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Fondé à St-Tropez en 1971* vilebrequin.com

*

Founded in St-Tropez in 1971

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

A FINE ROMANCE Travel can be a bit like falling in love – the alchemy between people and place is heartfelt, unpredictable and utterly irrational. Some people fall for India the moment they step off the plane, others just never get the place, no matter how many tuk tuks and hot pink saris hove into view. And why does one woman adore Tuscany, when for another it just has to be Provence? It’s a chemistry thing. But I’m yet to meet the person who doesn’t love Greece. It seems to hit the spot at every stage of life, from student island-hopping to romantic luxe and family good times. I think of Greece and I smile – the place is pure pleasure, no try-hards allowed. So no apologies for devoting ten pages of the issue to its blue seas, whitewashed splendours and hidden gems, all introduced by bestselling novelist and grecophile Victoria Hislop. Elsewhere in the magazine we’re focusing unashamedly on family adventures – whether in Costa Rica, Sri Lanka or Mallorca. We meet the globetrotting Bucket-List Family, whose have-kids-willtravel lifestyle has turned them into an The Hunstanton Lawn Tennis Tournament in Instagram sensation. And in Family Norfolk, a fabulous summer event that’s been Matters we find out the best tips for going since the 1920s... Bamford Body Splashes, travelling with that tricky number – hand-luggage-friendly fragrances that come in three – in tow. First, of course, there’s morning and evening scents... Amankora, five the packing to do, so make sure you beautiful new Aman lodges nestled in the Himalayan read Emotional Baggage to check out peaks of Bhutan... and the Bugaboo Boxer, a what your luggage says about you. revolutionary range of suitcases that can be Quite a lot, it turns out. clicked together to make travelling with

Gavin Gough/4Corners

Scott Dunn loves

multiple bags almost effortless

Gill Morgan Editor

CONTRIBUTORS JENNY COAD Jenny Coad is deputy travel editor of the Daily Mail and her work has also appeared in Condé Nast Traveller, English Heritage Magazine, 25 Beautiful Homes and Harper’s Bazaar. A design graduate with a specialism in silk-screen printing, you can follow her keen eye for pattern and colour on Instagram @jenny.coadtravel. 6

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DOUGLAS ROGERS Douglas Rogers is an awardwinning author and journalist with 15 years’ experience writing for the world’s leading magazines and newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Daily Telegraph, Travel + Leisure and National Geographic Traveler. Born and raised in Zimbabwe, he now lives in rural Virginia.

MONICA VINADER Monica Vinader is a jewellery designer and businesswoman whose creations have been worn by the likes of Kate Winslet, Emma Watson and The Duchess of Cambridge. Before starting her brand, she spent 15 years travelling around Central and South America, with jobs that included running a fishing lodge in a very remote part of Mexico.


BIG IDEA? SLEEP ON IT. Give your grand plan the overnight test. Get a good night’s sleep in your fully flat bed, and arrive ready to make it happen. Find out more at virginatlantic.com.


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Cover image of Oia, Santorini: Sakis Papadopoulos/Getty. This page: Gallery Stock

ISSUE 06. SPRING 2017

The Next Big Thing

Life and Style

Destinations

1 0 T H E N E X T B I G T H I N G

2 1 T H E D U N N T H I N G

2 2 K I N G D O M O F S E C R E T S

From an Andaman Island paradise to a Cape Town art hotel, we celebrate the best trends in travel around the globe

4 5 F R O M B E A C H T O B A R

Barefoot luxe style

Six of the finest boat trips 3 4 T O G R E E C E , W I T H L O V E

Parasols from Rajasthan

48 MONICA VINADER

The jewellery designer reveals her ultimate holiday destinations 7 7 T H E B U C K E T L I S T F A M I LY

How a tech entrepreneur and his wife sold up and took their young family on a globetrotting adventure 9 5 W A N D E R L U S T

Tom Parker-Bowles, Melissa Odabash and Alex Monroe on where their global ambitions will take them next Editorial Design Director Sara Martin Design Vanessa Arnaud Picture director Lyndsey Price Picture editor Emma Hammar

8 4 T R O P I C A L M O D E R N

The amazing design history of Cambodian resort Knai Bang Chatt 89 FIRST OF THE SUMMER WINES

Uncorking the best for Scott Dunn guests 9 0 F A M I LY M A T T E R S

5 2 W H E R E T H E W I L D T H I N G S A R E

Adrenaline-fuelled action for all the family, in wild (but safe) Costa Rica The best street markets in the world

92 EMOTIONAL BAGGAGE

8 0 A C C E S S A L L A R E A S

What your luggage says about you

Mallorca’s hidden gems

9 6 T H E T R A V E L L E R S

9 4 R I G H T P L A C E , R I G H T T I M E

Meet the long-suffering Granny Nanny

For advertising enquiries: Tony Galaxis at tony.galaxis@ epncommunications. com or telephone +44 (0)207 434 3038

Victoria Hislop on her four-decade love affair with Greece and why it really has something for everyone

5 8 P I T C H P E R F E C T

Advice from a Scott Dunn expert

Publisher Crispin Jameson Project manager Sarah Glyde Colour reproduction PH Media Print Logical Connections

The unspoilt allure of Sri Lanka 2 8 G O W I T H T H E F L O W

64 THE KEEPSAKE

People

Editor Gill Morgan Deputy editor Charlotte Hogarth-Jones Sub-editors Damon Syson Mel Bradman

Andrew Dunn hails big occasion travel

Unmissable events from around the globe

© Copyright 2017 Brave New World Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission from the publishers. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for any errors it may contain Brave New World Publishing Ltd 6 Derby Street, London W1J 7AD, +44 (0) 20 3819 7520 advertising@bravenewworld.co

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THE NEXT BIG THING

THE WILDERNESS

DISCOVER (sensational)

ALASKA 10

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If your idea of America is a landscape built on a colossal scale, consider Alaska. It’s a pile-up of superlatives: the biggest state, the highest US mountain (Mount McKinley), the largest national parks, 100,000 glaciers... One of the US’s two non-contiguous states, Alaska was once a tourism secret, the terrain of intrepid travellers only. Now, as well as entering the luxury market, it’s taking on those other titans of mountainous majesty: New Zealand, Iceland, Norway. So what’s there? Fjords, glaciers, national parks with caribou and moose and grizzlies flicking salmon from streams; humpback whales, and, above it all, the Northern Lights. Some cruise, others hike; all use the word “awesome” without cringeing. scottdunn.com/alaska


THE NEXT BIG THING

THE NEXT BIG THING Exploring the Alaskan wilderness, a party house in Amsterdam, and getting the perfect night’s sleep: here’s what we’re getting excited about this season

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THE NEXT BIG THING

THE MOOD

SUITE (peaceful)

Previous pages: Bernd Römmelt/4Corners. Overleaf: Jody MacDonald/National Geographic Creative

DREAMS

Of all luxuries, the most desirable and elusive is a good night’s sleep. No wonder top hotels are racing to introduce the best sleep-therapy packages – way beyond lavender pillows and camomile tea. From enlisting sleep-disorder therapists, systems that initiate sleep with lighting and music, yoga and neuro-linguistic programming, each is taking a different approach in the quest to give guests the best night’s sleep. Six Senses (pictured) has sleep doctor Michael J Breus PhD on board, along with a team of sleep ambassadors who liaise with guests prior to their arrival to fine-tune rooms and suites. Duvets featuring cooling zones, bamboo-fibre pyjamas and organic pillows are all part of the package, with a personalised programme of spa treatments and activities to combat the most persistent insomnia.

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THE NEXT BIG THING

THE GALLERY HOTEL

ON THE (arty)

W AT E R F R O N T Nature, food, history and beauty are in abundance in South Africa, but perhaps it has hidden its contemporary culture under a bushel. No longer, and when the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa opens in September it’ll be a breakthrough on two counts: a museum with 80 galleries over nine floors and the 28-room Silo Hotel on the top seven floors – all topped by a rooftop sculpture garden. In the rooms, modern and traditional mingle, with spectacular pillowed-glass windows courtesy of its architect, London-based Thomas Heatherwick. Outside is Cape Town’s V&A Waterfront district. The Silo is part of the Royal Portfolio Collection and a great boon to the Rainbow Nation. Rooms from £730. scottdunn.com/silo

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THE NEXT BIG THING

THE SECRET

ANDAMAN (otherwordly)

ISLANDS

To find a set of pristine islands is every traveller’s grail, and it’s getting harder all the time. But the Andaman Islands, a tropical archipelago in the Bay of Bengal – with India to the west and Myanmar to the north – are the real Robinson Crusoe deal: white-sand beaches, azure waters, jungle hiking and great diving, as if Mauritius and the Maldives had been given a Southeast Asian makeover. The hotels are coming, including the Jalakara, which opened in 2015 on an old plantation in Havelock. These islands are still remote, accessed from east India, and nearby lies otherworldliness in the Nicobar Islands: tribal and off-limits to tourists because of vulnerability to outside influences. “Unspoilt” is an overused word, but in this case, it’s the mot juste. D AY S L I K E T H I S

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THE NEXT BIG THING

THE ESCAPE

HOUSE (exclusive)

PA R T Y

The Airbnb “hometel” phenomenon has had an interesting effect. While it has eaten into traditional hotel business, it’s increased the desire to stay in domestic environments and accelerated the trend for “exclusive-use” properties for significant birthdays, treats and special occasions (see p21, Dunn Thing). Hence Canal Huis 58, a luxurious four-bedroom townhouse on Herengracht in Amsterdam’s inner ring, which marries domestic convenience and chic – original wooden beams and Delft tiles – with hotel-quality service. It’s rammed full of antiques and character, and the fridge is pre-stocked with your favourite genever and cave-aged Edam. Outside, you’re pell-mell into the grachts (canals). scottdunn.com/canalhuis58 D AY S L I K E T H I S

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THE NEXT BIG THING

THE GADGET

I N S TA N T (iconic)

PRINT 18

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With nearly 2bn photos uploaded daily, the world is obsessed with sharing photos. Yet when Polaroid went bankrupt in 2001, “instant print” – the original social snap – seemed over. Whither the physical photo in the digital age? Ah, but instant-print inventor Edwin Land’s dream wouldn’t die. Not only did Polaroid persist (there’s now a Polaroid factory in the Netherlands and a new model, the Impossible Project’s I-1), but there’s been a revival of instant print, with apps including Swing (billed as “the first downloadable Polaroid camera”) and the new Leica Sofort: the first instant camera from Leica. The Sofort prints straight after you shoot and all that Polaroid magic comes flooding back as the picture develops before your eyes. us.leica-camera.com


THE NEXT BIG THING

THE TREND

SHOP (chic)

THE HOTEL Perusing the hotel boutique has always been a holiday guilty pleasure. Now, however, hotels are taking a new tack, meaning you can literally shop what you see – be it a plate, chandelier or item of furniture. At Finca Cortesin in Spain (pictured) you can leave with the bedspread. At Singita luxury lodges in Tanzania, Zimbabwe and South Africa, you can take the stunning wildlife prints straight off the walls. The glamorous Oetker Collection has gone a step further and created its own lifestyle brand, Eden Being, which includes both in-hotel boutiques and an e-commerce offering (edenbeing.com). You’ll find beautifully curated collections and bespoke objects, inspired by the stylish world of each hotel. So whether it’s a Liz Taylor-style swimsuit that reminds you of a summer spent at the Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc, or vintage jewellery that represents the elegant Parisian style of Le Bristol, you’ll find something to treasure back home.

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BEYOND BELIEF

Even by the extraordinary standards of the Galapagos Islands, the elaborate mating dance of the blue-footed booby is a remarkable sight to behold. Just as remarkably, you can witness it close-up; all the wildlife on the islands allow you to draw remarkably near. A year-round destination, Silversea has made it easier than ever to discover the wonders of the Galapagos Islands with the all-inclusive Silver Galapagos experience which includes flights between Ecuador and the Galapagos Islands, transfers, a two-night pre-cruise hotel stay, and more.

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Voyage Expectation D A Y S L I K E Beyond THIS

For more information and to book, please contact Scott Dunn.


THE DUNN THING

“My sister’s birthday dinner was in the Medina, overlooking Marrakech, watching acrobats, listening to Berber drummers, and followed by horsedrawn carriages back to the riad” BY ANDREW DUNN FOUNDER OF SCOT T DUNN I L LU ST R AT I O N H E AT H E R G AT L E Y

Y

ou only need witness the excitable, garrulous groups mustering at airports across the country to realise that weddings, birthdays, celebrations and anniversaries are a huge inspiration for group trips. It’s about sharing experiences you’ll never forget, with people you care about, far from everyday life, often in multigenerational groups, with friends and significant others. At Scott Dunn we’ve seen a rise in luxury celebration travel, which is why we recently brought out our first Seriously Special collection. For travel is the perfect way to celebrate. Obviously we’ve long seen couples going away to celebrate an anniversary, but the variety of trips and reasons for celebration have become ever more imaginative. Whatever the occasion – a business sold, a child about to fly the nest, a parent’s landmark birthday – there’s a holiday for it. Yes, having a party at home is wonderful. But often it’s no fun as you’re too busy hosting it, and sorting out logistics. Which is why I believe that to create something special you should go on holiday. To take a recent example,

we took over a riad in Marrakech for three days to celebrate my sister Pippa’s 50th birthday. My team at Scott Dunn organised amazing experiences throughout. We had the birthday dinner in the Medina, on a roof overlooking Marrakech, watching acrobats and listening to Berber drummers. This was followed by h0rsedrawn carriages back to the riad. The next day some of us went quad-biking at the foot of the Atlas Mountains, while others took part in a fantastic treasure hunt through the souks. My sister loved every minute. A classic option is to hire a big villa, which has the advantage of allowing people to hive off and do their own thing. And Scott Dunn can take care of the itinerary, ensuring there’s something for everyone – perhaps a boat trip, a bucket-list excursion or an adventure. Sometimes we get great challenges. One group asked us to create a walking itinerary from the Austrian Alps to Venice. And why not? I’ve personally done a 50th birthday in Venice and it’s brilliant, while a group walk is a great idea. We’ve organised a cricket match in the Alps, cocktails on the Great Wall of China and black-tie dinners in the Mediterranean. Almost anything’s possible. There are occasions for corporate groups too. We took one party of 10 TV producers to the Alps to ski with national champions and discover the thrill of freeriding, culminating with a champagne cocktail party and gourmet dinner, and on another occasion organised a group of 14 from an advertising agency to stay in two of our luxury villas in Mallorca, complete with a private 40ft yacht excursion, private use of the Pollença golf course, a volleyball match on the beach and a seafood barbecue with flamenco. Our experience means we can craft the perfect corporate trip, the most special birthday celebration, the finest upmarket stag or hen do; indeed, anything else that involves creating the most special of special occasions, whether for 10 people, 40 or 100. It’s the ultimate travel treat – and we all deserve significant experiences on our significant occasions.

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KINGDOM OF SECRETS The exotic, teardop-shaped island of Sri Lanka is full of hidden gems. Now, with the hippest boutique hotels adding to its allure, it has come into its own, says Rachael Pells

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GUESTS ARE SERVED 10 TRADITIONAL SRI LANKAN CURRIES: A FEAST FOR THE EYES IN 100 DIFFERENT COLOURS

Nearly eight years on since the end of the 26-year civil war, sophisticated properties are launching across the kingdom, and new areas are being developed all the time. You’ll see few high-rise blocks, since building above the height of the coconut trees was against the law until recently. My first stop after arriving in bustling Colombo was the Kandy House, an ornate, 200-year-old ancestral home built for the last chief minister of the Kandyan Kingdom. A tranquil oasis nestled on the outskirts of Sri Lanka’s second city, this nine-bedroom boutique hotel has the comfort of a warm, family home – but with all the privacy and luxury aspects of an adult retreat. Rooms are individually decorated with suitably delicate antique furniture, and my sleeping quarters boasted an impressive four-poster bed. As night fell, crickets sang as we sipped Ceylon Arrack cocktails mixed to perfection by the hotel’s Butterfly Bar. This is where my education in local cuisine began. The kitchen describes itself as a “fresh fusion” of traditional dishes and modern ingredients, but twice a week Kandy House serves its guests 10 traditional Sri Lankan curries – a feast for the eyes in a hundred different colours, and perfect for new arrivals unsure of how to tackle the local fare. A tasting menu, but on a vast scale. After a dip in the hotel infinity pool the next morning, I was ready to explore. Kandy is a honeypot for art, culture, history and nature. A popular route from here is to cut through the heart of the island, Sri Lanka’s “cultural triangle”, and to the southwest coast for its rewarding white sandy beaches. But first, a couple of miles from Kandy House sits the Botanical Peradeniya Garden: the area’s answer to London’s Kew Gardens, but with hundreds of enormous fruit bats. The scale of the trees and gardens is impressive, and there is a spectacular collection of orchids – a botanist’s dream. Just north of Kandy Lake is the city’s most famous attraction – the Temple of the Tooth

Clockwise from top: traditional stilt fishermen; the courtyard of Fort Bazaar hotel in Galle; elephants at Pinnewala; egg hoppers – a typical Sri Lankan breakfast. Previous pages: Lion’s Rock at Sigiriya

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Previous pages: Tuul & Bruno Morandi/Sime/4Corners. This page: Gallery Stock, Alamy

F

eeling lightheaded as I watched a family of elephants tiptoe oh so gracefully past my safari truck, I realised I’d forgotten to breathe. So silent were these beasts – a breed unique to Sri Lanka, different in the face to their African and Indian cousins – that I didn’t want to disturb their peace or end this special moment. The teardrop island of Sri Lanka has risen to the top of Instagram feeds, but don’t be fooled into thinking this long-haul destination du jour is just another tropical beach to tick off the bucket list. What makes Sri Lanka stand out as a must-visit destination is something far less easy to pin down, or capture in a smoothly filtered photograph. It’s partly the fact that such disparate experiences – beach, jungle, plantations, culture and the chicest of boutique hotels – are available within a country no bigger than Ireland. Classic European-influenced style mixes with ancient Indian culture in a way that’s hard to find in Sri Lanka’s neighbours.


Top left: John Alexander. Left: Jerry Redfern/Lightrocket. Opposite: Joe Beynon/Axiom – all Getty Images

– a World Heritage Site central to Buddhism and an essential port of call for tens of thousands of visitors every year. The temple is housed within the royal palace complex of the former Kandyan Kingdom and is said to hold the relic of the tooth of the Buddha. Since ancient times, the relic has played an important role in the country’s politics as it is believed that whoever is in possession of it holds the governance of the land. Driving a couple of hours south from Kandy, we arrived at tea country, home to plantation factories still producing Sri Lanka’s most important export. In these cooler climes, women pick tea leaves the way they have done for 150 years and you can sample world-class Ceylon tea straight from the source. We took the scenic train up to Haputale, to stay at Living Heritage Koslanda. Designed by Manik Sandrasagra, a Sri Lankan film director and cultural visionary, this is a boutique hotel of castle proportions. Suites are furnished with antique touches while the 26

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effect is simple, respectful and unassuming. Don’t miss out on a walk to Koslanda’s very own waterfall, cutting into a natural plunge pool in the estate’s 80-acre forest. For the last stage of my Sri Lankan odyssey, I headed south and hit the coast: here still was the colonial charm, but a younger crowd was at play, with the new wave of luxury traveller mixing with surfers, artists and the odd backpacker. In the trendy beach town Tangalle, I visited Kandy House’s sister hotel, The Last House. Similarly rustic-chic in style, this private beach villa is among the last standing works of Sri Lanka’s architectural hero Geoffrey Bawa, known as the master of “tropical modernism”. Awash with bright, soulful colour, the Last House fights back against the larger hotel chains surfacing in the area and is a shining example of how Sri Lanka does boutique hospitality best. There is an idyllic garden, a private beach and a small fishing boat for hire. But it’s enough being able to stand on the beach looking

Clockwise from right: a bedroom at Kandy House; traditional fishing boat; a lush tea plantation in Haputale, central Sri Lanka; Kandy Lake in the heart of the hill city of Kandy

LOOKING OUT TOWARDS THE INDIAN O C E A N , N O T H I N G S TA N D S I N T H E W AY O F T H E V I E W U N T I L A N TA R C T I C A towards the Indian Ocean, while locals remind visitors that nothing stands in that way of the view until Antarctica. Further south still sits Kahanda Kanda, whose uber-modern style and service takes Sri Lankan luxe to a different level. The UNESCO World Heritage Site Galle Fort is just a short tuk-tuk ride away. My final stop was Galle itself. A fort built by the Portuguese in 1588 and later taken by the Dutch, its ancient walls are made from coral, granite and lime and are a testament to Sri Lanka’s fortitude against waves of occupation and natural disasters over the centuries. Walking through cobbled streets, I found it hard to believe I had been swimming in waterfalls a few days before. And here, in the heart of the town, you’ll find another achingly hip hotel – Fort Bazaar, an 18-room converted townhouse addition to the Teardrop brand. As I sat that evening, Galle began to buzz with chatter and jollity. Exotic but understated, this place has a laid-back charm all of its own. Western tourism may be hungry for Sri Lanka and the country just as welcoming of it, but the land is very unspoilt and many secrets are left to explore. I went to Sri Lanka hoping to find sunshine and beautiful scenery, but came away with something much richer: a sense of serenity, a wealth of lessons learned and a restored peace of mind. Call Scott Dunn on 020 8682 5075 to arrange your trip to Sri Lanka. D AY S L I K E T H I S

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GO WITH THE FLOW T

From island-hopping in a dhow to a canal cruise in France, nothing revives the senses like a holiday on water, says Oliver Bennett

hey’re calling it the “blue mind” – the transformational benefits of being close to water. There’s such a restorative factor gained from proximity to rivers, seas and oceans that it’s now recognised as a leading source of wellness and joy. But of course, any yacht aficionado could tell you that. The minerals in the sea air, the sound of the waves, the clink of halyards, the wash lapping against the riverbank – not to mention the elegant progression from place to place in luxury – and you can see why Scott Dunn’s boat and yacht holidays are increasingly popular. You can charter your own journey around the Greek Islands, savour the long summer nights of Norway, or, after a near-mythical adventure around tropical Myanmar, end up on a gorgeous beach.

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1

TROPICAL COASTLINE

MOZAMBIQUE The dhow – a low-slung sailing boat with a sail like a furled triangle – is one of the loveliest sights of the southeast African coastline. It’s also the best way of hopping around the islands of Mozambique. You’ll find a fantasy tropical coastline: swaying palms, white sands and iridescent coral, where you commune with turtles, colourful fish and birdlife. You’ll stay in serviced camps on picturesque Robinson Crusoe islands, eat freshly caught dinner under the stars, and dive and snorkel by day. Stops include the Ulumbwa River, where mangroves give way to rural villages, and Ibo Island in the 32-island Quirimbas archipelago, where local silversmiths sell their wares. Unforgettable. scottdunn.com/dhow-safari


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LA VIE EN ROSE

FRANCE The waterways here are magical – the arteries of rural France. What better way to explore them than in one of the luxury guest barges (known by the French term péniches-hôtels) that traverse France, from Brittany to Bordeaux and through to Avignon, working from April to October on routes that take in iconic vinous regions: Languedoc-Roussillon, Burgundy, Provence, Franche-Comté and the Rhône. On board, all meals and drinks are included, with 15 wines and 20 cheeses served, representing each region visited. Groups can grab a whole barge, which sleep 4-12; or, if you’re travelling solo or in a pair, book per cabin. On land, you’ll visit local markets with a chef, sip coffee in quaint villages, cycle the cassoulet off on the towpath and play pétanque. Got a bigger party? Book more than one boat. scottdunn.com/afloat

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Top left: Eric Lafforgue/Art in All of Us/Getty Images. Opposite: Richard Taylor/4Corners

N O R W AY One of the world’s great sailing countries, Norway has a coastline that is riven with those wonderful, sheer-sided inlets called “fjords”. Glacial in origin, these extraordinary chasms saw the development of sailing holidays back in the 19th century, and it’s easy to see why. On Scott Dunn’s trip on the cosy Fjord Explorer from Storfjord to Hotel Union Øye, you’ll take in glorious, vertiginous Hjørundfjord, see the Sunnmøre Alps, pass atolls, small islands and villages, and wave to fishing boats and the inhabitants of Norway’s characteristic red wooden houses. And when you alight, you’ll find Norwegians as charming as their landscape is sublime, as you eat flatbread and salmon amid the quiet mountain hospitality. Depending on your date of departure, you’ll enjoy long summer nights and (possibly) the Northern Lights. Wonderfully refreshing. scottdunn.com/fjord-cruise

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E X O T I C V O YA G E

INDONESIA

S TA F F O U T N U M B E R G U E ST S BY 19 TO 14, WHICH INCLUDES DIVE I N S T R U C T O R S A N D S PA T H E R A P I S T S

Aside from the honeypot that is Bali, Indonesia is one of the world’s travel secrets – a diverse tropical nation with a great seafaring culture. The finest vessel for an Indonesian voyage is Lamima, a 65m phinisi – a two-masted traditional boat – that was built to a peerless specification on Sulawesi island by Marcelo Penna, a yacht designer from Barcelona. Staff outnumber guests by 19 to 14, with a crew that includes dive instructors, spa therapists and a chef who creates a mix of Indonesian and European dishes. With seven luxurious cabins, the boat is itself a destination, but it’s the journey that will astound. There’s remote Sumba, tranquil Lombok, the temples of Java and Komodo, where the eponymous “dragon” – the giant lizard – can be seen. En route, experience active volcanoes, secluded beaches, coral reefs, diving with manta rays and incredible on-land trails. scottdunn.com/lamima

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I S L A N D O D YS S E Y

GREECE

Shutterstock

Homer’s epic poem The Odyssey could be cited as the first travelogue, a heroic sea journey around ancient Greece. His actual route is hotly debated, but a deep classical presence remains in a sailing charter of Greece. The sea is the eternal Mediterranean, the coastlines reveal fishing villages, beaches and limestone hills – even the names, including Andros, Mykonos, Kos, conjure up the greats of antiquity. You can devise your own journey in consultation with the skipper. The yachts – catamarans with lounge, kitchen, and comfortable cabins – sleep 6-10, and depart from the west of Athens. A much-loved itinerary is to track the Peloponnese peninsula round to Poros, car-free Hydra, sleepy Kythnos and north to Kea. With lashings of tzatziki, golden sunsets and chilled retsina, it’s anything but Spartan. scottdunn.com/ yachtgreece

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The Ultimate Family Destination Beachfront located by the Ionian Sea, in Costa Navarino - the prime destination in Greece’s southwest Peloponnese, in an unspoiled land of olive groves and vineyards, The Westin Resort Costa Navarino offers families countless ways to explore and play; the fascinating Aqua Park, the indoor sports arena, numerous sports and activities for all, including two signature golf courses, a racquet academy, a variety of on-water and under-water sports, and outdoor pursuits to the beautiful Messinian countryside, all cater for an invigorating stay. Enjoy the golden 1.5km-long sandy beach, the sparkling Ionian waters, the refreshing pools and the reviving Greek sunshine, savor cross-cultural menus, as well as local produces and recipes in a stunning variety of dining venues, discover authentic cultural experiences, or rejuvenate with signature therapies and treatments at the award-winning Anazoe Spa.

ΜΗ.Τ.Ε.: 1249K045 A0159601

For more information, please visit scottdunn.com/costanavarino or call +44.20.8682.5040


Arrive In Style Voted best airline in the Indian Ocean at the World Travel Awards 10 years running, Air Mauritius takes care over every detail to make your flight as comfortable and relaxing as possible so that when choosing the national airline your Mauritian experience begins the moment you set foot on board. With two exotic cabins, where the décor is inspired by the tropical flora and fauna of the island, Business class boasts a personalized cabin service, with a dedicated cabin crew, lie-flat cocoon seats with a 60 inch seat pitch, fine wines and international menu. Air Mauritius Economy Class is reputed to be one of the best in the world, and our attentive crew will do its best to ensure that you experience this personally. Space- that’s the first thing you’ll feel when you take your seat. Each seat has its own individual TV screen as standard. A menu designed by our chef features a selection of main courses and wide range of beverages which help to create a relaxing comfortable journey that exceeds expectation. Air Mauritius not only welcomes you to Mauritius but also opens up the world beyond. Twinning an Indian Ocean stay with other destinations in the Air Mauritius network like Australia and South Africa creates the perfect holiday or stop-over.


4Corners

B OAT T R I P S

Previous page, from top: the lap of luxury awaits aboard the Lamima in Indonesia; experience your own Greek odyssey in a private catamaran. Above: Hot air balloons over Gawdawpalin Temple in Myanmar

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T H E B O AT T O M A N D A L AY

M YA N M A R It’s partly due to Rudyard Kipling’s magnum opus, Mandalay (the old royal capital of Burma/Myanmar) that the name is fixed in everyone’s mind, as if it were mythical. But it does exist, and the 115-mile trip along the Irrawaddy River from Mandalay to the other ancient city of Bagan is crammed with flavour. The Irrawaddy is awe-inspiring, and you’ll see village life with stilted homes, bullock carts, ploughs and pagodas. On land, you’ll find a country stuck in a more graceful era, where saffron-robed monks and sarong-clad locals somehow remain elegant through the hottest summers. On deck, keep an eye out for rare river dolphins riding your bow waves and cool off in the boat’s lovely swimming pool. Want to end your trip on a beach? At Ngapali on Burma’s west coast there are white sand beaches for that final chill, where Kipling’s words come to mind: “Come you back, you British soldier; come you back to Mandalay!” scottdunn.com/roadtomandalay D AY S L I K E T H I S

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GREECE SPECIAL

TO GREECE WITH LOVE Whitewashed villages, azure skies and a rich cultural heritage – the glories of Greece continue to seduce travellers

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GREECE SPECIAL

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LOVE LETTER TO GREECE

VICTORIA HISLOP

“Hedonism is a Greek word. Here, you’re positively meant to live for the moment” The bestselling novelist first visited Greece over 40 years ago – and she’s still drunk on its beauty

Previous pages: Gallery Stock. These pages: Manfred Mehlig/4Corners; Rex/Shutterstock

M

y relationship with Greece began a long time ago. It was 1976 and I went to Athens and then to the island of Paros on a family holiday. I was 17 and it was a life-changing experience. From outings to Hastings Castle and afternoons on a chilly beach in Bognor Regis (until then, the format for our vacations), suddenly I found myself gazing up at the Acropolis and down into water that was clearer and warmer than I could ever have imagined possible. It was love at first sight, and from that moment I began to visit once a year, then twice, and nowadays I don’t even count. I have a house there, speak the language and spend several months of the year travelling and researching for my books. When people ask me why I love Greece so much, part of me simply wants to say: “What’s not to love?” At every level, Greece has something to offer. Culturally, it is the richest of countries, with a line of continuous civilization that begins from several millennia before Christ through to the present day, with a density of archaeological museums and sites unmatched anywhere in the world. Like most who visit, I know that places such as Delphi are more than simply rows of stones, not just remnants of ancient architecture. They have some kind of magic that draws us, its 21st-century visitors, in the same way they drew people several thousands of years ago. Sitting in the ancient theatre of Epidaurus, for example, watching a play under a full moon, I have felt all those invisible barriers between past and present simply melt away. Standing in the stadium at Ancient Olympia, or at the entrance to the Palace of Knossos, has a similar effect.

In Greece, the idea of democracy was created, beauty was defined (even worshipped), the archetypes of comedy and tragedy were written, early forms of medicine were developed. We owe so much to Greece, and each day, even if unwittingly, we speak hundreds of words with roots in its ancient language. But it’s not just the high culture of ancient history and the blazing glories of the Byzantine period (though these are undeniably beautiful and led the way for the rest of the world) that attract us to Greece. The living culture of food, wine and music are a huge daily pleasure for everyone in the country (Greek or visitor). Hedonism is, naturally, a Greek word. Dionysus was the God of the grape harvest, and quite rightly worshipped. There is no shame in enjoying yourself to the full there. You are positively meant to derive pleasure from the good

things of life and to live for the moment. The crisis that has hit Greece in recent times is undeniably hard for people there, but it has done nothing to mar the eternal beauty of their country. This cannot be tarnished and will endure for much longer than this period of hardship, which I hope will become simply a line in a history book. Being intoxicated by a perfect, dry assyrtiko (never underestimate Greek wine) is one thing. Being drunk on the beauty of a landscape is another. I have travelled the length and breadth of Greece, slept on mountains and beaches (as well as in the cheapest and the most expensive hotels), and visited dozens of islands. Sometimes its sheer beauty is overwhelming. The rolling green-black hills of the Peloponnese, the dramatic mountains of Epirus in the north, the extraordinary bays of Halkidiki and the gentler landscapes of the islands – all of them are breathtaking. The bright blue-and-white Greek flag, which evokes sky, sea and the dazzling white of so many buildings, is proudly flown all over Greece. There is, of course, a single Greece, but at the same time there are many: ancient and modern, mountains and sea, mainland and islands. All of these things bring me back, time after time after time. Victoria Hislop is the author of seven novels set in Greece, including The Island. Her latest is Cartes Postales from Greece (Headline Review)

Previous pages: the famous blue roofs of Oia in Santorini. Opposite: Chrissopigi, Sifnos

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GREECE FOR... NEW ROMANTICS Whether you’re staying in the simplest of guesthouses or luxiest of hotels, the romance of Greece is the same: it’s in the sunsets, the boat rides, the ever-blue horizon, the echoes of ancient poets and philosophers. Not to mention all that crushed white linen worn against newly sunned skin… most of us rarely look better than we do in Greece. Some romantic destinations demand the Big Moment, the va-va-voom outfit, the ultimate restaurant: it can all be a bit stressful, and when the moment doesn’t deliver, what a letdown. Not here – simplicity is all. Island-hopping is surely made for lovers, young and

old; too unwieldy with friends or children in tow but the ultimate in romance, to pull out of a harbour, sail past ancient lands and onto the next whitewashed idyll. When I think of my trips to the islands with boyfriends past (and husband present) – to Mykonos (pictured, right) with its pretty coloured houses or Santorini with its red and black volcanic beaches – I think of easy days of lolling and reading, lunching and delicious siestas. A little culture, but not too much. Of strolling in the early evening as church bells chime. Of that lovely moment when you’ve showered after a day on the beach and join your other half for that delicious first gin and tonic on the terrace as the sun goes down. Heaven. Lorna Pope

Scott Dunn Suggests Greece’s enchanting luxury hotels make a for a truly romantic break

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A wave of luxury hotel openings

and Fira, it’s where you’ll see

luxury hotel in Greece, exuding

in recent years has made Greece

the most beautiful sunsets over

exclusivity. The rooms are private

the ideal place for couples

the caldera. On Mykonos, the

pavilions, beach cabanas or

and honeymooners. The island

Mykonos Grand lives up to its

villas, all with their own private

of Santorini is filled with

name and is on one of Greece’s

pools, and there’s an excellent

characterful boutique hotels built

very best beaches, Agios Ioannis,

spa. The car-free island of

into the rock face. The Grace

which you might recognise from

Spetses is also well worth a visit.

Santorini, however, is a well-kept

Shirley Valentine. Located on the

Stay at the Poseidonion Grand

secret. Located in a quiet spot

mainland, on the east coast of

Hotel, which has a stunning

on a peninsula between the

the Peloponnese, the Amanzoe

waterfront location and is close

island’s two main towns of Oia

is undoubtedly the ultimate

to the picturesque old port.

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Atlantide Phototravel/Getty Images; 4Corners

GREECE SPECIAL


GREECE SPECIAL

Scott Dunn Suggests From palace hotels to beach resorts, discover the best places to enjoy Greece’s cultural treasures Athens is the perfect place for

Hotel has dramatic views of the

culture vultures to start. One of the

Temple of Poseidon – it’s hard

glamorous old palace hotels is the

to imagine a more memorable

best option for accommodation

location. Thessaloniki, Greece’s

– either the five-star King George

second-largest city, is also of

Palace in the city’s golden quarter,

historical interest. There’s plenty

or the five-star Hotel Grande

to explore, but it’s far more

Bretagne, which has an incredible

pleasant to stay at the five-star

roof terrace with amazing views

Danai Beach Resort, about an

over the Acropolis, and a rooftop

hour away in Halkidiki.

pool to cool off in after you’ve explored the city’s cultural glories. Scott Dunn can arrange private tours of the city with a historian or foodie walking tours through local markets and traditional tavernas, sampling Greek delicacies with a local expert. A 90-minute drive from the capital, the Cape Sounio

T H E H O T E L G R A N D B R E TA G N E H A S A ROOFTOP POOL TO COOL OFF IN ONCE YOU’ VE E X P L O R E D T H E C I T Y ’ S C U LT U R A L G L O R I E S

GREECE FOR... C U LT U R E V U LT U R E S For anyone who loves history, Greece is fascinating – and one of the few destinations where the reality often exceeds our fantasy of the place. I first visited Greece as a teenager – driving across Europe with my parents and some of their friends, taking it in turns between a battered 2CV and a splendid Vincent motorbike, the weather becoming balmier as we headed south. I loved it instantly, and even lived in Athens for a while in my early twenties – a time of youthful adventure, romance and eked-out drachmas. I remember sailing past Cape Sounion on the way to the islands, and seeing the partially tumbled columns of the Temple of Poseidon – like a dream of ruined antiquity – the kind that inspired 18th-century Grand Tourists to adorn English parkland with classical follies. And who can forget their first sighting of the Acropolis – viewed from Mount Lycabettus, as

Wordsworth saw it, or from the roof terrace of the King George Palace Hotel (pictured above). And Delphi, the ancient world’s most sacred of places, which still retains the power to move , and has some kind of magic – no matter how many coachloads of visitors there are. And then in the archaeological museums at Delphi and Athens, you find some of the finest, sometimes the sexiest examples of the Greek fascination with the human form. For many, it’s the jumble of epochs and of ancient and modern that gives Greece its immense charm (that, and the people). Like Rhodes, with its mix of classical ruins, medieval city, Byzantine chapels and former mosques, or the abandoned churches and Greek villages over on the Turkish mainland, a reminder that until the 1920s, ethnic Turks and Greeks lived alongside each other on much of the coast and the islands. And between them, Homer’s “winedark sea” – probably best enjoyed on a charter yacht. James Collard D AY S L I K E T H I S

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4Corners; Karan Kapoor/Getty Images; Tetra Images/Getty Images; Getty Images

GREECE SPECIAL

GREECE FOR... Y O U R F A M I LY A N D OTHER ANIMALS

We’ve had more adventurous family trips, more far-flung, more stylish even, but none has been quite as happy as our holidays in Greece – six in total. What is it about the place that makes it so perfect for families? It’s partly the fact that the Greeks love children, which brings a joyfulness to proceedings. Then there’s the simplicity of lifestyle, however chic the version: the whitewashed, unfussy decor, the outdoor living, the constant messing about in water, the relaxed tavernas and easy food. We’ve done five-star luxury in Crete with a baby, a rustic villa in 42

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W E H I R E D A L I T T L E B O AT. . . A N D T H AT ’ S W H E N W E R E A L LY FELL IN LOVE WITH THE PLACE

the lovely wooded hills of Paxos with two-year-old twins; and four separate stays in our favourite place of all – the north-east coast of Corfu, made famous by Gerald Durrell in his classic My Family and Other Animals. The first time, we stayed in the White House in Kalami, where Gerald’s big brother Lawrence had lived. We hired a little boat, and that’s when we really fell for the place: the magic of pottering around empty


GREECE SPECIAL

coves, jumping into clear blue water, pulling into a taverna for a shady lunch… I couldn’t believe a holiday could be so relaxing with three young children in tow. So much swimming and sunshine meant, when they were little, they always had an afternoon nap, under the boat canopy or when we moored in the shade of some cliffs – and often, rather helpfully, while we enjoyed a glass of rosé and a plate of grilled fish. Our nature-obsessed son could chase lizards to his heart’s content and the three of them would snorkel in wonder, pointing at brilliantly coloured fish as they went. As the children turned into teenagers, we’ve rented villas up and down that little stretch of coast, from Kassiopi to Agni, and taken family and friends along with us. We know which are the best rocks to jump off, which taverna does the tastiest calamari, and which bays have the swankiest superyachts (ogling them is an enjoyable grown-up pastime all of its own). Simple pleasures. Gill Morgan

Scott Dunn Suggests With so many great hotels, travelling to Greece as a family couldn’t be easier For very young children, Daios

over with activities. There’s a

separate hotels, but what it lacks

Cove in Crete is ideal. It’s a

great watersports programme

in intimacy it makes up for with a

compact resort and our Explorers

on offer, Aqua Explorers, so

vast array of things to do. Facilities

kids club here takes children from

children can enjoy everything from

include a water park, go-kart

four months old, so it’s perfect

paddleboarding to waterskiing

track, bowling alleys and golf

if you’d like a mix of family time

and kayaking to sailing. If you’re

courses. And for the perfect villa

and time alone. For slightly older

travelling with teenagers, Costa

experience, Villa Omina in Corfu,

children, Eagles Palace and

Navarino on the mainland

has a private pool and beach.

Eagles Villas near Halkidiki on

Peloponnese is the place to go.

Call 020 8682 5080 to discuss your

mainland Greece are bubbling

It’s a huge resort made up of two

holiday to Greece with our experts.

Previous pages: Zakynthos. Opposite page, top: Cap Gastria and Gastriotisa church on the island of Tinos Left: the private beach at Villa Omina in Corfu, a stylish, contemporary, property that sleeps 10, making it ideal for two families

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LUXURY BY COMO

travel well, eat well, stay well Surf the Maldives, or dive among coral forests in the Turks and Caicos. In Bhutan, hike Himalayan peaks, or in Bali, freewheel down the slopes of a volcano. At our properties worldwide, adventure meets luxury, award-winning cuisine and a deep commitment to holistic wellness.

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A5 portrait / A6 landscape

COMO HOTELS AND RESORTS BALI | BANGKOK | BHUTAN | LONDON | MALDIVES | MIAMI BEACH | PERTH AU | PHUKET | TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS

comohotels.com

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COMO HOTELS AND RESORTS BALI | BANGKOK | BHUTAN | LONDON | MALDIVES | MIAMI BEACH | PERTH AU | PHUKET | TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS


G E T PA C K I N G

Day to night Whether it’s boho luxe for her or tailored beachwear for him, today’s coolest holiday styles will take you straight from poolside to bar

1 4 3

2

5

6

1. SANDALS

2. RING

3. EARRINGS

4 . S T R A W H AT

5. DRESS

6. BEACH BAG

Linen and cotton Petal Festival sandals, Tabitha Simmons, £445

Diamond, topaz and pearl ring, Delfina Delettrez, £850

Gold plated Rita tassel earrings, Marte Frisnes, £135

Iraka palm grey and orange straw Maïa hat, Yosuzi, £260

Silk georgette Ara dress, Talitha collection, £835

Straw Adorada circle bag, Sophie Anderson, £165 D AY S L I K E T H I S

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7

8

9

10

11

12

7. W A T C H

8 . S T R A W H AT

9. SHIRT

10. SUNGLASSES

11. SHORTS

12. SANDALS

I.N.O.X. professional diver watch, Victorinox, £495

Quito straw Panama hat, Borsalino, £145

Camp-collar voile cotton shirt, Everest Isles, £135

D-Frame acetate sunglasses, Thom Browne, £625

Seersucker striped shorts, Officine Generale, £150

Edoardo intrecciato calf leather sandals, Bottega Veneta, £485 D AY S L I K E T H I S

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My holiday gems

TRAVEL ALBUM MONICA VINADER

The jewellery designer reveals her travel inspirations, from stone-buying trips in India to her favourite Mexican hotel

I love Marrakech. I first travelled there when I was 18. I went from the city to Ouarzazate and Zagora, down the amazing Drâa Valley, which has incredible kasbahs. It was an unforgettable trip. I’ve been so many times since – each time I feel like I discover something new. I admit I always dedicate some solid shopping time, and on my last trip I bought some beautiful carpets from one of the most interesting dealers in town, who works by appointment only. 48

D AYS L I K E T H I S

Getty Images, Hisham Ibrahim/Getty

MOROCCAN MAGIC


TRAVEL ALBUM

HOTEL LUXE

I stayed recently at the Mandarin Oriental in Marrakech, which has amazing service. But the best thing was having our own private riad with pool, set in gardens. A real retreat from the hectic streets of the medina.

H O L I DAY ST Y L E

I’m very careful with the sun, so if I go to the beach I’ll always bring a hat and a tube of La RochePosay sunblock. I always take my Havaianas, and I love Ancient Greek sandals, paired with Lemlem cover-ups to slip on for lunch. On long-haul flights, I always take a big cashmere scarf – I buy them via friends in Jaipur who have the softest, lightest scarves.

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M Y I D E A L D E ST I N AT I O N

TAST Y TAC O S

I love Mexican tacos. If you know which street vendors to go to they can be amazing. There’s a speciality called Tacos al Pastor – delicious, and the best hangover cure after a night of tequila and dancing.

THE PERFECT HOTEL

When it comes to hotels I’m quite fussy, as I used to be in the hotel business. I always look for great service and a simple aesthetic. One of my favourite places is Hotel Esencia in Tulum – it ticks all the boxes, including a gorgeous beach.

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My favourite travels are with my husband and daughter. For us, there’s nothing better than a trip to Mexico, where we combine days on the beach with visits to Mayan ruins, colonial towns like Merida, and museums – Mexico City’s archaeological museum is a favourite. It’s filled with Aztec and Mayan wonders.


TRAVEL ALBUM GRAND DESIGNS

As a child we spent a lot of summers in Biarritz in France, staying at the grand Hôtel du Palais, which is right by the beach. I still love it there. We still shop in the same bakeries and bring back the same espadrilles and Basque linen from Jean Vier. We took my parents and family for Dad’s 80th last year and it’s great to share with my daughter and niece the same things my sister and I enjoyed when we were little.

JEWEL PURPOSE

Roberto Machado Noa/Getty Images, Shutterstock, Alamy, Monica Vinader

I buy and cut all my stones in India, where I’ve been going for years. I adore the colours of Jaipur and what people wear – it’s so uplifting. Bar Palladio is great for drinks and supper and I love staying at Samode Haveli, a beautiful traditional mansion that feels like a real oasis in the city. I always try to discover something new – once I managed to arrange a visit to the Jal Mahal (Water Palace) in Jaipur, which is not generally open to the public.

WONDER WALLS

Florence is a wonderful place on so many levels – I spent three months there studying History of Art before going to art school and I go back every year. If there’s one place I always go to it’s the Brancacci Chapel to see the Masaccio frescoes. D AY S L I K E T H I S

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C O STA R I C A

Exotic and safe, Costa Rica is one of the most family-friendly destinations in Latin America. Putting his vertigo to one side, Douglas Rogers takes his brood on the action (and chill-out) holiday of a lifetime

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C O STA R I C A

Clockwise, from left: a deserted beach in Guanacaste on the Pacific coast; a blue-and-yellow macaw; Douglas Rogers and family enjoying their Costa Rican adventure

Getty Images, Douglas Rogers, Istvan Kadar/Getty Images

W

e were an hour into our hike in Costa Rica’s Rincón de la Vieja Volcano National Park when we saw the creature. Sunning itself across the path in front of us, blocking the way, was a giant yellow-black lizard – a Black Ctenosaur (’tino-sore) – its prehistoric eyes blinking ominously at me. What made the sight so surreal and cinematic was the smoke rising from a bubbling geyser behind it, and the park’s titular volcano, a ribbon of cloud around its cone, towering above. I felt as if we’d stepped into a scene from Avatar. We were about to take a wide berth around the lizard when an odd thing happened. A howler monkey – one of a troop playing in the surrounding trees – let out a series of screeching yelps whereupon the lizard raised its head, blinked and ambled off into the brush. “Thanks, Boots!” said my son, without a second thought, and we continued on our way. It was the fourth day of a week-long family holiday in Costa Rica, and there was nowhere my wife, Grace, and our kids, Whitaker, 6, and Madeline, 8, would rather be. When they were younger, the children were huge Dora the Explorer fans – hence the “Boots” reference – and they had long wanted to see monkeys, jungle and volcanoes. But it wasn’t just wildlife and wild landscapes we’d come for. We have had some experience of the outdoors as a family. Since our children were born, we’ve made several trips to southern Africa. I grew up in Zimbabwe, where my parents still live, and we’ve gone on safaris there and in South Africa. The main drawbacks, however, are that the flights are terminally long and there are malaria tablets and yellow fever jabs to get. All this before my American wife begins to discuss security concerns: “Zimbabwe is not exactly Switzerland,” she will say. Wanting somewhere wild and exotic – and safe – without having to trek to Africa from our home in Virginia, we looked elsewhere. It didn’t take long to work out that Costa Rica – literally known as the Switzerland of

the Americas – was the perfect destination for an adventurous young family. A sliver of a country sandwiched between Panama and Nicaragua, the Caribbean and Pacific lapping its shores, Costa Rica is unique for the region. In 1948 it abolished its military and began pouring money into conservation. By the 1970s and ’80s, when much of Latin America was in the grip of caudillos and death squads, Costa Ricans – Ticos – were declaring vast swathes of the country, from volcanodotted rain forests to tropical dry coastlands, protected nature reserves, and teaching school kids about biosphere and sustainability. With 0.03 per cent of the Earth’s land mass but 6 per cent of its biodiversity, Costa Rica was “green” before the term existed, and it has been a ready-made paradise for outdoor enthusiasts – surfers, hikers, white-water rafters and zip-liners – for years. We persuaded our friends Kathy and Mike and their four boys (aged 11 to 17), to join us, and booked a hotel near Playa Avellana, D AY S L I K E T H I S

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a beach town south of Tamarindo, on the Pacific’s popular Nicoya Peninsula. The Nicoya Peninsula is the most visited part of the country and yet, this being Costa Rica, that doesn’t mean shopping malls, sixlane highways and multi-storey resort hotels. Ten miles out of Avellana, nearing the end of a four-hour drive from San José airport to the west coast, the road became a rutted, dusty dirt track. We thought we had taken a wrong turn. But no, this is development Costa Rica style: the government intentionally keeps roads unpaved and airports small, and ensures hotels comply with strict environmental building codes. “We have an expression: if we don’t build it, they will come!” a local in the tourist industry told me – Field of Dreams in reverse. We arrived late evening, a soccer-ball sun setting over the glassy Pacific. Time for a dip in the pool and a lazy swing on hammocks suspended between palms. The Pacific Ocean waves were our soundtrack. We settled into a lazy rhythm, woken not by alarm clocks each morning but by screaming howler monkeys in fern-like guachipelín trees. An iguana the size of a small crocodile sunned itself by the pool, and we sent Madeline up a papaya tree to pick fruit for breakfast. The adults were soon tucking into delicious rich cups of fresh Costa Rican Tarrazu coffee. We had booked a zip-line excursion that first day, and made our way to Pura Aventura, 54

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Gallery Stock, Getty Images

NAME OF SECTION


C O STA R I C A

THE FEARLESSNESS OF YOUTH M E A N T T H AT M Y K I D S T O O K T O T H E HIGH WIRE LIKE TRAPEZE ARTISTS

Bottom left: sunset surfing in Playa Santa Teresa. Below: a shoal of hammerhead sharks off Cocos Island. Centre right: a marine iguana basks in Corcovado National Park

a canopy outfitter on a 150-year-old horseand-cattle ranch a half-hour drive south. The wonder of Costa Rica’s conservation ethos is that while it makes every effort to preserve its forests, it also goes to great lengths to make sure you see them – even from a steel wire suspended above a canyon or forest canopy. Zip-lining is a leading industry in Costa Rica, and we joined a dozen other families (mostly American and British) on Pura Aventura’s 11-station zip-line above the slopes and canyons of the ranch’s lush green old-wood primary forest. I suffer from vertigo and was concerned for my kids, but the fearlessness of youth meant they took to the high-wire like trapeze artists, doing each station in tandem with a guide. One of the sections is 300m long, suspended over a deep gorge; my wife put me to shame by doing

that stretch hanging upside-down. The following day was a surf lesson. Nicoya is famous for its surf schools and we booked lessons with Real Surf Trips, a Costa Rican company with two camps on the peninsula. Our four-hour lesson was with an instructor named Gustavo. We gathered on Playa Avellana at dawn. A ribbon of white sand facing turquoise ocean, Avellana is one of Latin America’s great beaches, made so by the fact that, aside from the coconut sellers, the only commercial business on it is a stylish beach bar, Lola’s, once named one of the 10 best beach bars in the world. Wooden tables and high-backed chairs were set on pebble and beach sand under the shade of palms and walnut trees, the ocean a few yards away. Waiters in blue T-Shirts ferried fruit and

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C O STA R I C A

rum cocktails, bowls of ceviche and fresh grilled line fish. Surfing exposes your age and condition. Ten years ago I could at least get up on a surfboard; this time, even in the gentle left breaks, I could barely get up on my knees. “Daddy, you look like a blob of marshmallow on a stick of gingerbread,” Madeline said. Damn that girl. The kids, on the other hand, used to riding around on scooters, were near naturals, and within an hour both were up, riding waves to the shore. Escaping further insult, I snuck off to Lola’s for an early piña colada. The days folded into each other and a wonderful gauzy routine set in. We would walk to the beach in the morning, swim and body surf, lunch on ceviche, tuna steaks and mojitos at Lola’s (fish and chips for the kids), then cool down at th hotel in the afternoon, adults taking siestas in those hammocks.

We broke up one day with an excursion to Tamarindo, the largest town on Nicoya – it reminded me of a bustling Greek Island village. On the second last day, we drove two hours north, into the interior, for a hike in the aforementioned Rincón de la Vieja Volcano National Park, famous for its still-active, 6,217 ft-high cindercone volcano. The steaming geysers, dense jungle and weird lizards did remind me of Avatar, although another meeting soon after the lizard set me straight. On the way back from the volcano we literally bumped into another family we knew from home. We had no idea they were holidaying with their kids in Costa Rica, too. But it all fit a theme: Costa Rica is wild and exotic, but it’s also safe, accessible and perfect for children. Call Scott Dunn’s Americas team on 020 8682 5030 to arrange your trip.

Below: fresh ceviche at Lola’s bar on Avellana, one of Latin America’s best beaches

W E ’ D W A L K T O T H E B E A C H E A R LY I N T H E M O R N I N G , L U N C H O N C E V I C H E A N D M O J I T O S , T H E N TA K E S I E S TA S I N H A M M O C K S B A C K AT T H E H O T E L Scott Dunn Suggests

Above: a bedroom at Arenal Nayara hotel in the Arenal Volcano National Park

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The Costa Rica Family Wildlife

You’ll stay at the Arenal Nayara

Adventure starts with two

for three nights – a stylish hotel

nights in Finca Rosa Blanca,

surrounded by lush tropical

an arty boutique country inn

rainforest. It’s a great base for

in the Central Valley near San

family-friendly activities, from

José. From here, you are taken

zip-wiring to canopy walkways

by motorboat through the

and white-water rafting. Continue

mangroves to remote Casa

by road to finish your holiday

Corcovado Jungle Lodge on the

with four nights in the luxurious

Osa Peninsula for three nights.

Andaz Peninsula Papagayo, a

You’ll see glimpses of scarlet

beach resort set on the Peninsula

macaws, iguanas, jaguars,

Papagayo. Facilities include a

pumas and many more in their

great spa, an infinity pool and a

natural habitats. Ride horses, go

kids’ club. Or tailor this itinerary

scuba-diving and sea-kayaking,

to suit your family’s needs. Costa

or take a leisurely nature-trail

Rica Family Wildlife Adventure,

walk. Continue by road to one

from about £4,600pp for 12 nights

of the country’s most iconic

including flights. For details visit

highlights: the Arenal volcano.

scottdunn.com/costaricacool

Getty Images

Costa Rica is perfect for families looking for an off-the-beaten track adventure, seeing incredible wildlife, and ending with the ultimate beach break


Pitch Perfect

For a true taste of life abroad, head to a bustling street market and discover local treasures. Jenny Coad finds six of the best

u V I N TA G E D R E A M S W H AT T O B U Y Vintage telephones, old Louis Vuitton luggage, African mud cloths, Navajo jewellery...

WHEN The third Sunday of each month. General admission from 6.30am is $6 (around £5)

DON’T MISS Keep your eyes peeled for local A-listers Cindy Crawford, Diane Keaton and John Malkovich

SEE ALSO Local Harvest Farmers' Market, which sometimes features live music

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Long Beach, USA You can buy early-bird tickets for this enormous market in the Vets Stadium (the location for numerous Hollywood motion pictures, and where the Motorcycle Freeway World Cup finals have been hosted). More than 800 vendors sell everything from golden-nugget slot machines to French enamel teapots, Singer sewing machines, vintage clothing, high-school lockers and old signage. Crack-of-dawn admission costs $12 (around £10) and gets you in at 5.30am, when the best deals are to be had. Everything for sale has to be over 20 years old. Seek out Through the Porthole, a travelling home décor business (follow them on Instagram @throughtheporthole). They specialise in gorgeously rustic salvaged items for the home, such as old-fashioned scales, battered suitcases, soda bottles and mid-century chairs.


STREET MARKETS

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Jorge Monedero, Alamy, Shutterstock

Ventimiglia, Italy People pop over from France to visit Ventimiglia in Liguria, which has a popular market on the seafront each Friday. It’s only 7km from the French/Italian border and 40km from Nice. The 500 stalls offering local delicacies as well as a jumble of clothes and accessories make it worth the trip. You can pick up designer labels, shoes and bags, as well as items for the home and garden. For the really good stuff, it’s a case of pot luck. Have a blast of caffeine at Bar Cavour or Baires Cafe before scouring the stalls for a bargain. There is also a food market in the centre of Ventimiglia (Mon-Sat) that sells olive oil, cured meats, globe artichokes, olives, buffalo ricotta and local honey, as well as seasonal treats like truffles. If you’re making a day of it, why not have supper in Osteria Consani on Via del Teatro. It’s modest, traditional and cheap.

W H AT T O B U Y Leather goods, clothes, sundried tomatoes

WHEN The street market is on Fridays until 4pm. The food market is open Mon-Sat until 1pm in the food halls at the centre of Ventimiglia

DON’T MISS Supper at Osteria Consani, Via del Teatro

SEE ALSO Gaziello on Via San Secondo 14, to buy oil grown in the hinterland valleys

u SPICE OF LIFE

Mumbai, India Crawford Market in south Mumbai is a reminder of the British Raj. The elegant building dates from the late 19th century and was named after Arthur Crawford, the first municipal commissioner of the city when it was known as Bombay. The building features friezes depicting Indian rural life designed by Rudyard Kipling’s father, John Lockwood Kipling, who was born in British India. This is a popular wholesale market selling terracotta-coloured spices as well as tropical fruit, all sorts of vegetables and items that might not ordinarily appear on your shopping list. Locals buy everything from parrots and puppies to moreish Indian sweets. Head to Cottage Industry and The Bombay Store for gifts, and to Tijori, Amrapali, Tanishq and Tribhovandas Bhimji Zaveri for jewellery. DIA Fashion mall is the place for clothing.

W H AT T O B U Y

WHEN

DON’T MISS

SEE ALSO

Spices, gifts. FabIndia (clothes, jewellery), Ogaan (luxury ethnic fashion) and AM Cotton World (children's clothes) all come recommended

The market opens daily between 10.30am and 8pm

Second-hand books from the famous pavement bookshops near Flora Fountain

The biggest fish market in Mumbai – known locally as “Bhaucha dhakka” – at Ferry Wharf

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Athens, Greece Varvakios Agora, the central market on Athinas Street, is the city’s store cupboard. The traditional covered market has operated here since 1886 and excavations have unearthed Roman ruins, suggesting it was a trading spot even earlier. You can buy every ingredient for supper as well as Greek sweets and spices. It’s very much a working market arranged like a perfectly ordered larder: meat, fish, vegetables. Flip-flops are inadvisable – the floor can be wet. Many of the stall holders have been in the business for generations. The Miran and Arapian stalls are recommended for preserved meats, and Zafolias for feta cheese. You can also eat in the market in a low-key “ouzerie”. Try local dishes, such as patsas (soup made from pigs’ trotters or lambs’ feet) prepared with ingredients straight from the market in Diporto on Sokratous Street. The name means two entrances and the basement tavern does indeed have two doors. The surrounding streets are culinarily themed. Evripidou Street specialises in spices, and here Elixir (No 41) and Bachar (No 31) are both well worth a visit. 60

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W H AT T O B U Y

WHEN

DON’T MISS

SEE ALSO

Olives, spices, feta cheese, cured meats

The Central Market is open Mon-Sat, 7am to 6pm

Hunt down the celebrated “poet sandal-maker to the stars” Stavros Melissinos on Aghias Theklas Street

Monastiraki flea market, next to Monastiraki metro station, on Sunday mornings

Getty Images, Alamy

v

GREEK FEAST


STREET MARKETS

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ANYTHING ELSE IS JUST A HOLIDAY

D AY S L I K E T H I S

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u L E AT H E R W A R E

Inca, Mallorca

W H AT T O B U Y All things leather. Quely biscuits, made in the Inca factory

WHEN The Inca market operates on Thursday mornings. Bargain hunters should arrive early

DON’T MISS Stop off in the nearby village of Binissalem to buy Mallorcan wine from nearby vineyards

SEE ALSO Lloret de Vistalegre market, which sells mouthwatering fresh figs

Inca, midway between Palma and Pollença, is the leather capital of Mallorca. Its Thursday market in the town centre offers the perfect excuse to stock up on handbags, belts, wallets, jackets and shoes. Inca is within the El Raiguer region, home to the oldest shoe-making guilds on the island, and has a long history of leather craft. The town still produces expert-built footwear for export across the globe. Men’s footwear company Monge has its smart shoes built in Inca and Camper has its HQ here, so you can pick up shoes for a song in their outlet store. The market spills over several streets and you’ll be tempted by textiles, brightly glazed ceramics, fruit, vegetables, flowers, soap and more. Inca is also famous for traditional cellar restaurants, so carve out some time to dine here too.

FULL BLOOM v

Flower sellers have sold their blooms on Cape Town’s Trafalgar Place and Adderley Street since the 19th century. From the early 1900s, they’ve been appearing on cheery postcards and in magazines and newspapers. The flowers were originally grown in Constantia, once farmland, now a smart suburb of Cape Town. Now, most come from further afield. Look out for varieties from the UNESCO-protected Cape Floral Region. Some of our best-loved blooms – gladiolis, freesias, nerines, agapanthus, geraniums and pelargoniums – hail from here.  Many of the stalls are handed down through the generations, and sellers are happy to share their stories. Delia, who was born on a banana boat, began working on her stall when she was 15 and has been here for 38 years. Her grandparents, great-grandparents and great-great-grandparents sold flowers before her. She says the market is best visited in the morning when it’s at its liveliest.   Bree Street, a 10-minute walk from Adderley, is a cool place to eat. Try Bacon on Bree – Cape Town’s inspired “baconporium”. 62

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Getty Images

Cape Town, SA

W H AT T O B U Y

WHEN

DON’T MISS

SEE ALSO

A bunch of proteas, South Africa’s longlasting native flowers. Delia once sold 800 of these striking blooms to one customer

Adderley Street Flower Market is open from Monday-Saturday, 24 hours a day

Check out Cape Town’s vibrant Long Street – the city's central strip, famed for its numerous clubs, pubs, bars, design stores and everything in between

Old Biscuit Mill, a hip village in the Cape Town suburb of Woodstock, where you can buy African prints and delicious food


T H E K E E P S A K E R A J A S T H A N PA R A S O L S

Give us a twirl

P H OTO G R A P H E D BY L O U I S A PA R RY

I

f you head into a bustling bazaar in Jaipur and glance upwards, you might think you’re peering through the world’s biggest kaleidoscope. What you’re actually looking at is a sea of umbrellas, fabricated in the most incredible array of colours. Traditionally made to protect locals from the punishing sun, these umbrellas are now one of the most popular purchases among travellers wishing to take a bit of street life home with them. “In 2014, I went on holiday to Jaipur, knowing before I went that I wanted to buy one of these umbrellas,” says Scott Dunn India expert Jessica Campbell. “I’d seen pictures of them and thought they were beautiful. I found mine on a street

stall opposite the Palace of the Winds, in the heart of the city. As usual, there was the compulsory haggling, which is all part of the fun. The starting price was around 2,000 rupees [about £24], and I ended up paying 400 [£5]. Mine is mainly made up of triangles of pink and purple with tiny mirrors stitched in. And it has an embroidered handle. There were so many colours to choose from. It took me ages to decide.” While you might spot the umbrellas in other regions of India, they’re chiefly specific to Rajasthan, the country’s driest state. You’ll see them on just about every street stall, but their ubiquity doesn’t detract from their uniqueness. The umbrellas are an impressive recycling initiative, made from remnants of fabric from factories or fashion emporiums, so no two are ever the same. They’re crafted by local artisans, often stitched together on market stalls. Chances are you’ll see one being made as you zig-zag your way through the mayhem. They’re smaller than the average European umbrella – almost child-size – but huge versions cover the stalls. Naturally, you can buy designer versions online, but nothing beats the real thing. “Mine now hangs permanently open from a shelf in my bedroom,” says Jessica. “Always an exotic start to the day.” Words by Mel Bradman


A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

The ultimate escape Gourmet cuisine, world-renowned wine and incredible luxury lodges, all set in one of the most diverse destinations on earth – New Zealand

Clockwise, from above: hiking on Cecil Peak; helicopter ride over Whakaari; annandale

With some of the most spectacular scenery on the planet, exceptional culinary delights and world-class wines, New Zealand is like nowhere else. While it’s a fantastic year-round destination, spring is an ideal time to find out what this incredible country has to offer. Widely recognised as a haven for adrenaline junkies – everything from heli-skiing to deep sea diving is just a click away – New Zealand is also the ultimate place to switch off and surrender to total relaxation. With over

9,000 miles of coastline and unspoiled beaches and coves, its diverse shores offer everything from lazy days to blazing sunsets. The three “S”s (sun, sea and sailing) are an absolute must. Scott Dunn has a range of luxury lodges to suit everyone, from the ultimate couple getaway to a haven for family adventure, or the epitome of that once-in-a-lifetime trip. From the tip of South Island to the foot of North Island, New Zealand is a traveller’s paradise. It’s remarkably easy to get

around, with infinite ways to explore the diverse terrain – helicopter, private jet, guided 4x4 or self-drive. A range of bespoke experiences is there for the taking, including scenic helicopter flights , private chartered boat cruises, and – this being “The Land of the Hobbit” – a Lord of the Rings tour. Of course, all this fun and relaxation can lead to a hearty appetite, and you won’t want to miss out on the exquisite gourmet food New Zealand has to offer. As a nation surrounded by the sea, it is rich in fresh, year-round seafood. And naturally this nation of keen farmers is famed for its lamb, beef and dairy. And then there’s the wine. Where to begin? It was Sauvignon Blanc that put New Zealand on the wine map – and critics say it’s the best in the world. Yet the country’s unique soil, climate, water and pioneering spirit mean it succeeds with diverse varieties and styles; from the warmer-climate wines, such as Bordeaux-style blends and Syrah, grown in Hawke’s Bay and further north, through to cooler-climate wines, such as Pinot Noir and Riesling in the southerly regions. As the Maoris say, “Kia Ora!” (be well and healthy).○

scottdunn.com/newzealand


Where to stay From elegant boutique hotels to eco-friendly tree-house suites – New Zealand has something to offer all travellers The beauty of nature is never far away in New Zealand, which is why it’s known as “Godzone” (God’s Own Country). If you want to surround yourself with towering mountains, lush green valleys and meandering rivers, look no further than Scott Dunn’s choice of some of the country’s most incredible properties in our two-week NZ taster... Start with some serious R&R at Annandale Luxury Villas. Set amid a rugged landscape of hills and bays, this hidden gem sits on a 4,000-acre farm where a wealth of land and water activities awaits. The most memorable experience here is taking a dip with the smallest, rarest and friendliest species of dolphin: the Hector dolphin. Next, head to Hapuku Lodge & Tree Houses, at the foot of South Island’s

Kaikoura Ranges and overlooking the Pacific Coast – one of the world’s most epic spots for whale watching. Further south, Mahu Whenua eco sanctuary is a short helicopter ride from Queenstown airport, meaning this hidden gem is easily accessible, while giving you the feeling of seclusion in what is virtually your own private national park, spanning over 200 square miles. Queenstown is a must do – but our top tip is to stay at Blanket Bay in Glenorchy, an elegant, alpine-esque retreat framed by crystal-clear Lake Wakatipu and the majestic Southern Alps. From here, take a scenic heli-flight to Fiordland National Park, soar over glaciers and waterfalls, and end with a champagne picnic on a mountain top. Don’t leave Queenstown

without tasting the local Central Otago Pinot Noir and teeing off at Over the Top Golf, 4,500 ft up on Cecil Peak. Lastly, subtropical Northland is a scuba, sail and beach paradise. Think “Mediterranean meets New Zealand”. New property Helena Bay Lodge, recently voted the world’s best new luxury hotel, is located on two miles

of pristine coastline, with four private beaches and many intimate coves. Guests enjoy estate-to-plate cuisine, courtesy of a Michelin-starred chef. The perfect place to end the adventure by kicking back and soaking up the sun. New Zealand will leave you wanting more. All this, and you haven’t even scratched the surface


P H O T O E S S AY N A M I B I A

One of the most sparsely populated countries in the world, Namibia possesses a stark and mesmerising beauty. From its vast ochre deserts to inky-blue seas and magnificent wildlife, we celebrate a land of extraordinary contrasts

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NAMIBIA

O

f all the countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, Namibia is arguably the most stunning. Its coastline and deserts are among the most photographed in the world. The word “namib” means “vast place” – and here, space is everything. So where to begin when describing its raw beauty? Possibly the desert, which is the world’s oldest, dating back 55 million years, and stretches over 2,000km. Serving up the warmest palette of pastel pink, burnt orange, rust red and sienna, it’s home to the world’s tallest shifting sand dunes. It’s also teeming with wildlife; you may spot the gemsbok (a national symbol) helping itself to wild desert melons. Lions, elephants and rhinos roam freely, while ostriches gather in pairs, ready to flee at the sight of a cheetah. Bursts of colour pop up sparingly across the country: gorgeous emerald-green lakes, purple jagged mountains,

and the bone-white mudflats on the Tsauchab River. Tribal groups still live off the land. In the remote Kunene region in the north reside the isolated Himba people. Their origins can be traced back to the early-16th century and their traditions hold fast. Women are only allowed to bathe in smoke; they put smouldering charcoal in a bowl with herbs and wait for the steam to rise. Framing the north is the Skeleton Coast, an endless stretch of deserted beach with seal and flamingo colonies. Viewed from the air, it’s sublime: a twinkling turquoise ocean with surf breaking out over the dunes. When you see the shipwrecks and whale and seal skeletons dotting the coastline, you begin to understand the origins of the spooky name. It’s unforgiving territory, but there’s a wealth of untarnished beauty in the barrenness.

Previous pages: an aerial view of the Skeleton Coast – a dramatic stretch that is a resting place for many shipwrecks

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Below: a herd of elephants visits a watering hole in Etosha National Park, a protected area in northern Namibia

Opposite: hot air balloon rides are an outstanding way to experience the majesty of the Namibian landscape


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Previous spread: George Steinmetz/National Geographic Creative . Opposite page: Jim Brandenburg/Minden Pictures/National Geographic Creative. This page: Pim Vuik/Gallery Stock


George Steinmetz/National Geographic Creative


Jen Goerlich/Gallery Stock, George Steinmetz/National Geographic Creative Previous pages: zebra herd in Namib Rand Nature Reserve. The grasses here take on the form of mysterious “fairy circles”, where little grows Above: the megadunes of the Namib Sand Sea move slowly across the white mudflats of the Tsauchab River in Namib-Naukluft National Park Left: the spiky Quiver tree – so named because bushmen were said to make quivers from its branches, which are tipped with spiral rosettes of leaves

For more information about holidays in Namibia, call 020 8682 5070

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ALL

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INTERVIEW

Meet the Bucket List Family What’s it like to throw your life up in the air and set out on a family adventure with two small children in tow? Meet the couple who took the plunge – and turned their trip into a business

INTERVIEW CHARLOTTE HOGARTH-JONES

It’s a fantasy for many: the idea of taking a break from conventional life to travel the world while your children are still small. Most of us, of course, never take the plunge – careers, schooling and the pressures of life get the better of us and what seemed a good idea over a drink on holiday gets forgotten. For some though, the fantasy becomes a reality, whether that’s made possible by an extended break between jobs, a decision to rent out a property, or – in Garrett Gee and his wife Jessica’s case – the sale of his business. “It started off as a joke,” says Jessica, 31. “We kept saying, let’s just sell everything

and go travelling.” Garrett, 30, had founded a tech business – a mobile scanning app – with college friends and had worked incredibly hard building it up over the years. But the opportunity arose to sell to Snapchat – and suddenly freedom beckoned. “We put everything from the sale into investments and decided to head to the South Pacific for five months. Our son Manilla was just a year old at the time and Dorothy was three. But when we came home at Christmas we decided we weren’t ready to stop travelling yet.” What’s interesting about what the family did next, though, was their decision to turn their extended adventures into a business all of its own. Free spirits they may be, but they are clearly entrepreneurial down to their fingertips, so they started posting news of their adventures on social media as The Bucket List Family. “Although it didn’t start as a business, our social media following quickly grew and we’re now able to work with hotels, brands, airlines and other companies to continue our journey,” says Garrett. The reality of this very modern family adventure is a lot of hard graft in amongst all the thrilling experiences. Both Garrett and Jessica work many hours a week (Garrett estimates up to 60), editing videos, uploading blog and social posts and contacting brands and companies. They may spend their days swimming with humpback whales in Tonga, snorkelling in Tahiti, eating noodles in Japan or horse-riding in Scotland, but Jessica is clear that “it’s not a straightforward vacation. Our journey has essentially turned into Garrett’s second business.” So what of the practicalities of being constantly on the move with two such young children? “Travel days are always difficult and tiring,” says Jessica. “Packing up and moving. Children feed off your disposition 100 per cent so if you’re cranky or upset, you can be sure they will be too. We have to have a regular schedule that works for us and we stick to it every day. Wherever we are, we wake up, D AY S L I K E T H I S

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INTERVIEW

have breakfast, either Garrett or I will do some exercise and then Manilla has a nap before we go out exploring. You can’t treat every day as a permanent vacation, it’s too exhausting. We try to end most days on the beach or in a park so the kids can run around and let off steam.” Their other tip for family travelling is to be realistic about what you can achieve. As Garrett says, “It can be frustrating when you’re in an amazing new country and you want to get out there and see everything, but you just can’t – everyone gets burnt out too quickly, – so we often have to cut things back. In Australia we were going to make eight stops but we only managed two.” Their success in turning this fantasy trip into a business is built on the professionalism of their social posts. They are an extraordinarily photogenic family and the children, now aged four and two, clearly enjoy performing for the camera. But their parents are aware of some of the potential perils of their lifestyle. As Jessica says, “We feel incredibly lucky to live as we do. But once a month we take a step back and say, OK, we need to put our marriage first, or our kids first, and if it becomes a problem we’ll just walk away.” Soon, though, despite planned trips to the Galápagos and Africa, the full-time travelling will have to end. They intend to continue to take long trips away together, but Dorothy starts school this autumn and is beginning to crave proper, consistent friendships. “It’s the one thing I wish I could give her,” confesses Jessica. But the couple believe there is so much the family has gained from

Left: life is one big adventure for the Bucket List Family. Bottom left: Dorothy, 4, and Manilla, 2, having fun in Venice

the experience. “It’s a joy to see Dorothy and Manilla playing with children from so many different cultures. They really do love and respect everyone.” Garrett concurs: “Some of the business success I’ve had doesn’t make me feel successful. But being able to offer these experiences to my children is very rewarding. I know it’s a huge privilege to see my children grow up and I think our culture has tricked people into thinking that only seeing your

family at the weekend is normal. It isn’t.” And Jessica adds, “The most important thing I’ve learned is that all that really matters is your family. There was a day in the Caribbean when our flights were cancelled, Manilla had fallen and had a bloody nose and both kids were screaming. I looked at Garrett and thought, ‘Should we just go home? Where is home?’ But then I looked at all the craziness in front of me and I realised, ‘This is it.’”

T H E FA M I LY A D V E N T U R E 1 1 Y E A R S O N

Images courtesy of The Bucket List Family

Writer and broadcaster Mary Ann Sieghart looks back

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We took the children away for a four-month trip when they were 12 and 14 and it was quite the best thing we’ve ever done. Eleven years later, they still talk about it, and it laid the ground for them to be much more independent, savvy and open-minded than they would ever have been had they just stayed at school and had a completely conventional upbringing. It wasn’t all great: the all-time low was when both found themselves in hospital, on drips, in Venezuela, with extreme vomiting and diarrhoea. The hospital had caked blood on the floor and though I needed to spend the

night with them, there was nowhere for me to sleep. Both kept sobbing that they wanted to go home, so I felt pretty guilty. But this was hugely outweighed by the frequent highs: watching a volcano erupt in Costa Rica, singing along with musicians in Cuba, spending two days in a dug-out canoe to get to the foot of the Angel Falls and sleeping in a hammock when we got there… Each of them has since spent nearly a year travelling independently in remote parts of the world and I was full of confidence that they would be able to cope – as indeed they did. It brought us together as a family – I had worked more or less full-time since they were tiny and to be able to be with them 24/7 for four months was a great bonding experience. It was the ultimate quality time.


Relaxation begins the moment you arrive

Ideally located on a private, sandy beach in Halkidiki, Eagles Palace offers everything you desire for a perfect summer holiday experience.

www.eaglespalace.gr

Reservations: +44 (0) 20 8682 5040, www.scottdunn.com/eaglespalace


ACCESS ALL AREAS

Viva Mallorca... Rob Daley, Scott Dunn’s Executive Chef, shares his favourite destinations on the Balearic island, from a family-run bakery in Pollença to an exclusive beach restaurant

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ver the past two decades, Mallorca, the largest of the Balearic Islands, has established itself as one of the Mediterranean’s most exclusive destinations. The ultimate seal of approval came with its use as a location for acclaimed BBC drama The Night Manager, which depicted the island as a sun-kissed playground for the super-rich. “The Night Manager has definitely focused a lot of attention on Mallorca,” says Rob Daley, Scott Dunn’s Executive Chef. “Though the type of clients we welcome already knew that Mallorca had that aspect to it. Pollença, where over half of the Scott Dunn villas are located, strikes a perfect balance between high-end tourism

“Yet whenever I go back, I still find myself doing things that I’ve never done,” he says, “like finding new restaurants or visiting beautiful villages I’ve never seen before. I’ve travelled around most of Mallorca, but I’m still discovering new highlights, especially in terms of food. From a culinary point of view, there’s a lot going on.” Rob recommends Palma, the island’s capital, as a great place to visit for an alternative experience, should you tire of picturesque ports, golden-sanded beaches and rustic villages. “Palma doesn’t always get the attention it deserves,” he says. “The Santa Catalina district is a real up-andcoming area; a lot of the people working on the yacht scene live there and there’s

I L LU ST R AT I O N S

INTERVIEW

LUIS MENDO

DAMON SYSON

“I’ VE TRAVELLED AROUND MOST OF M A L L O R C A , B U T I S T I L L F I N D M YS E L F DOING THINGS I’VE NEVER DONE” and local colour. Although it does welcome visitors in the summer, it still has a very authentic Mallorcan feel.” For Rob, one of the key attractions of Mallorca, apart from its fantastic yearround climate, is its manageable size. The island is just over 60 miles from coast to coast at its widest point. “From Pollença, you can drive pretty much everywhere within an hour. And yet there’s so much of the island that still feels untouched.” Rob has spent the past four summers living on the island, from where he oversees Scott Dunn’s private chalet operation. 80

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a lively food market at the centre. The area surrounding it has become a bit of an evening destination – with everything from hipster coffee bars to nightclubs – all very cool and a bit of a contrast from the quieter side of the island.” But for Rob, Mallorca’s biggest attraction remains the local inhabitants. “I’m always amazed at how friendly the people who live on the island are. They’re genuinely happy to see you. You really do get to know everyone in the village.” Here, Rob shares his top 10 Mallorcan experiences. ○

THE MUSEUM

Real Cartuja, Valldemossa The Royal Carthusian Monastery in Valldemossa was occupied by Carthusian monks for over 400 years. When they were expelled in 1835, their “cells” were rented out to visitors, the most famous of whom were composer Frédéric Chopin and his lover, French writer George Sand, who spent a disastrous winter there in 1838. Today, a series of cells shows how the monks lived, while artefacts related to Chopin’s stay, including his piano, are also displayed. Entry includes a piano recital during the summer – and there’s also a small modern art museum with works by Picasso, Miró and Bacon.


THE VIEW

Mirador de la Victoria The most memorable location from The Night Manager is La Fortaleza, a former fortress on the headland at the top end of Port de Pollença. Dating back four centuries, and surrounded by terraced gardens with tumbling bougainvillea, it’s one of the most expensive properties in Spain. One of my favourite views on the island is from the Mirador de la Victoria. You look across the bay, over La Fortaleza, with mountains on both sides. It’s the perfect place to watch the sunset. There’s a restaurant up there with a terrace, and a bar if you fancy a sundowner.

THE MARKET

Santa Catalina, Palma Mallorca has a number of markets, but for me, two stand out. The first, in Santa Catalina in Palma, is the kind of young, hip option. It’s a great place to go for things like fish stalls and butchers, but it’s also got cute little tapas and sushi bars. There’s a really lively atmosphere. You can go there at lunchtime, buy something from one of the stalls, then go to another where they’ll take the produce you bought and cook it for you. You can buy five or six prawns, go to the bar, get a drink, and they’ll cook whatever you bought. The other is Sineu – the biggest open-air market on the island. It happens once a week, and what’s special about it is it’s still a livestock market. It’s where you go to buy a live chicken, a goat, sheep or cow. There’s plenty going on to keep the kids amused, the atmosphere is fun and it’s a really good local experience.

THE CAFE

La Mar Dolça, Pollença Pollença is very much a local place that has remained unchanged for generations. There are still six or seven family-run bakeries in the town, which is something I love. My favourite place to go for a morning coffee or a delicious pastry is called La Mar Dolça. It’s owned by a guy called Esteban – all the pastries and cakes sold there are hand-made on site by him. It’s fantastic, and a real testament to one man’s passion for what he loves. He’s pretty much the hardest-working guy I know. D AY S L I K E T H I S

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THE BEACH

Cala Deià If you’re looking for a sandy beach that’s accessible and fun, you can’t beat Cala San Vicente. It’s in the most fantastic location, with some of the best views. But if you’re after something more exclusive, I recommend Cala Deià, where the fish restaurant that featured in The Night Manager is located. A day trip there is something we can arrange for our guests. You travel by car to Soller, then get a boat directly to the restaurant – by far the best way to arrive. The scenery is amazing, the food is superb and it’s a memorable experience all round. The beach itself isn’t much to write home about, sadly. It’s rocky and it’s tiny. Most people just go there for lunch.

T H E F I E S TA

La Beata, Santa Margalida Each village on the island has its own annual fiesta, which means every weekend, throughout the summer, there’s a town with a festival to visit. They’re a lot of fun, usually very family-oriented and often quite quirky. Some involve re-enactments of the historic conflict between the Christians and the Moors, which basically involves all the town’s inhabitants having an enormous play-fight. One of the most charming is the festival of La Beata in Santa Margalida, which takes place in September. All the couples in the town re-enact going to collect some water with the devil attempting to steal the water and break their earthenware pots. All these people dressed in traditional clothes go in procession through the town, and people dressed as devils pretend to fight with them. It’s great fun.

THE VILLAGE

Fornalutx One of my favourite excursions is to a stunning spot that’s a bit off the beaten track. Fornalutx is a tiny mountain village just off the road between Pollença and Soller. You take a little turning, then head up the hill on a winding road until you reach the village. It’s tiny – you can walk around it in 10 minutes – but it’s extremely pretty. There isn’t much there in the way of bars or cafés, just beautiful stone houses, atmospheric narrow cobbled streets and beautiful views. And there aren’t usually many people around because they simply don’t know it’s there.

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ACCESS ALL AREAS

T H E R E S TA U R A N T

Restaurante Miceli, Selva The hilltop village of Selva is home to a superb restaurant called Miceli. The restaurant is basically a terrace with amazing views, run by a husband-and-wife team. There’s no printed menu; the husband comes to your table and asks if you’d like the long tasting menu or the short one. His wife cooks the food, using produce bought that morning, and it’s delicious. If you’re after more upmarket dining, there’s a restaurant in Port de Pollença called Argos, recently awarded its first Michelin star. It’s likely to get very popular, but we can secure bookings for our guests. The chef, Álvaro Salazar, uses local produce and Mallorcan recipes, but all done in a modern way. And they serve really great cocktails.

THE WINE BAR

(A Walk on) the Wine Side, Port d’Alcudia There’s a really fun place to go for a drink in Port d’Alcudia, which is not an area we would normally recommend to our guests. It’s better known for its younger party scene, though it is gradually becoming a little bit more upmarket. This place is called (A Walk on) the Wine Side. It’s a wine bar that specialises in Mallorcan and Spanish wines; they have a really great selection, and serve some of the best tapas you’ll find on the island. The seafood, which they source from Galicia – famous for having the best shellfish in Spain – is particularly good. There’s a great atmosphere. It’s all very simple and informal and quite different to most of the places people who visit Mallorca tend to go to.

THE KEEPSAKE

Teixits Vicens, Pollença When it’s time to go home, you might want to take something back to remind you of the island. There’s a famous textiles manufacturer in Pollença called Teixits Vicens. It’s a family-run craft workshop that’s involved in making roba de llengües – hand-made fabrics with a traditional Mallorcan tongue pattern, which come in a range of colours. It’s the last remaining factory shop on the island: an interesting place to visit and a great place to pick up a gift or memento to take home with you.

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Tropical modern INTERIOR DESIGN

The Cambodian resort Knai Bang Chatt is a stunning renovation of three abandoned mid-century villas. Behind it lies a dramatic history harking back to a golden age of architecture. By Oliver Bennett

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K

nai Bang Chatt (or KBC to its friends), on Cambodia’s south coast, is an architectural marvel. Based around a core of three renovated mid-century villas, augmented with two newer buildings in similar spirit, it has a fascinating backstory. Those original three buildings date from the 1960s and were built to the style of Vann Molyvann, a student of Le Corbusier who is still alive at 90 and was part of a progressive “tropical modern” movement called New Khmer Architecture. Refurbished by the Cambodian-based French architect Francoise Lavielle over the last decade, something of that futuristic grandeur attaches to KBC. You notice the light-and-shade geometry, the square pilasters framing ocean-liner balconies. No paintings hang on the walls; televisions are only available to those who ask.

These historic rooms have a startlingly contemporary “raw” flavour, as well as warmth. Their frugal luxuriance attests to the glorious history of Kep. In the early 20th century, this fishing village – just over two hours’ drive from Phnom Penh – was an opportunity waiting to happen. The Franco-Cambodian ruling classes christened it variously Kep-sûr-Mer, La Perle de la Côte d’Agathe, even the “Cambodian Riviera”. Cambodia gained independence in 1953 and Kep moved into a new golden age, rebooted by King Norodom Sihanouk who repackaged it as a royal resort and showcase for New Khmer Architecture. Around 150 villas were built, including Sihanouk’s summer home. All this came to an end with the rise of the Khmer Rouge in 1970. Sihanouk fled to Beijing. The villas were looted as exemplars of bourgeois materialism and rotted in the tropical climate. It was only in 2003, when the Belgian businessman Jef Moons first came to Kep, that their potential was assured. In 2006, Moons bought three abandoned villas and set about refurbishing them. As you enter the rooms of KBC, the Corbusier-meets-New Khmer aesthetic greets you like a balm. The beng beds are huge wooden platforms. Big windows are set off by antique dressers. Mosquito nets remind you you’re in the tropics. There’s handmade lemongrass soap in the walk-in shower and kramas – the Cambodian sarong – in which to flop. Now the secret’s out, the next golden age can’t be far away. D AY S L I K E T H I S

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Left: the Sailing Club art deco corner of Knai Bang Chatt resort, framed by an ocean-liner-style balcony. An extra-low bed, made from beng wood, is used as a coffee table. Handmade beng Cambodian open-arm chairs complete the setting

Right: a new stairway by the French architect Francoise Lavielle blends in with the original 1960s decor. Natural products were used in the eco-based refurbishment, including limestone paint and granite. An ornamental pond surrounds this building

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Above: a living area exudes the new “raw and historic” decor. 12th-century Khmer vases are transformed into lamps and an antique daybed is used as a coffee table adorned with jars from Cambodia and Vietnam. The sofa – a modern touch – is by Belgian designer Axel Vervoordt Right: more pared-back elegance. An art deco cabinet and an open-arm chair, made from beng wood, alongside a 14th-century bronze vase and a 13th-century urn. Earthy primary paint washes are featured throughout the rooms

Scott Dunn offers 7 nights at Knai Bang Chatt from £2,100pp for a double sea view room on a B&B basis, including flights and transfers. Call our Cambodia team on 020 8682 5060 for more information

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A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

South Tyrol, the very top of Italy

Italy’s crowning glory has it all: world-class cuisine, fascinating history and nature at its most majestic Nestled between Austria and Switzerland, South Tyrol is one of Europe’s hidden gems. This picturesque Italian province is unique among its European peers, with its people speaking three languages: German, Italian and Ladin. The landscape is mind-blowingly beautiful, with charming towns, medieval villages complete with vineyards that date back to the 17th century and alpine meadows decorated with wildflowers. Visitors flock to South Tyrol from all over the world to catch a glimpse of the majestic Dolomite mountains, a UNESCO World Heritage site. The South Tyrolean Dolomite region is particularly rich in possibilities for adventure including the eyecatching rock pinnacles, towers and table mountains. South Tyrol is rich in culture and history; the region is an eclectic mix of Mediterranean and Tyrolean customs, reflected in the people, language, architecture and delicious food. Take advantage of the magnificent scenery and explore the Val Pusteria valley, the most harmonious of nature’s

offerings, with its emerald meadows, fairytale forests and gentle rolling hills. Set out on an unforgettable adventure by bicycle or on foot; there is over 13,000km of hiking trails across the scenic mountainous terrain in South Tyrol. Celebrated mountaineer, Reinhold Messner is a South Tyrolean native and was the first man to climb every mountain over 8,000m and to complete a solo ascent of Mount Everest without the use of contained oxygen. In 2016, The Telegraph crowned Messner ‘The World’s Greatest Living Man’. To experience the best of worldfamous South Tyrolean hospitality, stay at one of the many unforgettable family-run accommodations. South Tyrol is home to an exceptional 18 restaurants that have been awarded a total of 23 Michelin stars, the highest density of Michelin stars in Italy. They are full of traditional and contemporary culinary delights. South Tyrolean Speck – a local delicacy that has been around since the early 13th century – is a must-try. It pairs perfectly with South Tyrol’s delicious locally produced cheeses and wines.

For wine lovers, 27 of the region’s wines have received the prestigious Italian wine award, ‘Tre Bicchieri’ (three glasses) by the ‘I Vini d’Italia 2017’ guide. This is no surprise, as 20 different grapes grow on merely 12,350 acres of vineyard. With a thriving culinary scene, illustrious history, over 300 days of sunshine each year and a magnificent abundance of natural beauty, South Tyrol offers an adventure of unforgettable delights. ○

scottdunn.com/tyrolsummer

Above: awe-inspiring landscapes and vibrant local gastronomy make South Tyrol a one-of-a-kind destination


A TOAST TO SUMMER Stuart Bathgate, Scott Dunn’s Guest Services Manager, reveals how he gives your holiday extra sparkle – and shares some of his favourite bottles

WHITE Ca’n Vidalet Blanc de Blancs Sauvignon Blanc, Moscatel, Chardonnay 2015 A local Mallorcan wine, the Ca’n Vidalet vineyard is 1km outside Pollença. Pale yellow with light green reflections, it’s delicate and tangy, with aromas of citrus fruits, hawthorn blossom, a hint of green-apple skin and jasmine. Drink with light, summery dishes and salads. Serve at 8-10°C WHITE Mâcon/Vignerons de Mancey Chardonnay 2015 Great news that Chardonnay is regaining its well-deserved popularity. This one is fantastic and hasn’t been anywhere near oak! It’s an elegant, delicate white wine that’s smooth and lets the grape shine. Drink with creamy fish dishes and white meat. Serve at 10°C

S PA R K L I N G Bailly Lapierre Vive-la-Joie AOC Crémant Chardonnay & Pinot Noir 2008 Burgundy is one of only seven regions in France approved to produce Crémant, dry sparkling wine made with méthode traditionelle, as used in Champagne. It has fine bubbles and a light golden reflection. Drink with shellfish, desserts or as an aperitif. Serve at 6-8°C ROSÉ Vol d’Anima de Raimat Pinot Noir & Chardonnay 2015 A fresh, modern wine from the Costers del Segre DO around Lleida (between Barcelona and Zaragoza). Although sweet on the nose, this is a surprisingly dry rosé with a light body. Drink with oily fish, including tuna Niçoise salad, pasta, pizza and tapas. Serve at 4-6°C

W

e take our wine selection process very seriously here at Scott Dunn – it’s a tough job but someone has to do it! Andrew Dunn, the Founder, and I sample up to 40 different wines, twice a year, to source the best bottles for our guests in our Mediterranean villas and our alpine chalets. We narrow the selection down to two reds, two whites, two rosés and something sparkling. Guests in our villas receive a hamper of wines to enjoy during their stay, while our chalet guests are served a different pair of wines each evening, which are specially chosen to complement the chef’s menus. For the villa programme we use local suppliers in the South of France and Mallorca, and we love to surprise guests, so we tend to steer away from things that are already super-fashionable. Having said that, there are some bottles that guests love year in, year out – if you’re going to be basking in the sun in the South of France, for example, a bottle of delicious Côtes de Provence rosé always goes down a treat. Once we’ve made the initial selection, we start thinking about what will complement the food. For summer, we look for light, fresh, easy-drinking wines that work with barbecues, salads and seafood. For our winter selection, we choose things that work with a broader palate, so whether you’re enjoying a rich Tartiflette or a spicy Malaysian dish, you’ll be sure to find a fantastic match to drink with it. Of course, the luxury of being on holiday is that you can do exactly what you want, so if guests would like us to swap some bottles within the villa hamper and drink rosé all week, that’s absolutely fine. Once the final selection has been made, we arrange to have our Master Sommelier visit each resort to train the teams to ensure they know which wines complement which foods. And if you can’t wait until your next break, here is a selection of some of our recent villa favourites.

RED Domaine la Colombette Pinot Noir 2015 Made from the pinot noir grape in the hot southern region of Hérault, this light red is great served slightly chilled. With sweet spices, red fruit nuances and a light oak from the barrels it was matured in. Drink with a barbecue. Serve at 8°C and 16°C

RED Chateau la Mascaronne Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah & Mourvèdre 2012 A great example of the variety of Provençal wines. Aromas of blackcurrant, blackberry, cherry, with soft tannins, create a full-bodied red. Matured in oak, this wine is powerful but well balanced. Drink with strong cheese, grilled red meats. Serve at 12-15°C D AY S L I K E T H I S

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THREE’S A CROWD

Q

Our family – we have three children, Alice, two, Artie, six, and Matt, nine – love travelling. But I’ve noticed that being five really pushes up the price, and creates all kinds of logistical problems – from where we can sit on the plane to finding the right accommodation. Then we have to find different activities for the kids, at different times. Does Scott Dunn have any solutions?

ANSWER BY GRAHAM HORNER

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A

I sympathise. As a father of three myself, I know a lot of family travel – from family hotel rooms with a double and a sofa bed to airplane seat configurations – is designed to accommodate a unit of four. With added complications like the price of hiring a people carrier (not to mention the time spent hunting one down), the incremental cost of that third child can be huge. Fortunately, Scott Dunn has lots of ways around this. Taking charge of your needs right from the start, we leave nothing to chance. We will pre-book flight seats for you to get the optimum arrangement: two seats for one parent and one child; three

seats for the other parent and two children. The furthest you’ll be apart from each other is across the aisle or a row in front/behind. Transit can be arranged to and from the airport, tailor-made for five. Then, once you’re at your resort, a concierge or – if you’re staying at one of our exclusive Explorer resorts, a guest-relations manager – can arrange other transport. Getting the right place to stay is allimportant because booking multiple hotel rooms is the biggest expense. Our favourite family resorts offer residence-style or villa accommodation for bigger families, with space for a third bed in the second bedroom and kitchenette. If you choose a villa with kitchen facilities (available at many of our family-friendly resorts), you can cater for an

Getty Images, Alamy

Scott Dunn’s Graham Horner answers one reader’s family travel conundrum


F A M I LY M A T T E R S

impromptu feeding frenzy and leave snacks in the fridge. Feeding a toddler early evening, then arranging a babysitting service, means parents can eat later with the older two. If you want to book one of our hotels, it’s always best to do this through a Scott Dunn consultant, as this is where our expertise and local knowledge comes into its own. We have specialist knowledge of each of our hotels, so while it might state on their website that only rooms-for-four are available, we will know if they are able to put in an extra bed or transform a day bed into a night bed. If you were booking the same hotel through booking.com, for example, you might end up paying for two rooms. Keeping children happy on holiday is something we do best. Seven resorts in the Med have Scott Dunn Explorers kids clubs. These offer dedicated programmes for 4 months-2 years old; 3-4; 5-7; 8-11; and 11-plus. Older kids can enjoy more adventurous sports (zip-wiring, snorkelling, rock-climbing); while the younger ones can play games and be taken to the beach/pool, paint, etc. There are activities to suit everyone: making T-shirts, learning to cook, tennis lessons, or taking a swing at golf. It’s a winning

combination of physical fun, creativity and relaxation, available from 10am-6pm every day. If you opt for one of our villas or chalets you can also get a private nanny to look after your youngest, freeing up the rest of you to head out on an excursion. Many of our ski chalets are perfect for larger families, with options sleeping up to 10, 12, even 14 people, a driver service to shuttle you around in an eight-passenger vehicle, and childcare on tap. So yes, there’s a lot of arranging and planning to do for a family of five, but it’s worth it. There’s a joy in travelling with kids; it brings out the best in them. What I’ve often seen happen is them forming their own little gang, bonding more because they’re forced to spend time together. They might all run off to kids club after breakfast, and you won’t see them until early evening, giving you and your husband a chance to relax with a glass of wine. It’s also great to experience a new destination through their eyes – a twoyear-old, six-year-old and nine-year-old will each have their own perspective and have an amazing holiday for different reasons. With our help, and being savvy from the start, you can save a lot of money and have a fantastic time.

OLDER KIDS CAN ENJOY MORE ADVENTUROUS SPORTS WHILE YOUNGER O N E S A R E TA K E N T O T H E B E A C H

Family Noticeboard Travelling with children? News and ideas for globetrotting parents

SKI FROM THREE The earlier you start learning to ski, the better. And now children from as young as three years old can take to the slopes, thanks to Scott Dunn’s newly launched Little Ones ski programme in Val d’Isère. A gentle introduction for toddlers under the guidance of experienced, enthusiastic instructors, lessons are available to book now.

SCAVENGE LA Los Angeles is one of the most thrilling cities in the world to explore at any time of the year, and now there’s a wonderful way to do it as a family – going on a scavenger hunt. Ideal for children aged eight and under, the tour takes in all the city’s major landmarks in a fun, exciting and novel manner: you’ll gather items en route, as well as a prize at the end of the day. A brilliant way to keep wandering minds engaged and also to enjoy the whole destination together.

WHERE EAGLES DARE A firm Scott Dunn favourite, few resorts understand what families need like Eagles Palace on the Halkidiki Peninsula. One of the best, and most luxurious, resorts in Greece, they will open 40 new Eagles Villas this summer – perfect for families looking for a little more privacy and space. Each villa enjoys a magnificent view over the Aegean and comes with its own individual plunge pool – particularly useful if you’re looking to cool off while younger family members nap. The tremendous Eagles Palace facilities will also be available to villa guests, along with pools, tennis courts and a gym that will be exclusively theirs.

BEACH PRETTY Every parent knows it can be a challenge keeping your child safe from the sun. After all, an excitable six-year-old wants to run on the sand, splash in the sea and eat ice lollies – not sit patiently through yet another sun-creaming session. Thankfully Sunuva rash vests have been the saviour of many holidays, and this summer Scott Dunn guests will receive them in exclusive new colours: smoky blue with neon orange, and for teens, pale grey with neon yellow. Building sandcastles never looked so good.

Left: zip-wiring is one of the activities on offer at Scott Dunn Explorers kids clubs

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VIEWPOINT

Emotional baggage

Are you a matchy-matchy couple or a mega-bag family? Charlotte Hogarth-Jones decodes what your luggage says about you

T H E C A R RY- O N S

T H E M E G A - B A G F A M I LY

It’s a matter of honour to the carry-on aficionado never to be seen at the airport carousel. Packing with precision, every trip demands a well-honed capsule wardrobe, a handy multi-adaptor, neat travel bottles of toiletries and nothing more. Papers are shunned in favour of digital boarding passes, and impulse duty-free purchases are a big no-no. With every new flight, the carry-on lover sees an opportunity to better their PB, gliding through security with ease in record time (their new four-wheeled carry-on has shaved a few seconds off their time).The most efficient and well-organised of travellers, they are a joy to travel with – that is, unless they become faced with their ultimate fear: being forced to place their pride and joy in The Hold. Carries: Mulberry, Longchamp, Eddie Harrop, Dunhill

Some families like to keep it simple with one enormous bag. Despite strict luggage quotas per family member (“you know we’ll be sharing shampoo, Alice – take that out”), ruthlessly policed by Dad during the Big Pack the night before, the mega-bag always takes at least three people to heave onto the check-in scales. Once the weigh-in occurs, the official enquiry begins – who put that extra pair of shoes in there? Is a fleece really necessary for Mallorca? – but there’s no denying the loyalty of each member to the pack. After all, whole group luggage is a risky strategy – lose one suitcase, lose them all. Carries: Eastpak, Samsonite, The North Face, Kipling

M R A N D M R S M ATC H Y- M ATC H Y

The deadliest travellers at the airport, stylish jet-setting kids see luggage not only as a means of transporting items from A to B, but also as a form of entertainment – some flashier models even fold out to become a bed. It’s surprising how much speed these owners can gather scooting a Trunki across a freshly polished terminal floor. Less surprising, perhaps, is the fact that small plastic boxes on wheels tend not to take corners well. Owing to this, ride-on owners will only ever be found in two states of emotion – pure joy or utter defeat, crumpled on the floor by Pret. Carries: Trunki, JetKids

LU X U RY BAC K PAC K E R Adventure runs in the luxury backpacker’s blood, and whether it’s trekking in the Himalayas (unlikely) or visiting the mother-in-law in Spain (more probable), they travel prepared for any eventuality. An abundance of pockets means they never have to choose between their handy Leatherman, extra-strength DEET spray or a twolitre “portable” Platypus hydration system – although it’s a rare event that all three make it through security. Avoid standing behind them on the airport shuttle at all costs – the luxury backpacker often suffers from a distressing lack of spatial awareness. Carries: Burberry, MCM, Sandqvist 92

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THE TRUNK CALLERS Trunk owners are a very particular type of traveller. Happy to take on the extra inconvenience of baggage without wheels in exchange for bringing glamour back to Gatwick, they rarely adhere to weight restrictions – or care when they exceed them. Travelling with a trunk is their cross to bear, and they yearn to return to the golden age of travel. Their dream holidays come in the form of exotic, luxurious train journeys, roundthe-world cruises in beautiful sailing boats, and grand tours taking in the cultural gems of Rome, Florence and Venice. Nostalgic and idealistic, they are the least practical passengers at the airport – they do, however, have the very best stories. Carried for them: Goyard, Mark Cross, Charlotte Olympia

Trunk Archive/Condé Nast ltd

Nothing says “we’re together” like his-and-hers suitcases, the luggage of choice for couples who want to show marital solidarity, but don’t fancy mixing up their smalls. Whether they’re still carrying around the set they took on honeymoon all those years ago, or a brand spanking new pair (“we bought each other the same for Christmas! Can you imagine!”), they believe that the couple that travels together, stays together. Teamwork is the name of the game with these travellers, and you’ll most likely find one of them gesticulating wildly by the luggage carousel (“that one’s ours, Giles. Grab it quick!”) while the other struggles manfully with an overladen trolley. Carries: Louis Vuitton (with monogrammed initials), Globe-Trotter, Smythson

THE RIDE-ON KIDS


VIEWPOINT

W I T H E V E RY N E W F L I G H T, T H E C A R RY - O N LO V E R S E E S A N O P P O RT U N I T Y TO B E T T E R T H E I R P B, G L I D I N G T H R O U G H S E C U R I T Y W I T H E AS E I N R E C O R D T I M E

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CALENDAR

RIGHT PLACE RIGHT TIME From fiestas to natural wonders, we highlight the best time to experience some of the greatest shows on earth

M AY

CARIBBEAN St Lucia Summer Festival. A week-long shindig of music, food and art for those who can tear themselves away from the rainforests and beaches. This celebration of St Lucia’s cultural heritage also features a carnival. JUNE

SOUTH AFRICA KwaZulu-Natal Coast Sardine Run. Dubbed “the greatest shoal on earth”, the annual sardine run is the incredible spectacle of millions of sardines arriving at the east coast. And they’re not alone: predators, including sharks, dolphins and gannets, are hot on their shiny tails.

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FEBRUARY

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S PA I N

JA PA N

ALASKA

THAILAND

San Sebastián Day If you happen to be in the Basque port on this day, prepare yourself for the annual Tamborrada drum festival and a foodie blow-out as locals beat their way across San Sebastián in fancy dress, togged up in military garb from the Napoleonic period, or dressed as cooks. The tradition originated in 1702, when a baker began singing while filling barrels beside a church and a group of girls joined in.

Sapporo Snow Festival Dreaming of a white February? In Sapporo, you’ll find that and much more, when huge snow and ice sculptures snake through Odori Park. There’s an ice maze for children and adults can enjoy a drink in the ice bar.

The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Watch teams of intrepid canines (and their owners) go the distance in this race across snow and ice from Anchorage to Nome. The epic challenge, which first began in 1973, can last up to 15 days. Entrants have to withstand blizzards, sub-zero temperatures and gale-force winds.

Songkran Water Festival, Chiang Mai Prepare yourself for a soaking if you’re here during Songkran, the Thai New Year. The public holiday marks the end of the dry season and water-throwing is rife. Watch out for kids with water guns who regard tourists as special targets.

D AYS L I K E T H I S

Getty Images, Alamy

APRIL 12-20


CALENDAR

DECEMBER 13

SWEDEN St Lucy’s Day. Witness this magical procession of girls and boys clad in white gowns, blood-red sashes and a crown of candles as they compete to be Sankta Lucia, a Christian girl who was killed for her faith in the year 304 AD. And if you’re in the right spot, you may also be handed a delicious St Lucia saffron-and-raisin bun.

WANDERLUST Three notable travellers tell Days Like This about their recent trips and future jaunts

MELISSA ODABASH SWIMWEAR DESIGNER

My most recent trip was to one of the most beautiful islands in the Bahamas – South Andros. I stayed at the most incredible eco-resort, Tiamo. Next up, I’ll be travelling to The Shore Club in Turks and Caicos. Recently opened, it looks like yet another piece of paradise. It’s supposed to have one of the best beaches in the world, so I believe it will be the perfect backdrop for me to test out my new designs. ALEX MONROE JEWELLER

J U LY

SEPTEMBER 3

NOVEMBER 1-2

PORTUGAL

VENICE

MEXICO

Agitagueda Art Festival. An interesting medieval city in its own right, Agitagueda takes street art to a new level when umbrellas are hung above the roads. Walking under this “umbrella sky” is both a unique experience and a welcome refuge from the summer sun.

Historical Regatta On the first Sunday in September, 16th-centurystyle drama arrives in Venice in an event that first took place in 1315. Gondoliers in period costume carry the Doge, the Doge’s wife and Venetian officials up the Grand Canal in a brightly coloured parade.

Day of the Dead. Mexicans believe their lost loved ones are trapped in a spiritual waiting room and can return home at this time of year. Join the 4,000-year-old street party, where you’ll be unable to move for candy skulls and papier-mâché skeletons.

I recently went to Sicily for a week, to a snazzy hotel with a swimming pool nestled at the foot of Mount Etna between Catania and Taormina. I know the south of Italy very well, but I’d never been to Sicily before. It was everything I hoped it would be: little fishing villages with a cluster of brightly painted fishing boats bobbing around; kids diving off the rocks and jetties into clear blue water; and the people were incredibly friendly wherever I went.

AUGUST

SRI LANKA The Great Elephant Gathering. If your timing’s right, you could witness hundreds of elephants enjoying the world’s biggest pool party as they descend on an ancient reservoir in north-central Minneriya National Park. They’ve been doing it for centuries. The lure? A seemingly endless water supply during dry season.

T O M PA R K E R - B O W L E S F O O D W R I T E R A N D C R E AT I V E DIRECTOR OF THE EVENING STA N D A R D ’ S L O N D O N F O O D M O N T H

OCTOBER

NEW ENGLAND Autumnal Landscapes. The brilliance of fall in New England is legendary, with gold, scarlet and orange leaves ablaze across the landscape. Immerse yourself in the spectacle with a road trip. Zip-lining through the trees is a great way to get close to nature’s pyrotechnics.

I’m off to Chengdu in a few weeks, and I’m exceptionally excited. The food there is brimming with fierce chillies and those floral, numbing peppers. I’m going back to Mexico, a country I fell in love with long ago. It has one of the world’s greatest cuisines. I try to go at least once a year. This time, I’m heading to Baja California, travelling from Tijuana to Cabo. And eating, mostly on the street. This makes me very happy indeed. londonfoodmonth.co.uk D AY S L I K E T H I S

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THE TRAVELLERS

The Granny Nanny I L LU ST R AT I O N D A M I E N F L O R É B E R T C U Y P E R S

D

arling, of course I don’t mind, it will be great fun,” says Granny Alice, as she ponders how to break the news to her long-suffering husband, aka Grandpa Tim, that they’ll be staying home to make loom-band necklaces and play Candy Crush on the iPad with little Freddie and Eva rather than joining their daughter and son-in-law for the lakeside dinner at sunset that evening. “We’ll order in some pizzas for you, Mum,” says her daughter Tamasin. “The place down the road is meant to be fab. Dad won’t be disappointed, will he?” Alice thinks about her gastronomically obsessed husband, who frankly found his own child-rearing years a challenge some 40 years back. She murmurs an attempt at soothing reassurance. Of course she

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understands – after all, Freddie’s going through a wobbly patch, and even though the nanny is a delight, sometimes nobody is quite so good as granny. Still, so many of her friends hardly see their grandchildren, and they’re really so lucky that Tamasin and Greg wanted them to come along on their American odyssey. “Granny, you’re still coming zip-wiring tomorrow aren’t you,” eight-year-old Eva chirrups. Oh lord, she’d forgotten about that one. “Can’t wait, Evie darling. What a lucky granny I am.” And to think that her book-club friends are doing nothing more intrepid than trundling round Tuscany, gazing at frescoes, sipping vintage Barolo on sundappled terraces and nodding off over a good book with a bunch of other 70-year-olds. Poor things.


LANGKAWI …where wild nature meets adrenalin-fuelled adventure

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NATURAL ADVENTURE The UNESCO-protected coastline of Langkawi holds the key to 550-million-years-worth of natural heritage – the vast majority of which remains unseen by visitors. Four Seasons safari tours reveal the island’s most awe-inspiring wonders by boat, foot and kayak, putting guests of all ages back in touch with nature. BEACH Private, sandy and almost empty by day, the 1.5 kilometre beach transforms by night into the ideal place to rediscover the joy of quality time together, from romantic beach dinners to moonlit barbecues and bonfires. For more information and reservation, please visit

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Days Like This - Issue 7 - Spring 2017  

Days Like This - Issue 7 - Spring 2017  

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