der autographen Orchesterpartitur unbekannt; nur die letzten sechs Seiten von Satz III, mit Österbergs Markierungen zum Seitenlayout, befinden sich in der Nationalbibliothek Finnland (Quelle A2OF). Sibelius hatte Burmester auch die Uraufführung des überarbeiteten Konzerts versprochen. Da dieser jedoch im Herbst 1905 in Berlin – und auch anderswo – kein Konzert geben sollte, erwähnte Lienau schon im Juni in seinem Brief an Sibelius einen anderen Geiger; der Verleger empfahl Carl Halir`´ (1859–1909).52 Im selben Brief wird Richard Strauss als möglicher Dirigent der Erstaufführung genannt. Im Juli gab Lienau bereits das Konzert an Halir`´ und Paul Juon (1872–1940) für ein „Vorspiel“, und Anfang August scheint Sibelius Lienaus Vorschlag akzeptiert zu haben: die Erstaufführung des Konzerts sollte nicht unendlich verschoben werden.53 Lienau berichtete schließlich Sibelius: „Die Sache mit dem Violinkonzert ist in Ordnung. Halir`´ spielt es am 19. Oktober unter Leitung v. Rich. Strauss. Burmester hat verzichtet.“54 Im August machte die Veröffentlichung rasche Fortschritte. Die Korrekturabzüge des Klavierauszugs (Quelle CPf.) tragen den Eingangsstempel vom 12. August. Anfang September frohlockte Sibelius gegenüber Carpelan: „Das Violinkonzert wird jetzt gedruckt; bin in brillanter Arbeitsstimmung.“55 Die ersten Korrekturabzüge der Orchesterpartitur (Quelle CO1) sind am 29. September gestempelt; sie wurden Sibelius am selben Tag von der Firma R. v. Waldheim – Jos. Eberle & Co. aus Wien zugeschickt.56 Und einige Tage später war die Stimmung des Komponisten alles andere als brillant. Wohl mit Bezug auf die Korrekturabzüge des Konzerts lud Sibelius seinen Ärger bei Lienau ab: „Ich habe viel mit Orchester zu thun gehabt und weiss was für ein Lachen es giebt wenn z. B. Bässe con sordino da stehen. Nun, Hand aufs Herz, versprechen Sie bitte nie etwas auszugeben ohne dass ich ein fehlerfreies Correktur geliefert habe. Das ist ja doch das wenigste was Sie einem Künstler zustehen müssen. Wegen die Stimmen bin ich furchtbar unruhig.“57 Drei Tage später beschwichtigte der Verleger den Komponisten und versicherte ihm: „Sie können sich ganz beruhigen! Die Partitur und die Streichstimmen des Konzertes werden erst nach der Aufführung gedruckt, sobald Sie selbst die genauen Korrekturen nochmals durchgesehen haben! Nur die Harmoniestimmen müssen in einer kleinen Auflage vorher gedruckt werden. Wenn noch Fehler stehen bleiben, lasse ich ein Fehlerverzeichnis drucken und jedem Exemplar beilegen. Die Partitur wird ganz korrekt! Halir spielt natürlich nach dem korrigierten Exemplar.“58 Für die Erstaufführung präparierte Lienau eine Partitur für Strauss, in der Blätter der zweiten Korrekturabzüge (Quelle CO2) zusammenklebt waren; im Moment der Erstaufführung verfügte der Komponist immer noch über die (ersten) Korrekturabzüge, die er Ende September erhalten hatte.59 Lienau war darauf erpicht, das Konzert einem größeren Kreis von Geigern, und darunter den führenden Virtuosen, vorzustellen. Sibelius schrieb Carpelan Anfang Oktober: „Lieber Freund, Lienau und Konsorten enthusiastisch über das Violinkonzert. Wirklich ,enorm‘. Halir spielt es ,mit Freude und gut‘. Rich. Strauss dirigiert es. […] Welchen Virtuosen soll ich das Konzert schicken? Fragt


XXII mich Lienau. Ich denke, an alle bedeutenden.“60 Wieder hatte Carpelan eine Meinung dazu: „Was die Virtuosen betrifft, die das Konzert erhalten sollen, so kann ich aus Mangel an Katalogen und Lexika keine präzisere Hilfe geben. Vor allem natürlich ,Reisevirtuosen‘, so wie Ysaÿe, Thomson, den Meister des Oktavspiels (wenn ich mich richtig erinnere), Marteau, Kreisler, Kubelik, Petschikoff, Serato. Vor allem diejenigen, die in England und Amerika in Mode sind.61 Sibelius gab diese Namen wohl auch an den Verleger weiter.62 Burmesters Name war nicht mehr mit dem Konzert verbunden, und die Erstausgabe des Werks erschien ohne Widmung. Wann genau die Orchesterpartitur des Konzerts veröffentlicht wurde, ist unbekannt. Im November 1905 brach Sibelius zu einer längeren Europareise auf, gab die ersten Konzerte in England und verbrachte Zeit in Paris, bevor er Anfang Februar 1906 heimkehrte. Nach der Erstaufführung vergingen vier Monate, bis Lienau am 23. Februar 1906 an Sibelius schrieb: „Die Partitur des Violinconcertes ist soeben fertig geworden. Ich schicke Ihnen heute 2 Partituren, 3 Klavierausgaben des Concertes […]“.63 Obwohl der Verleger garantiert hatte, dass die Partitur „ganz korrekt“ würde, war die Erstausgabe nicht ganz ohne Fehler. Korrekturen wurden in der späteren Ausgabe von Hand eingetragen.

Die ersten Aufführungen und die Rezeption der Fassung von 1905 Die Erstaufführung der überarbeiteten Fassung des Konzerts fand am 19. Oktober 1905 in der Berliner Singakademie statt – in einem Konzert, „von Herrn Carl Halir`´ gegeben“ und, wie geplant, mit dem Berliner Philharmonischen Orchester, dirigiert von Richard Strauss. Dem Berliner Lokal-Anzeiger zufolge waren die anderen Werke in diesem Konzert Beethovens Violinkonzert und von Charles Martin Loeffler (1861–1935) La villanelle du Diable für Orchester sowie Eclogue und Carnaval des morts aus dessen Divertimento für Violine und Orchester.64 Die überlieferten Quellen enthalten keine Korrespondenz mit Strauss oder Halir`´; ob der Komponist dem Dirigenten oder dem Solisten vor der Premiere schriftlich Aufführungshinweise gegeben hatte, bleibt unbekannt. Der mit Sibelius befreundete deutsche Geschäftsmann Georg Boldemann (1865–1946), der das Konzert besucht hatte, berichtete dem Komponisten sofort nach der Erstaufführung, dass Halir`´ ein „prachtvoller Geiger“ sei und das Konzert „eine ausgezeichnete Wiedergabe“ erfahren habe, obwohl der Solist „für andere Sachen viel besser passt, als für Sibelius“. Laut Boldemann war der Erfolg groß: „Halir musste 3mal zum Schluss erscheinen und nach allen Sätzen wurde stark applaudirt. […] Der Herr Lienau meinte, man könne sehr zufrieden sein. Die Kritiken würden aber wohl sehr getheilt sein, denn er habe gehört, dass sich die Kritiker in der Zwischenpause stark uneinig gewesen seien.“65 Den Berichten in den Berliner Zeitschriften zufolge applaudierte das Publikum am meisten nach dem Beethoven-Konzert, das Leopold Schmidt im Berliner Tagblatt nach Sibelius’ neuem Werk als „Erfrischung“ empfand.66 Schmidts kurze Kritik war insgesamt eher negativ. Er war der Meinung, Halir`´ sei nur im zweiten Satz zu seinem schönen Violinklang gekommen, „was man von den anderen, in Kakophonien schwelgenden Sätzen nicht eben behaupten kann“.67 Der Bericht im Berliner Lokal-Anzeiger war wortreicher und positiver; er nennt das Konzert ein „höchst eigenartiges und fesselndes, wenn auch nicht durchaus Befriedigung hervorrufendes Werk“.68 Die Rezensenten hörten in den harmonischen Abläufen und der Orchestrierung des Werks auch nationale finnische Klänge, und laut Berliner Lokal-Anzeiger war die „melancholische Atmosphäre“ im ersten Satz, „so düster und doch anziehend wie der Charakter des finnischen Volkes“.69 Im Musikalischen Wochenblatt beschreibt Adolf Schulze das Konzert als ein „mit Fantasie geschriebenes, in Zeichnung und Farbe gleich fesselndes Werk.“ Seine Charakterisierung des Werks war insgesamt der positivste aller deutschen Berichte: „Eine düstere, melankoli-

XIX sche Stimmung beherrscht den ersten, in seiner thematischen Ausgestaltung etwas lose gefügten Satz. Geschmackvoller, klarer gestaltet und daher eindringlicher in der Wirkung ist das Adagio mit seiner wunderschönen, weich-melodischen Kantilene; prächtig der flott sich entwickelnde, im Rhythmus stellenweise sehr intricate Finalsatz. Äussert geschickt, das Soloinstrument stets gut hebend und unterstützend, ist die Instrumentierung, schwierig doch dankbar die Solopartie.“70 Robert Lienau erklärte Sibelius, dass die Aufnahme durch das Publikum viel günstiger gewesen sei als die durch die Kritiker, geschweige denn durch den Geiger Joseph Joachim (1831–1907): „Joachim hat übrigens ,geschimpft‘ – ,scheußlich und langweilig‘ war sein mir ausgesprochenes Urtheil; und als ich ihm sagte, ich sei der ,unglückliche Verleger‘, rief er: ,trotzdem scheußlich!‘ Lustig, nicht wahr? Na – Sie werden mit mir darüber lachen.“71 Sibelius’ Antwort war bissig: „Es thut mir sehr Leid wegen Joachim, den ich sehr liebe. Nämlich seinetwegen. Er scheint nicht mehr das Gefühlleben der Zeit zu verstehen. Ein Greis – unwiderruflich.“72 Lienau zufolge bemerkte Strauss, das Konzert sei „schlecht instrumentiert“.73 In Finnland fand die erste Aufführung des Konzerts in der überarbeiteten Fassung fünf Monate später, am 12. März 1906, im Festsaal der Universität Helsinki statt – im Rahmen eines Benefizkonzerts für den Pensionsfonds des Orchesters der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft Helsinki. Solist war der deutsche Geiger Hermann Grevesmühl (1878–1954), Robert Kajanus (1856– 1933) dirigierte das Philharmonische Orchester. Die Berichte über das Konzert waren im Wesentlichen nicht enthusiastischer als zwei Jahre zuvor; die 2. Symphonie und die erstmals aufgeführte Suite aus der Bühnenmusik zu Pelléas et Mélisande op. 46 zogen die meiste lobende Wertschätzung auf sich. Karl Fredrik Wasenius (1850–1920) bemerkte unter dem Pseudonym Bis., das Konzert habe „von der Überarbeitung und Straffung unleugbar profitiert“, insgesamt ist sein Bericht über die Aufführung des Konzerts aber dünn und konzentriert sich mehr auf Grevesmühls Spiel als auf das Werk.74 In der Nya Pressen war Flodin ähnlich verständnislos wie in seinen früheren Kritiken: „Trotz der revidierten Form glaube ich nicht, dass das Konzert mehr allgemeine Sympathie gewinnen wird.“ Flodin beschreibt das Werk als „zu kompliziert, zu ruhelos, Grau in Grau gehalten, rhapsodisch trotz seiner ausgedehnten Form und beladen mit jeder Art von technischen und rhythmischen Schwierigkeiten“.75 Nach seiner Rückkehr von der dreimonatigen Europareise im Februar 1906 entnahm Sibelius einem Brief Lienaus, der deutsche Geiger Max Lewinger (1870–1908) studiere das Konzert ein und plane, es im folgenden Herbst in Berlin und „anderen grossen Städten“ aufzuführen.76 Sibelius schrieb optimistisch an Carpelan: „Das Violinkonzert gewinnt mehr und mehr an Boden. Viele [Geiger] studieren es ein, und Lewinger spielt es neben anderen in der nächsten Saison in Berlin und anderen ,großen‘ Städten. […] Willst Du die Partitur des Konzerts haben? Ich bekomme sie morgen.“77 Vor Lewinger, der das Konzert tatsächlich in Berlin aufführte, wenn auch erst im Januar 1907, spielte der russische Geiger Lev Zeitlin (1881–1930) das Konzert schon im April 1906 in Helsinki, und die amerikanische Geigerin Maud Powell (1867– 1920) gab die ersten Aufführungen des Werks in den USA, und zwar in New York und Chicago Ende 1906 und Anfang 1907.78 Im Januar 1907 berichtete Sibelius Lienau über eine – wohl private – Aufführung des Konzerts in St. Petersburg, wo Ysaÿe das Werk „beim Professor [Leopold] Auer“ spielte. „Der Componist Liadoff Taneieff hat auf Piano accompaniert. Alle haben sehr annerkennend [sic] darüber gesprochen. Die sagten auch, wie Sie, dass es lange dauert für Geigen Conzerte überhaupt zur Geltung zu kommen.“79 Die Rezeption des Konzerts war insgesamt lau. Lienau berichtete Sibelius nach Lewingers Aufführung im Januar 1907 und verglich die Rezeption mit der der Orchestersuite Pelléas et Mélisande: „Das Violinkonzert hingegen, welches Lewinger neulich spielte, hat


XX nichts gemacht. Das ist eben ein Stück, welches sich erst langsam die Welt erobern wird.“80 Trotz der vielversprechenden Aufführungen des Konzerts zwischen 1906 und 1909 in Europa und den USA scheint Sibelius über den Erfolg seines „Sorgenkinds“ (wie er das Konzert in der Widmung des Partiturexemplars für Carpelan nannte) überwiegend Zweifel geäußert zu haben; noch viele Jahre nach den ersten Aufführungen waren seine Kommentare überwiegend pessimistisch. Als er im Oktober 1910 die Aufführung des Konzerts durch Franz von Vécsey (1893–1935) gehört hatte, vertraute er seinem Tagebuch an: „– v. Veczey [sic] spielte das Konzert. Ein feiner Musiker. Aber das Konzert kann noch warten! Es wird wohl in Fetzen gerissen werden. Oder, noch schlimmer, aus Mitleid erwähnt werden.“81 Und im Februar 1914: „Wieder [wurde] das Violinkonzert ,zerfetzt‘. Es ist, als ob Burmesters ,es schadet deinen [sic] Ruf‘ wahr werden würde.“82 Im Februar 1915, nach der Aufführung durch den polnisch-amerikanischen Geiger Richard Burgin (1892–1981) in Helsinki verfasste er indes einen eher optimistischen Tagebucheintrag über das Konzert: „Burgin hatte großen Erfolg mit dem Violinkonzert. Es ist, als ob sich die Ohren von Bis [Wasenius] und den anderen Stück für Stück darauf eingestellt hätten.“83 Nach 1910 war von Vécsey wahrscheinlich der eifrigste Vorkämpfer für Sibelius’ Konzert, was der Komponist auch schon 1910 mit Dankbarkeit anerkannte, als er das Werk dem damals 17jährigen Virtuosen widmete. Von Vécsey nahm das Konzert in die Programme seiner Konzertreisen auf und informierte Sibelius über den Erfolg der Aufführungen: „Grüße von Vecsey mit einer Mitteilung, dass das Violinkonzert überall in Südamerika und Europie [sic] Resonanz gefunden hat.“84 Sibelius selbst dirigierte die gedruckte Fassung des Konzerts nur einmal, im März 1924 in Stockholm, mit Julius Ruthström (1877–1944) als Solist. Im selben Konzerte dirigierte Sibelius die 1. Symphonie und die Uraufführung eines neuen Werks, Fantasia sinfonica, das später als seine 7. – und letzte – Symphonie bekannt wurde.

Die Schnirlin-Ausgabe der Solo-Violinstimme Im Frühjahr 1929 schrieb Lienau Sibelius: „Es wird in letzter Zeit häufiger darüber geklagt, dass in der Violinstimme Ihres ViolinKonzertes keine Fingersätze, Stricharten und Vortragsbezeichnungen angegeben sind. Soweit ich mich erinnere, haben Sie seinerzeit bei der ersten Drucklegung selbst den besonderen Wunsch geäussert, keine derartigen Bezeichnungen anzubringen und dies den Künstlern selbst zu überlassen. Da aber dieses Meisterstück von Ihnen sich mittlerweile überall eingebürgert hat und an den Musikhochschulen als wertvolles Studienmaterial benutzt wird, dürfte es wohl jetzt angebracht sein, diesem Mangel abzuhelfen und einen hervorragenden Virtuosen oder Pädagogen mit der Ergänzungsarbeit zu beauftragen. Wir müssen voraussichtlich im Laufe des Sommers eine neue Auflage drucken, und es wäre also jetzt der gegebene Zeitpunkt für die Vorbereitung.“ Lienau bat Sibelius, den Vorschlag zu akzeptieren, aber der Verleger hatte angesichts des knappen Zeitplans und wohl im Vertrauen auf die Toleranz des Komponisten gegenüber derartigen Einrichtungen offensichtlich seine Entscheidung schon getroffen: „Ich möchte meinerseits empfehlen, Herrn Professor Ossip Schnirlin mit der Arbeit zu betrauen. Er hat sich sehr viel mit dem Konzert beschäftigt und ist ja als Herausgeber von Violinkonzerten anerkannt. Lassen Sie mich bald wissen, wie Sie über vorstehendes denken; vielleicht könnte ich auch durch Vermittlung von Juon die Fingersätze und Bezeichnungen erhalten, die Franz v. Vecsey benutzt.“85 Ob von Vécsey, der Widmungsträger des Konzerts, spezielle „Fingersätze und Bezeichnungen“ hatte, entweder von ihm selbst oder vom Komponisten, bleibt im Dunkeln. Ob und was Sibelius dem Verleger antwortete, ist auch unbekannt, und Lienaus Brief Ende Mai scheitert bei der Klärung dieser Angelegenheit: „Wie ich Ihnen vor einiger Zeit mitteilte, lass ich jetzt von Herrn Prof. Ossip Schnirlin die solo [sic] Violinstimme des Violin-

XXIII konzertes durchsehen und mit Fingersätzen und sonstigen Bezeichnungen versehen.“86 Der Brief enthält zwei Fragen an Sibelius. Sie betreffen Vorschläge für enharmonische Änderungen von Noten an zwei Stellen der Kadenz und Metronomangaben. Auch die Antworten von Sibelius auf diese Fragen sind unbekannt. Keine der vorgeschlagenen enharmonischen Änderungen taucht in der Violinstimme auf, aber die Schnirlin-Ausgabe weist Metronomangaben auf (zu den Änderungsvorschlägen und Ergänzungen siehe den Critical Commentary). Insgesamt enthält die SchnirlinAusgabe Hunderte von ergänzten Fingersätzen, Auf- und Abstrichzeichen sowie in Fußnoten verschiedene Ossia-Lesarten, wohingegen die Originalausgabe der Stimme nur in vier Takten Fingersätze – alle in der Kadenz – und ca. 50 Zeichen für Bogenstriche aufweist. Die Neuausgabe der Violinstimme wurde im Sommer oder Frühherbst 1929 gedruckt. Ende September schrieb Lienau erneut an Sibelius: „Die neue Ausgabe der Violinstimme des ViolinKonzertes ist jetzt fertig und ich schicke Ihnen gleichzeitig 1 Exemplar. Ich habe schon von vielen Geigern und insbesondere Geigenlehrern ausgezeichnete Urteile über die Schnirlinsche Arbeit bekommen.“ Am Ende seines Briefs stellt Lienau eine Frage, die sicher eine Reaktion auf eine frühere Bemerkung von Sibelius darstellt: „Uebrigens warum sollte Herr Veczey [sic] böse sein?“87 Möglicherweise hätte Sibelius den Hinweis „Fingersätze und Bezeichnungen verwendet von F. von Vécsey“ bevorzugt oder sogar empfohlen, dass, wenn überhaupt jemand, der Widmungsträger des Konzerts die Violinstimme herausgibt.

Spätere Revisionspläne und Rezeption 1930, im Jahr nach der Veröffentlichung der Schnirlin-Ausgabe der Solostimme, plante Lienau auch Revisionen der Orchesterpartitur. Im Dezember schrieb er Sibelius: „Es ist mir im Laufe der Zeit von mehreren Kapellmeistern berichtet worden, dass in den Orchesterproben zu Ihrem Violinkonzert häufig die Rhythmik im letzten Satze bei den Musikern (namentlich bei kleineren Orchestern) Schwierigkeiten macht und zwar deswegen, weil in der Partitur und den Stimmen die Noten nicht korrekt im ¾ Takt geschrieben stehen. Wollen Sie mir bitte mitteilen, ob Sie damit einverstanden sind, wenn ich in Zukunft bei etwaigen Neuauflagen die Noten so drucken lasse, wie auf beifolgendem Zettel in der 2. Zeile angegeben. Die kleine Aenderung wird, glaube ich, in der Praxis von Wert sein und die Probenarbeit erleichtern.“88 Der „beifolgende Zettel“ ist nicht erhalten, aber Lienau bezog sich wohl auf die Notierung des Rhythmus in T. 45ff. Sibelius akzeptierte Lienaus Vorschlag ohne Diskussion, die Antwort des Komponisten eröffnete dem Verleger aber neue Perspektiven: „Besten Dank für Ihr freundliches Schreiben von dem 17. [Dezember]. Selbstverständlich bin ich einverstanden mit den vorgeschlagenen Aenderungen. Die Orchesterbegleitung möchte ich doch anders machen. Die ist zu schwer. Wie eine Symphonie. Bitte mir zu schreiben was Sie darüber denken.“89 In seiner Antwort stimmte Lienau dem „symphonischen“ Charakter der Orchesterbegleitung des Konzerts zu: „Was nun das ,Violinkonzert‘ betrifft, so kann ich mich ganz Ihrer Auffassung anschliessen, dass die Orchesterbegleitung tatsächlich etwas zu schwer ist. Ich habe schon öfter von Dirigenten Klagen darüber gehört, dass das ganze schöne Werk mehr einer Sinfonie ähnlich ist und die Violinsolostimme oft nicht genug zur Geltung kommen kann. Auch Herr Prof. Schnirlin, der sich ja sehr eingehend mit dem Violinkonzert beschäftigt hat, hält es für sehr begrüssenswert und für die Verbreitung des Violinkonzerts für äusserst nützlich, wenn Sie sich entschliessen könnten, die Orchesterbegleitung anders zu machen. Ich bitte Sie daher, sich mit dieser Arbeit freundlichst zu beschäftigen zu wollen und schicke Ihnen gleichzeitig eine Partitur. Wann glauben Sie, dass Sie Zeit haben werden, die gewiss nicht ganz leichte Neuinstrumentation auszuführen? Ich möchte das gern wissen, damit wir nicht unnötig von der alten


XXIV Ausgabe noch korrigierte Exemplare herstellen lassen.“90 Sibelius verwendet in seinem Brief an Lienau die Begriffe „zu schwer“ und „wie eine Symphonie“ offenbar als Synonyme, so wie er zuvor Brahms’ Violinkonzert als „zu symphonisch“ beurteilt hatte. 1943 jedoch bekannte er sich augenscheinlich weiterhin zu den „symphonischen“ Zügen der Instrumentierung seines eigenen Konzerts: „Die Begleitung des Violinkonzerts soll geprobt werden wie eine Symphonie […]“91 Während aus Sibelius’ Korrespondenz mit seinem Verleger der Revisionsplan nicht klar hervorgeht, schrieb Jussi Jalas später: „Sibelius scheint eine Revision der endgültigen Fassung [des Konzerts] erwogen zu haben, nicht genau in kompositionstechnischer Art, aber so, dass die Rolle des Orchesters im Mittelpunkt steht. Bleistifteintragungen in seiner eigenen Partitur lassen nämlich erkennen, dass der Komponist offenbar beabsichtigte, die schweren Blechbläser in Satz I und II zu streichen, [d. h.] die Posaunen und Trompeten. Um diese Partien zog er in jeder Passage eine Trennungslinie und teilte deren Aufgaben vorsichtig anderen Instrumenten zu. Dies ist wohl aus seinen eigenen Erfahrungen als Dirigent des Werks abzuleiten, weil in jener Zeit, mit Ausnahme der Eliteorchester, das Blech dazu tendierte, den Rest des Orchesters zu überdecken und den Solisten zu übertönen. Wegen der allgemeinen Entwicklung der Fähigkeiten der Orchesterbläser, durch die sich die Balance zwischen den Instrumenten verbesserte, brauchte er den Revisionsplan nicht länger zu verfolgen.“92 Sibelius schenkte seine „eigene Partitur“ mit den Bleistifteintragungen (siehe Quelle E) Jalas, der im Dezember 1943 auch auf diese Einträge oder „Skizzen“ einging: „[…] Autorenänderung – Skizzen in meiner Partitur.“93 In dieser Partitur, möglicherweise das Exemplar, das Lienau Sibelius zur Revision zugeschickt hatte, umkreiste Sibelius mit Bleistift nicht nur einige Stellen in den Trompeten- und Posaunensystemen, sondern auch in den Holzbläsern und Hörnern, und er skizzierte in den ersten beiden Sätzen Holzbläser- und Hornpartien für die (ersten) Violinen und Klarinette(n) (vgl. hierzu die Faksimiles XXII und XXIII; zu Jalas’ Partitur mit Sibelius’ Markierungen und Aufführungshinweisen siehe allgemein den Critical Commentary). Da der Komponist nur einige der Trompeten- und Posaunenstellen umkreiste, bleibt unklar, ob er vorhatte, sie ganz in der Partitur zu streichen, wie Jalas vermutete. Bei verschiedenen Gelegenheiten wurde in den 1930er und 1940er Jahren in Sibelius’ Korrespondenz mit Lienau darüber gesprochen, ob Metronomangaben und andere Aufführungshinweise in die späteren Ausgaben des Konzerts aufgenommen werden sollten (vgl. den Critical Commentary). Speziell die Frage des Tempos in Satz III hat die Interpreten entzweit. Nils-Eric Ringbom schreibt in seiner 1948 erschienenen Sibelius-Biographie: „Man hört, dass dieser Satz auf ganz unterschiedliche Art verstanden wird. Einige Solisten spielen ihn sehr schnell, andere fast im Tempo einer Polonaise. Auf die Frage nach dem richtigen Tempo antwortet der Meister: ,Er soll sehr souverän gespielt werden. Schnell natürlich, aber nicht schneller, als wenn er vollständig ,von oben‘ gespielt würde‘. – Nebenbei gehört es nicht zu Sibelius’ Angewohnheiten, genaue Tempoangaben zu notieren. Er glaubt, dass er in der Lage ist, sich der intuitiven Fähigkeit eines guten Künstlers anzuvertrauen, der im Rahmen der Tempoangaben in den Partituren die richtige Nuance trifft, und er will die Vorstellung des Interpreten nicht allzu stark einschränken.“94 Über die erfolgreichen Aufführungen hinaus verbreiteten in den 1930er und 1940er Jahren die ersten Aufnahmen (mit Jascha Heifetz und Guila Bustabo als Solisten) weltweit den Ruf des Konzerts. Die erste Aufnahme des Konzerts durch einen finnischen Interpreten, die Geigerin Anja Ignatius (1911–1995), erfolgte im Januar 1943 in Deutschland mit dem Städtischen Orchester Berlin unter der Leitung von Sibelius’ Schwager Armas Järnefelt (1869–1958). In seinem Brief vom Oktober 1942 an Lienau benannte Sibelius diese Interpreten für die Aufnahme: „Heute möchte ich Ihnen folgendes mitteilen: Wenn die Deutsche

XXI Grammophon-Gesellschaft geneigt wäre, mein Violinkonzert einzuspielen, so möchte ich auf das wärmste vorschlagen, dass meine Landsleute, die Violinvirtuosin Frau Anja Ignatius und mein Schwager, Hofkapellmeister, Prof. Armas Järnefelt das Werk ausführten. Ich wäre sehr glücklich, wenn es Ihnen möglich wäre, dies auszuwirken.“95 Die letzten heute bekannten Erwähnungen des Violinkonzerts in Lienaus Briefen an Sibelius aus den frühen 1940-er Jahren legen nahe, dass dem Werk auch schon in Deutschland weithin Wertschätzung zuteil geworden war.96 Im Februar 1943 informierte der Verleger den Komponisten über den „enormen“ Erfolg des Konzerts, das in der Berliner Philharmonie durch den Geiger Georg Kulenkampff (1898–1948) und den Dirigenten Wilhelm Furtwängler (1886–1954) viermal, stets vor über 2.000 Zuhörern, aufgeführt worden war.97 Im Verlagsvertrag zwischen Sibelius und Lienau 1905 enthalten, hatte das Violinkonzert eine lange und ereignisreiche Geschichte, auch aus der Perspektive des Verlegers. In seinen Erinnerungen beschreibt Lienau die schwierigen ersten Schritte und den späteren Erfolg des Konzerts: „Die Aufnahme bei den Zuhörern [1905] war lau. […] Sehr langsam eroberte sich das Konzert dann die Welt, zuerst in England. Es ging, wie alle großen Meisterwerke, seiner Zeit voraus, und erst die folgende Generation erkannte seinen Wert.“98 Besonderen Dank schulde ich meinen Kollegen Kari Kilpeläinen, Anna Pulkkis, Tuija Wicklund und Sakari Ylivuori für den vielfältigen, wertvollen Gedankenaustausch. Meine Korrespondenz mit Jonathan Del Mar über Details der Partitur war höchst aufschlussreich, die Geiger und Dirigenten Tuomas Haapanen, Tuomas Hannikainen, Pekka Helasvuo, Jaakko Ilves, Tero Latvala, Kaija Saarikettu und John Storgårds haben freundlicherweise mit ihren Sachkenntnissen beigetragen. Satu Jalas Risito unterstützte meine Untersuchungen, indem sie mir Zeit für inspirierende Gespräche gab und mir die überaus interessante Partitur ihres Vaters Jussi Jalas zugänglich machte. Rolando Pieraccini bin ich dankbar für die Möglichkeit, die Sibelius-Briefe aus seinem Besitz einsehen zu dürfen; Markku Hartikainen informierte mich über verschiedene biografische Quellen; Pertti Kuusi und Turo Rautaoja danke ich für ihr sorgfältiges Korrekturlesen, Stephen Stalter für die Überprüfung der englischen Texte. Eingeschlossen in meinen besonderen Dank seien auch Judith Picard und Berndt Schuff im Archiv des Robert Lienau Musikverlags sowie Hilkka Helminen in Ainola für ihre freundliche Hilfe und Gastfreundschaft. Tarja Lehtinen, Inka Myyry, Kari Timonen und Petri Tuovinen in der Nationalbibliothek Finnland, Inger Jakobsson-Wärn und Sanna Linjama im Sibelius-Museum und die Mitarbeiter des Finnischen Nationalarchivs waren bei der Suche nach den verschiedenen Quellen sehr hilfreich. Ich danke auch ihnen allen. Helsinki, Herbst 2013

Timo Virtanen (deutsche Übersetzung: Frank Reinisch)

1 Die unvollständige Fassung von 1903/1904 und die vollständige Fassung von 1905 für Violine und Klavier erscheinen in Band JSW II/1A. 2 Vgl. weiter zu Sibelius als Geiger und zum Violinkonzert: Erkki Salmenhaara, Violin Concerto, Wilhelmshaven: Florian Noetzel Verlag 1996 [= Salmenhaara 1996]. 3 Sibelius an Aino Järnefelt am 29. Oktober 1890 (Nationalarchiv Finnland, Sibelius-Familienarchiv [= NA, SFA], Kasten 94). Die überlieferten Manuskripte belegen dies nicht, aber viele der nicht identifizierten Skizzen seit den 1880er Jahren sind für (Solo-)Violine geschrieben. 4 Sibelius an Adolf Paul am 2. September 1898 (Kopie in der Finnischen Nationalbibliothek [= NL], Coll. 206.62). Carpelan an Sibelius am 7. Juni 1900 (NA, SFA, Kasten 18): „Vågar man i en framtid hoppas på en violinkonsert l. fantasi med orkester? –“ 5 Sibelius an Aino Sibelius am 18. September 1902 (NA, SFA, Kasten 95): „Olen saanut ihania teemoja viulukonserttiin.“


XXII 6 Die Skizze ist in blauer Tinte geschrieben und mit Bleistift durchgestrichen. Auf das Jahr 1902 weist die Anmerkung T[vär]minne 22 Okt[ober], die auf die Rückseite des Blatts geschrieben ist, in Verbindung mit einem Entwurf in derselben blauen Tinte wie die Skizze für das Thema des Violinkonzerts. 7 Vgl. auch Jukka Tiilikainen, The genesis of the Violin Concerto, in: The Cambridge Companion to Sibelius, hrsg. von Daniel M. Grimley, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 2004 [= Tiilikainen 2004], S. 66–80. Zu einem Überblick über die Skizzen, die bislang in einen Zusammenhang mit dem Violinkonzert gebracht werden konnten, siehe die „List of Sketches“ im vorliegenden Band. 8 Zum Eröffnungsthema von Satz I (HUL 1550, S. [4]) vgl. auch Tiilikainen 2004, S. 68f. Auf derselben Seite des Manuskripts notierte Sibelius eine Skizze zum Anfang des zweiten Satzes der 2. Symphonie sowie die Anmerkung Allegretto Klockorna i Rapallo („Glocken in Rapallo“) über ein Fragment, wohl über eine Melodie, die durch Kirchenglocken gespielt wurde. Die Klavierstücke op. 58 erschienen 1909, sind aber wahrscheinlich über Material komponiert, das teilweise auf die Jahrhundertwende zurückgeht. 9 Die Verbindung zwischen dem Konzert und Pohjolas Tochter ist auch erkennbar in HUL 0449, S. [2]. 10 Nach der Kadenz in A-dur im letzten Takt von Seite [1] zog Sibelius eine Linie zu den Systemen 5 und 6 auf Seite [2], wo die Vorzeichnung für cis-moll erscheint; später aber strich er die geplante Fortsetzung auf Seite [2] durch. Viele der frühen Skizzen und Entwürfe zu Satz II stehen in A-dur (vgl. auch HUL 1562, S. [1], sowie HUL 1563, S. [1] und [4]). HUL 0471, S. [1], und HUL 0473, S. [1], legen auch nahe, dass die Passage, die im ersten Satz des Konzerts in T. 102 (in der Fassung von 1905) beginnt, aus dem Material zu Satz II abgeleitet ist (vgl. T. 5 und 15 im Faksimile D). In HUL 0473, S. [1], ist die originale Fassung, die der in HUL 0471 ähnelt, in Tinte geschrieben und durch eine in Bleistift notierte Fassung ersetzt, die der/den endgültigen Fassung(en) ähnelt. Wenn man annehmen kann, dass Sibelius Satz I des Konzerts zeitweise in cis-moll schreiben wollte, dann würde Satz II in A-dur im selben (große) Terzverhältnis zu ihm stehen wie im vollendeten Konzert Satz I in d-moll zu Satz II in B-dur. Mehr noch, dieselbe Verbindung gäbe es zwischen den Skizzen zu Satz I in e-moll und zu Satz II in C-dur (vgl. HUL 0448, S. [2]). 11 Die römischen Ziffern II und IV, auf Seite [1] in rotem Bleistift hinzugefügt, legen wohl nahe, dass Sibelius beabsichtigte, diese Gedanken im selben Kompositionsplan zu verwenden. Über Cortège, Die gefangene Königin und die 4. Symphonie hinaus enthält das zweiblättrige Manuskript HUL 0472 Ideen zu Cassazione und Pan und Echo op. 53a (1906) sowie die römischen Ziffern I und III (auch in rotem Bleistift), die in Verbindung mit den Cassazione-Materialien erscheinen. 12 Burmester war ein deutscher Geiger und Schüler von Joseph Joachim. Von 1892 bis 1895 war er als Konzertmeister des Philharmonischen Orchesters Helsinki tätig. Tawaststjerna zufolge war „es nicht ausgeschlossen, dass Burmester Sibelius schon im Frühjahr 1902 in Berlin Sibelius aufforderte, ein Violinkonzert zu komponieren“. Siehe Erik Tawaststjerna, Sibelius. Åren 1893–1904, Helsingfors: Söderströms & Co. 1994 [= Tawaststjerna 1994]), S. 206: „Det är inte uteslutet att han våren 1902 i Berlin hade uppfordrat Sibelius att skriva en violinkonsert.“ Tawaststjerna liefert jedoch keinen Beweis für diese Annahme. 13 Burmester an Sibelius am 22. Juli 1903 (NA, SFA, Kasten 17). 14 Sibelius an Burmester am 8. August 1903 (Poststempel vom 13. August; Fotokopie in NL, Coll. 206.61): „Violinkonserten skall jag snart sända Dig i ett acceptabelt ,Klavierauszug‘ med skild tydlig hufvudstämma. Jag drömmer bara huru den må låta under dina mästarehänder.“ (Nachfolgender Brieftext in deutscher Sprache.) 15 Sibelius an Carpelan am 19. Dezember 1903 (NA, SFA, Kasten 120): „Konserten (violin) är färdig. Tvenne satser redan instrumenterade. Börjar att instr. den sista satsen.“ 16 Carpelan an Sibelius am 2. Oktober 1903 (NA, SFA, Kasten 18): „Däremot skulle jag på det varmaste rekommendera tillsändandet på kl.utdraget till Ysaye i Brüssel, väl den största konstnären på violin f. n. Han har stor ton, och därtill underskön (han spelar på Stradiv. ,Herkules‘), ett glödande medryckande temperament och stor reproducerande fantasi. Han skulle bort få dedikationen. Genom honom blefve du spelad öfveralt [sic], äfven i Frankrike. Således klav.utdrag åt Burmester, Ysaye och Marteau. Låt ej andra rangens virtuoser få manuskriptet, det skadar dig –“ 17 Burmesters Postkarte an Sibelius vom 4. Oktober 1903 (NA, SFA, Kasten 17).

XXV 18 Sibelius’ Postkarte an Burmester, gestempelt am 7. [?] Oktober 1903 (Fotokopie, NA, Erik-Tawaststjerna-Archiv [= ETA], Kasten 38): „Konserten är ju Dig tillegnad och således spelas den endast af Dig. […] Har ej tänkt på andra än Dig. Hvem fan har nu roddat?!“ 19 Hufvudstadsbladet vom 5. Oktober 1903: „Jean Sibelius har, som bekant, fulländat en violinkonsert, som komponisten tillegnat hr Willy Burmester. Hr Burmester har för afsikt att i början af mars komma öfver till Finland för att här spela konserten.“ 20 Päivälehti vom 24. Oktober 1903: „Jean Sibeliuksen sävellyskonsertti on tammik. 14 pnä. Säveltäjän uuden viulukonsertin esittää hra V. Novacek, sillä Villy [sic] Burmester voi tänne saapua vasta maaliskuulla.“ 21 Sibelius’ Postkarte an Carpelan vom 30. Oktober 1903 (NA, SFA, Kasten 120): “Min konsert är den 11 Jan. Uppskjutandet sker på grund af Novaçek [sic] som ej blir färdig med violin k. förrän i Jan. Han skall studera den tvenne gånger. Han blir bra. Således är det ej min skuld ty jag hade blifvit färdig.” 22 Anderssons Notizen von Gesprächen mit Sibelius (undatiert, SibeliusMuseum [Turku], Sammlung Otto Andersson, Notizbuch 9): „N. drog sig till en början; han beklagade sig över de snabba gångarna, som han inte ville få ut.“ 23 Burmester an Sibelius am 28. Dezember 1903 (NA, SFA, Kasten 17). 24 Carpelan an Sibelius am 26. Dezember 1903 (NA, SFA, Kasten 18): „Jag genom gick i dag din v-konsert och var uppspelt och belåten. Dock en anmärkning (den blindes): är väl adagiots slutkadans [sic] motiverad, är efter denna himmelsflykt dessa svåra 128de dels noter på sin plats? Det är möjligt att intrycket blir helt annat då man hör violinen under orkesterns uthållande ackord utföra dessa rapida arpeggier ,veloce‘, men till pianoackompagnemang synes mig kadensen väl virtuos efter satsens himmelska tankar. […] – Ja, nog är konserten härlig, jag visade den åt W[ester]lind, som var hos mig en dag; hade den hos sig ett dygn, han var hänförd, sade att allt klingar gudomligt bra, ,Vieuxtempsk teknik‘, ,Det finska orkestertuttit gudomligt‘, kadens II ,underbar‘ o.s.v.“. Axel Emanuel Westerlind (1844–1919) war ein Geiger und Dirigent. Mit dem „finnischen Orchester-Tutti“ bezieht sich Carpelan wohl auf die Allegro-Stelle im ersten Satz, T. 138ff. (Fassung von 1904). 25 Sibelius an Carpelan, undatiert, wahrscheinlich Ende Dezember 1903 (NA, SFA, Kasten 120): „Andra satsens slut kadens har jag låtit kvarstå efter moget öfvervägande. Observera accompagnements figuren i sidotemat!! Då framstår den nog motiverad. “ 26 In diesem Konzert wirkten außerdem der Bariton Abraham Ojanperä (1856–1916) und der Männerchor Muntra Musikanter mit. 27 O.[skar Merikanto] in Päivälehti vom 9. Februar 1904: „[…] viulukonsertti todellakin vastasi suuria odotuksia […] [T]äydellistä Burmesterin tekniikkaa kysyy loppuosa (konsertti onkin Burmesterille omistettu), ja teoksen taiteellinen huippu on yksinkertaisessa, mutta melkein ylimaallisen ihanassa Adagio-osassa […] Koko konsertissa on muuten orkesterin tehtävä sangen omituinen ja tavallisuudesta poikkeava […] Hra V. Novacek ansaitsee täyden tunnustuksen mestarillisesta suorituksestaan tässä vaikeassa tehtävässä; hän soitti sitäpaitsi konsertin ulkoa. Ihana Adagio-osa oli toistettava.“ 28 A.[larik] U.[ggla] im Hufvudstadsbladet vom 9. Februar 1904: „[…] en komposition, som utan tvifvel kommer att blifva ett kärkommet repertoarnummer för framstående violinvirtuoser.“ 29 K.[arl Flodin] in der Helsingfors-Posten vom 9. Februar 1904: „Må man taga hvilken berömd violinkonsert som helst, Beethovens, Mendelssohns, Bruchs, Brahms[’in,] Tschaikovskys – i dem alla finnes ett eller flere melodiska gestaltningar, hvilka skänka konserterna deras karaktäristiska behag, ja hela deras lynnesmärke, så att dessa melodiska motiv genast framstå för minnet, då man erinrar sig en af de nämda violinkonserterna. Men hr Sibelius har ingen dylik personlig not, som skulle bli till kompositionens adliga vapenmärke.“ Flodins Artikel vom 13. Februar in der Zeitschrift Euterpe (7, 1904), übte, wenn auch etwas weicher im Ton, scharfe Kritik an der Orchestrierung des Konzerts. Flodin war Herausgeber der Euterpe. 30 O. in Päivälehti vom 11. Februar 1904: „Konsertin loppuosa sen sijaan tuntuu taiteellisena työnä heikommalta.“ E.[vert] K.[atila] in Uusi Suometar vom 11. Februar 1904: „Wiimeinen, Allegro giusto, on meidän mielestämme kuitenkin konsertin ehjin, nerokkain osa.“ 31 O. in Päivälehti vom 11. Februar 1904: „Teoksen teknillinen vaikeus tuleekin luultavasti vaikuttamaan, että tätä konserttia hyvin harvoin saa viulutaiteilijain ohjelmissa nähdä.“ 32 E. K. in Uusi Suometar vom 16. Februar 1904: „Pienillä muutoksilla on siitä tulewa wirtuoosinumero, jolla on arwokas asema uudessa wiulu-


XXVI

33

34

35

36 37

38

39

40 41

42

43

44

45

46

47

kirjallisuudessa. Instrumentationia on ehkä paikoin ohennettawa ja ensi osan ulkopiirteitä oijottawa.“ Ders.: “Wiulukonsertista on ilmennyt eroawia ajatuksia. Kaikella kunnioituksella sen arw. arwostelijan yksityistä mielipidettä kohtaan, joka wäittää d-molli-konsertin olewan ,yhden ainoan erehdyksen‘ täytyy wahwasti epäillä, tokko tätä, allekirjoittaneen mielestä monessa suhteessa nerokasta säwellystä woi näin ylimalkaisella tawalla kuitata. […] Omituiselta myöskin tuntuu että sama arwostelija, joka ei juuri lempein silmin ole katsellut sellaisia Sibeliuksen säwelteoksia, joissa aitosuomalainen luonne selwänä esiintyy, nyt waatii sitä wiulukonsertilta (wrt. wiime Euterpeä), missä genrellä on wähimmät mahdollisuudet.“ Vgl. Flodin in der Euterpe vom 13. Februar 1904, S. 77: „Man hade framför alt väntat en finsk, sibeliansk violinkonsert, någonting alldeles nytt i formen, i behandlingen af det tekniska, i hela uppfattningen af genren.“ („Man hatte vor allem ein finnisches, Sibelianisches Violinkonzert erwartet; etwas ganz Neues in der Form, in der Behandlung der technischen Mittel, im ganzen Gattungskonzept.“) Sibelius an Carpelan, undatiert, nach dem 8. Februar 1904 (NA, SFA, Kasten 120): „Snart reser jag till Åbo. Måtte jag nu få åhörare. Här var det mera än dåligt. […] Publiken här är så ytlig och inbilsk.“ Die anderen Werke in den Konzerten in Turku waren das Andante für Streicher (aus der Romanze p. 42), Cassazione, En saga und das Finale aus der 2. Symphonie. Das Orchester in Turku bestand aus Mitgliedern des Orchesters der Musikgesellschaft Turku, verstärkt durch Spieler des Orchesters aus Tampere und Amateure. „–f.“ in Åbo Underrättelser vom 27. und 28. März 1904. Carpelan an Aino Sibelius am 11. Januar 1904 (NA, SFA, Kasten 98): „Ifall Österberg skulle hunnit kopiera Finalen till V.konserten, jag menar det exemplar, hvaraf jag eger de två första satserna, och som sedan skall sändas till Leipzig, så ville jag oändligt gärna ha denna Final här. Jag kan nu nästan utantill de första satserna och är i värklig extas: Aino förstår då mitt lifliga intresse för sista satsen. […] Jag nämner nu detta blott för det fall att klaverutdraget vore komplett, men Finalen blifvit liggande i Jannes arbetsrum.“ Sibelius an Carpelan am 8. März 1904 (NA, SFA, Kasten 120): „I dag afgå III satsen ur V.Conserten samt korrekturet till Tuonelas Svan.“ Was Sibelius mit den Korrekturabzügen zum Schwan von Tuonela meint, bleibt unklar. Dieser Satz aus Lemminkäinen war 1901 veröffentlicht worden. Sibelius an Carpelan am 3. Juni 1904 (NA, SFA, Kasten 120): „Min Violin konsert drager jag tillbaka; först om 2 år utkommer den. Min hemliga stora sorg dessa tider. Första satsen skall omarbetas, andantets midt äfven m.m.“ Sibelius an Aino am 24. Januar 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 96): „Viulukonserttia parantelen aika lailla.“ Ainos Briefe an Sibelius vom 25. und 27. Januar 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 27). Vor der Uraufführung schrieb Röllig die Orchesterstimmen aus dem Partiturautograph, Österberg die Solo-Violinstimme aus der Klavierbearbeitung. Warum die Materiale bei Röllig zurückblieben, bleibt unbekannt. In Sibelius’ Korrespondenz sind keine weiteren Partiturexemplare erwähnt. Sibelius an Aino am 26. Januar 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 96): „Olen kuullut Brahms’in viulu konserttia joka on hyvä. Mutta niin toista (sinfoniskt för mycket) kun minun.“ Sibelius’ Briefentwurf an Lienau, undatiert, aber vermutlich von Anfang 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46): „[…] Das Violinconzert mache ich fast neu.“ Carpelan an Sibelius am 6. Februar 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 18): „Du torde hålla på med violinkonserten m.m. Förlåt att jag tar den till tals! Du skref två kadenser och torde kassera den ena. Vore ej möjligt bevara bägge genom att lägga ett ,alternatift‘ d.v.s. bifoga hvardera med ett ad libitum? Flere v.konserter äro ju försedda med alternatifva kadenser.“ Sibelius an Carpelan am 6. April 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 120): „Andra temat i konserten är nu klart. Bara jag kommer öfver 1sta satsen går allt af sig sjelft.“ Aus der Frühfassung des ersten Satzes in der Einrichtung für Violine und Klavier sind nur etwas mehr als fünf Seiten überliefert (vgl. den Critical Commentary, Quelle B1Pf.F). Die erste Kadenz in Satz I (T. 206ff. in der Fassung von 1904) wurde aus der Klavierpartitur einfach ausgeschnitten und in die überarbeitete Fassung eingefügt – dies geht aus den Papiersorten des Partiturautograph der überarbeiteten Fassung hervor (vgl. den Critical Commentary, Quelle A2Pf.). Österbergs Postkarte an Sibelius vom 7. Mai 1905 (NL, Coll. 206.42): „Cortégen och det jag har af Violinkonserten är skrifvet. Sänd med

48 49 50

51

52

53

54

55 56 57

58 59

60

61

62 63 64

65 66 67 68 69

det snaraste så mycket Du har färdigt. […] Skall solostämman också skrifvas?“ Sibelius an Lienau am 5. Mai 1905; der Verbleib des Originalbriefs ist unbekannt. Zitiert nach Tawaststjerna (NA, ETA, Kasten 38). Sibelius an Carpelan am 6. Mai 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 120): „Violinkonserten blifver bra. Snart färdig.” Aino Sibelius an Carpelan am 8. Mai 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 120): „Den del som J. har färdig af violinkonsertens I del är redan hos kopisten för att renskrifvas, och J. kan säga att han har konserten nästan klar redan, så att där ej återstår alltför mycket arbete mera.“ Sibelius an Lienau am 12. Juli 1905; zitiert (teils aus dem Deutschen ins Schwedische übersetzt) nach Tawaststjerna (NA, ETA, Kasten 38): „Sände för några dagar sedan VK, Klavierauszug nebst Solostimme. […] Snart kommer VK partitur.“ („Habe vor einigen Tagen das VK geschickt, Klavierauszugs nebst Solostimme. […] Die VK-Partitur kommt bald.“) Lienau an Sibelius am 28. Juni 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46). Carl (Karel) Halir`´ (1859–1909) war Schüler von Joseph Joachim, 2. Geiger des Joachim-Quartets und Konzertmeister der Berliner Hofoper. Lienau an Sibelius am 17. Juli 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46): „Halir und Juon wollen es mir in einigen Tagen vorspielen – ich bin sehr gespannt!“ Sibelius an Lienau am 2. August 1905, zitiert nach Tawaststjerna (NA, ETA, Kasten 38): „Zwar habe ich Burmester das Konzert versprochen ab[e]r wenn er im Herb[st] kein Konzert in Ber[l]in giebt ist es ja unmöglich weiter zu warten.“ Lienaus Postkarte an Sibelius vom 7. August 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46). Burmester spielte das Sibelius-Konzert nie öffentlich. Er erscheint noch 1919 und 1920 in Verbindung mit dem Stadtorchester Helsinki (zuvor: „Orchester der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft Helsinki“), allerdings als Solist der Konzerte von Mendelssohn und Bruch. Die Korrespondenz zwischen Burmester und Sibelius erhellt Burmesters Haltung gegenüber Sibelius oder dem Konzert nicht weiter, das Werk wird in seinen Erinnerungen Fünfzig Jahre Künstlerleben (Berlin: August Scherl 1926) nicht einmal erwähnt. Sibelius an Carpelan am 7. September 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 120): „Håller på trycka violin-konserten, är på ett brillant arbetshumör.“ Vgl. Quelle CO1 und eine Postkarte von R. v. Waldheim – Jos. Eberle & Co. an Sibelius vom 29. September 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46). Sibelius an Lienau am 4. Oktober 1905; zitiert nach Tawaststjerna (NA, ETA, Kasten 38). Tatsächlich war in den ersten Korrekturfahnen der Orchesterpartitur eine con sordino -Anweisung für die Kontrabässe auf Sibelius’ Wunsch entfernt worden. Ein Briefentwurf von Sibelius an Lienau (undatiert, vermutlich vom Oktober 1905; NL, Coll. 206.48) zeigt, welche anderen Fehler der Komponist in den Korrekturabzügen entdeckte. Lienau an Sibelius am 7. Oktober 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46). Die Partitur gibt es noch heute im Archiv des Robert Lienau Musikverlags, Erzhausen. Sie enthält in Bleistift einige Dirigierhinweise, darunter dynamische Änderungen, in Strauss’ Handschrift (siehe den Critical Commentary, Quelle CO2). Sibelius an Carpelan am 2. Oktober 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 120): „Kära vän, Lienau et consortes förtjusta i violin konserten. Rigtigt ,enormous.‘ Halir skall spela den ,mit Freude und gut.‘ Rich. Strauss dirigerar den. […] Till hvilka virtuoser skall jag sända Conserten? Lienau frågar mig. Jag tänker alla af betydenhet.“ Carpelan an Sibelius, undatiert, (Oktober) 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 18): „Beträffande virtuoser som böra få conserten sig tillsänd kan jag i saknad af kataloger och lexika ej ge närmare anvisning. Naturligtvis främst ,Reisevirtuosen‘ s.s. Ysaye, Thomson, mästaren i oktavspel (om jag minns rätt) Marteau, Kreisler, Kubelik, Petschikoff, Serato[.] Sådana, som äro på modet i England och Amerika framför allt.“ Sibelius’ unvollständiger Briefentwurf an Lienau, undatiert, (Oktober?) 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46). Lienau an Sibelius am 23. Februar 1906 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46). Konzertankündigung im Berliner Lokal-Anzeiger vom 19. Oktober 1905. In seinem Bericht im Musikalischen Wochenblatt vom 20. Oktober erwähnt Adolf Schulze außer den beiden Konzerten nur Loefflers Eclogue und Carnaval des morts (Variationen über „Dies irae“). Boldemann an Sibelius am 19. Oktober 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 17). Leopold Schmidt im Berliner Tageblatt vom 21. Oktober 1905. Schmidt erwähnt keines der Werke Loefflers. Ebda. Anonymus im Berliner Lokal-Anzeiger vom 20. Oktober 1905. Ebda. – Finnische Zeitungen wie Helsingfors-Posten (23. Oktober), Uusi Suometar (24. Oktober), Helsingin Sanomat (25. Oktober) und


XXII

70 71 72 73

74 75

76

77

78

79

80 81

82

83

84

85

86

Tampereen Sanomat (26. Oktober) fassen einige der Berichte aus Berlin zusammen. Adolf Schulze im Musikalischen Wochenblatt vom 26. Oktober 1905. Lienau an Sibelius am 20. Oktober 1905 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46). Sibelius an Lienau am 23. Oktober 1905; zitiert nach Tawaststjerna (NA, ETA, Kasten 38). Robert Lienau, Ich erzähle. Erinnerungen eines alten Musikverlegers, unveröffentlichtes Manuskript (datiert „Weihnachten 1942“, Lienau-Archiv [= Lienau 1942]), S. 44. Bis. im Hufvudstadsbladet vom 13. März 1906: „Konserten har onekligen vunnit på omarbetning och strykning.“ K.[arl Flodin] in Nya Pressen vom 13. März 1906: „Oaktadt sin omarbetade form skall, tror jag, konserten ej vinna en allmännare förståelse. […] alltför komplicerad, alltför orolig, hållen grått i grått, rapsodisk, trots sin uttänjda form, och belastad med tekniska och rytmiska svårigheter af alla slag […].“ Lienau an Sibelius am 23. Februar 1906 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46): „Er [Lewinger] studiert es jetzt und wird es sicher im Herbst hier in Berlin und in anderen grossen Städten aufführen.“ Sibelius an Carpelan, undatiert, (Ende Februar?) 1906 (NA, SFA, Kasten 120): „[…] Violin konserten vinner mer och mer terrain. Flera studera den och Levinger [sic] bl.a. spelar den nästa saison i Berlin och i andra ,stora‘ städer. […] Will Du ha orkesterpartituret till Conserten? Jag erhåller det i morgon.“ Die Aufführungen in New York fanden am 30. November und 1. Dezember statt; Wassily Safonoff dirigierte das New York Philharmonic Orchestra. Powells spielte laut ihrem Brief an Sibelius das Konzert im Dezember 1906 in New York auch „in privatem Rahmen vor Kritikern, Musikern usw.“, aber die Darbietungen des Werks fanden eine schwache Resonanz. Die Aufführung des Konzerts im Januar 1907 in Chicago war hingegen ein „Triumph“ (Powells Briefe an Sibelius am 14. Dezember 1906 und 1. Februar 1907; NA, SFA, Kasten 26). W. L. Hubbards positiver Bericht über das Werk ist in der Chicago Daily Tribune vom 26. Januar 1907 veröffentlicht. Für einen Überblick über die Aufführungen des Konzerts von 1906 bis in die 1940er Jahre und seine Rezeption siehe auch Salmenhaara 1996, S. 39–42. Sibelius an Lienau am 18. Januar 1907 (Privatsammlung von Rolando Pieraccini, Helsinki). Im Dezember 1906 besuchte Sibelius St. Petersburg und war laut Tawaststjerna 1994, S. 212, und Salmenhaara 1996, S. 39, bei der Aufführung anwesend. Der Brief belegt dies jedoch nicht direkt – und die Verfasser geben auch keine weitere Begründung für ihre Annahme an. Lienau an Sibelius am 12. Januar 1907 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46). Tagebuch, 29. Oktober 1910 (NA, SFA, Kasten 37): „– v. Veczey [sic] spelat konserten. En fin musiker. Men nog får konserten vänta ännu! Utskälld skall den väl bli. Eller hvad ännu värre, att omnämnas af medlidande.“ Franz (Ferenc) von Vécsey war ein aus Ungarn stammender Geiger, Schüler von Jenö Hubay und Leopold Auer. Er spielte Sibelius’ Violinkonzert schon Ende 1909 in Berlin. Tagebuch, 7. Februar 1914: „Återigen violinkonserten ,nedskälld.‘ Det är som om Burmesters ,es schadet deinen Ruf‘ sannades.“ Worauf genau sich Sibelius bei dieser Bemerkung Burmesters bezieht, bleibt unbekannt. Tagebuch, 2. Februar 1915: „Burgin haft stor framgång med violinkonserten. Det är som Bis’ och andras öron småningom anpassades för den.“ Diary, 27. November 1920: „Af Vecsey hälsning med underrättelse att violinkonserten slagit alla med an öfverallt i Syd Amerikat och Europien [sic].“ Sibelius bezieht sich auf Vécseys Grüße (undatiert, vermutlich November 1920; NL, Coll. 206.40), die dieser in Bleistift auf die Rückseite eines Konzertprogramms geschrieben hatte (Konzert vom 3. November 1920 in Stockholm): „Ihr Violinconcert hat überall in Südamerika wie in Europa Begeisterung hervorgerufen!“ Lienau an Sibelius am 18. April 1929 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46). Ossip Schnirlin (gest. 1937), ebenfalls ein Schüler von Joseph Joachim, war ein deutscher Geiger und Violinpädagoge. Lienau an Sibelius am 31. Mai 1929 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46). Schnirlin war wahrscheinlich sogar schon früher den Solo-Violinpart durch-

XXVII

87

88 89

90 91

92

93

94

95 96

97

98

gegangen. Anfang der 1920er Jahre übernahm er zwei Ausschnitte aus Sibelius’ Konzert als Beispiele für „schwierige Passagen aus den wichtigsten Violinkonzerten“ (Arpeggien und Oktav-Flageoletts) in seine Anthologie Der neue Weg zur Beherrschung der gesamten Violinliteratur (Berlin: Schlesinger’sche Buch- und Musikhandlung, Rob. Lienau 1921) und fügte sogar einige Fingersätze hinzu. Lienau an Sibelius am 25. September 1929 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46). Durch das Fehlen des Sibelius-Briefs vom 9. September 1929 (in Lienaus Brief erwähnt) ist über Lienaus Anspielung auf von Vécsey nichts Genaues bekannt. Sibelius könnte angeregt haben, von Vécsey nach den Aufführungshinweisen zu fragen. Lienau an Sibelius am 17. Dezember 1930 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46). Sibelius an Lienau am 22. Dezember 1930 (Privatsammlung von Rolando Pieraccini, Helsinki). – Sibelius’ Entwurf zu diesem Brief (undatiert, wohl vom Dezember 1930; NA, SFA, Kasten 46) enthält dieselbe Information, aber mit anderer Nuancierung: „Die OrchesterBegleitung möchte ich doch neu machen – vereinfachen – weil die in diesem [sic] Form zu schwer ist. Man muss das Stück wie eine Symphoni [sic] [ein Wort nicht lesbar]. Bitte mir zu schreiben was Sie darüber denken.“ Lienau an Sibelius am 7. Januar 1931 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46). Jalas’ Notiz vom 12. Dezember 1943 nach einer Unterredung mit Sibelius (NA, SFA, Kasten 1): „Viulukonserton säestys on harjoiteltava niin kuin sinfonia […]“. Jussi Jalas, Kirjoituksia Sibeliuksen sinfonioista. Sinfonian eettinen pakko (Helsinki: Fazer 1988), S. 113: „Vielä lopulliseenkin versioon Sibelius näyttää ajatelleen muutoksia, ei tosin varsinaisesti sävellysteknillisiä, mutta teoksen orkesteriasuun kohdistuvia. Hänen omassa partituurissaan nimittäin on lyijykynämerkintöjä, jotka kertovat, että säveltäjä nähtävästi aikoi jättää ensimmäisestä ja toisesta osasta pois raskaat vaskipuhaltimet, pasuunat ja trumpetit. Näiden osuuden ympärille hän on joka kohdassa aina piirtänyt rajan ja kevyesti hahmotellut niiden tehtäviä muille soittimille. Arvatenkin tämä johtuu hänen omista kokemuksistaan teosta johtaessaan, sillä niinä aikoina, valio-orkestereita lukuunottamatta, vasket pyrkivät dominoimaan muuta orkesteria ja saattamaan solistin peittoonsa. Orkestereiden puhallinsoittajen taidoissa tapahtuneen yleisen kehityksen vähitellen korjatessa soitinten välistä tasapainoa hänen ei enää tarvinnut toteuttaa muutossuunnitelmaansa.“ Jalas’ Notiz vom 12. Dezember 1943 nach einer Unterredung mit Sibelius (NA, SFA, Kasten 1): „[…] Tekijän muutos – skitseerausta minun partituurissani.“ Nils-Eric Ringbom, Sibelius (Stockholm: Albert Bonniers förlag 1948), S. 88: „Denna sats hör man uppfattas mycket olika. En del solister spelar den snabbt, andra nästan i polonästempo. På frågan vilket tempo som är riktigt svarar mästaren: ,Den skall spelas alldeles suveränt. Snabbt, ja visst, men inte mer än att den kan tas fullkomligt ,von oben‘.‘ – Att ge exakta tempoanvisningar hör för övrigt inte till Sibelius’ vanor. Han anser sig kunna lita på en god konstnärs intuitiva förmåga att träffa den rätta nyansen inom gränserna för de i noterna angivna tempobeteckningarna, och vill inte lägga några ytterligare band på tolkarens uppfattning.“ Sibelius an Lienau am 12. Oktober 1942 (Privatsammlung von Rolando Pieraccini). Im April 1941 wollte der Verleger die Metronomangaben für Satz I und III des Konzerts bestätigt haben und fragte, ob Max Strub (1900– 1966), der das Werk im darauffolgenden Herbst (u. a. in Helsinki) aufführen wollte, Sibelius besuchen und das Konzert mit dem Komponisten erarbeiten könne. Vgl. Lienau an Sibelius am 9. und 24. April 1941 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46). Lienau an Sibelius am 11. Februar 1943 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46). Die Aufführung wurde auch gesendet und später als Tondokument veröffentlicht. Lienau 1942, S. 44: „Die Aufnahme bei den Zuhörern war lau. […] Sehr langsam eroberte sich das Konzert dann die Welt, zuerst in England. Es ging, wie alle großen Meisterwerke, seiner Zeit voraus, und erst die folgende Generation erkannte seinen Wert.“


Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D minor (Early version) Allegro moderato Flauto

I II

Oboe

I II

[Op. 47/1904]

I

Clarinetto I II in B Fagotto

Corno in F

I II

I II III IV

Tromba in F

I II I II

Trombone III

Timpani

Violino solo dolce ed espress.

3

Allegro moderato con sord.

Violino I

con sord.

con sord.

Violino II

con sord.

Viola

Violoncello

Contrabbasso

Š 1904 by Robert Lienau Musikverlag, Germany


4 9

I Solo

espress.

Cl. (B ) I II

Vl. solo crescendo

cresc.

Vl. I

cresc.

cresc.

Vl. II

cresc.

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

A 17

Vl. solo 3

Vl. I

al

al

Vl. II

al

al

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

.

3

3

dim.


5 25

sul G

Vl. solo cresc.

piĂš poco

poco cresc.

Vl. I

poco cresc.

poco cresc.

Vl. II

poco cresc.

Va. Vc. Cb.

33

Ob.

B[marcato]

I II [marcato]

marcato

Cl. (B ) I II

marcato

Fg.

I II I II

marcato

Cor. (F) III IV

marcato

dim.

Timp. 6

sul A 3

Vl. solo subito

I Vl. II marcato

Va. dim.

Vc.

Cb.

.

marcato

3

3


6 40

Fl.

I II poco

Ob.

I II poco

poco

poco

poco

Cl. (B ) I II

Fg.

I II

a2

poco

poco

I II poco

poco

Cor. (F) III IV poco

poco

Tr. (F) I II

I II

Tbn. III

Timp.

Vl. solo 3

5

[

5

pizz. senza sord.

arco

I poco

Vl. senza sord.

pizz.

arco

II poco pizz.

arco

Va. poco

Vc. poco

Cb. poco .

]


7 45

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

Cl. (B ) I II

Fg.

a2

I II

*

I II

Cor. (F) III IV

Tr. (F) I II

I II

Tbn. III

Timp.

Vl. solo

6

[

]

[

]

6

3

3

I

3

Vl. 3

3

II

3

3

3 3

Va.

3

3

3

3

3

Vc. 3

3

3

3

Cb. [ .

* See the Critical Remarks.

]


8 49

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

C

colla parte

[ ]

cresc.

Cl. (B ) I II

[ ]

cresc.

Fg.

I II

(a 2) cresc.

I II cresc.

Cor. (F) III IV

cresc.

Tr. (F) I II

I II

Tbn. III

Timp.

8va

3

sul G

Vl. solo cresc. molto

pizz.

colla parte

arco

I Vl. pizz.

arco

pizz.

arco

II

Va.

Vc. cresc.

Cb. cresc.

.


9 54

Fl.

I II

I II

Cor. (F) III IV

Timp.

Vl. solo ma poco a poco crescendo

I Vl. II Sp.

Va. Sp.

Vc.

Sp.

Cb.

58

Timp. un pochissimo cresc. ten.

Vl. solo crescendo

poco

I Vl. II

Va. un pochissimo cresc.

Vc. un pochissimo cresc.

Cb. un pochissimo cresc.

.

a

poco


10 62

Timp.

Vl. solo

Va. Vc. Cb.

66

Timp. diminuendo

Vl. solo

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

70

Ob.

I

I II

Cl. (B ) I II

I II

Cor. (F)

a2

III IV ( )

Timp.

Vl. solo

Va. Vc. Cb.

.


11 74

Ob.

I II

(I)

3

=

(senza stentando)

dim. 3

Cl. (B ) I II

dim.

Fg.

I II

I II

Cor. (F)

dim.

(a 2)

III IV

dim.

Vl. solo poco

=

(senza stentando)

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

78

Fg.

I II

Vl. solo poco

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc. pizz.

Cb.

.


12

D

82

Fg.

I II

Timp.

Vl. solo

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

86

Fg.

I II

Timp.

Vl. solo meno

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

90

Fg.

Vl. solo

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

.

I II

6

6


13 93

Ob.

E

I II

Cl. (B ) I II

Fg.

I II

6 6

Vl. solo 6

I Vl. II un pochissimo cresc. al *

Va. un pochissimo cresc. al *

Vc.

Cb.

riten. 98

Ob.

I II [

]

Cl. (B ) I II

Fg.

I II

6

Vl. solo 6

6

riten. I Vl. II

Va.

Vc. Cb.

.

* See the Critical Remarks.


14

(

= ) I

103

6

Cl. (B ) I II

Timp.

dolce

11

Vl. solo 6

(

= )

Vl. I

Vl. II

Va.

Vc. [arco]

Cb. dim.

108

Poco lento

Vivace *

poco riten.

Timp.

Vl. solo

Poco lento

Vivace * pizz.

arco

pizz.

arco

pizz.

arco

Vl. I

Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

.

* See the Critical Remarks.

poco riten.


15 113 ( =

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

del Tempo I)

Cl. (B ) I II espress.

Fg.

I II

I II

Cor. (F) III

III IV

Tr. (F) I II

I II

Tbn. III

( )

Timp. dim. possibile

Vl. solo dolce ma forte

( =

del Tempo I)

I Vl. II

Va.

Spitze

Vc.

Spitze

Cb.

.

poco


16

F

119

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

Largamente

Cl. (B ) I II

Fg.

I II dim.

I II

Cor. (F)

dim.

III IV

Tr. (F) I II

I II

Tbn. III

Timp.

*

Vl. solo forte ed espress. 9

Largamente pizz.

I Vl. pizz.

II

pizz.

Va.

Vc. cresc. ma marc.

Cb. cresc. ma marc. .

* See the Critical Remarks.


Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D minor Allegro moderato Flauto

I II

Oboe

I II

Op. 47

I

Clarinetto I II in B Fagotto

Corno in F

I II

I II III IV

Tromba in F

I II I II

Trombone III

Timpani

Violino solo dolce ed espress.

3

Allegro moderato con sord.

Violino I

con sord.

con sord.

Violino II

con sord.

Viola

Violoncello

Contrabbasso

.

Š 1905 by Robert Lienau Musikverlag, Germany


130 9

I Solo

Cl. (B ) I II espress.

Vl. solo cresc.

poco cresc.

Vl. I

poco cresc.

poco cresc.

Vl. II

poco cresc.

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

17

Vl. solo 3

Vl. I

Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

.

3

3

dim.


131 25

sul G

Vl. solo cresc. piĂš

poco

6

Vl. I

6

6

Vl. II

6

con sord. 6

Va. con sord. 6

Vc.

Cb.

33

1 ma marcato

Cl. (B ) I II

3

ma marcato

Fg.

I II

Timp. sul A 3

Vl. solo subito

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

.

3

3

3


132 40

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

Cl. (B ) I II

Fg.

I II

I II

Cor. (F) III IV

Tr. (F) I II

I II

Tbn. III

( )

Timp.

Vl. solo 3

5 5

I Vl. II

senza sord.

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

.


133 45

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

Cl. (B ) I II

Fg.

a2

I II

I II

Cor. (F) III IV

Tr. (F) I II

I II

Tbn. III

Timp.

Vl. solo

6 6

senza sord.

pizz.

senza sord.

pizz.

I Vl. II

pizz.

3

3

3

3

Va.

pizz.

Vc.

pizz.

Cb.

.


134 49

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

colla parte

cresc.

Cl. (B ) I II cresc.

Fg.

I II

(a 2)

cresc.

I II cresc.

Cor. (F) III IV

cresc.

Tr. (F) I II

I II

Tbn. III

Timp. sempre 7

a piacere

Vl. solo cresc. molto

colla parte I Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

.

* See the Critical Remarks.

ten.

veloce sul G *


135 54

I II

Cor. (F) III IV

( )

Timp. dim.

Vl. solo ma poco a poco crescendo

58

(

)

Timp. possibile

Largamente ten.

Vl. solo crescendo e poco a poco stringendo

62

Vl. solo

66

Vl. solo

Tempo I

70

Cl. (B ) I II poco

I II poco

Cor. (F) III IV

poco

Vl. solo crescendo

.


136

2

74

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

3

Cl. (B ) I II

Fg.

( = )

I II [

I II

]

( )

Cor. (F) III IV

Tr. (F) I II

I II

Tbn. III

Timp.

Vl. solo

( = ) I Vl. II div. arco 3

Va. 3

div. arco

Vc. div. (pizz.)

Cb. poco .


137 78

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

Cl. (B ) I II

Fg.

I II [

]

I II

Cor. (F) III IV

Tr. (F) I II

I II

Tbn. III

Timp.

Vl. solo

arco

I Vl. arco

II

Va.

[unis.]

Vc. [ [unis.]

Cb.

.

arco

pizz.

]


138 83

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II poco

Cl. (B ) I II poco [ ]

poco

Fg.

I II poco

I II

Cor. (F) III IV

Tr. (F) I II

I II

Tbn. III

( )

Timp.

Vl. solo

div.

I Vl. II [poco

]

[poco

]

[poco

]

Va.

Vc.

div.

Cb.

.

[unis.] arco


139

Poco a poco dim. ed allargando al 88

Fl.

I II forte

Ob.

I II forte

Cl. (B ) I II poco forte

Fg.

I II forte

I II dim.

forte

Cor. (F)

[

]

III IV forte

Tr. (F) I II

I II

Tbn. III

Timp.

Vl. solo

Poco a poco dim. ed allargando al

dolce

I forte

Vl.

arco dolce

pizz.

II forte arco dolce

pizz.

Va. forte pizz.

Vc. forte [pizz.] *

Cb. forte

.

* See the Critical Remarks.


140

3

93

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

Molto moderato e tranquillo

Cl. (B ) I II dolce

Fg.

I II

I II

II

Cor. (F) III IV

IV

Tr. (F) I II

I II

Tbn. III

( )

Timp.

tranquillo

Vl. solo

Molto moderato e tranquillo I Vl. II

Va.

colla punta dell’ arco

Vc. sempre colla punta dell’ arco

Cb. sempre

.


141 Largamente

99

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II I

Cl. (B ) I II

Fg.

4

I II 4

I II

Cor. (F) III IV

Tr. (F) I II I II

Tbn. III

Timp. * 4

Vl. solo espress. poco

Largamente

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

.

* See the Critical Remarks.

[

]

pizz. [

]


Profile for Breitkopf & Härtel

SON 622 - Sibelius, Sämtliche Werke, Serie II, Bd. 1  

SON 622 - Sibelius, Sämtliche Werke, Serie II, Bd. 1  

Profile for breitkopf