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PLAYING WITH PAPER illuminating, engineering, } and reimagining paper art } Helen Hiebert

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Contents introduction .......................................... 6

1 2 3

getting started: cut, score, fold, and weave ................................ 8 projects to play with: artistic ideas for weaving, flying, illuminating, and inflating paper ................. 28 gallery: taking paper to new dimensions ....................... 96

templates .............................................. 136 resources ............................................. 140 artist directory ................................... 142 acknowledgments .................................. 143 about the author ................................. 144

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Introduction

I

have to confess that I have an obsession with paper. I remember a classmate in fifth grade showing me a crumpled sheet of notebook paper that he’d been crushing and unfolding for days. I tried crumpling a sheet and was amazed at how soft it became. As I manipulated it, it was almost transformed into a new material—something like leather. Fast-forward fifteen years and I was living in Germany on a junior year abroad program in college, taking a class called “Paper.” This time I became engrossed in building with paper. I made a small table out of cardboard and constructed a threedimensional alphabet using pop-up techniques. During my senior year of college (in Tennessee), I delved into the art of origamic architecture, a technique developed in Japan, and made a series of objects that involved the transformation of flat sheets of paper that were simply cut, twisted, and folded to create three-dimensional sculptural forms. A few years after college, I had the opportunity to travel to Japan, where I was, once again, inspired by paper. I spent hours in paper stores and department stores looking at the incredible range of Japanese papers, stationery, and packaging designs. I fell in love with the way light filtered through traditional paper shoji screen walls in the traditional inn where I was staying. And when I returned to New York City, where I had moved after college, I discovered Dieu Donné Papermill, a studio dedicated to the art and craft of handmade paper. Soon after, I realized that I’d found a career. I worked as program director at Dieu Donné for six years. During that time, I learned everything about making paper by hand and had the opportunity to

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meet many experts in the field. I joined the national and international hand papermaking associations and wrote two how-to books about hand papermaking and one about making paper lamps. I met my husband during my tenure at Dieu Donné, and we decided to start a family in Portland, Oregon, where we live today. I have a small but well-equipped papermaking studio in my detached garage, where I produce artists’ books and installations, write a blog, and train interns. I travel and teach, sharing what I know about paper and telling people about the many amazing artists whose work I’ve had the opportunity to view and read about. I still frequently encounter artists from all walks of life who are transforming paper in amazing ways. I’ve asked many of them to contribute projects and images that fill the pages of this book. Their work showcases the variety of ways that artists are working with paper, including pop-ups, model making, paper cutting, book arts, quilling, origami, folding, and pleating, and there are even a few projects that involve flying paper. My hope is that you will be inspired by the potential of paper as an art form. The versatility of paper rivals that of any medium: it can be torn into pieces or burned with a match, yet it has the integrity to grace graphic design, fashion, and even architecture. Even though I no longer need a sheet of paper to write this manuscript because technology has usurped much of our need for it, I trust that artists will continue to create with it and collectors will continue to appreciate its beauty, that same beauty I saw as the light filtered through the ancient shoji screen panels in Japan.

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getting started: CUT, SCORE, FOLD, AND WEAVE

Chapter

1

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page 10

Getting Started:

playing with paper

cut, score, fold, and weave

P

aper is an incredibly versatile material. Not only is it useful as a substrate for all kinds of printed material and art media, but it is also used sculpturally in book arts, model making, architecture, fashion, lighting, interior design, and graphic design. The following guide to materials and techniques will familiarize you with the properties and tools that make working with paper simple and enjoyable.

What Is PaPer? Paper is made from plant fibers such as wood, rags, or grasses, which contain cellulose. The fibers are beaten to a pulp, diluted in water, and poured onto a wire mesh screen surface. As the water drains through the mesh, the pulp solidifies on the

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surface and the fibers interlock through a process called hydrogen bonding. The wet sheets are then pressed and dried to form sheets of paper, and the same basic process is used whether paper is made by hand or by machine.

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a BIt of hIstory The first papers (aside from papyrus, which is not a true paper, because the fibers are not macerated) were made by hand from plant fibers in Asia about two thousand years ago. Later in Europe and then in America, papers were produced by hand from

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cotton and linen rags. Today, commercial papers are made on large machines, where pulp is poured onto a conveyor belt–type screen and then dried, coming off the belt as it is cut into sheets. The advent of the industrial revolution all but eliminated the need for handmade papers, but thankfully, artisans who like to hold on to traditions and artists who like working on handmade paper as a substrate have kept hand papermaking alive. Since the 1970s, artists have been working with handmade paper as a two- and three-dimensional medium in and of itself. There is also a wide range of decorative papers on the market today, many imported from around the world, which are suitable for a variety of artistic techniques.

Where to fInd PaPer I love discovering new papers, sometimes in odd places, like the Jong Ie Nara Paper Art Museum that I visited in Seoul, South Korea, where I found hundreds of origami paper designs that I had never seen before. I have a stockpile of papers in my flat files, so I have stash a to choose from. Here is a list of places to start looking for interesting papers for your projects. • At your fingertips. Wrapping paper, envelopes, office paper, cardstock, tissue paper, and newspaper are just a few of the papers that you might have at home. • In the recycling bin. Call your local printing company or raid your recycling bin and you are bound to find some interesting paper. Don’t forget to think about outof-date business cards, used file folders, envelopes, and other sorts of office papers as a resource. • At specialty stores. There is a plethora of decorative papers on the market today, from origami

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paper to hand-decorated papers. Check out the selection at art supply stores, stationery stores, and scrapbooking and specialty paper stores. There are also a few paper distributors in the United States who manufacture and import decorative papers from around the world that are distributed to stores nationwide (see Resources, page 140).

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• Online. If you live in a small town, it might be hard to find unique papers. There is a wide selection available through distributors and retail stores online. If you are like me and want to touch and see a paper before purchasing it, most paper suppliers sell swatch books, and some will send you a sample of one or two sheets.

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page 12 playing with paper

paper properties Sometimes you’ll need a particular paper quality for a particular project: you might want a paper with extra sizing for a watercolor painting, a strong paper that will be folded and unfolded as the pages in a book, a translucent paper for a lampshade, or a lightweight paper for a hot air balloon. The following factors affect how a paper will perform in a given project. Paper Content There are numerous types of paper on the market today, many machine made from wood, others handmade from plants. Papers range from 100 percent cotton rag watercolor papers, which are acid free, to newspapers made from wood pulp, which turn yellow after a few weeks. Many suppliers offer information about paper content, and you’ll want to investigate this, especially if you are concerned about how long your paper will last. Paper Grain Paper has a grain, like wood does. Grain direction is particularly important when the paper is being folded (such as in an accordion fold or the pages of a book). When manufactured commercially, paper fibers align in the direction of flow on the machine. When you buy sheets of paper, they have been cut down from larger sheets or rolls. In general, the longer dimension

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testInG a PaPer’s GraIn dIreCtIon There are several tricks for testing a paper’s grain direction, and one of the simplest is to bend the sheet in both directions (this test works best on thicker papers). One direction will be considerably more resistant to bending than the other. The direction that offers less resistance indicates the paper’s grain direction.

indicates the grain direction (for example, the grain on a 22 × 40 inch [56 × 102 cm] sheet runs in the 40 inch [102 cm] direction). texture/surface Paper produced on a machine has a subtle woven texture, created when the paper is formed on wire mesh cylinders that carry the wet paper fiber and leave a pattern on the finished sheet. Other textured finishes, such as embossed patterns, are created by using rollers in

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the later stages on the papermaking machine. Traditional handmade paper formed on a mold and deckle have laid lines, which are pressed into the sheet when it is made on a mold constructed of rows of metal wires or bamboo. Laid lines are very close together and run perpendicular to the chain lines, which are made up of stitched wires that affix the laid lines to the mold. And because handmade paper is made one sheet at a time in a mold, it has deckled edges, those rough and feathery borders.

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the tear or fold strength must be adequate. If paper has to be dampened for dyeing or printing, it must have a high wet strength. The strength of a paper does not relate to the paper’s thickness: many of the thinnest Japanese papers are

incredibly strong, due to the long fibered pulp used to create the paper and the sheet formation technique, which involves several layers of pulp laminated together to form a sheet.

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additives and Coatings Sizing is a chemical that is often added to paper to make it somewhat waterproof and thus prevent bleeding when working on it with wet materials, such as watercolor or ink. Papers are sometimes coated with a thin layer of calcium carbonate or china clay to create a surface that is suitable for the printing industry. Some papers are additionally calendared, or polished, to give them a smooth surface. There are hundreds of decorative patterned papers, some hand printed and others printed by machine. Paper thickness/Weight Papers come in a variety of weights and are most commonly referred to as text weight (normal office copier paper) or cover weight (cardstock and heavier). The thickness of a sheet of paper is often measured with calipers and is typically given in thousandths of an inch. The weight of a paper is described using a complex system in pounds in the United States and grams per square meter in Europe. opacity Opacity is the measure of how much light is kept from passing through a sheet of paper. Opacity is important in papers that will be printed on both sides, such as book pages. There are also many translucent papers, which are suitable for lampshades, folding screens, and window decorations. Several projects in this book are enhanced by translucent papers and feature techniques such as cutouts, which create shadows, and pierced holes, which allow light to filter through. Paper strength Paper strength is important for a variety of reasons. If the paper is going to be folded and unfolded, such as in a book, map, or pamphlet,

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page 14

basic tools and materials

e C

playing with paper

Cutting tools I have a small paper cutter in my studio for cutting small sheets to size, as well as an assortment of scissors (b): a standard 8 inch (20 cm) pair, a child-size pair, and tiny scissors (not shown) for making intricate cuts. A heavy-duty pair (t) might be useful for some projects. A rotary tool (d), used to cut fabric, can be used to cut organic lines and shapes. Punches An awl or a potter’s needle (e) (make your own by poking a needle into a cork [f]) works well for punching tiny holes, and an unthreaded sewing machine can punch a row of holes in a flash. Handheld hole punches (g) are great for punching shapes and holes close to the edge of a sheet of paper, but my favorite is the Japanese hole punch (h), which has interchangeable punches in various sizes and allows for punching holes anywhere on a sheet. Decorative punches (c) come in a variety of patterns and are easy to use (the Shadow Ornament project is made with a decorative punch). When you need to cut perfect circles (such as for the Interchangeable

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q

f h

Here is a guide to special tools and materials for working with paper. knives and mats Most of the projects in this book require a craft knife (a). My favorite is the type that takes a #11 blade. Replace the blade often—as with knives in the kitchen, a sharp knife makes cutting easier, especially on thicker papers. A cutting mat protects your work surface and most have grids printed on them, which makes it easy to measure and cut straight lines.

j

t

I

G P

m

s r

a n B

l

k d

o

Ring), use a circle cutter (i). This tool requires a steady hand and frequent blade changes and must be used on a cutting mat. triangles and straightedges I prefer metal rulers (k) for cutting, because plastic rulers can fray when running a knife along their edge. I have rulers ranging in length from 6 to 36 inches (15 to 91 cm), and I use the size that best fits the project. Many metal rulers have cork on the back, which keeps them from slipping. I like a transparent plastic graph ruler for measuring because it has a grid of lines on it, which makes plotting and drawing parallel lines easy. A metal triangle (l) comes in handy when plotting and cutting angles. folding and scoring tools Bone folders (m) are a common bookbinding tool used to score paper in preparation for folding as well as for creasing folds. They are typically made from bone (cow or deer), but some are made from wood, plastic, or even Teflon. In a pinch, you can use the back of a knife to score

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paper. It is often helpful to place the paper you are scoring on a cutting mat or a few pieces of cardstock to cushion the paper when scoring. Proper scoring is done on the side of the sheet that will be folded outward. For example, you score the outside of a book cover. adhesives and applicators My favorite adhesive is PVA glue, which is a white, clear-drying, archival glue, and I love using a mini glue applicator (n), which is available from The Lamp Shop (see Resources, page 140). Brushes (o) also work. Glue sticks (p) are useful for temporary gluing and when gluing thin papers, such as tissue paper. Double-sided tape (q) is thin and works well for laminating sheets of paper together; artist’s tape is repositionable and doesn’t leave a residue, which makes it perfect for temporary connections. drawing tools Pencils (r) and erasers (s) are essential for outlining and marking your measurements.

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page 15

Here’s a glimpse at some of the cool fasteners you can find in office and art supply stores that lend themselves to working with paper.

Fasteners. Peek through your office drawers and you are likely to come up with a variety of fasteners, such as paper clips and staples. Stationery, office supply, and scrapbooking stores have interesting and colorful selections of these items, plus mini clothespins, eyelets, Velcro, clips, brads, and more. Screw posts are metal fasteners that allow you to bind a stack of papers.

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attachments and connections

 Don’t forget the fabric store! Sewing is a great way to connect papers: I run paper through the sewing machine all the time, but you can do many things with hand stitching as well. Japanese stab bindings are done with a needle and thread, and I’ve seen artists even use a drill to make holes in stacks of paper (if you try this, be sure to secure the stack of paper with a clamp).

Think outside the box. I like to use magnets (see the Interchangeable Ring and Accordion Night-Light Cover projects), and I’m always on the lookout for materials that might not normally be used with paper, such as bamboo barbeque skewers for the hinges of the Envelope Folding Screen and the Piano Hinge Photo Album.

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Paper tabs. I like to unfold envelopes, boxes, and other types of packaging to examine their engineering. There are numerous greeting card and gift wrapping ideas that utilize paper engineering as well, and the mechanisms in pop-up books and cards can get even more complex. Simple paper tabs and slots can develop into complex paper structures.

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page 16

how to fold a perfect sixteen-section accordion

playing with paper

Several projects in this book require accordion folds, and the best method is not by folding the sheet back and forth, like most of us did when making simple fans in elementary school.

Reverse the valley fold so that there are three mountain folds. Now fold the top mountain fold up to meet the single leaf edge of the sheet, aligning the edges and creasing the new fold. Fold the middle and last folds up in the same manner, aligning all of the edges and creasing each fold (c).

b

✂ materIals • paper, cut to size • bone folder • bench hook or strip of wood (optional)

c

InstruCtIons

1 make the fIrst fold Place the sheet of paper, face down, on the work surface and fold it in half, matching up the short edges as perfectly as possible. Turn the folded paper to position the folded edge at the top of the work surface (a). a

2 make the seCond set of folds Take the top leaf (a single layer) of paper and fold it up, matching it up with the top folded edge. Crease the fold. Flip the paper over and repeat with the top leaf of paper on the other side. There are now four layers of paper. 3 reverse some folds Unfold the paper gently and note that there is a valley fold (when unfolded, the fold looks like the letter “V,” or a valley) in between two mountain folds (when unfolded, the fold looks like a mountain ridge) (b).

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tIPs Make sure the grain direction runs in the direction of the accordion folds. Use a bench hook tool to push the edges of the folds up against a firm guide for accuracy; alternatively, you can attach a strip of wood to your work surface.

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page 17

how to set an eyelet ✂ materIals • eyelets

4 ComPlete the aCCordIan Finally, fold the bottom leaf up (d) to complete an accordion with sections that are half the size of the original. There are now eight sections.

• hole punch to match the eyelet size (individual punches or Japanese screw punches with several hole sizes can be found at art, craft, and scrapbooking supply stores) • eyelet setter • hammer • cutting mat

InstruCtIons Punch a hole in the paper where the eyelet will be set. Place an eyelet face down on a cutting mat, line up the hole in the paper, and set the eyelet setter on top of the straight sides of the eyelet. Hammer the back of the eyelet setter with a few short taps to set the eyelet.

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d

5 reverse folds aGaIn As in step 3, begin by stretching the paper out and reversing all of the valley folds. Continue as in step 3 until all sections are folded and creased. There are now sixteen sections in the accordion (e). e

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page 18 playing with paper

sculptural paper techniques Paper becomes sculptural as soon as you crumple a sheet, cut a slit, or make a fold. The next few pages will give you an idea of paper’s potential as a sculptural medium and are meant to serve as exercises to inspire exploration. Many of these techniques have entire books dedicated to them (see Resources, page 140). As soon as you make a few cuts and folds, you’ll be on your way to figuring out how to manipulate paper in new ways.

stretCh It Many materials, fabric in particular, utilize stretching properties. By creating a series of slits in paper, it too will stretch and expand. Lots of holes are created as a result, but I think you’ll find the effect quite pleasing.

 Fold a square of paper in half on the diagonal. Fold it in half again. Cut slits from alternating ends, taking care to cut from the folded edges, as shown. Unfold the paper, hold it from the smallest square, and let gravity take care of the rest. Attach a piece of string to hang it, if desired.

 Accordion fold a square or rectangular sheet of paper into four panels (see page 16 for instructions on how to fold an accordion). Cut alternating slits as indicated, carefully unfold the sheet, and stretch it into three dimensions.

Artist Matt Shlian utilizes a similar technique to stretch paper in amazing ways with his intricately cut Stretch studies series (see page 130).

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page 19

Cutting slits of varying shapes and sizes into a sheet of paper enables the paper to be folded, bent, or curved, creating interesting textured surfaces.

slIts aCross a fold Parallel slits cut perpendicular to a fold release the sheet of paper from its two-dimensional state and allow it to be shaped into a vessel or lantern form. Fold a rectangular sheet of paper in half. With the open edge facing up on the work surface, fold the top layer of paper back down about 1â „2 inch (1.3 cm). Flip the paper over and repeat on the other side.

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textured surfaCes In the early 1900s, when purchasing a lamp and shade was an expensive endeavor and Victorian paper crafts such as paper cutting were popular, lampshade makers developed cut and pierced designs. Patterns are available from lamp craft suppliers, or you can design your own.

Unfold the last two folds and cut slits perpendicular to and through the center fold at about 1â „2 inch (1.3 cm) intervals. Finally, unfold and roll the form into a cylinder. Adhere the outer edges with a strip of doublesided tape. Try variations using deckled scissors, cutting the folds at an angle, creating additional folds in a taller sheet of paper, or punching decorative holes in each slit.

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page 20 playing with paper

PaPer Cuts Paper cutting is a tradition found in many parts of the world. Start with simple patterns, like the well-known accordion fold cutouts and paper snowflakes, and then advance to more sophisticated designs and techniques.

Accordion fold a sheet of paper into four panels (see instructions on page 16). Draw a pattern, use a template, or work freehand, leaving some areas on the folds uncut.

 Fold a paper circle or square in half multiple times as shown. Cut out a pattern, using the illustration as a guide.

Fold a sheet of paper in half. Cut slits as indicated with a craft knife. Unfold and attach center parts with a dab of glue, a glue stick, or a piece of double-sided tape.

Artist Béatrice Coron uses her craft knife like a pencil, drawing paper cuts in everything from book pages to wearable paper dresses (see page 102). Model created by Paul Johnson

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getting started

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These do-it-yourself models are from Carol Barton’s book, The Pocket Paper Engineer, a three-volume series on how to make pop-ups step by step. This instructional workbook trilogy is a complete class in the art of designing pop-ups and is filled with construction tips, illustrations of sample pop-ups, and recommendations for tools and supplies (see Resources, page 140).

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PoP-uPs Everyone gets a kick out of popup books and greeting cards, watching the paper transform from two to three dimensions as the page unfolds. Here are a few very basic pop-up folds that serve as the foundation for unlimited and still-to-be imagined pop-up forms.

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page 22 playing with paper

GeometrIC solIds Google “geometric paper sculpture” and you will find instructions for making everything from pyramids to polyhedrons. (I even found instructions for folding a paper DNA model.) Designing forms like these requires the mind of an architect—being able to visualize three-dimensional objects as flat forms. Once you’ve got that down, you just need to add tabs for gluing, and then you’re ready to score, fold, and assemble! Kell Black’s Piece of Cake project (see page 40) features techniques used in creating threedimensional geometric shapes.

Use these illustrations as a guide to map out your own cube and pyramid in any shape or size.

There are many variations and combinations of the basic cube and pyramid shapes. I made this set of vowels called Sound Blocks.

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Score a rectangular sheet of paper as shown. Carefully manipulate along the creases to create alternating mountain and valley folds.

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sCored Curves The fact that you can make a stiff, flat material form fluid folds never ceases to amaze me! Making curved folds is one of the best uses of a bone folder—the paper has to be scored first in order to force it to curve in ways it wouldn’t normally go. Paper choice is important: look for a stiff yet pliable material; otherwise, the paper will tend to crack along the score lines and pucker around the curves. You can make a simple template as a guide for scoring or use a flexible French curve (a drafting tool).

Use a compass to draw a series of circles, one inside the other, with approximately 2 inches (5 cm) between each circle. Score along the plotted lines (freehand or with the aid of a template or French curve). Remove a small pie-shaped section, as shown. Carefully crease along each scored line, alternating mountain and valley folds. Overlap the edges by 1⁄2 an inch (1.3 cm) and glue or tape in place.

 Score the curves as shown. Manipulate the creases into mountain folds, bringing the form into a round. Overlay the edges and glue or tape in place.

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page 24 playing with paper

Pleat Pleat! Pleating is common with fabric, but in most cases it requires stitching or heavy starching to keep the pleats in place. Paper’s rigidity makes these repetitive designs stay in place once they are folded. Start by folding a triangle to learn the basic principles and then try the other variations. Once you’ve mastered turning corners with pleats, you’ll be a whiz at making the Accordion Night-Light Cover (page 76) and the Expanding File Folder Book (page 90). There are two excellent books that feature many variations on pleat folding: Creating with Paper, by Pauline Johnson, and Folding Techniques for Designers, by Paul Jackson (see Resources, page 140).

Fold an isosceles triangle in half and then reverse the fold (folding the paper in both directions is called a universal fold and trains the paper to reverse fold easily in future steps). Accordion fold the doubled paper as shown, unfold, and accordion fold again in the other direction, reversing all the folds. Unfold completely, holding the tip of the triangle pointing away from you. The first fold on the left half of the triangle is a mountain fold and the center crease is a valley fold. Carefully reverse all the folds on the right half of the triangle, so they match the folds on the left; at the same time, alternate the short folds in the center crease.

Artist Eric Gjerde pleats paper in complex ways, creating origami tessellations, many of which he shares in his book of the same name and on his blog (see page 110 and Resources, page 140).

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 This fold is best tested first with a thin paper. Accordion fold a rectangular sheet into eight sections. Next, fold the entire accordion in the middle at a right angle and then reverse that fold. Unfold back to a rectangle and notice the diagonal folds. Work the folds so that the diagonals all end up creasing in the same direction and the verticals alternate between mountain and valley folds, as shown.

This pleating is a bit trickier, until you get the hang of it. Use a thin paper and make a model by accordion folding a 10 × 16 inch (25.4 × 40.6 cm) sheet of paper into sixteen sections. Divide and mark the accordionfolded paper into five 2 inch (5 cm) sections. Score alternating diagonals between the sections as shown. Fold along the score lines and then reverse the folds (because the paper is thin, it should not be difficult to fold through the layers). Gently unfold to reveal the diamond pattern along the accordion folds. Starting from one end, manipulate the paper into a series of diamonds with convex creases (valley folds) in the center of each diamond. If your paper is wide enough, it can be pulled into a spherical form.

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page 26 playing with paper

orIGamIC arChIteCture Japanese engineer Masahiro Chatani wrote a book called PopUp Origamic Architecture, which combines paper folding and cutting techniques. Sometimes this is called kirigami. My first works in paper more than twenty years ago were inspired by Chatani’s books, and I made a series of models. When illuminated, these structures create dynamic shadows.

 Follow the diagram to create a series of graded steps. Cut and score accordingly and push the pop-ups into place.

Create a series of slits as indicated. Score the ends of each slit on both sides and carefully bend the paper or fold it into a cylindrical form.

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Artist Paul Jackson uses another principle of origamic architecture in the Interlocking Pop-Up Castle project (see page 36).

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orIGamI Last but not least, origami is probably the most well known of all of the ways of working with paper, and there are hundreds of books on the subject. Origami, quite simply, means folded paper, and most origami folds begin with a square that is folded multiple times to create objects ranging from flowers to animals. Artists have developed innovative origami techniques, such as wet folding, which involves folding damp paper. This makes the paper more malleable and allows the origami artist to do things that are not possible with dry paper. Traditional origami designs

Chris K. Palmer folds these intricate origami tessellations in kite paper.

Mike Friton’s tessellations become three-dimensional.

Artist Peter Gentenaar’s pieces morph from flat to sculptural forms as wet paper dries in tension with bamboo structures (see page 106).

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In my own explorations in hand papermaking, I embed materials such as string and wire between sheets of paper during the wet sheet formation process. As the sheets dry, they transform from flat sheets into three-dimensional forms, a sort of paper origami that is controlled by the paper itself.

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Chapter

projects to play with: ARTISTIC IDEAS FOR WEARING, FLYING, ILLUMINATING, AND INFLATING PAPER

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2 }

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ProjeCt

artist: Helen Hiebert A variation on window stars seen in Waldorf communities, Paper: kite paper

PaPer tIdBIts Kite paper is a colored wax paper, traditionally used in European kite making. Multicolored packages of 6¼ × 6¼ inch (15.9 × 15.9 cm) sheets can be found online or in Waldorf school stores. Grocery store wax paper or colored tissue are also options, but the crispness and translucency of the kite paper make it worth the special order.

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Window Stars a

b

projects to play with

r

eminiscent of kaleidoscopes and cut paper snowflakes, these stunning light catchers brighten your windows, even on overcast days. This is a great family project—just a few simple folds and some glue. Display a grouping to ward off birds trying to fly through a crystal clear window.

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InstruCtIons

1 CuttInG the PaPer Fold eight 6 1⁄4 × 6 1⁄4 inch (15.9 × 15.9 cm) sheets of kite paper in half, and cut or tear along the folds to create sixteen rectangles that are approximately 6 1⁄4 × 3 1⁄8 inches (15.9 × 7.9 cm). 2 fold and Glue Do the following to all sixteen pieces of paper: First, fold the sheet in half lengthwise. Unfold, and then fold all four corners into the center line, creasing the folds and locking them in place with a fingernail or bone folder. Fold all four corners in again. Use a glue stick to tack down all of the folds so that each unit lies flat (a).

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3 assemBle the seCtIons Take two sections and place one on top of the other. Holding the two narrow points together, fan them apart until the overlap is approximately 1⁄2 an inch (1.3 cm) and glue the sections together (b). Continue joining section by section. Apply glue to the last section and tuck it underneath the first section to complete the circle. Attach the star to a window with a small piece of transparent tape.

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✂ materIals • kite paper or tissue paper • scissors or craft knife • bone folder (optional) • cutting mat (optional) • glue stick • transparent tape

 ConsIderatIons The possibilities for these stars are endless. Begin with a square instead of a rectangle, vary the paper size, modify the folds, overlap the sections in a different fashion, alternate colors, or include the entire rainbow!

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a

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project

b

c

artist: Helen Hiebert Inspired by a design by Linda Riogeist

Papers: Thai unryu, Crystal Metallic

d

paper tidbits There are many translucent papers that are imported from Japan, Thailand, and a variety of other countries. These are often referred to as “rice papers,� but they are not made from rice. They are made from the long inner bark fibers from plants like kozo (or paper mulberry), which has been used throughout Asia for centuries to make paper.

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InstruCtIons

1 PunCh and Cut the PaPer Punch the card-weight paper and trim the edges using a ruler, leaving approximately 1⁄4 inch (6 mm) around the design for the balsa wood frame (a). 2 attaCh the hanGer and Beads Most balsa wood has colored ends and bar codes. If so, trim or sand to remove these. Measure and cut two lengths to fit the cardstock height and another two that are 1 ⁄4 inch (6 mm) smaller. Use an awl to pierce a hole in the center of two of the shorter lengths of balsa wood, thread the needle, and attach a loop of thread to the top for hanging and some beads at the bottom, if desired (b).

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3 adhere the CardstoCk to the Balsa Place the punched cardstock face down on a piece of scrap paper. Apply a small amount of glue to one edge of a longer length of balsa wood, smooth it out, and adhere it to one edge of the paper, using the paper’s edge as a guide. Repeat with the other longer length on the other side. Check that the smaller lengths will fit between the longer ones, sanding the ends down if necessary or shaving them with a craft knife. Glue them in place (c). attaCh the transluCent PaPer Cut the translucent paper slightly larger than the cardstock and place it face down on scrap paper. Apply glue to the face of the square of balsa wood pieces, smooth it out, and then stick it down to the translucent paper. Immediately lift the glued ornament to make sure there are no wrinkles in the translucent paper. Place the ornament on a cutting mat with the translucent paper facedown and trim the paper to the outer edges of the balsa wood (d).

4

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projects to play with

L

ight filtered through paper is captivating, and this project is inspired by the Japanese shoji screens that do a lovely job of dividing space and creating a beautiful atmosphere in a room. Shadows are fun because they change, depending on the light source. Hang this shadow ornament on a Christmas tree or in a window, or package it in a ring box as a gift.

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Shadow Ornament

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✂ materIals • cardstock • plain translucent paper • 1⁄8" × 1⁄8" × 24" (3 mm × 3 mm × 61 cm) stick of balsa wood • decorative thread • beads (optional) • craft knife • cutting mat • paper punch • ruler • sandpaper (optional) • awl • needle • scrap paper • white glue • pencil

 ConsIderatIons Most paper punches have a limited reach, so the size of this ornament is limited to how far the punch can reach into the paper. Cutting a design by hand eliminates this challenge.

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ProjeCt

PaPer tIdBIts An incredible range of 8½ × 11 inch (21.6 × 28 cm) cardstock is available in a variety of stores and online. Scrapbooking papers come in an even wider variety of printed designs. Use a heavier weight cardstock to ensure these bugs don’t lose their capacity to fly for a long time!

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artist: Mike Friton Paper: metallic cardstock

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Kirigami Mobile

a

b

projects to play with

I

nnovator Mike Friton has patented numerous shoe prototypes for Nike as well as collapsible wings for stage performances. His passion for finding new ways to translate flat materials into three-dimensional shapes has led him to experiment with three-dimensional textile and paper sculpture, exploring weaving and cut-out techniques, like these kirigami insects and animals.

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} ✂ materIals • template (see page 136) • cardstock • alligator clips • wire • string • craft knife • cutting mat • pencil • bone folder • straightedge • scissors (optional)

sCore and fold Score along all of the score lines as indicated. Fold the butterfly in half and crease the center line with a bone folder. Unfold the wings about halfway and manipulate the score lines along both sides of the body section, making the body pop up. Fold the butterfly in half again to reinforce the body folds (b).

2

InstruCtIons

1 transfer the ImaGe to PaPer Enlarge the template found on page 136 to your desired size and print it onto a sheet of cardstock. These samples each fill an 8 1⁄2 × 11 inch (21.6 × 28 cm) page. With a craft knife and cutting mat, cut out the butterfly outline, the small shapes in the wings, and the slits in the body (a).

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3 make the moBIle I found this Photo Ball Mobile online, but it would be pretty simple to construct your own. Mini alligator clips can be purchased at electronics stores, or search the aisles of local office supply stores for interesting clips. Suspend the clips from wire or string and let your insects and animals bounce around.

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 ConsIderatIons Kirigami is a variation of origami that involves cutting the paper in addition to folding it. Kirigami patterns are usually symmetrical and start with a folded base, which is cut and then the cuts are opened and flattened. Once you make one or two of these, it will be easy to branch out and design more mobile characters of your own!

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ProjeCt

artist: Paul Johnson Paper: 12 pt. colored cardstock

PaPer tIdBIts Cardstock comes in a variety of weights: use 80# (pound) or 100# cover stock to make this castle stand upright.

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T

ake three sheets of paper and cut them into eight interlocking pieces to make this pop-up paper castle! Book artist Paul Johnson has devised numerous lightweight collapsible structures by studying cellular packaging designs, and his pop-up books utilize interlocking slots and tabs, which allow them to collapse flat. a

projects to play with

Interlocking pop-up Castle

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b

✂ materIals • templates (see page 137) • 3 sheets cardstock, 8 1⁄2" × 11" (21.6 × 28 cm) • craft knife or scissors • cutting mat

InstruCtIons

1 Cut out the Castle PIeCes Photocopy each template onto a sheet of cardstock. Cut out the pieces, including the slits (and the windows, if desired) (a).

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2 InterloCk the PIeCes Start by interlocking the castle pieces, ensuring that the windows are facing out. Next, interlock the outer walls, keeping the battlements at the top (b).

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 ConsIderatIons Once you familiarize yourself with how the slits function, design your own collapsible structures, from simple grids to abstract forms. Try using printed cardstock or decorative papers.

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a

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ProjeCt

b

c

d

artist: Helen Hiebert Papers: translucent vellum, cardstock

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InstruCtIons Cut out the CIrCles Use the cutting mat and circle cutter to cut out seven or eight circles (1 1⁄2 or 2 inches [3.8 or 5 cm] in diameter) from the vellum (a).

1

2 fold the CIrCles Fold each circle in half and crease the fold with a bone folder. Unfold and flatten back out into a circle. Don’t turn the paper over (this fold is easy if the first two creases are on the same side of the paper); fold the circle in half again, so that the two ends of the line that were just folded together overlap. Crease this fold, creating a cross on the circle. Unfold. Now turn the paper over and fold the circle in half so that the end points of the two previous folds meet and overlap. Unfold into a circle again, push in at the center of the last fold, and flatten the folds to create a quarter circle (b).

3 joIn the CIrCles Cut small pieces of double-sided tape (approximately 1⁄4 × 1⁄2 inch [6 mm x 1.3 cm]) to adhere the paper sections. Place a piece of tape on one side of a section and adhere another section to it, taking care to line them up. Repeat with each section, making a long snakelike piece. The last section will be joined to the first, bringing the piece into the round (c). 4 add the BaCkInG Cut a circle of cardstock just a bit wider than the diameter of the ring topper. Apply a thick layer of white glue (do a test first, to make sure the glue dries clear) to the circle and set the ring topper on it. Push the topper down so that it forms a semi-sphere and all of the folded edges touch the glue. Hold in place until the glue sets (or find

a small weight to set on top of it as it dries). Let it sit for a few hours. Place a drop of epoxy on the back of the magnet and attach it to the center of the ring topper. Connect the topper to the ring blank (d).

projects to play with

Y

ou can make several of these ring toppers in different colors and swap them out to match your mood. A small magnet holds the ring topper in place but allows you to customize the piece for variety.

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Interchangeable ring

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✂ materIals • translucent vellum paper • colored or decorative cardstock • strong slim magnet (see Resources, page 140) • ring blank (see Resources, page 140) • double-sided transparent tape • white glue • epoxy glue • cutting mat • circle cutter • bone folder

 ConsIderatIons Purchase a circle cutter at an art or craft supply store to make cutting a perfect circle a snap.

PaPer tIdBIts Before there was paper, vellum was a paperlike substrate made from calfskin, which was cleaned, bleached, stretched on a frame, and scraped to produce single pages for scrolls and books. Today, commercially produced vellum is made from plasticized cotton and the paper is translucent. Vellum has a stiff quality, which enables it to hold its shape when folded; it is often used for architectural drawings.

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ProjeCt

artist: Kell Black Paper: index-weight white cardstock

PaPer tIdBIts Index-weight cardstock is the perfect weight for this project— thick enough to hold up, but not too thick for the intricate folds in this 2 inch (5 cm) -long piece of cake.

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piece of Cake a

InstruCtIons

1 Cut the PIeCes Photocopy the template onto cardstock and cut the pieces (a). 2 make the Plate and fork Score all of the lines on the bottom of the plate with a thin tool, such as the unsharpened edge of a craft knife. Carefully fold the edge of the plate between each triangle to create a fluted edge. Bend the fork handle slightly so that it rests on the edge of the plate (b).

b

3 make the Cake Score and fold along all of the solid lines. Glue the tip of the cake together, placing the tab on the inside of the slice. Score and fold the top of the cake and glue it in place, with the frosted edges showing on the outside. Score, fold, and glue the line of frosting between the layers onto the cake (b).

c

4 make the Candle Starting with the tapered edge of the candle piece, roll the paper around a toothpick and glue it where the end meets the line on the paper. Put a dab of glue on the bottom of the wick and slip it into the candle (b).

projects to play with

W

ho doesn’t love cake? And this slice has no calories! Surprise a lucky someone with one of these on her birthday! Kell Black, author of Paper New York and Paper Chess, makes one each year for his secretary at work.

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}

assemBle Glue the bottom of the cake onto the plate, glue the fork in place, and glue the candle on top (c). Let’s eat cake!

5

✂ materIals • cardstock • template (see page 138) • craft knife • cutting mat • bone folder • toothpick • white glue • pencil • ruler

 ConsIderatIons Before assembling, decorate your piece of cake with stickers, markers, or colored pencils.

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ProjeCt

artist: Helen Hiebert Papers: baby envelopes from Paper Source; photos printed on Epson Premium Presentation Paper Matte

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T

he piano hinge binding was developed by hedi kyle, a pioneer in the field of book arts who has developed many innovative binding systems and unique folding methods. I gave it my own twist by using envelopes because the double layer of paper means the hinge is built in. And because envelopes are rarely used for mail anymore, here is a creative use for them!

projects to play with

piano hinge photo album

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}

InstruCtIons

a

1 PrePare the enveloPes Determine the size and shape of the picture frame. The frame pictured here is 1 1⁄2 × 2 inches (3.8 × 5 cm), allowing for a 3 ⁄8 inch (1 cm) border on three sides and extra space at the hinge. mark the hInGes Trace the template on page 139 on a lightweight cardstock and cut it out. Place the template with the notched side along one edge of the envelope and mark the notches with a pencil. Mark the slight angle at each end of the pattern (a).

2

✂ materIals • lightweight cardstock • baby envelopes (2 1⁄4" × 3 1⁄2" [5.7 × 9 cm]) • photos • slim bamboo skewers • template (see page 139) • craft knife • heavy duty scissors, wire cutting tool, or garden clippers • cutting mat • pencil • ruler or straightedge • scissors

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3 Cut out the hInGes and WIndoWs Using a craft knife or scissors, cut, remove, and discard the notches and the angles from the ends. The edge of the envelope is now divided into three sections between the notches. With the flap closed, measure, draw, and cut out the window on one envelope to make a template. Use the window template to trace the shape onto all of the other envelopes (keeping the flaps closed) and cut them out (a).

playing with paper

page 44

b

4 fIll the PoCkets Cut photographs to fit inside of the envelope: the width should be 1â „2 an inch (1.3 cm) smaller than the width of the envelope and the height should be 1â „4 inch (6 mm) shorter than the envelope height. Insert two photos, back to back, into the window frames, paying attention to the orientation. Seal the parts of the flap that are not cut away. 5 thread the BIndInG Cut bamboo skewers to the height of the spine using heavy duty scissors. Arrange the photo pages and stack them with the backs (the sides where the flaps show) of the envelopes all facing the same direction. Working from the bottom of the pile to the top, pick up the bottom two envelopes and thread a skewer into the top section of the top envelope, the middle section of the bottom envelope, and then back into the top section of the top envelope. Pick up the third envelope and place it on top of the first two. Thread the skewer in the same fashion. Continue adding pages until they are all joined (b).

PaPer tIdBIts Baby envelopes are available at specialty paper stores, stationery stores, and online, where all sorts of papers, shapes, colors, and sizes can be found. Create custom photos for this book by printing them onto photo paper and cutting them to size.

Detail of the binding.

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V varIatIons • This project can be adapted for any envelope shape or size. • Leave one edge of the window connected to create a flap, so that the photos can be revealed when the window is opened. • Don’t seal the envelopes for easy photo swapping. • Use translucent vellum envelopes for an interesting effect. • Create shaped window cutouts with a circle cutter or a template.

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project

artist: Helen Hiebert Papers: colored envelopes, asanoha (star pattern) Japanese lace paper

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E

nvelopes are fun to work with because they come in a variety of colors and sizes and other papers can easily be slipped into the pockets. This adapted piano hinge allows the panels of the mini folding screen to flex in both directions, enabling the screen to be displayed in a variety of ways or even folded into a box-shaped lantern. Cut out patterns reminiscent of stained glass, slip decorative papers inside, and set the screen in a spot where it can catch some light.

projects to play with

Envelope Folding Screen

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}

a

✂ Materials • A7 envelopes • lightweight cardstock • decorative paper • bamboo skewers • heavy duty scissors, wire cutting tool, or garden clippers to cut bamboo skewers • stencils • pencil • template (see page 139) • craft knife • scissors • cutting mat • straight edge or ruler • bone folder

instructions

1 cut panels Draw or trace the stencil pattern onto an envelope, leaving a 1⁄2 inch (1.3 cm) margin on each edge. With the envelope flap closed but not sealed, cut the stencil design through all of the layers with a craft knife. Carefully erase any pencil marks after cutting. Repeat on each envelope panel (a).

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V variations The flexible hinge allows the envelope panels to be joined in various configurations: try making a vertical wall hanging, a box lantern, or a multi-panel screen. Accordion fold the finished project into a stack of flat panels for easy storage.

(Text) (Ray)

 considerations Consider alternating two patterns or design four or more unique panels to make the paper cuts tell a story. To find imagery, look for ready-made stencils in art supply stores, download clip art from the Internet, or trace pictures or patterns found in magazines or books.

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playing with paper

page 48

b

2 Mark the hinges Trace the template onto lightweight cardstock and cut it out. Place the template with the notched side along one edge of the envelope and mark the notches with a pencil. Mark the slight angle at each end of the pattern as well. Flip the template over and repeat on the opposite side of the envelope (b). Note: Do not cut notches on the sides of the envelopes that will not be hinged, such as the two ends of the folding screen.

paper tidbits Until 1840, all envelopes were individually cut by hand from rectangular sheets of paper. In the United Kingdom, George Wilson patented the method of tessellating (tiling) multiple envelopes on one large sheet of paper and reduced the overall amount of waste produced. Japanese lace papers are lightweight, fabriclike tissues that are machine made. The distinctive patterns are formed when the long fibers are separated by jets of water sprayed through patterned screens onto the wet, newly formed sheets.

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(Text) (Ray)

3 cut the hinges Using a craft knife or scissors, cut, remove, and discard the notches and the angles from the ends. The edge of the envelope is now divided into six sections between the notches.

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page 49 projects to play with

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d

c

4 score the hinges Alternating envelope hinges (envelopes 1, 3, and so on) will be cut like this: Keeping the envelope flap closed, place a straightedge or ruler along the points of the V-shaped notches on one side of the envelope, so that it is parallel to the edge. Using a bone folder, carefully score the section between the top of the envelope and the first notch. Skip a section and then carefully score every other section between the notches (c).

e

Flex the scored sections back and forth and then gently pry the edge of the envelope open, reverse the folds, and tuck the scored sections inside the envelope (d). Repeat on the opposite side of the envelope. For alternating envelopes (2, 4, and so on), score and tuck every other section so that the hinges, when joined, will interlock.

5 fill the pockets Cut a sheet of decorative paper to fit inside of the envelope: the width should be 1â „2 inch (1.3 cm) smaller than the width of the envelope and the height should be 1â „4 inch (6 mm) shorter than the envelope height. Slide the paper inside the envelope and seal the parts of the flap that are not cut away. asseMble the screen Thread the bamboo skewers through the alternating hinges and trim the ends using heavy duty scissors (e).

6

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9}

page 50

project

artist: Helen Hiebert Papers: warp: Taiwanese mulberry, crumpled by the artist; weft: hand marbled paper by Steve Pittelkow

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projects to play with

W

eaving paper is much faster than weaving cloth, and with so many decorative papers to choose from, it is both fun and easy to come up with a paper combination that will match any type of home decor. The paper crumpling, the wavy lines of the warp and weft, and the tiny cutout windows make this project a step up from the paper weaving most of us learned in elementary school. Paper can be woven to create wall hangings, window coverings, coasters, or place mats. Ideas abound!

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Woven Table Runner

}

✂ Materials • two complementary papers • clear contact paper (optional, if waterproofing is desired) • craft knife • cutting mat • ruler • pencil • glue stick • thin sheet plastic (styrene) or dense cardboard

 considerations In weaving, the warp is the set of lengthwise yarns that are held in tension on the loom, and the weft is the yarn which is drawn through the warp yarns to create cloth. Here, the blue crumpled paper is the warp, and the marbled paper is the weft.

A window hanging allows light to filter through the cutouts. It is simple to shape the edges of the paper with scissors, and the holes for hanging from the branch were cut with a circle punch.

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(Text) (Ray)

Choose a soft, flexible paper for the warp if the table runner will hang over the edge of a table. The mini cutting mat is made from thin sheet plastic (styrene) but chipboard or dense cardboard will also do the trick. The runner can be placed under glass or covered with clear contact paper to protect it.

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playing with paper

page 52

a

instructions

paper tidbits Traditional Japanese momigami is a strong, clothlike paper that has been coated in starch, dried, and then scrunched until the sheet feels like soft chamois and can be used like cloth. Marbling is the art of printing multicolored swirled or stonelike patterns on paper or fabric. The patterns are formed by first floating the colors on the surface of a liquid and then laying the paper or fabric on top of the water, allowing it to pick up the color.

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(Text) (Ray)

1 prepare the warp and weft Determine the length and width of the table runner and cut the warp paper to that exact size. The weft paper can be cut smaller (as shown) or can be cut to the same length and width as the warp. Place the warp paper right side down and position the weft paper on top of it. Using a ruler and a pencil, draw a guideline around the weft paper onto the warp paper.

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b

page 53

Cut the weft: Lay the weft paper on a large cutting mat and cut it into undulating strips that are approximately 1 inch (2.5 cm) wide, taking care to keep the pieces in order for weaving (a).

3 start weaving Erase pencil marks and then turn the warp paper face up. Starting from the left or right, weave the first strip of weft paper over and under the warp paper slits. Weave the second strip starting underneath the warp so that the pattern alternates from row to row to create the woven pattern. Repeat this process and continue alternating to complete the weaving (b). The last piece might be difficult to weave into the remaining slits. If this is the case, trim the long, flat side of the strip to fit before weaving it in.

projects to play with

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2 cut the warp and weft Cut undulating slits running the length of the warp: The first slit should start at the left-hand pencil guideline and approximately 1 inch (2.5 cm) above the bottom guideline and run across the warp, stopping at the right-hand pencil guideline. Continue making slits approximately 1 inch (2.5 cm) apart, stopping 1 inch (2.5 cm) above the top guideline.

c

4 glue the edges Use a glue stick to carefully tack the ends of the woven weft pieces to the warp. Flip the table runner over and glue the remaining ends down. 5 cut out the windows Cut a small piece of styrene or chipboard into a triangular shape that is approximately 1 inch (2.5 cm) wide and 2 inches (5 cm) long. Slip the mini cutting mat underneath each section of the warp and/or weft paper and use a craft knife to cut out the little windows (c).

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artist: Helen Hiebert Paper: Van Dyke photo printing by Alyssa C. Salomon on handmade abaca paper

10}

page 54

project

paper tidbits Tracing paper is a type of translucent paper used to trace images. Its manufacturing process includes immersion in sulfuric acid for a few seconds, a treatment that makes it stronger than the original paper. The combination of a thin yet strong paper makes it the perfect choice for this project.

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Inflatable Ball

instructions

a

projects to play with

B

alls are a familiar and universal object, enjoyed by people (and animals) throughout time and across cultures. This ball is fun to play with because it is lightweight—simply fill it with air and inflate it like a balloon. Unlike rubber balloons, however, this one can be partially filled and shaped because the paper isn’t elastic and can hold its shape. Or fill it with birdseed or rice to make a paperweight (or a sculpture that isn’t likely to be blown away or knocked over).

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} b

1 cut the gores Cut four lengths of tracing paper a bit longer than the template (see page 139) and fold them in half lengthwise. Stack these sections together, creating eight layers of paper. Trace the template onto cardstock, cut it out, place it on top of the stack of tracing paper, and trace the template pattern onto the top layer. Using a craft knife or scissors, carefully cut out eight gores (a). glue the first two gores Place one gore face down on a piece of newsprint. Starting 1 inch (2.5 cm) from the top point, apply a thin bead of glue ( 1⁄8 inch [3 mm]) to one edge of the gore, ending 1 inch (2.5 cm) from the bottom tip. Be sure to get good coverage with the glue (any gaps will lead to holes in the seam and the ball will not inflate). Smooth out the glue with a brush. Place a second gore on top of the first (right side up), lining up the edges and pressing to adhere the seam. Remove the newsprint and discard it. Let the glue set for a few moments (b).

2

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✂ Materials

about gores: The word gore is a sewing term, referring to a fabric (or in this case, a paper panel) that is usually tapered or shaped to make up a garment, such as a skirt.

(Text) (Ray)

• 14" (35.7 cm) -wide roll of tracing paper • cardstock • template (see page 139) • pencil • scissors or craft knife • cutting mat (optional) • newsprint or scrap paper • white glue • glue brush (optional) • blow dryer

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c

page 56

3 add gores 3 to 8 Slip a piece of newsprint in between gores 1 and 2 on the work surface. Just as in step 2, apply glue, but to the opposite side of gore 2. Attach gore 3 (c). Lift the two gores that were just glued and make sure the glue isn’t seeping through to gore 1. Pinch the glued area and move your fingers along the entire seam to ensure adhesion. Remove and discard the newsprint.

playing with paper

Slip another piece of newsprint between gores 2 and 3 on the opposite side and glue gore 4 to gore 3. Continue in this fashion until gore 8 has been glued and is at the top of the stack. The stack of gores will look accordion folded. Go back through each accordion, making sure the seams are glued all the way along the edge and that only two gores are glued together. Let the glue dry. After all the sections are glued together, the view from the end of the stack looks like an accordion. Trim approximately 1⁄2 inch (1.3 cm) from the top and bottom tips (d).

4 final gluing Slide a piece of newsprint underneath gore 1. Leaving gore 1 flat on the table and keeping gore 8 as is on top of the stack, gently fold gores 2 through 7 in half and tuck them inside the two outer gores. Place a 1⁄8 inch (3 mm) bead of glue along the open edge of gore 1 and carefully adhere gore 8 to it (e). Allow the glue to dry.

d

5 inflate Cup one of the cut ends in one hand, gently pinching or covering the opening, and blow air into the other end, and then continue to inflate the ball with a blow dryer on the low setting (f). 6 cap the end Gently force the air out of the ball while cupping one end in one hand, so that the other open end is more or less flat. Cut a circle large enough to cover the hole out of tracing paper, apply glue around the edges, and cap the ball with it, applying pressure with a hand from behind. The other end is not capped, so that the ball can be deflated for storage purposes (g).

 tip: upside down or right side up? In order for all of the imagery to appear on the outside of the ball, place gore #1 face down, gore #2 right side up, gore # 3 face down, and so on as the sections get glued together. This isn’t necessary if there is no imagery on the ball.

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(Text) (Ray)

When applying glue along the edge of a sheet of paper, it is convenient to have a glue applicator. It is also handy to place a piece of newsprint underneath the item being glued. This will catch any glue that slips off of the object being glued and is easy to pick up and discard, preventing glue in unwanted areas.

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e

f

g

V variations • Enlarge the pattern to create other ball sizes. • Create a different shape! Instructions for creating gore patterns for other shapes and sizes can be found on the Internet. • Some or all of the gores can be embellished with drawings, markers, rub-on letters, or rubber stamps, among other things.

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11}

page 58

project

artist: Brian Queen Paper: tissue paper

paper tidbits Tissue paper is available in drugstores, art supply stores, and even grocery stores and comes in a variety of colors and patterns. Tracing paper is slightly heavier and works well for larger balloons. Japanese papers are lightweight, much stronger, and more expensive and are a great option for a more durable balloon.

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P

aper hot air balloons have an interesting history! Two French brothers, born into a paper manufacturing family, succeeded in launching the first manned hot air balloon ascent in 1783 (the balloon was made of paper and fabric). During World War II, the Japanese created balloon bombs, which were a best-kept secret during the war. Nine thousand large hydrogen balloons were constructed from paper, incendiary bombs were attached, and they were floated across the Pacific Ocean on the high-altitude trade winds in an attempt to attack the United States. Approximately 300 balloon bombs were reported to reach the mainland, some traveling as far as Michigan, and the only World War II casualties on American soil were six picnickers in Oregon who found one of the balloons and tried to move it, causing it to explode. flying a hot air balloon Getting a hot air balloon to fly can be tricky. Here are a few helpful hints: • Find a wide-open space and make note of the wind direction. Seasoned balloonists release a small rubber helium balloon to test the winds. Only fly the balloon in light wind (or in a large auditorium for a more controlled flight). • The paper has to be light enough to float when the balloon is filled with hot air. The air temperature where the balloon is being flown is also a factor. Good flights require a large temperature difference between the air inside and outside the balloon, so the balloon will fly best on a cool day. • There are also safety considerations. Paper burns, so take care not to get the heat source

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too close to the paper. It is best to launch in a big open area or indoors with high ceilings, so the balloon doesn’t get caught in trees or drift toward power lines or roads. Depending on the temperature and wind conditions, be prepared to chase the balloon for several blocks.  considerations • Purchase a roll of tracing paper or a thin Japanese paper to avoid gluing together pieces of tissue paper; however, this colorful tissue paper balloon looks really beautiful when flown. • The gore template (see page 139) can be scaled up to create larger balloons, and a quick search on the Internet will lead to a variety of gore patterns for other interesting shapes and sizes.

(Text) (Ray)

projects to play with

Paper Hot Air Balloon

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}

✂ Materials • 18 sheets of 20" × 26" (51 × 66 cm) tissue paper • stiff paper for template • 5" (12.5 cm)-diameter circle of tissue paper • 22 " (56 cm) length of coat hanger wire or equivalent or 6" (15 cm)-diameter ring from lamp supplier (see Resources, page 140) • template (see page 139) • craft knife or scissors • cutting mat (optional) • glue stick • pencil • newsprint or scrap paper • white glue • glue brush (optional) • blow dryer • artist’s tape • heat gun or camping stove

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c

playing with paper

page 60

a

b

instructions

1 prepare the tissue paper Take three sheets of tissue paper and glue them end to end with a glue stick on the 26 inch (66 cm) edge, coordinating the paper colors as desired. Make sure there are no gaps in the glue coverage. The glued pieces of paper should measure approximately 60 inches (152.4 cm) in length. Create six of these, and stack the lengths one on top of the other (a). 2 cut the gores Enlarge the template (see instructions on the left), trace onto a stiff paper (brown Kraft or butcher paper work well), cut it out, place it on top of the stack of tissue paper, and trace the template pattern onto the top layer twice, side by side. Using a craft knife or scissors, carefully cut out twelve gores (b). 3 create the balloon envelope Follow steps 2 through 4 from the Inflatable Ball project (refer to pages 55 and 56) to create the balloon envelope. Note that there are twelve gore sections instead of eight; be sure to assemble all twelve before sealing the envelope (the assembled balloon is called an envelope) (e). notes on teMplate preparation: The gore pattern enlarges to 59 inches, which requires several sheets of paper and two stages of enlargement on a photocopier. I found it easiest to plot out on a large sheet of kraft paper. If you want to enlarge it on a photocopier, it needs to be enlarged 667%: first copy it at 200% and then enlarge that pattern by 347%.

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(Text) (Ray)

4 cap the top Gently arrange the tops of the gores in such a way that the opening at the top of the envelope is flat on the work surface. Apply glue to the outer rim of the 5 inch (12.7 cm) circle of tissue paper and attach it to the envelope, covering the opening (c).

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projects to play with

6 Launch! To fill the balloon, open the accordion folds and hold it over the source of heat. If there is access to electricity, the ideal heat source is an industrial heat gun. A camp stove also works well and has the advantage of being portable. If using a camp stove, it must be fitted with a stovepipe for safety reasons (tissue paper is highly flammable). Lower the neck of the balloon over the stovepipe (it is helpful to have another person hold the balloon until it is inflated). Fill with hot air until a distinct upward pull is felt. Let go and it will quickly ascend (e).

d

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5 Fit and attach the Wire hoop The wire hoop serves two purposes: to weight down the bottom of the balloon so that it is more stable in flight and to create an opening, making it easier to fill with hot air. Determine the size of the wire hoop by placing it in the opening of the neck of the balloon 1 inch (2.5 cm) from the bottom of the gores. Remove the sized hoop and tape the overlap. Make twelve tabs in the neck of the balloon by cutting 1 inch (2.5 cm)-deep cuts between each of the twelve seams. Set the wire hoop in place by folding over and gluing the tabs (d).

e

 tip: Holes discovered after assembly and/or inflation can be easily patched with pieces of transparent tape.

5 foot diameter inflatable ball.

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12}

page 62

project

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P

rotect favorite books with this cover or make a reusable jacket for notepads, memo books, and address and phone books. Color coordinate a section in your library or highlight special books by covering a group with the same paper.

projects to play with

Reusable Book Cover

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}

✂ Materials • strong cover-weight paper • waxed linen bookbinding thread • pencil • ruler • craft knife • cutting mat • bone folder • double-sided tape • sewing machine or awl • foam core or Styrofoam • needle

artist: Bridget O’Malley Papers: Cave Papers in tangerine and teal

 considerations • Waxed linen is strong and durable, and the wax gives it a sticky quality that aids in the sewing process.

paper tidbits Cave Paper is a small hand-papermaking studio located in the basement of a Minneapolis warehouse, where the walls are hewn rocks and the space extends further than the light does. Proprietors Bridget O’Malley and Amanda Degener approach making paper in a way that is as cavelike as the surroundings. There is a certain rough elegance to the papers that begins and ends with the raw materials. They use flax and cotton rag along with natural dyes and pigments (indigo, walnut, persimmon, red iron oxide, ochre, and black) to create strong, durable sheets suitable for book covers.

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(Text) (Ray)

• Scoring is usually done on the outside of the paper or the side that will be folded away from you. • The book can be stitched on the sewing machine, but the stitching will look machine made rather than hand sewn and rustic.

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⁄2"

1

height of book

playing with paper

page 64

(1.3 cm)

instructions

1 deterMine the paper size Use the guidelines shown at the left to determine the book jacket’s height and width. Make a sketch indicating the measurements—this will come in handy during subsequent steps. Height: the height of the book + 1" (2.5 cm) Width: width of the book × 2, + the spine thickness + 41⁄2" (11.4 cm) Cut the paper to size (height by width).

(1.3 cm) 2" (5 cm)

width of book + 1⁄4" (6 mm)

width of book + 1⁄4" (6 mm)

width of spine

a

2" (5 cm)

⁄2"

1

2 Mark and fold Find and mark the center of the book cover lengthwise. Divide the spine thickness in half and measure that distance from the center in both directions. Score and fold to create the spine. Tuck the actual book up against the spine and mark the folds for the flaps, adding 1⁄4 inch (6 mm) on each side so the book has a bit of room to move in the finished jacket. Score and fold the flaps (a). cut and position the pocket Cut or tear a small pocket from paper for the front cover. Tack the pocket in position on the front cover with doublesided tape.

3

 tip: Tear paper to make it look like it has a handmade (deckled) edge by scoring it along the tear line, folding it back and forth along that line to weaken the fiber bonds, taking a damp sponge and running it along the folded edge on both sides, and finally tearing the paper along the dampened edge. The resulting edge will have a feathery, deckled look.

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page 65

pierce the holes Run both layers of the pocket through an unthreaded sewing machine set on a wide straight stitch, remembering not to pierce the top edge. Then, with the flaps of the jacket folded over, run the top and bottom edges of the book jacket through the sewing machine (b). Alternately, use an awl to pierce holes along the edges of the cover, approximately 1⁄8 inch (3 mm) apart. Set a piece of foam core or Styrofoam beneath the paper for easy punching.

4

5 stitch Tie a knot in one end of the thread and cut the end of the thread short. Thread the needle. Starting at one corner of the pocket on the inside of the book, hand stitch through the holes using a running stitch. Remove the double-sided tape from the inside of the pocket. Tie off the thread at the end of the pocket on the inside of the jacket. Tie another knot in the end of the thread and sew the top and bottom edges of the book, knotting the thread at each end (c).

projects to play with

7/12 10:55 AM 4/12 7:19 PM

b

c

 tip: hiding the knots There are a couple of tricks to hiding the knots and tying off the thread on the top and bottom edges of the cover. Tie a knot at the end of the thread and begin stitching at the end hole on the inside of the folded cover (between the two layers of paper). Take the needle from the inside, between the layers, to the outside of the cover (the knot will be held by the paper) and begin the running stitch, continuing across the cover. There will be one rogue hole on the inside of the cover that never has a thread going through it. To end the sewing (because it is hard to tie a knot in between the two layers of paper), backtrack one hole and insert the needle so it just goes through one layer of paper, to the inside, and then create an “S” stitch between the layers of paper and around some of the existing stitches. This will be invisible and will hold like a knot.

(detail)

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(Text) (Ray)

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13}

page 66

project

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(Text) (Ray)

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One-Sheet Books

projects to play with

W

hen artist hedi kyle first discovered the pamphlet fold in the early 1990s, she immediately started experimenting with new ways to create simple book structures utilizing a single sheet of paper. These projects make a great introduction to book arts for kids of any age. You can also print patterns, drawings, or text on standard-size office paper, if desired.

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}

✂ Materials • text-weight paper (models shown are from 11" × 17" [28 × 43.2 cm] sheets) • craft knife • cutting mat • bone folder • straightedge

artist: Hedi Kyle Paper: artist’s design printed on text-weight French paper

V variations

paper tidbits Paper and stationery stores have a variety of text-weight papers. Run standard paper sizes through an inkjet or laser printer to add content to your book.

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(Text) (Ray)

There are many variations on this fold. Once you’ve made the four shown here, try variations on the cuts, cut a shape in the slit instead of a straight line, or vary the paper size.

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page 68

variation #1:

pamphlet fold

playing with paper

1 Fold a sheet of paper in half widthwise. Open it up and fold it in half in the other direction. Accordion fold to create four double panels. Unfold the paper and make sure the middle vertical fold is a mountain fold facing you. Cut along the vertical fold between the two double inner panels with a craft knife.

2 Mountain fold the paper in half widthwise. Grab the top corners of the two outer double panels and push gently to pop out the inner panels until they form a star shape.

3 Flatten the star by folding each outer panel to an opposite side. Fold in half to create a booklet.

This model is made from an 8½ × 11 inch (21.6 × 28 cm) sheet.

2

1

3

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extended pamphlet fold

page 69

1 Fold the paper in half lengthwise. Open it up and fold it in half in the other direction. Accordion fold to create eight double panels. Unfold the paper and make sure the middle vertical fold is a mountain fold facing you. Cut along the vertical fold between the six inner double panels with a craft knife.

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variation #2:

2 Mountain fold the paper in half lengthwise. Grab the top corners of the two outer double panels and push gently to pop out three boxshaped segments.

3 Collapse the box-shaped segments in pairs over one of the side panels to form a booklet. The other side panel becomes the booklet’s cover as it folds around the pages; it ends up being a bit less wide than the pages and the other cover.

This model is made from an 11 × 17 inch (28 × 43 cm) sheet.

2

1 3

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page 70

pop-up pamphlet fold

playing with paper

variation #3:

Fold the paper in half lengthwise. Open it up and fold it in half in the other direction. Accordion fold to create eight double panels. Unfold the paper and make sure the middle vertical fold is a mountain fold facing you. Make cuts as shown approximately 1 inch (2.5 cm) below and parallel to the vertical fold between panels 2 and 3 and 6 and 7. The middle panels and the two outer ones remain uncut.

1

2 Mountain fold the paper in half lengthwise. Grab the top corners of the two outer panels and push gently to pop out the cut sections. Panels 4 and 5 will also pop forward.

3

This model is made from an 11 Ă— 17 inch (28 Ă— 43 cm) sheet.

Flatten and fold the outer sections forward to create covers.

2

1

3

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dos-à-dos

page 71

1 Fold the paper in half lengthwise. Open it up and fold it in half in the other direction. Accordion fold to create eight double panels. In this variation it does not matter whether the center vertical fold is a mountain or a valley. Unfold the paper and cut off one panel. There are now seven double panels. Cut along the horizontal fold between panels 2 and 3 and 5 and 6. Panels 1, 4, and 7 remain uncut.

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variation #4:

2 Mountain fold the paper in half widthwise. Grab the top corners of the two outer panels and push gently to pop open two boxlike shapes. It will be necessary to reverse some of the folds to achieve this.

3 Collapse the pop-outs to create two booklet sections facing in opposite directions.

This model is made from an 11 × 17 inch (28 × 43 cm) sheet.

2 1

3

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project

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Party Lights

instructions Make a reed loop Tear several pieces of tape (approximately 1 inch [2.5 cm] in length) and place them on your work surface. Take a long piece of reed (approximately 10 feet [3 m]) and wind a loop around the top of the yogurt container, tucking it up underneath the lip at the opening. Pinch the loop and carefully slip it off of the container. Wrap a piece of tape around the overlap, hiding the end of the reed and making a loop (a). Slide the loop of reed back onto the container and tape it in place by putting a piece of tape over the taped loop and wrapping it over the top of the container. Affix the loop to the container in one other spot, directly across from the first piece of tape.

a

✂ Materials

1

artist: Helen Hiebert Papers: Thai unryu

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projects to play with

T

hese lanterns are a simplified version of the collapsible chochin lanterns, which were originally hung outside of small shops in Japan. The support structure is thin basketry reed, but I’ve had fun experimenting with wire, string, and other basketry materials. The paper technique for this project falls somewhere between collage and papier-mâché. It doesn’t take long to make one of these simple designs, but finessing the collage can turn it into a work of art.

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}

• thin, flexible, strong paper • thin basket reed • cardboard • small piece of 18-gauge wire • small glass candleholder • masking tape or artist’s tape • small yogurt container • scissors • craft knife • cutting mat • white glue • small glue brush • hole punch • eyelets and eyelet-setting tool • needle-nose pliers

V variations These can either hang or sit on a table. Try winding reed around various containers or even PVC piping to make a long tube that can be twisted into a ring or wreath. Rope lighting, that plastic tube lighting available at hardware stores, can be safely slipped inside for simple illumination.

(Text) (Ray)

 considerations Basket reed can be found in some craft stores or it can be ordered from specialty suppliers (see Resources, page 140). These lanterns can be cast on any type of vessel, but a plastic container is good because it can be manipulated or even cut away if necessary for removal after collaging.

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2 wind the reed Continue winding the reed around the container, spacing the rounds about 1 inch (2.5 cm) apart and taping each round of reed to the container. Try to line up the tape—this will make it easier to remove in step 5. Make another loop at the bottom, trim the reed end, and then slip the loop off of the container while carefully holding the end and tape the reed to itself, forming a loop. Slip the loop back onto the container and tape it in place on the container (b).

playing with paper

page 74

b

3 collage the paper Cut or tear pieces of paper that are approximately 2 Ă— 2 inches (5 x 5 cm). Hold one piece of paper over a section of the yogurt container. Remove the paper and apply a thin bead of glue to sections of reed, eyeballing where the paper will lie. Lay the paper down on the glued area and press it into place (c). Glue the next piece in a similar fashion, but in addition to putting glue on the reed, apply glue to the edge of the section of paper that has already been glued down, overlapping the papers. Continue gluing paper until the container is covered. Note: Cover the taped areas last. Once the rest of the container is covered with paper, it will hold the reed in place and the tape can be removed as the last pieces of paper are applied (d).

c

d

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e

page 75

5 reMove the container Peel up and carefully remove the two pieces of tape that are holding the reed to the container opening. Hold the bottom of the container in your lap, grab the top lip of reed, and with both hands, gently pry the reed and paper off of the container. This will be a bit harder if there is a lot of glue on the container; if the paper rips, it is easy to patch with another collaged piece. Loosen the piece of tape at the bottom of the container and trim it. Cut a round of cardboard and slip it inside the lantern bottom. This creates a flat surface for a glass candleholder (e). Trim the top edges, if desired, leaving about 1â „2 inch of paper above the top ring of reed. Apply glue to the edges and tuck them under to create a clean edge at the top of the lantern.

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4 cover the bottoM Collage more pieces of small paper to cover the bottom of the container. Allow the glue to dry.

attach the hanger Punch two small holes on opposite sides of the top of the lantern and set eyelets in them (see page 17). Take a small piece of wire and bend it into an upside-down “U� to make a hanger. With needle-nose pliers, bend the ends of the wire up to catch in the eyelets (f).

6

f

paper tidbits Thai unryu is one of the most common decorative papers widely available in art supply stores and online. It comes in a variety of colors and in a large sheet size, and the paper is thin yet strong.

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project

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projects to play with

T

his simple variation on an accordion fold tucks naturally around a night-light and provides an elegant glow for trips down the hallway at night. Choose cool, soothing colors of paper or warm ones to change the mood. Change the shape of the night-light by varying the angle of the pleats, or by creating multiple pleats. See page 25 for ideas.

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Accordion Night-Light Cover

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✂ Materials • Tyvek or lightweight cover stock • small piece of cardstock for scoring template • 4 small slim magnets (see Resources, page 140) • 4 small small steel nails • craft knife • cutting mat • bone folder • triangle • pencil • straightedge • small hammer (optional)

artist: Helen Hiebert Paper: Painted Tyvek

paper tidbits Tyvek is a synthetic fibrous material, a registered trademark of DuPont. It is very strong and difficult to tear, but it cuts easily with scissors or a craft knife. Tyvek is breathable (water vapor can pass through it), but it is waterproof. Tyvek is used commercially to make envelopes, car covers, house wrap, and more.

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(Text) (Ray)

 considerations Tyvek comes in white only, but it is really easy to rub color onto; its fibrous nature absorbs watercolor, acrylic, or ink, which highlights the fibers, making for an interesting effect. Put a dab of color on a cotton swab and rub it into the Tyvek.

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b

playing with paper

page 78

a

instructions

1 accordion fold Cut plain or colored Tyvek to 10 inches × 11 inches (25.4 × 28 cm). Accordion fold the 11 inch (28 cm) dimension until each accordion is approximately 1⁄2 an inch (1.3 cm) wide and there are sixteen pleats (see instructions on how to fold a perfect accordion on page 16) (a).

2 Make a scoring teMplate Use the cardstock to make a 2 1⁄4 inch (5.7 cm)-long scoring template that is the width of two pleats (approximately 1 1⁄4 inch [3.2 cm]) and cut the corners at a 45-degree angle on one end. 3 score Use the scoring template to score over each pleat. It is important to begin and end with a half-scored section. Carefully fold each scored angle in one direction and then go back and reverse fold each angle (b). V variations Change the angle of the perpendicular fold to create a variety of shapes, lengthen the paper to change the accordion fold sizes, or vary the way the paper meets the wall by playing around with where it is attached.

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d

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c

4 pleat Gently unfold the entire sheet of paper and fold it slightly along the invisible line that runs between the tips of the points (these points look like the rooftops of a row of houses). Keeping the long sections of the pleats intact, carefully reverse the folds of the shorter sections while popping them into place and collapsing the folds (c). 5 attach to the wall I used small magnets to connect my sconce to the wall. Hold the night-light cover over the fixture and put four small marks on the wall. Push or lightly pound four tiny nails into the wall. Set the night light cover over the nails and attach the four magnets to the nails, sandwiching the paper in between (d). a note about safety: This project is designed for a small 7-watt night-light bulb that gives off very little heat. The paper sits about 2 inches (5 cm) from the bulb in any direction, and the opening at the top of the accordion shade allows the heat to escape.

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project

artist: Hedi Kyle Papers: wrapping paper, office paper

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a

b

✂ Materials

projects to play with

T

he cover for this booklet is made from just one sheet of paper. Hedi Kyle developed this structure using origami and other folding techniques. The booklet is completed when a simple signature (a stack of paper folded in half ) is pamphlet stitched into the center of the cover.

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Diagonal Pocket Folder

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• decorative text-weight paper • office-type paper for the pamphlet • bookbinding thread • craft knife • cutting mat • pencil • straightedge • bone folder • small scrap of Styrofoam or cardboard • awl • needle

instructions

1 Make the first folds Cut the pocket folder paper to 12 × 20 inches (30.5 × 50.8 cm) (grain short: see note on page 12). Place the paper face down on the work surface. Mark the center on both sides and fold both of the long edges to the marks. Unfold (a).

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2 roll the folds With the paper in a vertical position, make a mark 8 inches (20.3 cm) up from the bottom and fold the bottom edge of the paper up to that fold. Fold that folded section up and over itself two more times, creasing it each time. Unfold to reveal three 4 inch (10.2 cm)-wide sections. (The top 8 inch [20.3 cm] section remains unfolded) (b).

(Text) (Ray)

 considerations Choose a text-weight paper that is strong and flexible. A cover-weight paper will be too thick to accommodate all of the folds in the pocket folder, but the paper does need to be stiff enough to hold up to wear and tear because it will function as a book cover. The pages for the pamphlet can be created from any type of text-weight office paper.

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d

e

f

g

h

playing with paper

page 82

c

3 pleat Reverse fold #2 and bring it up to meet fold #3, forming a pleat. Fold the bottom edge up to meet the pleated fold (c). 4 Make the corner folds Fold in the two bottom corners at 45-degree angles, lining them up with the two long vertical folds (d).

6 refold the long verticals Fold the paper back down along that horizontal fold line, covering the bottom corners that were just folded. Fold the long vertical sides into the middle (f). 7 Make More angles Fold the top corners down at 45-degree angles so that they meet in the center. Fold the bottom edges back up, aligning the top edges (g).

paper tidbits Wrapping paper is a huge industry today, with paper stores carrying specialty printed sheets of paper for gift giving. But there is a shocking price tag to the environment: in the United States, four million tons of waste is generated annually from wrapping paper and shopping bags! Why not upcycle those gently used sheets instead of sending them to the landfill?

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5 Make More corner folds Flip the section of paper (with the folded corners) up toward the top. Fold the bottom two corners (the new ones that were hidden beneath) up at 45-degree angles to meet the horizontal fold line (e).

(Text) (Ray)

8 score The next two steps are tricky! Take a bone folder and a straightedge and score well along the edge of the last fold, creasing the layer of paper directly beneath the fold (h).

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j

k

l

m

n

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i

Start Finish

9 squash fold Unfold the last two folds and stick a finger between the two layers of paper (i). Fold the paper along the crease that was just made and flatten the folds, creating a kite shape (j). Repeat on the other side. m tuck Tuck one kite-shaped section into the other (k). Hold the tucked sections together and tuck them up underneath, creating a triangular top (l). q fold the pages Cut four to six sheets of office paper to 4 1⁄4 × 8 inches (10.8 × 20.3 cm) and stack them together. Fold the stack of pages in half to 4 1⁄4 × 4 inches (10.8 × 10 cm).

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w bind the paMphlet Set the spine of the folded signature on the fold of the pocket folder. Set a piece of cardboard or Styrofoam underneath and with an awl, punch three holes through the signature and the cover, one in the middle, and one 1 ⁄2 an inch (1.3 cm) from each end (m). Cut a piece of thread three times the height of the cover and thread the needle with it. Following the diagram above, draw the needle through the center hole, starting on the inside of the signature. Bring the needle through the top hole and back to the inside. Skip the center hole and bring the needle out through the bottom hole. Bring the needle back through the center hole and into the inside of the booklet. Tie a knot around the thread running along the spine, and cut the ends to approximately 1⁄2 an inch (1.3 cm) (n).

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page 84

project

artist: Scott Skinner Paper: itajame-decorated Japanese paper by Susan Kristoferson

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Sode Kite

24" (70 cm)

✂ Materials

⁄4" (6 mm) Slit

• strong, thin paper • bamboo spars (see Resources, page 140) • 4 yd (3.7 m) cotton, linen, or Dacron line • kite-flying line and winder (20-pound test line strength) (see Resources, page 140) • 5 or 6 yd (4.5 or 5.5 m) of macramé yarn (optional) • pencil • craft knife • cutting mat • straightedge or ruler • white glue • glue brush • needle

⁄4" (6 mm) Slit

1

1

kite body

13 1⁄2" (34.3 cm)

27" (68.6 cm)

⁄4" (6 mm) Slit

⁄4" (6 mm) Slit

1

(9 cm)

11 1⁄2" (29 cm)

3 1⁄2" 13 ⁄2" 1

(34.3 cm)

Slit

6

"(

m

)S m

lit

⁄4 " 1

(6

1 4

m

m )S

lit

top triangle Piece

6 1⁄4" (15.9 cm)

28" (71 cm)

23" (58.4 cm)

1

projects to play with

W

ho doesn’t love flying a kite and watching it soar in the sky? The sode kite originated in Japan, resembles a kimono, and was traditionally built and flown to ensure the health and happiness of a newborn boy. Former Air Force pilot instructor Scott Skinner has been a dedicated kite maker, flier, collector, teacher, and philanthropist of the sport with the Drachen Foundation in Seattle for three decades. He creates art kites—like the one pictured here—combining traditional American quilt designs with Japanese kite shapes and motifs.

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}

 considerations Ideal paper qualities for this project include a strong paper that can withstand the wind, a colorful and/or translucent paper that will catch the light, and a large sheet of paper (or try piecing together smaller sheets, which can create lovely patterns against the sky).

⁄4" (6 mm) Slit

1

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page 86 playing with paper

kite terMinology: Bamboo spars form the support structure for the kite. They have a “skin side,” which is green and brown, and a “pulp side,” which is light tan. Spars are a specialty item available from kite suppliers (see Resources, page 140). Or, if you are handy and have the right tools, bamboo stakes sold in garden shops can be cut and split. Green bamboo from your own garden is another option, although it is best to dry it out before making the kite.

a

The sail of a kite refers to the paper. The bridle of a kite is the line that connects directly to the kite. This rigging holds the kite at its flying angle relative to the wind. The wing is the upper portion of the kite where the lift is produced during flight.

instructions

b

draw the kite outline Lay the paper out on a work surface. Follow the diagram (see page 85) to draw the kite body and the small triangular piece onto the paper with a pencil. Cut out the pieces using a craft knife and straightedge. Remember to cut the small slits in the kite body, the two diagonal slits “under the arms” of the kimono, and the two slits on the triangular piece.

1

cut the spars Cut the following lengths of bamboo:

2

One vertical spar: 30 1⁄2 inches (77.5 cm) Two horizontal wing spars: 25 inches (63.5 cm) (mark the center on each of the horizontal spars) One bottom skirt spar: 12 inches (30.5 cm) Note: During assembly, keep in mind that the kite surface (and spars!) must be symmetric for stable and directional flight. Measurements are given as guides only; skilled kite makers modify traditional designs, being careful to maintain symmetry and structural integrity.

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c

page 87

4 fold the seaM allowances Using a sharp pencil and pressing firmly, mark a 1 ⁄2 inch (1.3 cm) seam allowance around all the edges of the kite. The pressed-in pencil line will score the seams, enabling them to fold accurately. Fold all of the seam edges up, but do not glue yet. 5 glue the spars Lay the vertical spar skin side down, threading the bottom end through the center slit and keeping the top flush with the top of the triangle. Lay the top and bottom wing spars horizontally, with about 1⁄2 an inch (1.3 cm) of each end extending out through the side slits (c). Lay the bottom horizontal skirt spar along the bottom seam allowance, slipping the ends through the slits. With all four spars in place on the paper, apply a line of glue along the center spine. Flip it over and press it into place, keeping it on the center line. Apply glue to the pulp side of one wing spar and flip it into place, using the seam as a guide. Repeat with the second wing spar. Follow the same procedure for the small skirt spar at the bottom. When all four spars are in place and the glue is dry, apply a bead of glue along all seam allowances and fold the paper snugly over the spars, overlapping the corners (d).

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3 attach the triangle With the kite paper face down on the work surface, fold it in half vertically, marking the center (the spine). Unfold (a). Glue the triangular piece onto the top of the kite, centering it and overlapping by 1⁄2 an inch (1.3 cm). Fold a 1⁄2 inch (1.3 cm) seam allowance on the two equal sides of the triangle, overlapping the paper at the corner. Glue the seam allowances in place (b).

d

paper tidbits Itajame (ee-tah-ji-may) is a traditional Japanese foldand-clamp shibori, or tie-dye, technique. Ideally, thin, strong, absorbent papers are folded in various patterns; the folds are gently held in place with blocks, sticks, or shaped pieces; and the edges and corners of the folded paper stacks are then dipped into colorful, lightfast, wash-fast inks. When opened flat, beautiful patterns emerge.

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f

playing with paper

page 88

e

6 tie the bowlines Cut two pieces of cotton line that are slightly longer than the wing spars. Working on the back of the kite with the sail on the table, tie one end of string to the exposed spar end on one side of the top wing spar. Pull the line almost taut and secure the other end to the opposite end of the spar. Do the same with the bottom wing spar and the remaining length of string. The bowlines will be adjusted when preparing the kite for flight (as described in the first bullet of step 10— do not adjust the bowlines until ready to fly) (e). 7 add the bridle loops Turn the kite over so that the front side is face up. At the intersections of the horizontal wing spars and the spine (the neck and waist of the kimono shape), use a needle to poke two holes on either side of the spar on the diagonal. Thread one end of the cotton line through the sail from the front side of the kite (the side that will be seen when flown). Then bring the line back through the other hole to the front so that both ends are on the front side of the kite. Make the two ends equal and tie a square knot securely over the spar intersection. Then tie the two free ends together in a simple overhand knot approximately 2 inches (5 cm) from the first knot. Trim the ends (f).

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g

h

Lark’s Head Knot

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i

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8 add the bridle line Cut a piece of cotton line approximately 2 yards (1.8 m) in length. At each end, fold over about 6 inches (15 cm) of line and tie an overhand knot close to the line’s end. This forms a loop at each end of the line. With one loop, fold over the short bridle loop at the top of the kite and secure a lark’s head knot (h) behind the bridle-loop knot. Do the same at the “waist” bridle loop. The bridle is now securely attached to the kite but can be easily removed in case of damage, tangling, or fraying (g). 9 add the adjustable bridle point There is now a long loop from the neck to the waist of the kite/kimono. With the kite flat on the table, lift the top of the bridle line vertically above the neck point, forming a right triangle with the line (i). Lay the line down along the wing spar. Cut a new 6 inch (15 cm) length of line and make a small loop, tying it closed with a simple overhand knot (j). Join this small loop with the bridle line at the open point of the triangle with a lark’s head knot (h). m let’s go fly a kite! Attach the kite-flying line to the adjustable bridle line and the kite is ready to fly, but here are a few kiteflying pointers:

j

• When preparing the kite for flight, wrap each bowline (the lines tied onto the wing spars) around one of the wing spar ends until each wing spar curves and the line sits about 3 inches (7.6 cm) above the spine on the back of the kite. This bow is very important for the directional stability of the kite in flight. • This kite will fly without a tail if bridled perfectly. Generally speaking, if the kite loops and dives erratically, the bridle point is too high and must be lowered along the bridle line (make small adjustments of 1⁄4 inch [6 mm] or less). If the kite just pulls but shows little inclination to climb vertically, the bridle point is too low (raise the bridle point along the bridle line in small increments). If you are a firsttime kite flyer, you might try adding 5 or 6 yards (4.5 or 5.5 m) of macramé yarn to the bottom of the spine (as a tail) to stabilize the kite’s flight.

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project

artist: Roberta Lavadour Papers: ledger paper, green stripe

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T

he expanding file folder has been a staple in the home and office for decades. Creating a folder from scratch opens up possibilities for using different papers and playing with proportions. Artist Roberta Lavadour developed this structure for a workshop and had her students create unique expanding file folder books to hold a set of recipes, which they printed and exchanged. The folder can be adapted to house CDs and DVDs, business cards, postcards, and more.

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Expanding File Folder Book

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✂ Materials • text-weight paper • cover-weight paper • cardstock for scoring template • Velcro dots • craft knife • cutting mat • ruler • bone folder • pencil • double-sided tape

paper tidbits Check local resale or print shops for vintage maps, ledger sheets, discarded printed papers, or old blueprints. There is also a plethora of interesting printed wrapping papers that are sold by the sheet. German Ingres paper is available in most art supply stores and is easy to work with, readily available, and inexpensive.

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 considerations Choose a strong but fairly lightweight paper for the accordion section. Practice this fold with a lightweight paper before tackling thicker sheets. If the folder will be used frequently, choose a strong, durable paper. The wrapper is cover weight.

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a

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b

instructions

c

1 accordion fold the text-weight paper The sample shown here is 14 1⁄2 × 17 inches (36.8 × 43.2 cm), designed to accommodate 4 × 6 inch (10 x 15 cm) postcards. If using paper printed on one side only, begin with the paper printed side up. Follow the instructions for folding a sixteen-panel accordion on page 16. Unfold the entire sheet and place it unprinted side up (a). 2 score two perpendicular lines Make a scoring template out of cardstock that measures 4 × 17 inches (10 × 43.2 cm). Place the template along one long edge and score a line along the length of the paper. Repeat on the other side. Using the template will ensure that the next folds are accurate (b). 3 repleat Fold each side along the scored line toward the center of the sheet. Refold the paper into the concertina folds, making sure that the first fold is a mountain fold (see page 16) (c).

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5 fold More triangles Open the first page, holding it straight up. This will form a straight vertical plane to fold the next two panels against. Replicating what you did with the first panel, fold the top right corner of the next section down into a right triangle and fold the bottom right corner up to create a right triangle. (Notice that the first and last panels are two thicknesses of paper; all others are four thicknesses.) Work through each set of panels, using the previous panel held vertically to keep your folds square (e).

d

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4 fold the first triangles Place the folded paper in front of you so that the cut edges are on your right and the folded edges are on your left. Fold the top right corner down, forming a right triangle against the left side of the concertina. Repeat at the bottom of the page, folding the bottom right corner up and forming a right triangle against the left side of the concertina (d).

e

reverse the folds When you get to the last panel, go through the stack in the other direction, reversing the triangle folds (so they are creased in both directions). Don’t make new folds! Next, unfold all of the triangles and return the concertina panels to their original rectangular shape. (In pop-up lingo, this double creasing is referred to as “exercising the folds.� This preparation will make assembly easier, much like preparatory folds in origami) (f).

6

f

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g

playing with paper

7 pop the corners in and pleat Before beginning this step, unfold the entire sheet once more and place it printed side down. The first fold in the center is a mountain fold and the first side panel folds are valley folds. Refold the entire accordion, reversing the center panel folds, so that they are aligned with the side folds and the first fold is a valley fold. Fold the side panels up so that they are at a 90-degree angle to the center (g). What comes next is tricky, so take your time. Looking at the corner of the pleat, you are basically folding each diamond shape into fourths. Find the first diamond (skip the half-diamond at the very end) and fold it in half vertically by bringing the outer left and right points together, training the base and side folds to the inside. Then fold it in half horizontally, reminding the folds to maintain their proper direction. The first and last panels only have half a diamond shape and can simply be pinched together and folded up against the sides of the wrapper (h). Note: It is helpful to notice that the concertina folds on the base and sides will always be in the same direction/orientation. Only on the short portion of the pleat that folds back over itself, along the center line of the diamond shape, is the direction of the fold inverted.

8 the non-adhesive wrap This is a clever wraparound cover! Cut a piece of cover-weight paper to 7 × 17 1⁄2 inches (17.8 × 44.5 cm). Place the paper on the work surface in a horizontal position, printed side down. Starting at the right edge, mark and score vertical lines at 4, 8 1⁄4 , 9, 13 1⁄4 , and 13 3⁄4 inches (10, 21, 23, 33.7, and 35 cm). Fold along the score lines (i ).

h

Taper the ends in the 4 inch (10 cm) section if needed and tuck them into the front pocket of the concertina. Use double-sided tape to tack the back edge of the concertina to the cover. Apply four small Velcro dots in the corners to make a closure (j).

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j

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chapter

gallery: TAKING PAPER TO NEW DIMENSIONS

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valérie buess: paper sculpture Valérie Buess creates organic forms which evolve from pieces of paper that used to be trees as her art finds its way back, literally, to its roots. Over the past twenty years, Buess has developed various techniques for working with waste paper: newspaper, phone directories,

magazines, train schedules, books, etc. It is the useless quality of these materials that inspires her, as she takes the waste and recycles it into new dimensions.

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Photo: the artist

Photo: the artist

 Ready!, detail, 2011 Telephone directory, magazines, 4¾" × 6" × 4¾" (12 × 15 × 12 cm)

 Storehouse of Joy, detail, 2011 Magazines, drawing paper, 10" × 10" × 4" (25.5 × 25.5 × 10.5 cm)

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Photo: the artist

Photo: Susann Babion

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 Wild Lace, detail, 2008 Pages of old books, 13" × 10¼" × 11³⁄8" (33 × 26 × 29 cm)

Wolke 3 , detail, 2005 Telephone directory, 23 2⁄3" × 391⁄3" × 25 2⁄3" (60 × 100 × 65 cm)

Photo: the artist

 Amazonenhelm, 2004 Telephone directory, 8 7⁄8" × 6 1⁄3" × 8 2⁄3" (22.5 × 16 × 22 cm)

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jocelyn châteauvert: handmade paper jewelry and installation Jocelyn Châteauvert earned an MFA in metalworking and jewelry and worked extensively with Timothy Barrett in hand papermaking at the University of Iowa. Châteauvert’s sculptural forms emerge from the paper she makes by hand: after pressing, she uses her hands to crease, fold, and pinch, integrating structure with design. The

paper responds, then shrinks, taking its final form from the air as it dries. Châteauvert has received several prestigious awards for her work, including recognition as the first artist working in a craft medium to receive a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship. She pursues her work full time, creating jewelry, lighting, sculptures, and installations.

 Fresh, 2007 Wall sconce, artist-made abaca paper; petals: cut, layered, and pressed; center: hand-twisted, wood base, internally lighted, 16" (40.7 cm) diameter

Photo: Mark Tade

 Lily Clouds, 2007 Installation of approximately 200 lily pads, artist-made flax paper, 12" to 40" (30.5 to 101.6 cm) diameter. Permanent collection of the Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC. Photo: Mark Tade

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Photo: Rick Rhodes

Photo: Mark Tade

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 Grasses, 2008 Sculpture, artist-made abaca paper; fronds: cut, rolled, and air-dried, 16"h × 22"w × 9"d (40.6 × 56 × 23 cm)

 Fungi, 2012 Brooches, over-beaten flax, formed pulp, acrylic paint, mirrors, 2½" (6.4 cm) diameter Photo: Jocelyn Châteauvert

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béatrice coron: paper cutting Born and raised in France, Béatrice Coron has lived in Egypt, Mexico, and China and now lives in New York City. She worked at a series of odd jobs before cutting stories out of paper to create illustrations, artists’ books, fine art, and public art. Using silhouettes, she has invented situations, cities, and worlds composed of memories, word associations, ideas, observations, and thoughts. Her silhouettes are a language she has developed over the years. Cut from a single piece of

material, the profusion of individual stories creates a coherent world. In paper cutting, as in life, everything is connected. Coron’s paper cuttings have been shown at the Museum of Arts & Design in New York, and she spoke about her creative process at TED in 2011. Her work is in major collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and her public art can be seen in subways and airports.

Photo: Béatrice Coron

 Evening Song, 2009 Arches paper, 44" h × 7½" w (111.8 × 19.1 cm)

 CurioCity, 2011 Cut Tyvek, 44½" × 44½" (113 ×113 cm)

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Photo : Etie n n e Fro ssard

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 Fashion Statement, in collaboration with Elizabeth DeSole, 2010 Cut and sewn Tyvek, 40" h × 20" w × 20" d (101.6 × 50.8 × 50.8 cm)

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vincent floderer: paper crumpling Trained in Paris and Germany, Vincent Floderer has a unique technique of crumpling sheets of paper in a precise and controlled way, exhibiting the extraordinary elastic properties of paper. Floderer is a performer and an origami teacher who has been a guest at numerous

origami conventions in Europe, the United States, and Japan. He founded CRIMP, the Center for Research on International Paper Folding. Floderer exhibits his work widely and has created window displays for Printemps, Guerlain, Christofle, and Mellerio in Paris.

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Photo: Alain Hymon

 Clitocybe, 2007 Tissue paper, 11 7⁄8" × 6" to 22 2⁄3" × 192⁄3" (30 × 15 to 58 × 50 cm)

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Photo: Alain Hymon

gallery

Photo: Romain Chevrier

 Flower Fall, 2005 Tissue paper, 19 2⁄3" × 19 2⁄3" (50 × 50 cm)

 Crumpled SIA (Spring into Action), created by Manuel Madaleno, 2006 Alios wrapping paper, 67" × 19 2⁄3" (170 × 50 cm), variation on Jeff Beynon’s Spring into Action model

Ph oto :A lain Hy mo n

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 Frou Frou, created with Konstanze Breithaupt, 2006 White tissue paper, 27½" × 19 2⁄3" (70 × 50 cm)

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peter gentenaar: handmade paper sculpture In Peter Gentenaar’s work, his love for nature and the materials it produces and his fascination with technique are integrated. Despite his Dutch roots (a culture orientated in fine painting), he found paper fiber to be a material much closer to nature and with much more character than he ever found with paint. He began experimenting with paper in 1972 and moved from being an artist who used paper as a substrate to a papermaker; while doing so, he found endless amounts of new

possibilities for shapes and forms in paper. Gentenaar developed his own specialized equipment (a vacuum table and Hollander beater) to process long flax fibers and create a shrinking pulp for his sculptures. The tension created between the pulp and the bamboo as the sculpture dries gives the material its form. Gentenaar and his wife, Pat Gentenaar-Torley, started the Holland Paper Biennial in 1996 and publish a book for each biennial.

Photo: Pat Gentenaar-Torley Photo: Pat Gentenaar-Torley

 Anne in Paperland, 2011 Linen, pigment, and bamboo, 10' (3 m) tall, installed at Pulchri Studio, July 2011 Paper dress by Peter George d’Angelino Tap

 Eternal Flame, 2011 Linen, pigment, and bamboo, 74¾" × 59" (190 × 150 cm)

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Photo: Pat Gentenaar-Torley

gallery

Photo: Pat Gentenaar-Torley

 Expanding Memory, 2010 Linen, pigment, and bamboo, 55" × 47¼" × 17¾" (140 × 120 × 45 cm)

 Golvende Harmonie, 2011 Linen, pigment, and bamboo, 78¾" × 63" (200 × 160 cm)

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Photo: Pat Gentenaar-Torley

Photo: Pat Gentenaar-Torley

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 Witte Wolk 3 , 2011 Linen, pigment, and bamboo, 431⁄3" × 39 1⁄3”× 31½" (110 × 100 × 80 cm)

 Blokken op Golven, 2011 Linen, pigment, and bamboo, 108¼" × 57" (275 × 145 cm)

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pat gentenaar-torley: handmade paper pulp paintings Pat Gentenaar-Torley was born in San Francisco and studied at the California College of the Arts in Oakland. Since 1971, she has been living and working as an artist in the Netherlands. She and her husband, Peter Gentenaar, began experimenting with paper in the early 1970s. Gentenaar-Torley loves paper’s natural, organic structure and has gradually discovered a world of variety in its fibers. Over the years, she has developed her technique of pulp painting with pigmented paper fibers in a watery solution. Using the colored pulps, Gentenaar-Torley

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pours thin, often transparent layers of pulp next to and on top of each other, sometimes shaping them with a knife as she works. She has an uncanny talent of painting “upside down,” beginning with the front of the painting on the surface of a vacuum table and gradually building up the pulp layers on the back, finishing with a layer of hemp and then a layer of cotton pulp (like the canvas of a painting). Water, in all its forms, is one of her favorite subjects, as is plant life. This seems logical because they are the basis of paper!

Photo: Piet Gispen

Photo: Piet Gispen

 Flying Water Dragon/Parrot Tulips, 2011 Paper pulp painting using pigmented cotton, linen, hemp, straw, and kozo, 23" × 20½" (58.4 × 52 cm)  Moonlit Day, 2008 Paper pulp painting using pigmented cotton, linen, hemp, straw, and kozo, 39" × 26" (99 × 66 cm)

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Photo: Piet Gispen

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Photo: the artist

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 Imadata Pool, 2010 Paper pulp painting using pigmented cotton, linen, hemp, straw, and kozo, 131⁄3" × 9½" (34 × 24 cm)

 Psychedelic Ducks, 2005 Paper pulp painting using pigmented cotton, linen, hemp, straw, and kozo, 48" × 30" (122 × 76 cm)

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eric gjerde: origami tessellations When asked by his parents what he wanted to be when he grew up, Eric Gjerde replied, “A paperologist.” Throughout his childhood and adolescence, he enjoyed paper crafts and origami—a frequent birthday gift was stacks of paper and rolls of tape. After preparing for a technology career, Gjerde kept looking for an artistic outlet to balance his creative side with his professional life. He returned to his childhood

love of paper and became fascinated by the transformation of flat sheets of paper, manipulated only with his hands, into patterns of complexity and beauty. This form of alchemy never ceases to amaze him, and it provides a continual source of inspiration. These days, Gjerde works out of his studio in Strasbourg, France, focusing on the geometric art of origami tessellations.

Photo

Photo: Steve Mann

: Ste ve M ann

 Aztec Twist, 2007 Elephant hide paper, 7 7⁄8" × 7 7⁄8" (20 × 20 cm)

 Water Bomb, 2006 Elephant hide paper, 7 7⁄8" × 7 7⁄8" (20 × 20 cm)

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Photo: Steve Mann

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 Flowers, 2006 Metallic wrapping paper, 11¾" × 11¾" (30 × 30 cm)

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Photo: Steve Mann

Photo: Steve Mann

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 Pinwheels, 2007 Japanese unryu paper, 10" × 10" (25 × 25 cm)

 Tiled Hexagons, 2006 Elephant hide paper, 7 7⁄8" × 7 7⁄8" (20 × 20 cm)

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dj gramann ii: paper fashion DJ Gramann II is a prolific creator of wearable art. His dynamic body of work has included couture designs, period costumes, strange creatures, and even lovable puppets. After earning a BFA from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, Gramann worked in New York, London, and Amsterdam. Committed to designing and constructing the finest handmade garments, he now operates Gramann Studios, located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. One facet of Gramann’s

exciting career is a line of clothing made entirely of newspaper, trash bags, and other recycled items. In these pieces, glamour icon meets global consciousness in a way only a couture designer could manifest. Featured at the City Pages 25th Birthday Party, two dozen looks, ranging from glam to ham, received great acclaim. Gramann’s unusual use of materials only hints at his level of skill as a traditional couturier.

Photo: Sean Smuda, Model: Sara Stevenson Scrimshaw

Photo: Tony Nelson, Model: Sara Stevenson Scrimshaw

 Dance Captain, 2004 Newspaper, bottle caps, jute twine, Size 6

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 Show Poster, 2003 Voltage: Fashion Amplified show poster, trash bags, Size 6

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Photo: Dietrich Gesk, Model: Nellie Basset

 MuMu Land, 1998 Newspaper, trash can liners, twist ties, cardboard, plastic wrap, Size 4

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Photo: Tony Nelson, Model: Navita

Photo: Dietrich Gesk, Model: John Christiansen

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 Ivana, 1998 Newspaper, trash bags, Size 12

 Towering, 2004 Newspaper, masking tape, twine, Size 2

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paul jackson: paper folding Paul Jackson has been a professional paper artist since 1982. He is best known for developing a series of alternative folding techniques such as crumpling, one crease, and curved ribs (featured here). In

addition, he has run Sheet to Form workshops for students of art and design at more than fifty universities worldwide and is the author of more than thirty books.

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Photo: the artist

Photo: the artist

 Brown Bowl, 2006 Folded 100gsm white hammered paper, dry pastel, sealant, 6" tall (15 cm)

 Stack, 2006 Folded 100gsm white hammered paper, dry pastel, sealant, 7" tall (17.8 cm)

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Photo: the artist Photo: the artist

Photo: the artist

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 Vessel, 2006 Folded 100gsm white hammered paper, dry pastel, sealant, 8" tall (20 cm)

 Recliner, 2006 Folded 100gsm white hammered paper, dry pastel, sealant, 15" long (38.1 cm)

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 Pod, 2006 Folded 100gsm white hammered paper, dry pastel, sealant, 7½" tall (19 cm)

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hedi kyle: artists’ books Hedi Kyle’s work focuses on the book as a three-dimensional object that still holds traces of its historical predecessors. She is drawn to unusual forms to free the book of its traditional purpose and explore new ways of reading and viewing. Kyle transforms what she sees; she

experiments, adapts, and diverts to rebuild. She takes the freedom to concoct features and materials from many sources. The book as a mechanical object of extraordinary diversity never loses its fascination and inspires her ongoing investigation.

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Photo: Paul Warchol

Photo: Paul Warchol

Triangular one sheet books, 1993 Paper, silkscreen, 6" × 3" and 3" × 1½" (15 × 7.5 cm and 7.5 × 3.8 cm)

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 Tangram, 2009 Folded typographical map, cardboard tray, 5" × 5" (12.7 × 12.7 cm)

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Photo: Paul Warchol

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Photo: Paul Warchol Photo: Paul Warchol

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 Maze, 2008 Interlocking loop structure, paper, drawings, inkjet printed stickers, Plexiglas, 5" × 2½" (12.7 × 6.4 cm)

 Scroll Pull, 2011 Handmade paper, drawings, 8¼" × 10" (21 × 25.4 cm)

 Triptych Agenda, 2011 Paper, tape, leather, 7" × 4" × 1" (17.8 × 10 × 2.5 cm) closed

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michael g. lafosse and richard l. alexander: origami Michael G. LaFosse trained as a biologist but has been working for more than thirty years as an origami artist. He creates nature-inspired sculptures, often studying his subjects in their natural habitats. LaFosse credits Akira Yoshizawa for showing him this way of creative work in origami art and study. In 1996, Richard L. Alexander and LaFosse cofounded the Origamido Studio, a teaching center, gallery, and origami design and papermaking studio, in Massachusetts.

Together, LaFosse and Alexander design the origami and then produce custom handmade paper for each new creation. Their works have graced museums worldwide, and their commercial art draws attention to print ads, products on TV, and in upscale retail stores such as Hermès of Paris and Saks Fifth Avenue. Together, they have authored more than sixty books, kits, and video publications about origami and related paper arts.

Photo: Michael G. LaFosse

 American Alligator, designed in 2006 by Michael G. LaFosse, folded in 2007 by Michael G. LaFosse and Richard L. Alexander Handmade paper of premium abaca fiber by Richard L. Alexander, 18" (45.7 cm) finished length, folded from a 6' (1.8 m) square

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Photo: Michael G. LaFosse

 Wilbur, the Piglet, designed and folded in 1991 by Michael G. LaFosse Handmade paper of 20% cotton linters and 80% abaca fibers, 9" (23 cm), folded from a 12" (30.5 cm) square

Photo: Richard L. Alexander

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 Big Brown Bat, Eptesicus fuscus, designed in 1978, folded in 1989 by Michael G. LaFosse Handmade paper of overbeaten kozo fiber, 10" (25.4 cm) finished length, folded from a 10" (25.4 cm) square

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barbara mauriello: book arts Barbara Mauriello’s academic background in literature and the fine arts led her more than thirty years ago to an apprenticeship at The Center for Book Arts in New York City, a place where she teaches today. In all of her years of teaching and making books, she finds herself returning to the same themes: color, form, and the

transformation of materials. A folded and cut piece of paper becomes a landscape of mountains and valleys. Add paint, and you’ve got the sea and the sky, a game of puzzle blocks, and a poet’s house. When she’s working, she likes the surprise of not quite knowing what the paper will do as it’s being manipulated.

Photo: Jeffrey Vrock

 Artist’s Housing: For Emily Dickenson (2004) Box: hand-painted paper over boards; Scrolls: poems written in pencil on 19th century paper, tied with cotton ribbons, 8¼" × 13" × 1½" (21 × 33 × 3.8 cm)

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Photo: Barbara Mauriello

Photo: Jeffrey Vrock Photo: Jeffrey Vrock

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 Wonder Worlds (2012) Tunnel book: cut and collaged Japanese printed papers; accordions: handmade linen/cotton paper; 3 3⁄8" × 3 3⁄8" × 9" (8.6 × 8.6 × 23 cm)

 Puzzle Blocks (2009) Blocks: Stencil-painted paper folded into 12 cubes which can be arranged and rearranged to form changing geometric landscapes; Box: 7 3⁄8" × 9½" × 2¾" (18.7 × 24.1 × 7 cm)

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 Wild Cards (2007) Stencil-painted cards, gouache on handmade paper, with embroidery and button embellishments; pages linked together with accordion-pleated paper; Box: combination of cloth and paper over boards; Book: 6½" × 5" × 53" (16.5 × 12.7 × 134.6 cm) (open) in a folding box.

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giles miller: cardboard furniture Giles Miller Studio creates a range of products and surface materials from corrugated cardboard. It has been the studio’s mission to elevate this amazing material with commissions from Stella McCartney, the

London Design Museum, and Bombay Sapphire, among others. Giles Miller is happy to be able to show the true potential of this amazing eco-considerate material.

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Photo: Luke Hayes

 Brown Paper Bag, 2008 Cardboard, leather, 68½" × 531⁄3" × 66" (173 × 135.5 × 176.6 cm)

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Photo: Luke Hayes

 Stella McCartney Store, Paris, 2008 Cardboard fluted wall covering, 192⁄3 sq yd (18 m 2)

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 Pool Rocker Chair, 2006 Cardboard, 22" × 30¾" × 26 1⁄8" (56 × 78 × 66.5 cm)

Photo: Luke Hayes

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Photo: Luke Hayes

Photo: Luke Hayes

 Wardrobe-C, 2008 Flat pack cardboard, 38 1⁄8" × 192⁄3" × 78" (97 × 50 × 198 cm)

 Flute Lamp, 2006 Cardboard, 8½" × 8½" × 15¾" (21.5 × 21.5 × 40 cm)

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lisa nilsson: paper filigree Lisa Nilsson has a BFA in Illustration from the Rhode Island School of Design and graduated from the medical assisting program at McCann Technical School, where her lifelong aesthetic interest in anatomy and cool-looking medical things grew a bit more informed. Her pieces are made of Japanese mulberry paper and the gilded edges of old books. They are constructed by a technique of rolling and

shaping narrow strips of paper, called quilling or paper filigree. Quilling was first practiced by Renaissance nuns and monks, who made artistic use of the gilded edges of worn-out bibles, and later by eighteenth-century ladies, who made artistic use of lots of free time. Nilsson finds quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.

Photo: John Polak

Photo: John Polak

 Sagittal Section: Head and Torso, 2010 (detail, right) Mulberry paper, 9" × 13" × 1" (23 × 33 × 2.5 cm)

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Photo: John Polak

Photo: John Polak

Photo: John Polak

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 Abdomen, 2011 Mulberry paper, 15" × 12½" × 1½" (38.1 × 31.8 × 3.8 cm)

 Head 1, 2011 (detail, right) Mulberry paper, 11½" × 14½" × 1½" (29.2 × 36.8 × 3.8 cm)

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lâm quang and kestrel gates: handmade paper lighting Lâm Quang and Kestrel Gates are a husband and wife team who work collaboratively from concept and design through the creation of their paper light sculptures, continually inspiring one another into further exploration. Beginning with natural raw materials, they employ both traditional and self-taught techniques. The rhythm of papermaking, wire bending, papering, painting, and waxing shapes their days and weeks. For them, this work feels both functional and expressive.

They consider how the light will affect the feeling and usage of a space, while drawing extensively on the wellspring of Asian aesthetics. They are deeply inspired by the natural world and natural life cycles—by the qualities of new growth, silence, and fruition. With their lights, they hope to enhance these elements in other people’s lives. They are represented by galleries along the West Coast and create custom lighting for residential and commercial settings.

 Seaweed, 2009 Handmade paper, wire, 28" h × 20" w (71.1 × 50.8 cm)

Photo: Lâm Quang

 Gardenias, 2008 Installation in a residential setting, 30" h × 40" w (76.2 × 101.6 cm)

Photo: Leila Cheiko

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Photo: Kestrel Gates

 Pitcher Plant, 2010 Handmade paper, wire, 18" h × 10" w (45.7 × 25.4 cm)

Photo: Leila Cheiko

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 Dragon Tree, 2009 Handmade paper, wire, 24" h × 18" w (61 × 45.7 cm)

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shawn sheehy: pop-ups Shawn Sheehy makes pop-ups because he loves sculpture as much as he loves books. He enjoys the puzzle of developing a form and then engineering its movement on the page. His favorite subjects are creatures of the wild world, both because they are so satisfying when they work correctly and appear to be lifelike and because he is an advocate

for creatures who are being squeezed out of their environments due to human activity. Pop-ups have appeal for all ages in all demographics and are therefore a powerful communication tool. Sheehy has produced a number of limited-edition artists’ books that are widely collected, and he has taught paper engineering all over the United States.

Photo: Julia Stotz Ph

 Welcome to the NeighborWood: A Pop-Up Book of Animal Architecture, bee spread, 2003 Handmade paper, letterpress printed, construction, 8½" h × 14" w × 8" d (21.6 × 35.6 × 20.3 cm) (open)

o: ot Ju lia ot St z

 Holiday card, witch, 2010 Cardstock, 6¼" h × 9" w × 2" d (16 × 23 × 5 cm)

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Photo: Ricardo Martinez Ph

 Beyond the 6th Extinction: A Fifth Millennium Bestiary, turtle spread, 2007 Handmade paper, letterpress printed, construction, 10" h × 14" w × 10" d (25.4 × 35.6 × 25.4 cm) (open)

oto : Ju lia Sto tz

o: ot Ju lia ot St z

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 North American wildflower series, columbine, 2011 Cardstock, letterpress printed, 6¼" h × 9" w × 2" d (16 × 23 × 5 cm)

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matt shlian: paper sculpture Matt Shlian is a designer, an artist, and a paper engineer. His work is rooted in print media, book arts, and commercial design, and he is currently collaborating with scientists and researchers by using paper folding as a means to understand structures at a micro level. Shlian sees the researchers’ inquiry as a basis for artistic inspiration, and they see paper engineering as a metaphor for scientific principles. Shlian also teaches at the University of Michigan, runs a studio in Ann Arbor,

Michigan, and creates design and commission work for companies such as Apple and Procter & Gamble. When he went to visit his robotic piece, Unlean Against Our Hearts, a few weeks after it was installed at the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, he was thrilled to see nose prints from kids who had smashed their faces up against the Plexiglas; he was delighted to realize that his work could momentarily ease the minds of sick children.

Photo: Matthew Shlian

Photo: Cullen Stephenson

 Ara106, 2011 100# text-weight Fox River Coronado on 100# cover-weight, Fox River Coronado, 34" × 44" × 1" (86.4 × 111.8 × 2.5 cm)

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 Stretch studies, 2011 (detail, right) 100# text-weight Fox River Coronado, size varies

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Photo: Cullen Stephenson

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Photo: Matthew Shlian

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 Unlean Against Our Hearts, 2011 Tyvek, size varies

Photo: Matthew Shlian

 We Are Building This Ship as We Sail It, 2010 100# text-weight Fox River Coronado, 8" × 6" × 9" (20.3 × 15.2 × 23 cm)

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ingrid siliakus: paper architecture Ingrid Siliakus’s architectural, figurative, and abstract paper architecture is recognized internationally. This form of paper art, which involves the creation of a three-dimensional object from one sheet of paper by simply cutting and folding it, has its roots in Japan, where the forms of kirigami and origamic architecture were developed. A resident of Amsterdam, Siliakus expresses her spatial thinking capabilities in

the way she constructs with paper. Her process can take months of precise drawing and calculations to develop, as she designs a piece, layer by layer. Siliakus has exhibited at the Holland Paper Biennial, her work has been featured in international magazines and exhibitions, and her three-dimensional skylines have been used as illustrations for prominent advertising and real estate agencies.

 Reflejar, 2008 Fashion paper 82⁄3" × 6¼" × 6¼" (22 × 16 × 16 cm)

Photo: the artist

 Innerrings, 2006 Created for the Museum Rijswijk (The Netherlands) during the Holland Paper Biennial, paper, 1113⁄16" × 1113⁄16" × 1113⁄16" (30 × 30 × 30 cm) Photo: the artist

Photo: the artist

 Cosmopolitan, 2011 A limited edition of five featuring the skyline of New York, paper, 113⁄8" × 151⁄3" × 15 1⁄3" (29 × 39 × 39 cm)

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Photo: the artist

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Photo: the artist

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 Big City, 2011 The skyline of Amsterdam, cardstock, 1113⁄16" × 13¾" × 13¾" (30 × 35 × 35 cm)

 Cover of Wallpaper Magazine, 2009 Fabric paper, cut from a sheet of paper measuring 16½" × 11½" (42 cm × 30 cm)

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helene tschacher: paper sculpture Helene Tschacher is a paper and book artist who lives in Germany and exhibits her work internationally. She recently served as president of the International Association of Hand Papermakers and Paper Artists (www.iapma.info). Her current work involves cutting, folding,

and manipulating books, catalogs, and other printed media, altering their original form as the printed words become illegible, the pages are distorted, and the original stories no longer exist.

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Photo: the artist

 H2O, 2008 Printed parchment paper, 39 3⁄8" × 39 3⁄8" × 3½" (100 × 100 × 9 cm)

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Photo: the artist Photo: the artist

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 To Stay in Touch, 2010 Installation in Wonju, Korea, of cardboard squares covered with book pages and Hanji paper, 72⁄3 yd × 3¼ yd × 21⁄8 yd (7 × 3 × 2 m)

 Dancing Book, 2011 Cut and glued book pages, 5½" up to 9¾' (14 cm up to 3 m) depending on how displayed

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Enlarge these templates as indicated and photocopy them onto the paper recommended for the particular project. Use templates at 100% unless otherwise noted.

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Photocopy templates at 310%.

Photocopy templates at 340%.

A

Kirigami mobile, page 34

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Photocopy templates at 200%.

page 137 templates

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Castle, page 36

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Piece of cake, page 40

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mm)

6" (15 cm)

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1 3/4" (4.5 cm)

6" (15 cm) 3 1/4" (8.2 cm)

templates

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1/4" (6

6" (15 cm) 4 3/8" (12 cm)

Piano Hinge alBum, page 42 6" (15 cm)

5" (12.7 cm) 59" (1.5 m)

(Actual diagram is double the width shown on the left and is this shape.)

6" (15 cm)

5" (12.7 cm)

6" (15 cm) 4 1/2 " (11.4 cm)

15" final height

*Note: This is half of the template. Make two photocopies and tape together at the midpoint.

6" (15 cm) 31/2 " (9 cm)

This diagram is shown at 15% scale. 6" (15 cm)

Actual template shape

2 1/2 " (6.4 cm)

Midpoint

inflataBle Ball, page 55

6" (15 cm)

enveloPe folding Screen, page 46

1 5/8" (4 cm)

Photocopy template at 200%. 5" (12.7 cm)

Hot air Balloon, page 59 7/8" (2.2

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playing with paper

PaPer and art suPPliers

The papers featured throughout the book can be found at the following stores and suppliers. Graphic Products Corporation Carpentersville, IL www.gpcpapers.com

Distributor of Black Ink and decorative papers Hiromi Paper, Inc. Santa Monica, CA http://store.hiromipaper.com

sPeCialty PaPers

booKs

Cave Paper Minneapolis, MN bomalley@cavepaper.com www.cavepaper.com

The Cardboard Book

Handmade papers, workshops, and internships

Cover to Cover

Narelle Yabuka Gingko Press

Kristoferson Studio Calgary, Canada kristudio@shaw.ca www.kristoferson-studio.ca

Imported Japanese papers

Custom order decorative papers, including itajime and paste papers, workshops

Hollander’s Ann Arbor, MI www.hollanders.com

Steve Pittelkow Saint Paul, MN paperandbooks@me.com

Decorative papers, bookbinding supplies, and workshops New York Central Art Supply New York, NY www.nycentralart.com

Huge supply of decorative papers and art supplies Oblation Papers & Press Portland, OR www.oblationpapers.com

Custom handmade papers, decorative papers, fine stationery, and letterpress printing Wet Paint Saint Paul, MN www.wetpaintart.com

Decorative papers and art supplies

Shereen LaPlantz Lark Books

Creating with Paper (1967) Pauline Johnson University of Washington Press Folding Techniques for Designers: From Sheet to Form

Marbled papers, marbling tools and supplies, and classes

Paul Jackson Laurence King Publishing, Ltd. Paul Jackson is the author of more than thirty paper books.

misCellaneous suPPliers

Get Writing! Creative Book-Making Projects for Children (2008)

Into the Wind Boulder, CO www.intothewind.com

Paul Johnson A&C Black Paul Johnson is the author of numerous books about bookmaking for teachers and children.

Kite parts

Non-Adhesive Binding: Books without Paste or Glue

Lamp Shop Concord, NH www.lampshop.com

Glue applicators, metal rings, and lamp parts Northwest Magnet Portland, OR www.northwestmagnet.com

Rare earth magnets

Keith A. Smith The Sigma Foundation

Origami Art: 15 Exquisite Folded Paper Designs from the Origamido Studio Michael G. LaFosse and Richard L. Alexander Tuttle Publishing

Nunn Design Port Townsend, WA www.nunndesign.com

Manufacturer of ring blanks

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Origami Tessellations: Awe-Inspiring Geometric Designs Eric Gjerde A K Peters/CRC Press

The following books are out of print but they are worth looking for through used book dealers.

Pop-Up Geometric Origami R. Klanten, S. Ehmann, and B. Meyer Die Gestalten Verlag

Masahiro Chatani and Keiko Nakazawa Japan Publications (USA)

Paper Folding Templates for Print Design

Paper Folding & Paper Sculpture

Papercraft: Design and Art with Paper

Trish Witkowski HOW Books

Kenneth Ody Emerson Books, Inc.

Paper Illuminated

Pop-Up Origamic Architecture

Helen Hiebert Storey Publishing, LLC Helen is also the author of

Papermaking with Garden Plants & Common Weeds and The Papermaker’s Companion. Paper: Tear, Fold, Rip, Crease, Cut

Raven Smith Black Dog Publishing

Playing with Books Jason Thompson Quarry Books

The Pocket Paper Engineer, Volumes 1, 2 & 3 Carol Barton Popular Kinetics Press

Unfolded: Paper in Design, Art, Architecture and Industry Petra Schmidt Birkhäuser Architecture

The Moveable Book Society www.movablebooksociety.org

Membership organization for pop-up and moveable book enthusiasts. Origami USA www.origamiusa.org

National society dedicated to the art of paper folding.

Masahiro Chatani Ondorisha Publishers, Ltd.

organizations

Drachen Foundation www.drachen.org

Everything you want to know about kites Friends of Dard Hunter www.friendsofdardhunter.org

National organization dedicated to hand papermaking, hosts annual conferences Hand Papermaking Magazine www.handpapermaking.org

Semiannual journal in the field of hand papermaking International Association of Hand Papermakers & Paper Artists www.iapma.info

International membership organization dedicated to paper art, hosts biannual conferences

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} Artist Directory Kell Black Clarksville, TN blackk@apsu.edu Valérie Buess Marburg, Germany valerie.buess@gmx.de

www.valeriebuess.com Bridget O'Malley of Cave Paper Minneapolis, MN bomalley@cavepaper.com

www.cavepaper.com Jocelyn Châteauvert Charleston, SC roselanestudios@hotmail.com Béatrice Coron New York, NY bc@beatricecoron.com

www.beatricecoron.com Vincent Floderer Saint-Aulaire, France vincent.floderer@orange.fr

www.le-crimp.org Mike Friton Portland, OR mikefriton@yahoo.com

www.zoo-play.com Peter Gentenaar Rijswijk, Netherlands gentor@hetnet.nl

www.gentenaar-torley.nl Pat Gentenaar-Torley Rijswijk, Netherlands gentor@hetnet.nl

www.gentenaar-torley.nl Eric Gjerde Mutzig, France ericgjerde@mac.com

DJ Gramann II Minneapolis, MN dj@gramannstudios.com

Chris K. Palmer Shadowfolds Berkeley, CA chris@shadowfolds.com

www.gramannstudios.com

www.shadowfolds.com

Paul Jackson Herzliyya, Israel origami@netvision.net.il

www.origami-artist.com Paul Johnson Manchester, England pauljohnson@bookart.co.uk

www.bookart.co.uk Hedi Kyle Philadelphia, PA hedikyle@comcast.net

Shawn Sheehy Chicago, IL shawnsheehy@gmail.com

www.shawnsheehy.com

Roberta Lavadour Pendleton, OR robertalavadour@gmail.com

www.barbaramauriello.com Giles Miller London, England studio@gilesmiller.com

www.gilesmiller.com Lisa Nilsson North Adams, MA lisa@remsbergphoto.com

www.lisanilssonart.com

Brian Queen Calgary, Canada bqueen@shaw.ca

http://alyssasalomon.com

www.origamido.com

Barbara Mauriello Hoboken, NJ bmauriello@verizon.net

www.hiihgallery.com

Alyssa Salomon Providence Forge, VA sa lt work@gma i l.com

Michael G. LaFosse and Richard L. Alexander Origamido Studio Haverhill, MA info@origamido.com

www.missioncreekpress.com

Lâm Quang and Kestrel Gates HiiH Handmade Paper Lights Portland, OR light@hiihgallery.com

Matt Shlian Ann Arbor, MI matthewshlian@gmail.com

www.mattshlian.com Ingrid Siliakus Amsterdam, Netherlands paperartnl@yahoo.com

www.ingrid-siliakus.exto.org Scott Skinner Monument, CO

www.scottrskinner.com Helene Tschacher Mainburg, Germany helene@tschacher.de

www.helene.tschacher.de

www.origamitessellations.com

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acknowledgments

I

am grateful for the wonderful sense of sharing that exists within the paper community: thanks to each and every artist who said “yes� when I asked you to contribute images or projects for this book. Special thanks to my intern, Leah Uvodich, for helping me in the production of this book. Thanks to Hook Pottery Paper, Marjorie Tomchuk, Josephine Banens, Mary Leto, Patricia Cheyne, Sue Nuti, and Rosemary Cohen for sending paper swatches, and to Graphic Products Corporation for sending me their swatch book featuring 800 papers. Thanks to Bill and Sue Funk for the use of their home and property for some of the photography. And thanks to Ted for believing in me; to Willam and Lucah for giving me the time to research and write; and to my mom and dad for quietly nurturing my inquisitive mind.

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page 144 playing with paper

} About the Author H

elen Hiebert runs a small papermaking studio where she creates art, installations, and artists’ books; trains interns; and hosts workshops and consultations. She is an adjunct faculty member at Oregon College of Art and Craft and teaches and lectures internationally. She is the author of Papermaking with Garden Plants & Common Weeds, The Papermaker’s Companion, and Paper Illuminated and the producer of the film Water Paper Time. She lives in Portland, Oregon, with her husband and their two children. To learn more about her work, visit www.helenhiebertstudio.com.

The Hydrogen Bond installation

Mother Tree Project

Alpha, Beta, …

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Š 2013 by Quarry Books Text Š 2013 Helen Hiebert First published in the United States of America in 2013 by Quarry Books, a member of Quayside Publishing Group 100 Cummings Center Suite 406-L Beverly, Massachusetts 01915-6101 Telephone: (978) 282-9590 Fax: (978) 283-2742 www.quarrybooks.com Visit www.Craftside.Typepad.com for a behind-the-scenes peek at our crafty world! All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without written permission of the copyright owners. All images in this book have been reproduced with the knowledge and prior consent of the artists concerned, and no responsibility is accepted by the producer, publisher, or printer for any infringement of copyright or otherwise, arising from the contents of this publication. Every effort has been made to ensure that credits accurately comply with information supplied. We apologize for any inaccuracies that may have occurred and will resolve inaccurate or missing information in a subsequent reprinting of the book. 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 ISBN: 978-1-59253-814-0 Digital edition published in 2012 eISBN: 978-1-61058-642-9 Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Hiebert, Helen, 1965Playing with paper : illuminating, engineering, and reimagining paper art / Helen Hiebert. pages cm 1. Paper work. I. Title. TT870.H5173 2013 745.54--dc23 2012019931

Design: Based on original design by Landers Miller Design Page Layout: Laura H. Couallier, Laura Herrmann Design Cover Images: Stephen Funk Photography, (bottom right): Leila Cheiko Illustrations and Templates: Mattie Reposa

Printed in China

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