Page 1

bravekids.eu 1


Brave Kids 2017 Report Table of Contents Brave Kids Mission....................................................................................................................................3 Brave Kids 2017 Infographic.....................................................................................................................4 Brave Kids 2017 in Numbers.....................................................................................................................6 Brave Kids 2017 in the World....................................................................................................................7 Brave Kids 2017 Groups and Cities ..........................................................................................................8 Brave Kids 2017 Calendar of Main Events..............................................................................................11 Brave Youth 2017.....................................................................................................................................12 Brave Kids Georgia 2017 ........................................................................................................................15 Brave Kids Artistic Instructor Training and Practical Dissemmination Project......................................16 Brave Kids 2017 Artistic Instructors........................................................................................................17 About Brave Kids 2017 Participants........................................................................................................18 Project Impact..........................................................................................................................................19 Brave Kids Logic Model.....................................................................................................................19 Brave Kids 2017 Survey .....................................................................................................................19 Intercultural Knowledge, Openness, and Sensitivity............................................................21 New International Network of Friends and Positive Attitude to Stay in Touch....................22 Empathy and Compassion.....................................................................................................23 Self-Confidence.....................................................................................................................25 Self-Efficacy..........................................................................................................................26 Motivation and Desire to Work Hard and Make Projects that Help Others..........................27 Communication Skills...........................................................................................................29 Artistic Skills.........................................................................................................................29 Funding for Brave Kids 2017 ..................................................................................................................31 Partners and Sponsors Brave Kids 2017..................................................................................................32 Acknowledgments....................................................................................................................................34 References................................................................................................................................................34 Annex 1: Brave Kids Logic Model..........................................................................................................35 Annex 2: Brave Kids 2017 Survey Statistical Analysis...........................................................................41

bravekids.eu 2


Brave Kids Mission Our mission is to bring together children from all over the world in an atmosphere of friendship and respect for each other’s cultures. We do so by joining children together in artistic experiences aimed to inspire them to imagine a better future for themselves and their communities and providing them with the tools to help realize their aspirations. The Brave Kids creative process provides young participants with the opportunity to express themselves and their culture. Participants are supported to discover their own unique potential and value, which raises their confidence and aspirations. Under the guidance of professional artistic instructors who serve as facilitators, young participants teach and lead each other, encouraging them to exchange ideas, skills, and approaches. By collaborating with other young people from diverse backgrounds on a common creative project, participants develop their ability to communicate and learn to understand difference and celebrate common experience. This valuable and exciting artistic process nurtures the emotional and social development of its young participants, helping them to make steps towards positive transformation in their own lives and in their communities in the long-term. Brave Kids promotes cross-cultural understanding amongst the next generation by connecting young people from different countries and backgrounds in a shared creative endeavor. By providing a platform for young people from disadvantaged backgrounds and the teachers, mentors and activists who champion their rights, Brave Kids hopes to stimulate debate and positive change to help address the inequalities facing children around the world.

bravekids.eu 3


Brave Kids 2017 Infographic

bravekids.eu 4


bravekids.eu 5


Brave Kids 2017 in Numbers

5 Brave Kids Cities in Poland, 1 in Slovakia, and 1 in Georgia 135 kids from 24 Artistic Groups and 16 countries in Poland and Slovakia 24 kids from 5 Artistic Groups and 4 countries in Georgia 31 Group Leaders 14 Artistic Instructors 83 Volunteers 75 Host Families 155 Local Kids Participated in Workshops with Group Leaders 48 Public Events 2000+ Viewers of Events in First Stage in Cities 1400 Viewers of Brave Kids Grand Finale

bravekids.eu 6


Brave Kids 2017 in the World

Brazil - More Paths Georgia, Tblisi - Caritas Georgia, Tsaghveri - Shevardeni Ensemble Georgia, Zahessi - Zahessi 5 India - Sarvam Foundation Iran - Donya Children’s Research Institute Israel - Ukuleles for Peace Kenya - Koinonia Children Team Lithuania - Folk Dance Ensemble Seltinis Mexico - Casa Hogar Nueva Vida “Little Bees” Moldova - Reverence Dance School Morocco - Youth Association for Culture and Development (YACD) Aissawa Kids Poland, Kraków - Dance Effort Poland, Krasne - Group RIDETO

Poland, Wałbrzych - Club Cordex Poland, Warsaw - Hope4Street Poland, Wałbrzych - Wałbrzyznian Talent School Poland, Wałbrzych - Songs and Dance Group Wałbrzych Poland, Warsaw - Youth Cultural Practitioners Poland, Wrocław - Colourful Children Romania, Salcia-Tudor - The Buds Romania, Pitești - The Song and Dance Show Group Russia - The Arctic, Yakutia, Sakha Republic Slovakia - Foundation Good Romani Fairy Kesaj Turkey - Group TFD (Turkish Folk Dancers) Ukraine, Lviv - Theatre “Under the Bridge” Ukraine, Kharkiv - Novy Kadr USA - CircEsteem

bravekids.eu 7


Brave Kids 2017 Groups and Cities The first stage of the Brave Kids 2017 took place from 17 June to 1 July in six different cities: Białystok, Kosice (Slovakia), Przemyśl, Wałbrzych, Warsaw, and Wrocław. The second stage took place in Oborniki Śląskie from 2 July to 11 July. Brave Kids Georgia 2017 took place in the Samtskhe-Javakheti region from 18 August to 29 August. Białystok Artistic Groups • • • •

Slovakia - Foundation Good Romani Fairy Kesaj, Leader: Martina Koptová Georgia, Zahessi - Zahessi 5 - Fifth Zurab Anjaparidze Art School, Leader: Tamar Aragvishvili Lithuania - Folk Dance Ensemble Seltinis, Leader: Julija Muningienė Poland, Krasne - Group RIDETO from Children’s Home in Krasne (Janusz Korczak Centre for Educational Care Services), Leader: Urszula Borkowska Organizational Team

Organizational Partner: Fundacja Teatr Narwal oraz Stowarzyszenie Widok

• • • •

Łukasz Szczepański – Chief Organizer Anna Żebrowska - Host Families Coordinator Anna Sałaban - Volunteers Coordinator Katarzyna Siwerska - Volunteers Coordinator Joanna Sałaban - Leader of Volunteers

Kosice Artistic Groups

• • • •

Ukraine, Lviv - Theatre “Under the Bridge,” Leader: Svitlana Manita Brazil - More Paths, Leader: Flavia Bittencourt India - Sarvam Foundation, Leader: Ranjini Nair Poland, Wałbrzych - Songs and Dance Group Wałbrzych, Leaders: Anastazja Grzeszak, Sylwia Salamaj Organizational Team

Organizational Partner: Stowarzyszenie Haliganda

• • • • • •

Roman Sorger – Chief Organizer Nikola Šoltésová – BK Coordinator Radka Neubertová – Host Families Coordinator Miriam Vargočková – Volunteers Coordinator Karolína Dienesová – Manager Michaela Komárová – PR

bravekids.eu 8


Przemyśl Artistic Groups • • • •

Mexico - Casa Hogar Nueva Vida “Little Bees,” Leader: Ammi Hidai Poland, Warsaw - Hope4Street, Leader: Julia Powierza Romania, Salcia-Tudor - The Buds, Leader: Gica Paraipan Ukraine, Kharkiv- Novy Kadr, Leader: Kateryna Usmienstseva Organizational Team

Organizational Partner: Fundacja Wymiany Kulturowej toTU toTAM

• • • •

Magdalena Pardel – Chief Organizer Hanna Trefler, Monika Fedyk - Host Families Coordinators Agata Zawada - Volunteers Coordinator Viorica Alexandru, Aneta Mistelska - Leaders Program Coordinators Wałbrzych Artistic Groups

• • • •

Morocco,Youth Association for Culture and Development - Aissawa Kids, Leader: Khalid Bentyeb Moldova - Reverence Dance School, Leader: Iulia Ursan Poland, Wałbrzych - Club Cordex, Leader: Andżelika Toborek Turkey - Group TFD (Turkish Folk Dancers), Leader: Nalan Sarikabak Organizational Team

Organizational Partner: Fundacja “EMU” im. Elżbiety Marii Urbańskiej

• • • • •

Magdalena Sawicka – Chief Organizer Małgorzata Skrzypnik - Host Families Coordinator Anabel Carrion Pichaco, Irene Fernández Bermúdez - Leaders Program Coordinators Maya Sawicka - Brave Youth Program Assistant Karolina Lewis, Sebastian Stalka - Leaders of Volunteers Warsaw Artistic Groups

• • • •

Iran - Donya Children’s Research Institute, Leader: Naghmeh Limooee Romania, Pitești - The Song and Dance Show Group , Leader: Violeta Vacaru Poland, Warsaw - Youth Cultural Practitioners, Leader: Madina Demilova Russia - The Arctic, Yakutia, Sakha Republic, Leader: Svetlana Fedorova Organizational Team

Organizational Partner: Fundacja Świat Na Wyciągnięcie Ręki

• • • •

Aleksandra Ośko - Chief Organizer Martyna Gołębiewska, Jan Oliński – Volunteers Program coordinators Iwona Cichowicz - Host Families Coordinator Marta Wnukowska, Ola Brożyna – Brave Team

bravekids.eu 9


Wrocław Artistic Groups

• • • •

USA - CircEsteem, Leader: Viviane Clement Georgia, Tblisi – Caritas, Leader: Rusudan Oniani Kenya - Koinonia Children Team, Leader: Peter Kipngetich Cherono Poland, Wrocław - Colourful Children, Leaders: Elmelda Mashingo, Ewelina Dublanska Organizational Team

Brave Kids Headquarters, Song of the Goat Theatre Association

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Grzegorz Bral - Artistic Director Justyna Warecka - Executive Producer Iwona Stankova - Program Manager Kathy Lawson - Artist Liaison Michał Patyna - Logistics Laryssa Kowalczyk - Host Families Coordinator Marta Kochanowicz - Volunteers Coordinator Agata Mikołajczyk – BK in Oborniki Śl. Coordinator Iza Wołyniak – Manager of BK in Oborniki Śl. Malika Murzagali, Sara Sterpellone - EVS Volunteers Kamila Magnowska - Chief Accountant Marcin Prokopowicz - Technical Manager Mateusz Nawrocki, Aleksandra Palus, Katarzyna Wiązowska - PR EXPERT

Samtskhe-Javakheti Artistic Groups

• • • • •

Poland, Kraków - Dance Effort, Leader: Alicja Kucharska Poland, Wałbrzych - Wałbrzyznian Talent School, Leader: Jolanta Kowalczyk-Kokoszka Georgia, Shevardeni Ensemble, Leader: Nino Gelashvili Iran - Donya Children's Research Institute, Leader: Naghmeh Rahmanian Israel -Ukuleles for Peace, Leader: Daphna Orion Organizational Team

Organizational Partner: Toleranti Association, Samtskhe-Javakheti

Tsira Meskhishvili - Chief Organizer Liako Gogidze – Coordinator Tamo Kiknadze - Leader of Volunteers Iwona Stankova - Supervisor

• • •

bravekids.eu 10


Brave Kids 2017 Calendar of Main Events First Stage 17 June – 1 July 16 – 18 June: Arrival of Brave Kids Participants in Poland and Slovakia 18 June: Integration Meetings/Picnics in Białystok, Kosice, Wałbrzych, Warsaw, and Wrocław 19 June: Artistic Workshops Begin and Initial Group Performances in All Cities 25 June: Brave Kids Parades in Kosice, Przemyśl, Wałbrzych, and Wrocław 29 June: City Final in Warsaw 30 June: City Final in All Other Cities, Farewell Picnic in Warsaw 1 July: Farewell Picnics in Białystok, Przemyśl, Wałbrzych, and Wrocław Second Stage 2 July – 11 July, Oborniki Śląskie 2 July: Arrival of Brave Kids Participants in Oborniki Śląskie 3 July: Presentation of City Final Shows at Cultural Center 4 July: Artistic Workshops Begin 9 July: General Rehearsal at Cultural Center 10 July: Brave Kids Grand Finale at Teatr Polski 11 July: Brave Kids Group Departures Brave Kids Georgia 19 – 28 August 19 – 21 August: Brave Kids Group Arrivals 21 August: Artistic Workshops Begin and Initial Group Presentations 28 August: Grand Finale, Rabati Castle in Akhaltsikhe 29 August: Group Departures

bravekids.eu 11


From left: Ali Al-Hasani (BK 2011, Palestine), Wong Chau Yi (Helen) (BK 2013, Hong Kong), Michaela Komarova (BK 2015, Slovakia), Leo Lau Chung Chak (BK 2012, Hong Kong)

Brave Youth 2017 Brave Youth are former Brave Kids participants aged 18 – 23 who have taken the initiative to work in some socially-conscious way in their communities. The idea of the Brave Youth program, now in its second year, is to directly connect Brave Kids participants with these former Brave Kids so that they can inspire each other. We believe that by sharing the example of the work that Brave Youth do in their local environment, Brave Kids will be inspired to try to do the same in the future. Recruitment for Brave Youth started in Spring 2017 with an Open Call for Participants. Candidates were asked to fill in an application form and provide organizers with two recommendation letters confirming their involvement in social activism. The eight candidates also took part in a Skype interview with Brave Kids organizers. This year Brave Youth also had the opportunity to engage more in the artistic elements of Brave Kids, assisting Artistic Instructors as volunteers. Staying with Polish host families allowed both Brave Youth and local families to gain an inside look into other cultures and traditions. This year we had a group of four wonderful former Brave Kids: Ali, Leo, Helen, and Miška. They spent the first stage of Brave Kids project in Wrocław, Wałbrzych, and Kosice and traveled to Oborniki Śląskie for the second stage. EVS volunteer Malika Murzagali was responsible for preparing and coordinating the Brave Youth program with the supervision from Brave Kids managers.

bravekids.eu 12


BRAVE YOUTH DESIRED PROGRAM OUTCOMES Desired Short-Term Outcomes      

Improved Competence Working with Kids New Knowledge of BK “Kids Teach Kids” Model Increased Intercultural Knowledge, Openness, and Sensitivity Increased Self-Confidence Increased Self-Efficacy New International Network of Friends and a Positive Attitude to Stay in Touch

Desired Intermediate Outcomes   

Continue Developing their Projects Apply BK Model in Working with Kids Keep in Touch, Support, and Collaborate with other Brave Youth

Desired Long-Term Outcomes BRAVE YOUTH become BRAVE Young Adults with:   

Widened Perspectives and Sense of Possibilities Willingness to Cooperate in the World Reduced Prejudice … and they continue to take positive action in their communities and beyond. BRAVE YOUTH 2017 ACTIVITIES

1st Stage in Cities: The main Brave Youth activity throughout the 8th edition of Brave Kids was assisting Artistic Instructors during Brave Kids workshops. This allowed Brave Youth to learn new ways of working with kids, while also serving as an example and inspiration for the Brave Kids. Brave Youth also gave presentations to the city Group Leaders and Brave Kids and to potential NGO partners of the project on the community work they are doing in their countries. In order to keep track of their learning and experiences throughout the project, we organized weekly self-reflection meetings. 2nd Stage in Oborniki: In Oborniki, Brave Youth continued to assist Artistic Instructors during workshops. They also ran their own artistic workshops for local Polish children (July 6 - July 7) based on the skills they developed during work with Artistic Instructors. During the workshops with Polish kids they played games, taught a few songs in Slovak, Cantonese and Arabic, and taught the children the basics of stage settings and movement coordination elements. They also gave more presentations to Group Leaders and participants of the Brave Kids Contact Making Seminar. We organized two more self-reflection meetings to reflect on the experience and brainstorm for the future.

bravekids.eu 13


Group Leaders' Program This year we organized the 6th edition of the Brave Kids Group Leaders' Program, an integral part of the Brave Kids Project. Group Leaders are educators and professionals who travel with the Artistic Groups as their legal guardians as well as representatives of their organizations. During the Leaders' Program, Leaders work together with our facilitators to create a space to share their expertises as educators working with kids through art, while also interacting with the local community.

During the first stage of the project, Leaders met separately in the different cities involved in the Project: Wrocław, Warsaw, Przemyśl, Białystok, Wałbrzych and Kosice. There, they got to know each other and their host families and became more familiar with the Brave Kids Team and our program. The first week of workshops included team building activities and opportunities for Leaders to present their organizations, their kids, and their working methodologies. We also gave them insight into Brave Kids, how it is structured and our principal aims. Leaders also got in touch with the local community, presenting their organizations and work to local NGOs. During the second week Group Leaders led workshops for local Polish and Slovak children, in order to prepare together a small artistic performance that was part of the City Final Show. In the second part of the Project, all 24 Group Leaders met in Oborniki Śląskie. Here the Leaders' Program mirrored the scheme of the first two weeks, with some adaptations tailored to a larger group of people working along 140 children for one week. In particular, the sharing activities were structured to emphasize differences and similarities between different kinds of organizations and backgrounds. Great importance was also given to the evaluation meetings to receive Leaders' feedback about the Project as well as planning for continued engagement and communication after the project. Group Leaders worked with the Brave Kids Team to develop strategies and ideas to support children after the project and to create a network where both children and organizations could continue to maintain their new friendships, inspire each other, and create new projects.

bravekids.eu 14


Brave Kids Georgia 2017 This year, in cooperation with the Samtskhe-Javakheti Regional Association ‘Toleranti’ we organized the second edition of Brave Kids Georgia, which took place from August 18 to August 29 in Samtskhe-Javakheti region. The project united twenty four young artists representing the traditions and culture of four countries: Georgia, Iran, Israel, Poland. Project activities took place in several locations in the Samtskhe-Javakheti region: Tsaghveri, Borjomi, Akhaltsikhe and Abastumani. During the 40 hours of artistic workshops based on the ‘kids teach kids’ method, participants exchanged their cultures and traditions and created a common final performance which was presented to an audience of 100 people at the Theatre of Akhaltsikhe. The local community -volunteers, host families, and representatives of the city councils of Borjomi and Akhaltisikhe -- were also actively involved in the project. In addition to artistic workshops, the kids participated in an integration picnic organized by the families of the local project participants on 20 August and an intercultural evening on 24 August. They also had opportunities to go sightseeing and visit several important places, such as the Safara mountains monastery and Rabati Castle.

bravekids.eu 15


Brave Kids Artistic Instructor Training and Practical Dissemmination Project Over the life of Brave Kids, we have grown from hosting 15 children from three countries in 2009 to 144 children from 19 countries in 2016 and from producing the program in one city in Poland (WrocĹ‚aw) to having sites in multiple Polish cities as well as new international locations in Slovakia and Georgia. As we envision further expansion of Brave Kids to new sites and to reach new artists, groups of children, and cultural managers, we are critically aware of the need to maintain the quality and integrity of the project. Artistic workshops led by professional artistic instructors using an innovative facilitated peer learning model that we call “kids teach kidsâ€? are truly the heart of Brave Kids. This learning model is rooted in a foundation of compassion and trust and strives to nurture the Brave Kids' confidence in their own abilities, not only as artists, but as leaders in their communities. The Brave Kids Artistic Instructor Training and Practical Dissemination Project, a new two-year project cofunded by Creative Europe, aims to support the ongoing expansion of the Brave Kids Project while ensuring its continued quality and integrity. The core activities of the project include expanded training workshops for artistic instructors, recruitment and training of new artistic instructors in new project sites, and the development and publication of an integrated online manual of the Brave Kids model. More than a static written document, this manual will be an interactive platform that will allow us to engage a larger audience of new partners and collaborators, exchange best practices, and share the Brave Kids vision on a larger scale. The Brave Kids project and its unique model touch children and their communities from both here in Europe and all over the world, strengthening their belief in themselves and increasing intercultural understanding and friendship. Participants return to their home countries and share these gifts with their friends, families, and communities. By investing in the continued quality and integrity of the Brave Kids model, making it more accessible, and increasing the pool of those trained in it, we hope to multiply the potential impact of the project for children and their communities all around the world.

bravekids.eu 16


We are so grateful for the support of the European Commission and the Creative Europe Programme for this project and for our fabulous project partners: Fundacja Świat na Wyciągnięcie Ręki - Warsaw, Poland Fundacja Wymiany Kulturowej to TU to TAM - Przemyśl, Poland Haliganda Association - Košice, Slovakia Toleranti Association of Samtskhe-Javakheti Region - Akhaltsikhe, Georgia Charitable Foundation “Caritas Georgia” - Tblisi, Georgia MiniArtShow by Ioana Ginghina - Dragomiresti Deal, Romania Women's Charitable Organization "Our Vision" - Zhydachiv, Ukraine

Brave Kids Artistic Instructor Training June 9-11, 2017

Brave Kids 2017 Artistic Instructors

Ewa Hubar, Jolanta Sikorska, Magdalena Nykiel, Marcin Misiura, Nataša Cápová, Mary Sadowska, Ilona Krawczyk, Creo Kellab, Kasia Venka Godlewska, Mateusz Mefo Godlewski, Kasia Timingeriu, Gabriel Almagro, Liako Gogidze, Jacek Timingeriu (Artistic Director)

bravekids.eu 17


About Brave Kids 2017 Participants 159 children total participated in Brave Kids 2017 in Poland/Slovakia (135 children) and Georgia (24 children). They ranged in age from 7 to 18 years old with the majority falling between 11 and 15. As usual we had a larger proportion of females than males, with 100 girls (63%) and 59 boys (37%). Gender balance is a factor we try to achieve more each year, but the fact remains that more girls than boys tend to participate in artistic projects. 83% of participants were first-time Brave Kids, while 17% had participated in a previous edition.

bravekids.eu 18


Project Impact This year we undertook a big project to better understand the impact of Brave Kids for the various individuals who participate. While we know from first hand experience the powerful effects of the project, we wanted to approach studying the project's impact from a more rigorous and methodical perspective. Brave Kids Logic Model As part of this undertaking, we spent a lot of time developing a Logic Model for the project. A Logic Model is a visual map of a program that shows the main components and their relationships to each other as well as the logical flow for what the program does and what it intends to achieve. The process of developing our Logic Model was very enriching for us and helped us to clarify and refine many elements of the project, including the specific outcomes that we hope to achieve in the short, medium, and long-term. You can see the full Brave Kids Logic Model in Annex 1 at the end of this report. Brave Kids 2017 Survey The Logic Model also helped inform the content of the surveys that we gave to Brave Kids participants as the desired short-term outcomes that we identified in our Logic Model became some of the variables that we sought to measure in surveys. For the first time this year, we asked participants to complete a survey both before the project and after the project in order to see if there were any changes in these targeted variables during this time. There are several challenging factors involved in designing and administering surveys to Brave Kids participants. For one thing, there is a complete lack of existing measures (groups of survey questions designed to capture a certain variable) that have been validated for such a diverse population made up of children of different ages, developmental stages, cultures, and languages. Most validated measures for psychosocial variables like bravekids.eu 19


the ones we are interested in have generally only been tested on one age group from one culture/language group. The majority of these studies have been done with American and European children, giving a particular perspective to their approaches that may not be appropriate for children from other cultures and backgrounds. We also place a huge burden on our Group Leaders to translate the surveys from English to the participants' native languages. This is, of course, not a perfect system, but we lack the resources to translate surveys into the many languages of participants. Given these difficulties, we cannot be 100% sure that the meaning of survey questions translates equally well across cultures and languages. Furthermore, most measures investigating a particular variable, such as self-confidence, include a number of questions designed to capture to full spectrum of that variable. Again, because of both the linguistic and time burden on Group Leaders and participants, our surveys only asked one or two questions for each variable of interest. Our surveys are also subject to the limitations of both self-reporting and social desirability bias, whereby participants may give answers based on what they assume is desirable to their Group Leaders or project organizers. In terms of those who completed the surveys, they might also be vulnerable to a self-selection bias as those who made the effort to complete the survey may be more pre-disposed to a particularly favorable or unfavorable perspective. Finally, the strength of the surveys' conclusions is limited by the lack of any element of randomization in the pool of respondents and the lack of an appropriate comparison group who did not participate in Brave Kids against which we could evaluate the survey results of Brave Kids participants. Despite these serious methodological challenges, we found some interesting and encouraging results. Surveys were completed via Google Forms with Group Leaders assigning each participant a unique ID to maintain confidentiality and allow for matching pre- and post-survey answers for each participant. In the end, 91 participants completed the pre-project survey (57%), 56 completed the post-project survey (35%), and 36 (27%) completed both pre-project and post-project surveys, allowing for statistical testing to measure change in our targeted variables. Because of the varying response rates, results were evaluated and are presented in two different ways below. First, we compared respondents' answers before and after the project based on the percentage of total respondents who gave a particular answer. This method was chosen in order to account for the different survey response rates before and after the project, keeping in mind that the different compositions of the respondents pre- and post-project means that there may be some hidden biases in our results that we are unaware of. It is not a perfect comparison, but allows us to utilize all the survey data that we received, hopefully also presenting a fuller picture. These comparisons are presented using pie charts. The majority of questions asked respondents to answer how they felt about a given statement on a 10-point Likert scale. For example:

For the purposes of comparison, respondents' answers were grouped into three categories: low, medium, and high based on where they fell on the 10-point Likert scale. Low was defined as answering between 1 and 3, medium between 4 and 7, and high between 8 and 10. For respondents who completed both pre-project and post-project surveys, we also used a two-tailed paired t-test to measure whether there was a statistically significant change in each variable from the beginning to the end of the project that would suggest the project made a difference (keeping in mind that certain methodological limitations, such as the lack of a random sample and a comparison group, make it impossible for us to assert a definite causal link). However, as the existence of a statistically significant result is not always particularly meaningful by itself, we also used the Cohen's d statistic, which gives us information about the relative size of any observed effect. See Annex 2 for the complete data used to calculate these statistics. bravekids.eu 20


Testing for Statistical Significance p-value < 0.05

Statistically significant result

p-value < 0.001

Highly statistically significant result

Testing for Effect Size Using Cohen's d d= 0.2

Small effect size

d=0.5

Medium effect size

d=0.8

Large effect size

d=1.2

Very large effect size

Intercultural Knowledge, Openness, and Sensitivity One of the key variables that we hope to impact through the Brave Kids Project is participants' knowledge about and openness to other cultures. This is a somewhat difficult variable to capture objectively, however, as we are relying on participants' self-report. Furthermore, openness and sensitivity may depend a lot on participants' level of developmental maturity. To measure this variable, we asked particpants several questions about how much they felt they knew about the cultures and traditions of people from other countries and how they felt about meeting kids from other cultures and countries. “How much would you say you know about the culture/traditions of people from other countries?”

As you can see, there was quite a change in answers before and after the project. Before the project only 12% of respondents described their knowledge of other countries' cultures and traditions as high, but after the project that percentage rose to 60%. More specifically, in terms of respondents who completed both pre- and postproject surveys, there was an average 3.86 point increase in knowledge after the project. This difference was highly statistically significant (with a p-value < 0.001), and the Cohen's d statistic was 1.68, indicating a “very large” effect size. bravekids.eu 21


Please describe how you feel about meeting kids from different countries and cultures (check all that apply).

For this question, we saw an increase in the percentage of respondents who reported excitement along with a reduction in fear, which is very encouraging for us. Examples of “other” answers before the project included: “happy,” “stressed,” and “depends on the situation.” After the project, there were “other” answers like “happy,” “happiness,” and “it will be amazing.” Also encouraging were participants' impressions after the project in terms of whether they learned or improved their skills for cooperating with others who are different and respecting different cultures, as seen below.

New International Network of Friends and Positive Attitude to Stay in Touch Connected to the outcome of increased intercultural knowledge and openness, another desired outcome of the project is the creation of a new international network of friends for participants and a positive attitude towards staying in touch after the project (we later follow up on whether participants acted on this positive attitude).

bravekids.eu 22


“Would you like to make new friends from different countries and cultures during Brave Kids?”

98% of respondents before the project reported a desire to make new friends, and a full 100% reported that they had made new friends after the project with 70% answering that they made “a lot” of new friends.

Respondents also reported very high desire and motivation to stay in touch with the new friends they made, contributing to the ongoing sustainability of the project's core goal to promote intercultural understanding and friendship. Empathy and Compassion Another outcome we hope to create for Brave Kids participants is an increase in their empathy and compassion. Empathy is defined as “understanding and sharing in another’s emotional state or context” (Jolliffe & Farrington, 2006, p. 592). Compassion encompasses empathy but takes it a step further, as it “involves feeling for a person who is suffering and being motivated to act to help them” (Strauss et al., 2016, p.16). The literature on these topics notes the lack of good measures for assessing empathy and compassion, particularly among children and in terms of diverse cultural groups. However, there is some consensus that there are cognitive (thinking), affective (emotional), and behavioral components involved. Our questions were adapted from an existing questionnaire to address all three of these components. bravekids.eu 23


“When I see another child who is upset or hurt, I can usually understand how they feel.”

This question was used to measure cognitive empathy, the ability to understand how others feel. The percentage of all respondents who reported a high level of cognitive empathy rose from 58% before the project to 73% after the project. Among respondents who completed both pre- and post-project surveys, there was an average 1.5 point increase in this measure with a highly statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) and a large effect size (d=0.95). “When I see another child who is upset or hurt, I sometimes feels upset or hurt, too.”

This question was designed to capture affective empathy, or the phenomenon of feeling the emotional experience of others. Among all respondents, those reporting high levels of affective empathy rose from 57% to 77%. Among those who completed both surveys, there was an average 0.94 point increase, contributing to a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) and small effect size (d=0.46).

bravekids.eu 24


“When I see another child who is upset or hurt, I want to help them.”

This question measured behavioral empathy, which may also be understood as compassion, or the desire to do something to help others when we perceive they are suffering. It seems that our group came to Brave Kids already possessing a great deal of compassion! Nevertheless, there was a 2% increase overall among all respondents. Among those who completed both surveys, there was an average 0.83 point increase, which indicated a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) and a medium effect size (d=0.56). Self-Confidence We also hope to make an impact on participants' self-confidence through the project. We were interested in several aspects related to self-confidence: general self-confidence, self-confidence in relation to artistic ability, and self-confidence in relation to the ability to cooperate with others who may be different than you, a key component we believe is necessary to build a more peaceful world. It appears that Brave Kids participants also came to the project with high levels of general self-confidence. Looking at all respondents, there was little change observed. This could have to do with the difference in overall numbers of respondents between the pre- and post-project surveys. It could also be that the format of the question is too general and not particularly meaningful for participants, leading to confusion. Among those who completed both pre- and post-project surveys, there was an average 0.89 point increase in general selfconfidence, contributing to a small effect size (p < 0.05; d=0.49). “I feel good about myself and my abilities in general.”

bravekids.eu 25


However, when we asked about more specific kinds of self-confidence, we observed some more interesting results. With regards to self-confidence in relation to artistic abilities, those reporting high self-confidence levels rose from 66% to 81%. Among those who completed both surveys, there was an average 1.25 point increase in respondents' answers, leading to a medium effect size (p < 0.05; d=0.58). For self-confidence in relation to ability to cooperate with those who are different than us, those reporting high self-confidence rose from 69% to 84%. Among those who completed both surveys, there was an average 1.05 point increase, also leading to a medium effect size (p < 0.05; d=0.52). “I feel confident about my artistic abilities.”

“I feel confident about my ability to cooperate with other people who might be different than me.”

Self-Efficacy Self-efficacy refers to one's belief in one's own ability to succeed and accomplish a goal or task. It appears participants also had a fair amount of this quality before they begin the project with 87% reporting high selfefficacy, and there was only a small 2% observed increase among all respondents. Among those who completed both surveys, there was an average 0.61 point increase in self-efficacy and a small effect size (p < 0.05; d=0.39).

bravekids.eu 26


“I believe that if I work hard, I can achieve my goals.”

Motivation and Desire to Work Hard and Make Projects that Help Others We also ask participants several questions about their motivation and desire to work hard and, more specifically, about their desire to work hard in school and to make projects helping others in their communities. Among all respondents' the motivation to work hard to achieve goals rose from 81% reporting high levels of motivation before the project to 86% after the project. Among those who completed both surveys, there was an average 0.56 point increase in motivation and a medium effect size (p < 0.05; d=0.5). “I am willing and motivated to work hard to achieve my goals.”

bravekids.eu 27


With regards to the desire to work hard in school among all respondents, those reporting high levels of desire rose from 72% to 84%. Among those who completed both surveys, there was an average 0.81 point increase and a small effect size (p < 0.05; d=0.49). “I want to work hard in school.”

Finally, with regards to the desire to make projects that would help their communities, those with a high level of desire rose from 80% to 84%. Among those who completed both surveys, there was an average 0.5 point increase and a small effect size (p < 0.05; d=0.49). “I want to make projects that help others in my community.”

bravekids.eu 28


Communication Skills One unique element of Brave Kids is the degree to which participants have to be creative in discovering new ways of communicating with each other since there is not common spoken language. We asked participants after the project whether they learned or improved in skills related to communicating in other languages or without language. The results were incredibly positive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Did you learn or improve your skills at communicating in different languages or without language?â&#x20AC;?

Artistic Skills We also asked participants about whether they learned new artistic skills (such as songs and dances) during the project. As usual, they reported learning lots of new artistic skills.

bravekids.eu 29


All in all, these were very promising initial results from our first attempt at a more rigorous pre- and post-project comparison, and they suggest that the project is indeed making an impact on participants. While we encountered several challenges in terms of collecting both surveys from all participants, we still had a large enough sample size (n=36) to allow for statistical testing and initial results to inform future research directions. In the future, we would like to revisit our survey design to improve both its methodological strength and cultural appropriateness and sensitivity. We would also like to explore other ways to deliver it that would reduce the burden on Group Leaders and improve our response rates. In addition, we hope to expand our overall research agenda to inquire more about the impact for other types of participants, including Volunteers, Group Leaders, Host Families, and the general public who attend our performances.

bravekids.eu 30


Funding for Brave Kids 2017

Brave Kids is hugely grateful to the Municipality of Wrocław for their generous and ongoing support for the project, without which Brave Kids would not be possible. Brave Kids 2017 was also co-financed by the Adam Mickiewicz Institute, the Municipality of Wałbrzych, Municipality of Warsaw, Municipality of Przemyśl, Marshal’s Office of the Lower Silesian Voivodeship, Marshal’s Office of the Podlaskie Voivodeship, Marshal’s Office of the Podkarpackie Voivodeship, U.S. Consulate General in Kraków, Kosice Self-governing Region, the Municipality of Borjomi, and the Creative Europe Programme of the European Commission. In addition, we are so grateful to those groups who contributed to or covered in full their international travel costs and to those groups who invested time, energy, and money to securing visas to come to participate in Brave Kids! So much of the group preparation is undertaken on a voluntary basis, and we could not produce the project without the partnership of many wonderful organizations and families.

bravekids.eu 31


Partners and Sponsors Brave Kids 2017

bravekids.eu 32


The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

bravekids.eu 33


Acknowledgments Brave Kids 2017 Report prepared by Program Manager Kathy Lawson with assistance from Malika Murzagali and Sara Sterpellone.

References Jolliffe , D., & Farrington, D. P. (2006). Development and validation of the Basic Empathy Scale. Journal of Adolescence, 29, 589â&#x20AC;&#x201C;611. Strauss, C., Taylor, B.L., Gu, J., Kuyken, W., Baer, R., Jones, F, &, Cavanagh, K. (2016). What is compassion and how can we measure it? A review of definitions and measures. Clinical Psychology Review, 47, 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;27.

bravekids.eu 34


Annex 1: Brave Kids Logic Model

bravekids.eu 35


bravekids.eu 36


bravekids.eu 37


bravekids.eu 38


bravekids.eu 39


bravekids.eu 40


Annex 2: Brave Kids 2017 Survey Statistical Analysis

bravekids.eu 41


bravekids.eu 42


bravekids.eu 43


bravekids.eu 44


bravekids.eu 45


bravekids.eu 46


bravekids.eu 47


bravekids.eu 48


bravekids.eu 49


bravekids.eu 50


bravekids.eu 51


bravekids.eu 52

Brave Kids 2017 Report  

Summary of the 2017 Edition and Results from our Participant Survey