Page 1

2013 Season

Established 1950

Brandywine Polo Club

Fun

Friends

Family


4

Brandywine Polo Club


1218 Doe Run Road Coatesville, PA 19320 Phone: (610) 380-9909 mercerhillpolo@hotmail.com

PHOTO BY ELISABETH W. HARPHAM/EQUIDIGITAL.COM

8

Brandywine Polo Club


www.brandywinepolo.com

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ERICKA FUCHSLOCH

2.

1. 1. 1.

3.

The Art of Tailgating

3.

By Sarah Doheny

23 14 18 36

Features

Cover Photos By 1. Dawn Corbets 2. Alix Colman 3. Jim Graham

Returning to Brandywine

Alumni Spotlight

Game Rules

Robin Bostwick By Kate McClung

Freddie Fortugno By Ericka Fuchsloch

The View from the Striped Shirt By Lt. Col Steven L. Walsh USMC (ret)

Departments 11 Letter From the Board 12 Social Members and Trophy Donations List

30 2013 Polo Players 33 2013 Season Schedule

Photo Gallery 20 28 38 46

Club Lifestyles 22 Tailgate Members 26 Philly Style Cup Friday Nights Under the Stars 34 Tournaments of 2012 Mother Nature Not Fair! Polo School Barn Damage, April 2013 Livin’ the Vision & Season’s End

Also in this issue... 12 Voice of Brandywine Polo 24 Tailgate Recipes 37 The Game 40 History of Polo 42 Polo Gear

Contents 10

Brandywine Polo Club


The Message

Echoes

F

or over 2,500 years, summer months have been filled with the sounds of horses’ hooves thundering down Polo fields. Polo is the oldest team sport in the world and dates back to at least 600 BC, before the written record. Polo dates from before Alexander the Great, and before China’s Great Wall. Most of Polo’s history was documented in Asia until the British brought it to the Western world in the mid 1800’s, then on to the United States in 1876 (the year Custer made a questionable decision), and finally arrived at Brandywine in 1950. This long history has resulted in traditions that are integral parts of Polo, but as Heraclitus wrote, at a time when Polo was probably already being played, “the only thing that is constant is change”. This year we have seen tremendous change at Brandywine but the tradition of the game remains strong and the club will continue to grow and be successful as long as people continue to embrace that tradition whether as players or supporters, and to quote a more modern man, and one who I suspect may have watched a Polo match or two, and certainly a man that believed in fair play, Mahatma Gandhi stated, “Be the change that you wish to see in the world”. Tradition is everywhere before you at Brandywine. The names themselves, Chukka and Polo, both have ancient origins. The horses’ tack is little changed in thousands of years. The horses themselves are descendents of crossbreeding of English mares and Arab stallions and Argentine Thoroughbreds and Criollo crosses. The Manau Cane root mallets, (though for truth in advertising, the author does own one fiber cane mallet, which may make me a philistine), the leather knee pads and boots, the helmets based on the British pith helmets, even the name of our premier tournament at Brandywine, the Gerald Balding, comes from a great player from the 1930’s. One of the most important traditions of Polo is sportsmanship, on and off the field. At one time sportsmanship was even part of the rating system for a player. The modern game developed under the Victorian principles of fair play, which require gentlemanly manners, unobtrusive umpires, and calls that must not be questioned. These principles are codified in the rules by which no player may appeal in any manner to the umpire for a foul, except for the team captain who may politely discuss matters with the umpire. We must expect and contribute to this sportsmanship and tradition. We may be insignificant in the grand history of Polo, but we all embody and carry forward the tradition of the game whether we are players (experienced or novice), spectators, grooms, vets, farriers, breeders or trainers. We hope that this year Polo at Brandywine will continue to embody tradition and sportsmanship. What is certain is that this summer and hopefully for many more, there will be the sound of horses’ hooves charging down a sunny, grass field playing Polo. Thank you for your contribution. Meo regno pro equus. The Board of the Brandywine Polo Club

www.brandywinepolo.com

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Social Members: The Liz & Mike McKee Team, Coldwell Banker Preferred Keith Pension Lei & Kent Cochran Brushwood Stable Winner of free social membership draw from Willowdale: Jim Graves

“The Voice” of Brandywine Polo This year marks the 6th season having Bradley Hendrix as our announcer. His endless energy, knowledge of the sport, upbeat personality and unique announcing style have endeared Bradley to casual fans and seasoned players alike. “I am honored to be announcing Polo again and look forward to providing another year of fun and excitement.” “I try every match to give an overview of the rules and basic play so that even first time guests can understand and appreciate the game.” Bradley is a local dj and hosts several quizzo/trivia games at area venue’s and also dj’s weddings, benefits, special events, etc. Feel free to stop by the announcer stand and say hello!

Banner Sponsors: Oxford Feed & Lumber/Brandywine Ace Pet & Farm Purina Brushwood Stables National Bank of Malvern B&D Builders EBY Trailers

Trophy Donations: Unionville Saddle Shop Two Best Playing Pony Coolers Jay Gingrich Wooden Grooming Box

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Brandywine Polo Club


Brandywine Polo Club Program

2013 SEASON Board of Directors Scott Brown, Tim Jones, Nicholas Place, Kathy Fowser Whitman Advisors W.B. Dixon Stroud, Jr., Louis Micolucci Advertising & Sponsorship Sales Kathy Dress / Dress Media Program Coordinator Cindy Buchanan Graphic Design Harvey Walls Contributing Photographers Jim Graham, Dawn Corbett, Ericka Fuchsloch For information about this program, please contact the polo office or info@brandywinepolo.com. For advertising inquiries contact Kathy Dress at kdress@ptd.net or 610-589-0066.

Brandywine Polo Club 232 Polo Road Toughkenamon, PA 19374 Mail: PO Box 568 Unionville, PA 19375 Main Office: 610-268-8692 info@brandywinepolo.com Follow us on Facebook.com www.brandywinepolo.com All product and company names are trademarked or copyrighted by their respective owners. All rights reserved. www.brandywinepolo.com

Established 1950

Proud Member Since 1951

www.brandywinepolo.com

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Returning to Brandywine Announcement

By Kate McClung

T

his summer the Brandywine Polo Club is going back to its roots, in a way, as Robin Carroll-Bostwick joins the club as the Polo School Manager. Looking back on the club’s rich history, you will find that Carroll grew up at the Brandywine Polo Club, while her dad Del Carroll, played at Brandywine during the 1960s through the early 1980s. Del Carroll was Brandywine’s highest rated player at 9 goals, a level that is rarely seen by many clubs, and played with many of Brandywine’s familiar names. During this time, Robin was living upstairs at the old clubhouse at Brandywine Polo and working for players like Richie Jones and Dixon Stroud. Today you can look back to see that Robin has managed a number of clubs around the country, played with some of polo’s best players, and is responsible for the development of many new polo players and patrons. However, the plan wasn’t supposed to be for Robin to become an avid polo player. Her father had plans for her to enjoy other aspects of horsemanship, perhaps on the racetrack, as he followed the popular idea at the time that women had no place on the polo field. Robin had other intentions, as she swung up onto a polo pony and cantered onto the Brandywine Polo fields before a Sunday match, mallet in hand. As many daughters do, Robin knew how to convince her dad to follow her way of thinking, and Robin knew Del Carroll believed, “ If you are going to do something, do it right or don’t do it at all.” With that philosophy in mind,

Del’s support to help Robin improve soon kicked in, as Robin began her polo career with the support and advice of her father. Robin later moved to Florida to further her career, playing with and managing some of the great polo players, including Alfonzo Pieres, Benjamin Arya, and Paul Fortugno. During this time, Robin became a 1 goal player, and married Ricky Bostwick in 1987, whose family owned Village Farms Polo Club in Gilbertsville, New York. The direction of her career changed in 1999, when Robin began managing Aiken Polo Club, a club that was beginning a downhill slide and needed revitalization. After a successful renewal of the program, complete with the arrival of the USPA 26 goal Gold Cup to New Bridge Polo, Robin moved onto other challenges. Over the years, she also managed the Mypoia Polo Club and Southampton Polo Club, and helped to bring in new teams and tournaments, improve field management, cultivate social events, and teach new players the rules and riding skills. An advocate of the sport, Robin’s passion for polo has clearly shown in her work. The Brandywine Polo Club is excited to have Robin once again join the club and bring her skills and lessons learned to our membership. Equally, Robin is excited to get back to Brandywine and help a new class of polo players to “learn and understand the rules, the game, and horse.” Look for Robin at the club’s Friday night and Sunday matches and please give her a warm “Welcome home!”

Her father had plans for her to enjoy other aspects of horsemanship, perhaps on the racetrack, as he followed the popular idea at the time that women had no place on the polo field.

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Brandywine Polo Club


www.brandywinepolo.com

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Brandywine Polo Club


Many Thanks to Scott & Kathy Brown and all affiliated with Brandywine Polo Academy for many years of polo, laughs and friendships.

www.brandywinepolo.com

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Alumni Spotlight

Fred Fortugno and Jullian Hipwood.

Fred and his dog, Ripper.

Fred Fortugno

“I

t’s not all about winning it’s about camaraderie, the lifestyle, and meeting people. Don’t forget to have fun!” Alfred E. “Fred” Fortugno of Cochranville, PA first came to a polo match at Brandywine in 1957; he liked what he saw and decided to try the sport of polo. He was already an experienced rider of hunters and jumpers and quickly became one of the clubs most active players and biggest supporters. Fred tackled polo just as he approached becoming a licensed pilot and “The Mushroom King.” He earned a commercial license with multi-engine and instrument ratings for light aircraft, and became president of the largest mushroom canning company in the U.S. – Oxford Royal Mushroom Canning Co. “You know, if you want something badly enough and you make up your mind, 9 chances out of 10 you will get it. In 1948 when I took over this company I never dreamed we’d be number 1 in the nation in the canned mushroom business.” Fred’s passionate participation in and enthusiastic contributions to the sport of polo have spanned four decades. He reached the rating of 2 goals and for more than 30 years he had served as USPA Eastern Circuit

Fred and his airplane.

By Ericka Fuchsloch

governor since 1972, continuing his stewardship of the game by serving on the USPA Nominating, Constitution and Executive Committees. “Other guys talked about their ratings and I made up my mind to get to be the best I could. I set a deadline and made it.” Fred played in the ’72 26-Goal Sunshine League and 16-Goal League, the 1977 U.S. Open Championship and won the ‘77 Monty Waterbury Cup and the Delegate’s Cup, ’80 Bronze Cup, ’90 National Copper Cup as well as five Eastern Circuit 12-Goal titles and the Gerald Balding Tournament. On February 16th, 2007, Fred was inducted into the Museum of Polo and Hall of Fame in Gulfstream, Florida. He was awarded the Iglehart Award, given to those individuals who have proven exceptional life time contributions to the sport of polo. Fred is well-known for his sportsmanship and encouragement, both here and abroad, through gestures such as mounting numerous international teams from overseas and lending horses to the players at Brandywine to keep polo going there after a tragic fire killed many ponies. In addition to raising a daughter and three sons who are accomplished players, Fred was always ready with a kind word of encouragement, a steady horse or a sympathetic ear after a win or a loss. Generations of players credit Fred for starting, mentoring and sustaining their interest in polo including Cindy Buchanan and Crosby Wood. Fred lives in Wellington, Florida with Linda Clark at the Palm Beach Polo and Country Club. He continues to maintain his “Mallet Hill” farm and polo field in Cochranville, Pa. Mallet Hill has seen many fabulous days of polo that won’t be forgotten. Fred’s youngest son, Dana is married to Justine and practices law in Tennessee. Son Gene is married to Mia with one child. They also live in Florida. Fred’s son Paul, father of twins Christina and Andrew, died in 2008 from heart failure. Christina is in college, foxhunts and shows horses. Andrew is at U.VA where he plays polo. Fred’s daughter Karen has two daughters, Kim and Jennifer and they live in Colorado.

Left to right: Dixon Stroud, Fred Fortugno, and son’s Gene & Paul Fortugno.

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Brandywine Polo Club


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Club Lifestyles

1.

2.

3.

4.

1. Carlos Martinez-Baez 2. Melissa Harrington 3. Seth Howe and Betsy. 4. Mikaela Gioconda

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Brandywine Polo Club


DENIS F. O’FLYNN O’BRIEN

5.

➤ 6. 7. 8.

5. Tommy Ezcurra and Denis F. O’Flynn O’Brien 6. Melissa Harrington 7. Jake Brown and Brandon Kircher; 8. Kathy Fowser Whitman

www.brandywinepolo.com

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Tailgaters

Photos by Ericka Fuchsloch

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Brandywine Polo Club


Past Remembered ~ the Art of Tailgating By Sarah Doheny

TIM MALLOY

I

SARAH DEHONY

Sarah Doheny at her table.

TIM MALLOY

t’s that time again, as we gear up for the upcoming season. Time to get myself psyched up as I think ahead to all the Sundays that I need to plan for. Being an event coordinator has its advantages. To study the Art of Tailgating, my research revealed that in India there were the equivalent of tailgates at polo matches thousands of years ago; who knew? This also brings to mind English country house weekend luncheons, field side for fortification of the participants in the grueling event; fine china, crystal and linens carefully packed into fabulous leather cases with elegant tailored fittings secured for travel; huge hampers stuffed to the brim with meats, cheeses and fruits in gorgeous containers with wonderful drinks and spirit burners at the ready to heat up the savories. In the hands of a capable household staff, it went off like military maneuvers performed by a small army. Not to worry, it is not so daunting a task and really can be quite simple. Like, an elegant basket for two with your favorite prepared foods paired with a simple bottle of your favorite beverage. It is seriously all about the fun of breaking bread between friends and family. One hint: don’t take it too seriously. It is not brain surgery, it’s creating an atmosphere for the day, a celebration of sorts whether it is for 2 or 200 of your closest friends. Friends do seem to multiply when a good party is rumored on the grounds …. I enjoy planning parties, it’s how I was raised; my mother was the grand dame of parties. I begin preparations the day before, organizing the food, the cooking and then plating. One eats with his eyes first, so be creative. I use vintage glassware found in my travels. Mix and match your plates, don’t be shy! Look through the house and see what can hold beverages. My favorite to hold wine bottles is a charming chamber pot – it starts a conversation with new friends and also evokes memories of seeing them at your grandmother’s house. I trust you do know what a chamber pot is? We use martini glasses for fried hot peppers and shot glasses for sauces. It’s fun to stack glasses for visual impact. Cheeses are arranged on slate boards that we have found and bleached. I write out the cheese names in chalk. A simple 99¢ baguette, flowers are placed in anything I can find, from salad dressing jars to old stemware to logs hollowed out. You can see how easy it is to create a day full of fun and memories on the cheap! So let us get tailgating!

Polo en Blanc Day.

www.brandywinepolo.com

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Recipes

Tailgate Recipes

Crab Dip

Mini Bacon, Tomato, & Basil Sandwiches

Checkerboard Cheese Sandwiches

Frozen Lemonade Slushy

Yield: 6 cups

Yield: 12 appetizer servings

Yield: 80 mini sandwiches

Yield: Serves 8

Ingredients

Ingredients

Ingredients

Ingredients

2 (8 oz.) packages cream cheese, softened. 1 (4.5 oz.) can chopped green chilies, drained. 1 cup seeded and chopped tomato. 1 small clove garlic, minced. 1/4 to 1/2 cup whipping cream. 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice. 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce. 1 teaspoon hot sauce. 1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper. 1/4 teaspoon salt. 1/4 teaspoon pepper. 1 lb. fresh jumbo lump crabmeat, drained. Garnish: chopped fresh parsley.

9 slices ready-to-serve bacon, halved. 1/2 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. 1/3 cup mayonnaise. 1 garlic clove, minced. 9 slices extra-thin white bread slices. 3 plum tomatoes, sliced. 12 fresh basil leaves.

1 (10 oz.) block extra-sharp cheddar cheese, grated. 1 (10 oz.) block Swiss cheese, grated. 1 1/4 cups light or regular mayonnaise. 1 (4 oz.) jar diced pimiento, drained. 1 teaspoon dried onion flakes. 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper. 20 thin white bread slices. 20 thin wheat bread slices. Garnishes: grape tomatoes & black. olives, secured with wooden picks.

1 large lemon 1 2/3 cup superfine sugar 3 cups cold water 1 1/4 cups lemon juice

Preparation Combine first 11 ingredients in a large nonstick skillet; place over low heat, and cook, stirring constantly, until mixture is smooth and bubbly. Gently fold in crabmeat. Spoon into serving bowl, and garnish, if desired. Serve with French bread slices toasted with Casino Butter.

Preparation 1. Heat bacon according to package directions until crisp. 2. Stir together cheese, mayonnaise, and garlic. Spread mayonnaise mixture evenly onto 1 side of each bread slice. Layer 3 bread slices, mayonnaise sides up, with 3 bacon slices each. Top bacon evenly with 1 bread slice, tomato slices, and basil. Top each with remaining bread slices, mayonnaise sides down. Cut each sandwich into quarters.

Preparation Stir together first 6 ingredients. Spread half of mixture evenly on half of white bread slices; top with remaining half of white bread slices. Spread remaining half of mixture evenly on half of wheat bread slices; top with remaining half of wheat bread slices. Remove crusts with a serrated knife; cut each sandwich into 4 squares. Arrange, stacked in pairs, on a serving plate in a checkerboard pattern, alternating white and wheat. Garnish, if desired.

Preparation Combine one thinly sliced lemon and 1-2/3 cups superfine sugar in a bowl; mash with a spoon. Add 3 cups cold water and 1-1/4 cups lemon juice; let stand for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Strain. Puree half of lemon juice mixture and 4 cups ice in a blender until smooth. Pour into 4 chilled glasses; repeat.

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Brandywine Polo Club


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Philly Style Cup 26

Brandywine Polo Club


Photos by Andre Flewellen Photography

www.brandywinepolo.com

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Friday Nights Under the Stars

1.

1. Concert goers enjoy some great tunes under the stars. 2. Opposite page: Bronze Radio Return performs.

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Brandywine Polo Club


2.

2013 Concert Schedule May 31 June 7 June 14 June 21 June 28 July 5 July 12 July 19 July 26 Aug. 2 Aug. 9 Aug. 16 Aug. 23 Aug. 30 Sept. 6 Sept. 13 Sept. 20

2uesday Nite Band The Griz Band The Pharmers 61 North Taproom Trio The Bullets Ryan Tennis Beaucoup Blue The Nines Funk Band The Dupont Brothers 2uesday Nite Band Spokey Speaky New Sweden Casey Alvarez Rain Date Rain Date Rain Date

Fridaynightsunderthestars.com

VENDORS INCLUDE: Galer Estate Vineyard & Winery, Twin Lakes Brewing Co., and Carolina Pit Stop BBQ.

Gates open at 5:00 and intra-club polo matches begin at 5:30pm.

TICKETS:

Music starts around 7:30pm (after polo matches conclude).

• Kids 16 and under enter FREE. • Adult single ticket $20 online. • Adult single ticket $25 at the gate. • Group pass $60 per car, online or at the gate. (must have 3+ people in the car) • Season pass $100 online or at the gate.

Both event-specific tickets and season passes cover access to the grounds, music, parking and polo matches. Food and beverages are not included in the ticket sale.

Visit our website for details and information.

www.brandywinepolo.com

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The Players

RICARDO BARROS

1. 2.

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5.

8.

6.

10.

9.

14.

15.

12.

16.

HEATHER PEZZOTTI

13.

11.

7.

1. Ricardo Barros 2. Cindy Mason Buchanan 3. Robin Carroll-Bostwick 4. Avery S. Chapman 5. Devin Cox 6. Jessica Dublin 7. Nicolle DuHamell 8. Lory Eighme 9. Tommy Ezcurra 10. Kathy Fowser-Whitman 11. Ericka Fuchsloch 12. Mikaela Gioconda 13. Melissa Harrington 14. Seth Howe 15. Juan Martinez-Baez 16. Kate McClung

2013 Club M 30

Brandywine Polo Club


18.

22.

19.

PHOTO COURTESY OF DENIS O’FLYNN O’BRIEN

17.

23.

24. 20.

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26.

28.

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17. Joel McKeever 18. Louis Micolucci 19. Denis O’Flynn O’Brien 20. Jessica Oehler 21. Alexander Place 22. Nicholas Place 23. Patricia Sertich 24. Bruce Sibson 25. Dixon Stroud 26. Brian Sweeney 27. Ellen Tracey 28. Brendan Walsh 29. Johanna Walters *Brian Griffin - no photo

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Members www.brandywinepolo.com

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2

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Brandywine Polo Club


2013 Season

Under the Stars

Brandywine Polo Schedule

All Friday matches start at 5:30 unless specified otherwise. All Sunday matches start at 3:00 unless specified otherwise. All dates and times are subject to change, please visit www.brandywinepolo.com or call 610-268-8692 for updates.

Date

Club Matches

Sponsor

May 27

Opening Day Match (Memorial Day)



June 2

Sunday Polo



June 9

Chester Co. Hospital Cup

Chester Co. Hospital

June 15

3-6 goal Circuit Arena Final



June 16

Sunday Polo



June 23

McHugh Tournament Final



June 30

Sunday Polo



July 7

Mixed Couples Tournament Final



July 14

Jockey’s Polo Cup

Chasin for Chalfin

July 21

Philadelphia Cup



July 28

Challenge Cup Tournament Final



Aug 4

Sunday Polo



Aug 10

6-9 goal Arena Delegates Cup Final



Aug 11

Sunday Polo



Aug 18

Sunday Polo



Aug 24

Polo Ponies Tournament Final Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

Wasmer Schroeder

Sept 1

Gerald Balding Tournament Final



Sept 8

Paoli Cup

Paoli Hospital

Sept 15

UK Combined Services Team



Sept 22

Sunday Polo



Sept 29

Closing Day / Richie Jones Memorial

The Jones Family

Date

Friday Night Polo

Date

Friday Night Polo

May 31

Friday Night Polo

Aug 2

Friday Night Polo

June 7

Friday Night Polo

Aug 9

6-9 goal Arena Delegates Cup Prelims

June 14

3-6 goal Circuit Arena Prelims

Aug 16

Friday Night Polo

June 21

Friday Night Polo

Aug 23

Friday Night Polo

June 28

Friday Night Polo

Aug 30

Friday Night Polo

July 5

Friday Night Polo

Sep 6

Friday Night Polo

July 12

Friday Night Polo

Sep 13

Friday Night Polo

July 19

Friday Night Polo

Sep 20

Friday Night Polo

July 26

Friday Night Polo

Sep 27

Friday Night Polo

www.brandywinepolo.com

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PHOTO BY DENIS F. O'FLYNN O'BRIEN

2.

Tournaments 1.

5.

9. 8.

2012 Win PHOTOS 1,3 THRU 10 BY ERICKA FUCHSLOCH

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Brandywine Polo Club


3.

7.

10.

nners

11.

ANDRE FLEWELLEN

6.

4.

1. VFMA cadet singing “The National Anthem.” 2. Richie Jones Memorial 3. USA vs. Argentina - left to right: Brendan Walsh, Jake Brown, Juan Martinez-Baez and Mauricio Diaz. 4. Brandywine Polo wins the Fred Peterson 8 Goal: Juan Martinez-Baez, Omar Sosa, Justin Flood, Kathy Fowser Whitman. 5. Paoli Hospital Benefit - front row left to back row: Mary Salinas, Juan Martinez-Baez, Omar Sosa, Betty Moran, Peggy Mason, Cindy Buchanan, Kathy Fowser Whitman, Carol Rabe Palmer, Lynn Fry. 6. Chasin for Calfin - left to right: Nicholas Place, Thomas Escurra, Kathy Fowser Whitman, Omar Sosa. 7. Polo Ponies Memorial - left to right: Livin’ the Vision: Jesus Onterveros, Dennis O’flynn O’Brian, Thomas Escurra, Scott Brown, Kate McClung; Maryland polo: Tommy Huber, Sara Orthwein, Pj Ortwein, Tom Huber. 8. Women’s Tournament: Devin Cox and Ericka Fuchsloch. 9. Team Maryland with tournament sponsors Dress for Success. 10. Gerald Balding Tournament - left to right: Livin’ the Vision: Scott Brown, Brandon Kirchner, Jake Brown and Jesus Ontiveros. 11. Philly Style Cup.

www.brandywinepolo.com

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The View from the Man in the Striped Shirt Game Rules

By Lt. Col Steven L. Walsh USMC (ret)

E

ver wonder about the two riders on the field with the striped shirts who try to bring some order and control to what some would consider organized mayhem on horseback? The men and women who serve as the umpires of the game are a key and integral part of polo, vital to safe, organized and fair play. Like any organized sport, the rules of polo have evolved over time; in the case of polo that time would be about 2500 years. Polo was first played with 8-12 players per side when it was first adopted by in the 1850s by British cavalry officers serving in what today is northern India as a means to hone their riding and decision making ability. The rules were subject to liberal interpretation and there was no requirement to have an mounted umpire, but rather an two “officials” each nominated by the playing teams who would often stand on the sidelines. When the British added yet even more rules to the game, it became apparent that the umpires would need to be mounted to cover the entire playing field (300/160 yards). Today, the rules of polo call for two mounted umpires on the field and a “third man” or referee on the sidelines located in a position where he/she can observe the play and act as deciding authority on any disputes between the two umpires on the field as it comes to infractions. However, the rules do allow for the “third man” to be mounted as well. Most often given the requirement for additional horses, this practice is seldom observed. The primary purpose of the umpires is to ensure the safety of the horses, players and spectators. To that the

umpires and referee are, as it is stated in the polo guide, “the absolute game authority from the time is scheduled to play until it is concluded. The umpires and referee conduct the game, apply the rules of play and refer to the committee questions which cannot be resolved on the field.” This is accomplished by combination of three fundamental elements all officials must have to be successful on the field: • Knowledge of the rules: Obtained by extensive study, attendance at umpires clinics sponsored by the USPA and a yearly exam all certified umpires are required to pass with a minimum score of 95%. • Knowledge of approved procedures: In addition to a rock solid knowledge of the rules, a polo umpire must follow certain strict procedures to properly officiate a polo game. These include positioning on penalty hits, emergency procedures, qualifications of substitutes, etc. • Field judgment: A polo umpire must be able to develop and apply subjective field judgment that is critical in being a successful umpire. While anyone can memorize the rules and procedures, the ability to think quickly, in the saddle and react in the correct manner is field judgment. In the end, the players, all of whom play with passion, want the outcome of the game to be decided by the better prepared and better playing team, not by the umpires. If you think you may have what it takes to be an USPA umpire visit the USPA at WWW.USPOLO.ORG and click on Polo 101 for information.

Fouls Black (shirt) may hit white (shirt) and force him across the line of the ball and then take possession.

36

Black may bump white at right angles in scrimmage or in fencing for the ball at slow pace and no foul would be called because there would be no real danger.

Two players riding at a ball in the open must both give way to the left and take the ball on the right side.

In a bump or ride-off, black would commit a foul if at the instant of contact black’s mount’s shoulders were ahead of those of the white man as in diagram.

Brandywine Polo Club


The Game

E

ach polo match consists of 4 to 6 chukkers (periods) that last seven and a half minutes with a warning bell at seven minutes and a final bell thirty seconds later (unless a team scores after the warning bell which stops the chukker immediately). The game is played on a field with goal posts on each end. The players try to hit the ball between the posts (no matter how high), to score one point. After each goal, the teams change sides. Two mounted umpires accompany the players, (four on each team in outdoor polo, three on each team in arena polo) and a “third man” sits near the middle of the field to referee in case of a disagreement between the mounted umpires. The whistle is blown to indicate a foul, and stops the clock. At the end of the chukker, the players change horses. The Players Each team consist of four players. #1) An offensive player #2) The offensive midfielder #3) The pivot, often the highest rated player #4) The defensive back Each player is expected to cover his or her man (or woman) who is the numerical opposite on the field. Note: In arena polo, each team consists of three players. Polo Ponies The horses traditionally called ponies, are well trained equine athletes. Able to stop and turn on a dime, they are considered faster than racehorses over short distances. Polo ponies are the most essential part of the game.

At slow pace, black could cross white and no foul would be called. At full speed, the 20 feet would not be a safe margin and the cross would mean a penalty against black.

www.brandywinepolo.com

Handicaps “A polo handicap is your passport to the world.” – Sir Winston Churchill In polo, a handicap is required and considered a good thing. Players are rated from minus two to ten. Ten is the best. Each team’s handicap is the sum of the players’ handicaps. In an Open tournament, teams play “on the flat” meaning that no scoring advantage is given to the weaker team. In a handicap tournament, points are given to the weaker team based on the difference of handicaps between two teams. For example, if a sixteen goal (handicap) team plays against a seventeen goal (handicap) team, then one point is awarded on the scoreboard for the sixteen goal team at the start of the match. Fouls (See below) To the layman, fouls in polo are very hard to see. Even professionals have a hard time, but one can usually tell a foul by listening to the players after the whistle blows. A foul is basically a dangerous play, mostly stemming from crossing in front of the man with the ball. When the ball is hit, it creates an invisible line and the players must follow it as if they are driving on a makebelieve road. Each time the ball changes direction, the road changes as well. Penalty shots are awarded depending on where the foul was committed, or upon the severity of the foul. Lines on the field indicate where midfield, sixty, forty and thirty yard penalties are taken from. If the ball is hit past the back line by a defending player, a sixty-yard shot facing the spot where the ball went across the line is awarded.

Even though the angle may be slight, black may not cross the line of the ball if the pace is fast.

It is not necessary for black to come parallel with white before bumping. Black may bump white at full gallop at an angle not to exceed 45 O. Beyond 45 O there would be grave danger of a fall.

Or he may, as shown, come in from an angle, parallel to the line of the ball, and play as indicated if he can do so without interfering with white’s mount. If he should cross the line to the dotted position, it would be a foul.

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Mother Natu

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Brandywine Polo Club

Polo School Barn Damage, April 2013


Photos provided by Martha Fuller Photography for these pages only. Any reproduction of these photographs is strictly prohibited without written permission from Martha Fuller Photography.

ure Not Fair www.brandywinepolo.com

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Game Facts

A Short History of Polo

P

olo is thought to have originated in China and Persia around 2,000 years ago. The name of the game may well come from the word “pholo” meaning ‘ball’ or ‘ballgame’ in the Balti language of Tibet. The first recorded game took place in 600BC between the Turkomans and Persians (the Turkomans won). In the fourth century AD, King Sapoor II of Persia learned to play, aged seven. In the 16th century, a polo ground (300 yards long and with goalposts eight yards apart) was built at Ispahan, then the capital, by Shah Abbas the Great. The Moguls were largely responsible for taking the game from Persia to the east and, by the 16th century, the Emperor Babur had established it in India. (It had already long been played in China and Japan, but had died out by the time the West came in contact with those countries). In the 1850s, British tea planters discovered the game in Manipur (Munipoor) on the Burmese border with India. They founded the world’s first polo club at Silchar, west of Manipur. Other clubs followed and today the oldest in the world is the Calcutta Club, founded in 1862. Malta followed in 1868 because soldiers and naval officers stopped off there on their way home from India. In 1869, Edward “Chicken” Hartopp, of the 10th Hussars, read an account of the game in The Field magazine while stationed at Aldershot and, with fellow officers, organised the first game. Then known as “hockey on horseback,” it was played on a

hastily-rolled Hounslow Heath where a shortlist of about 10 rules was also hastily assembled. But, it was John Watson (1856-1908), of the 13th Hussars, who formulated the first real rules of the game in India in the 1870s. He later formed the celebrated Freebooters team who won the first Westchester Cup match in 1886. He was a key player at the All Ireland Polo Club which was founded in 1872 by Horace Rochfort of Clogrenane, County Carlow. The first polo club in England was Monmouthshire, founded in 1872 by Captain Francis “Tip” Herbert (1845-1922), of the 7th Lancers, at his brother’s estate at Clytha Park, near Abergavenny. Others, including Hurlingham, followed quickly. Handicaps were introduced by the USA in 1888 and by England and India in 1910. The first official match in Argentina took place on 3rd September 1875. The game had been taken there by English and Irish engineers and ranchers. In 1876, Lt Col Thomas St.Quintin, of the 10th Hussars, introduced the game to Australia. He is credited with being the Father of Australian Polo. Two of his brothers stayed on there as ranchers and helped the game to develop. In the same year, polo was introduced to the USA by James Gordon Bennett Junior who had seen the game at Hurlingham during a visit to England. Today, more than 77 countries play polo. It was an Olympic sport from 1900 to 1939 and has now been recognized again by the International Olympic Committee.

“Let other people play at other things — the King of Games is still the Game of Kings” – Inscribed on a stone tablet beside a polo ground South of the fabled silk route from China to the West.

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The Attire

Polo Gear

The Polo Helmet

is required equipment most commonly made of reinforced, padded plastic with a cloth covering. They are modeled after the pith helmets the British wore in 19th Century India. Modern helmets are designed to fend of flying balls and to protect the head if the player should fall off.

The Team Jersey

sports the color of the team and the number of the player’s position (from 1 to 4).

The Mallet

is made of root manau cane. It can bend quite a bit giving it a fair amount of “whip” during a hard swing. The head is made of tipa, a very hard wood. Both sides of the head are used to strike the ball.

The Bit controls the horse. Polo Knee Pads

provide protection from flying balls and rough ride-offs.

players use many different kinds of bit. This one is called a “Gag.”

The Breast Plate fastens to the girth and keeps the saddle from slipping backwards.

The Martingale is the leather strap that runs from the noseband to the girth, and keeps the horse from raising its head too high.

The Ball

is made of hard plastic that dents a bit each time it is hit.

Leg Wraps provide support to tendons and ligaments as well as protection from flying balls and stray mallets.

Polo Plates are special lightweight horse shoes made of iron. Polo plates have an inner rim and an outer rim, with the inner rim slightly higher than the outer rim, making it easier for the hoof to pivot in all directions.

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PHOTO BY JIM GRAHAM JimGrahamPhotography.com

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F oxfire AT THE

STONE BARN

FARM-TO-TABLE CUISINE Thursday • Friday • Saturday Lunch & Dinner Sunday Brunch BYOB

610.347.2414

100 Stone Barn Drive Kennett Square, PA 19348

www.thestonebarn.com

Weddings | Banquets | Events www.brandywinepolo.com

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DENIS F. O'FLYNN O'BRIEN

Top photo: Ellen Tracey Livin’ the Vision. Bottom photo: Season’s end.


Brandywine Polo Club 2013 Program  

Brandywine Polo Club 2013 Program

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