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EUGENE ARE A CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

FOR

VOLUME 17, ISSUE 1 USA $6.25 CANADA $12.25

BUSINESS

SPARKING STUDENTS’ INTEREST

+DEVELOPING EUGENE’S WORKFORCE

STATE OF THE WORKFORCE EDITION

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION

RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION

ENGAGING THE NEXT GENERATION


CO NTE NT S

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STATE OF THE WORKFORCE

Chamber Board of Directors

17 ALLIANCES & REINVESTMENTS

Chris Boone, Chair President, Boone Insurance Associates

22 RECRUITMENT & RETENTION EUGENE, OR

Cover Photo / Steve Smith Photography

FEATURES State funding and partnerships bring career and technical education to the classroom to better prepare tomorrow’s workforce. Here’s how to tap into the school-to-work pipeline.

Equal Housing Lender

OPPORTUNITY RISES IN THE WEST

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COVER STORY / North Eugene High School student Kai Camidge (right) in Metalworking II class, taught by Tyler Tjernlund (left). The class provides skill-based instruction that students can take to the workforce.

Perks pique interest, culture preserves talent. How to lure (and retain) qualified workers.

26 COMMUNITY

SUCCESSION PLANNING Engaging the next generation of aspiring business and community leaders.

28 MENTORSHIPS MATTER How to find and get what you need from mentors.

30 DIVERSITY & INCLUSION Six simple ways to take a more active approach.

Stephanie Seubert, Chair-Elect Partner, Evans, Elder, Brown & Seubert, Inc. Mandy Jones, Past-Chair CEO, Oregon Community Credit Union Nigel Francisco, Treasurer CFO, Ninkasi Brewing Company Scott Lindstrom, Vice-Chair, Organizational Development, Exec. Vice President, Jerry’s Home Improvement Center Cale Bruckner, Vice-Chair, Economic Development President, Concentric Sky

OUR COMMUNITY

YOUR CHAMBER

8 MEMBER VOICE

5 POLICY INSIGHT

LCC serves as a springboard for workforce training via conversations and collaborations.

Learn how to lend your voice with Advocacy 101.

Amanda Walkup Partner, Hershner Hunter, LLP

6 CHAMBER VISIONARIES

Casey Barrett General Manager, 5th Street Public Market

Chris Boone on opportunities, possibilities and stepping up to lead the way.

Cheryl Boyum CEO, Cascade Health Solutions

34 HERE & THERE

Chad Barczak CEO, IDX Broker

A look at the happenings that make doing business with the Chamber incredible.

Dr. Gustavo Balderas Superintendent, Eugene School District 4J

36 BIZZ BUZZ

Greg Lyons CFO, Western Shelter Systems

Promotions, new hires and news you can use.

Jason Lafferty General Manager, SnoTemp Cold Storage

10 QUERY & QUOTES Robert Jagger of Hyatt Place and Kim Korth Williams of McKay Investment Company talk trends and reflect on Oakway as a retail and hospitality hub. And, Nicole Kreck, owner of Hippie Hemp, ponders hemp’s potential while nurturing a new business.

12 SECTOR STRATEGIES

Thomas Pettus-Czar, Vice-Chair, Business Advocacy Owner, The Barn Light

What’s happening in Tech, Food & Beverage and Manufacturing.

42 A QUICK NOTE

32 MOVERS & SHAKERS

It has been a year of change for the Chamber. Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce CEO Brittany Quick Warner discusses why the time to evolve is now.

Celebrating Leadership at OCCU: Mandy Jones hands over the reins to Ron Neumann.

Ralph Parshall General Manager, Mercedes Benz of Eugene Trace P. Skopil CPA Partner, Moss Adams

E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |  O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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POLIC Y I NSIG HT

OPEN FOR BUSINESS

KNOW YOUR POLICY MAKERS

Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce

Comprehensive Printing Solutions Traditional Offset

Digital

Wide Format

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Binding Fulfillment Direct Mail Web-to-Print So Much More!

to know who your policy makers are at every level of government.

Chamber Staff Brittany Quick-Warner, CEO

yourself and start a dialogue early, so that when you have something

Ashley Barrington Administrative Support Barb Brunton Business Manager Beth Tassan Administrative Support Brandy Rodtsbrooks Director of Communications and Member Engagement

Sarah Delp Economic Development Specialist Tiffany Edwards Director of Business Advocacy Advertising Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce 541.484.1314

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 2018 BOLD STEPS AWARD WINNER

Design/Layout Turell Group 541.685.5000 turellgroup.com Printing QSL Print Communications 541.435.2747 Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce 1401 Willamette St. Eugene, OR 97401 541.484.1314 Open for Business A publication of the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce (USPS-978-480).

Bold Steps Winners are leaders in sustainability. Learn more or apply at: eugene-or.gov/boldsteps

Does your business have what it takes?

Open for Business is published quarterly by the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce in March, June, September and December. Circulation: 3,800. Open for Business © 2018

George Rode of George Rode Repair Shops with Mayor Lucy Vinis

But don’t wait until you need something to contact them, introduce to say, you won’t just be another anonymous voice. One great way to engage and educate yourself about your government officials is

Amanda Yankovich Events Manager

Joshua Mongé Director of Economic Development

phone [541] 687–1184 toll free [800] 382–1184 web qslprinting.com

Knowing whom to direct your advocacy efforts is critical. It’s important

Publisher Brittany Quick-Warner, CEO

The subscription price is $25, included in membership. Periodicals Postage Paid at Eugene, OR. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 1107, Eugene, OR 97440-1107.

through social media.

POLICY INSIGHT ADVOCACY 101 By Tiffany Edwards, Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce

SHOWING UP IS THE FIRST STEP TO GETTING THINGS DONE There’s an old saying that “the people who show up, get to make all the decisions” and in my experience, I find there’s a lot of truth to that. So often, the thought of getting involved and taking action can seem daunting. The truth is, those who engage are always better positioned as leaders, working to influence decisions and shape the policies that

While city, county, state and federal delegates all provide information easily found online, don’t forget all of the other elected officials and elected board members in your community. Do your best to include them on press releases, tours and events that your company may be hosting to help familiarize your elected officials with your business environment.

COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY When deciding the best approach to engage with decision makers in your community, be respectful of their time, as well as the attention they give to you and to your issue. While it’s their role as an elected official to represent the interests of their constituents, there are usually at least two sides to every issue. So, assume they are hearing multiple perspectives.

impact us all.

Present your viewpoint in a constructive manner by offering an idea,

There are a few simple steps that can help you identify the issues, learn

a conversation, rather than just expect compliance with how you’d

who to contact, and understand what to say to have your perspectives become part of solutions.

rather than just presenting a problem, and be willing to engage in like to see them vote. By communicating in a way that helps them to understand your stance, you’ll likely have a greater impact.

LEARN THE ISSUES

Most importantly, whether you’re communicating with a phone call,

The first step to becoming more civically engaged is to be aware of

email or other form of correspondence, make it personal. Form letters

what’s happening in your community. There are some great resources

can serve a purpose, but to truly be part of the conversation, you must

and tools to make it easier to stay on top of current affairs.

speak from personal experience and with passion.

• The Eugene Chamber’s weekly enews often includes updates on

Our community’s elected leaders take their jobs seriously, and

local policy issues affecting the business community. Email

without participation and advocacy from the community members

brandyr@eugenechamber.com to subscribe.

they represent, the system doesn’t work. Being civically engaged

• Local newspapers and media outlets: Access information when it’s most convenient. • Associations for your industry or neighborhood: Be sure to subscribe to their communications. • School boards and other smaller governing bodies hold regular meetings and communicate to stakeholders. • Meetings of your city council and county commission can always be found online through your city’s and county’s websites, along with agendas with topics and action items that are being considered. • Public meetings are usually live-streamed and archived and can be watched at virtually any time during or after the broadcast. • The Oregon State Legislature has a robust website with extensive

and “showing up” will provide you with opportunities to be more connected, empowered and influential within your community.

Passionate about policy? Connect with the Chamber enews to be informed of the issues that affect local business. Email Brandy Rodtsbrooks at brandyr@eugenechamber.com to subscribe. Be a voice for your industry when city councilors discuss topics that affect businesses. Email Tiffany Edwards at tiffanye@eugenechamber.com to be added to our advocacy list.

information on how to find, track, follow or weigh-in on any bill being considered by the legislature. E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |  O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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C H A M B E R V ISIO N A RI ES

YOUR BUSINESS. YOUR CHAMBER. YOUR COMMUNITY. CHAMBER VISIONARIES LEAD THE WAY With shifts in the workforce, new technologies, and an increase in innovative, cross-sector partnerships, the landscape of local business is changing. As the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce prepares to take the next step in this evolution, Chamber Visionaries will ponder what is possible in our community. Each quarter, we’ll share what’s on the minds of our thought-leaders.

The Oregon Community Foundation can help your tax-deductible gift pave the way toward a bolder, brighter outlook for Oregon’s future.

By Chamber Visionary Chris Boone Owner of Boone Insurance Associates and 2018 Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce Board Chair When I look forward to the future of our community, I see so many possibilities to positively impact our economy. Right now, the community in and around Eugene is on the cusp of measurable growth. How we choose to handle both the opportunities and challenges that this growth presents will determine our future and the future of those to follow. This is why, when the Chamber asked me to step up to help lead a new vision for the business community, I was excited to participate. Strong Chamber leadership that brings local business professionals together to discuss how we do business in Eugene will position us for the best possible future. I first became involved with the Chamber through the Young Professionals Network. It was an exciting way to engage as I was building my business, growing my family, and taking my place as an active leader in our community. During my time with the Chamber, I’ve seen so many opportunities to help grow this community. Increasing living-wage jobs, bringing new industries into the community, and advocating for policies that are business-friendly have inspired me to continue to engage at a high level by serving on the board of directors. What I see now is a community that is really trying to innovate. The partnerships and collaborations that are forming now are at the heart of some great changes to our local Thank you to the 2018 Chamber Visionaries: Anne Marie Levis, Funk/Levis & Associates Casey Barrett, Obie Companies Celeste Edman, Lunar Logic Chris Boone, Boone Insurance Associates

economy and workforce. By deepening our level of engagement with the work of the Chamber and its partners, it’s possible to create a great future for our community. Achievable innovations to benefit our community appear endless, when we look at projects like the 20x21EUG Mural Project, the new riverfront developments, and numerous businesses startups that are thriving.

Craig Wanichek, Summit Bank

My hope is that enough of us will step forward to lead and give voice to the challenges and

Ron Neumann, Oregon Community Credit Union

solutions that will position our community for success.

Join us in creating the best-possible future for our community. Spread the word using #ChamberEvolved

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oregoncf.org


M E M B E R VOIC E

LCC SERVES AS A SPRINGBOARD FOR WORKFORCE TRAINING By Dr. Margaret Hamilton | President, Lane Community College Since becoming the seventh president of Lane Community College, I have been energized to learn about the growing variety of businesses and industries in the Eugene area. I want to support their efforts through a renewed focus on workforce training. Helping train new and existing employees in the workforce is a personal passion. I came to Eugene after 30 years at New Jersey community colleges, where I built strong relationships with businesses and industries. Through collaborations with local health systems, I was able to develop online health information technology training that increased the supply of qualified coders and technicians for regional healthcare providers. I also fostered relationships in the technology sector that provide training in advanced manufacturing, robotics and information technology. Fitting training to employer needs is a unique talent of community colleges everywhere. We are able to focus locally and move quickly to train tomorrow’s workforce. Lane first offered customized training in the early 1990s for companies like Symantec and Sony. Over the years, the college developed basic workplace skills programs for Newood Display Fixture Manufacturing, PW Pipe and others. When the economy tanked, Lane pulled out all the stops to accommodate a huge enrollment surge. Our employer training program gradually transitioned from individually tailored programs to standardized industry training. These programs continue to be high-quality options, but today’s businesses also need personalized training to improve employee productivity. The Customized Training Department at Lane’s Small Business Development Center is the launch pad for workplace training. To boost our services, we are adding staff, such

Dr. Margaret Hamilton became president of Lane Community College in July 2017. She is a widely respected executive in community college education, strategic planning, accreditation, curriculum development, human relations, workforce and economic development, and in building partnerships with post-secondary education, higher education, and business and industry. To connect: 541-463-5200 or hamiltonm@lanecc.edu

as Michael Fuller, our new SBDC deputy director, who comes to us with 19 years of experience at Intel Corporation, as well as a new director for business relations. Meanwhile,

The power of one. The power of many. Hershner Hunter is a comprehensive business law

we’re excited by requests from regional medical centers, diesel manufacturers, food and

Is your business looking for

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firm with specialty areas to match your unique

As I meet more local leaders, I am excited by the opportunities in this area. Lane is ready

job training? Connect with the

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to help employers save on expenses by providing access to more locally available training,

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QU E RY & QUOTES

QU E RY & QUOTES

FARM TO HUB

OAKWAY CENTER’S FAMILY ROOTS RUN DEEP AS BUSINESSES BLOSSOM AMID HOSPITALITY AND RETAIL QUOTED: Robert Jagger, Hyatt Place and Kim Korth Williams, McKay Investment Company PHOTOGRAPHY: Steve Smith Photography

HOW DID YOUR COMPANY GET STARTED AND HOW DID IT LAND IN EUGENE?

IF YOU WERE GOING TO GIVE PUBLIC TOURS OF THIS COMPANY,

Our company, McKay Investment Company, owns the Oakway Center, which is also home to the new Hyatt Place hotel. McKay Investment Company began in the early 1960s. The property that now houses a bustling retail and business district was once our family farm. McKay Investment Company is still locally owned and managed by the founding family.

There are so many different things to experience here at Oakway

WHAT ARE TRENDS SHAPING YOUR INDUSTRY/BUSINESS? The new Hyatt Place hotel has been designed to respond to trends in the hospitality industry which is moving quickly towards personalization of guest services. Technology is shaping the guest experience at most major brands. Utilizing smartphones for check-in and room keys are transforming the way guests connect with our hotel. With options like a television automatically tuned to a favorite TV channel or an in-room alarm clock automatically set to a guest’s wake-up time, the guest experience is being transformed. New technology is really shaping our industry and pushing personalization of guest services to the forefront.

WHAT STOPS WOULD THE GUIDE MAKE? Center. The new Hyatt Place hotel is beautiful. The Sky Bar at the Hyatt Place has quickly become the main attraction, especially around sunset, as it faces west. With our many amazing restaurants onsite, a gastronomic tour is one to experience. My favorites are Sabai Café and Novo Latin Kitchen, but there are many other options spanning culinary traditions from around the globe. A lovely assortment of local boutiques and national stores round out the shopping experience, along with many helpful businesses, whether you’re in need of a bank, chiropractor, salon service, physical therapy, groceries, or help buying your first home. You’ll find a little bit of everything at the Oakway Center. WHAT CHAMBER EXPERIENCE HAS IMPACTED YOU OR YOUR BUSINESS THE MOST THIS YEAR? Recently, we completed a nearly three-year construction project on the west side of our property that houses approx. 22,000 square feet of retail and restaurants, a four-story parking garage and a

WHY IS EUGENE A GREAT PLACE TO DO BUSINESS?

Hyatt Place hotel. When we had our grand opening in August, the

Eugene is in the heart of Lane County, an area ranked by national tourist, lifestyle and business media as one of the most livable areas in the US. We’re fortunate to have both the University of Oregon and Lane Community College. Our city is known for its diverse cultural offerings, temperate climate and a wealth of activities and natural beauty that are attractive to visitors.

Chamber supported our efforts, were onsite, and were excited to introduce the new businesses, hotel and parking garage to the community. The Chamber helped with the various ribbon cuttings and helped to create a celebratory atmosphere. The sense of community during this season was enhanced by the Chamber’s involvement. We are grateful for their help and support. LEFT: The new 130-room Hyatt Place hotel at Oakway Center, surrounded by 28 shops and 11 eateries. RIGHT: Grab a seat and gather around the fire pit to watch the sunset at the 5th-floor Sky Bar.

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HIPPIE HEMP PONDERING THE PLANT’S POTENTIAL AND NURTURING A NEW BUSINESS QUOTED: Nicole Kreck, Owner of Hippie Hemp HOW DID YOUR COMPANY GET STARTED AND HOW DID YOU GET INTO THIS BUSINESS? Before we started Hippie Hemp, my husband and I wanted to get into the up-and-coming medical marijuana industry in Florida (where we lived at the time). In the midst of his networking, we met a hemp consultant from Colorado who introduced us to fullspectrum hemp extract and educated us on all the health benefits of hemp and many uses of the plant. After hearing numerous success stories and doing our own research, we decided to become distributors for his hemp extract brand. With that, Hippie Hemp was born as a retail and distribution company of hemp extract products. We began hearing success stories from our own family members and customers, but we wanted to do something more with hemp. That’s when we came up with the idea to open a brick and mortar store and to expand our product line to all hemp products. We knew Florida would not be a good fit for a hemp store, because of their state laws pertaining to growing hemp. We started doing our research on state hemp laws and decided Oregon would be the best fit. Once we came to visit and check out Eugene, we instantly fell in love with the city and all it has to offer. WHAT IS IT ABOUT YOUR ORGANIZATION THAT MAKES YOU PARTICULARLY PROUD? We are a family and veteran-owned business. My husband and coowner is serving his last year as an Army Special Forces engineer. Being a military family, we understand the hardships and sacrifices service men and women have to endure on behalf of our country. We offer a military/veteran discount, and we hope to be able to offer more support to military and veteran organizations in the future.

WHAT ARE TRENDS SHAPING YOUR INDUSTRY/BUSINESS? Right now, the biggest trend is growing hemp for hemp extract to use as a nutritional supplement. I’m hoping that with the legalization to grow hemp in Oregon more manufacturing will become available to utilize the plant in other industries, as well. There are thousands of uses of hemp that many industries (and the environment) can benefit from. Construction, textiles, paper products, plastic products, automotive and fuel are just some of the ways hemp can be used. Many states are realizing the endless possibilities that hemp has to offer, and they are legalizing growing hemp, or they are creating pilot programs. In the future, we know there will be more manufacturing options available within the United States for hemp farmers. WHAT CHAMBER EXPERIENCE HAS IMPACTED YOU OR YOUR BUSINESS THE MOST THIS YEAR? Everyone within the Chamber has been very helpful and wants to see our business succeed and thrive. Just becoming a member of the Chamber has been crucial to our business, because of all the networking opportunities. Starting a business is hard and takes a lot of hard work, but it’s even harder when you do it in a brand new city where you don’t know anyone. Networking has become key to getting our name out there and making connections in other industries. Hippie Hemp offers an array of products—from apparel, bags and accessories to hemp extract, salves and lotions—located at 187 E. Broadway and at hippiehempllc.com.

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SEC TO R ST R AT EG I E S

SEC TO R ST R AT EG I E S

Vibrant sector strategies, committed partnership, and inspired community leadership are helping to drive the growth of targeted industries and our regional economy. The Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce is proud to be a part of the Lane County Sector Strategies team. Each quarter, we’ll learn from the partners moving this work forward.

WHAT’S HOT IN EUGENE’S TECH SCENE? Article by MATT SAYRE, TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATION OF OREGON

Everything! We’re excited for this first, in a series, article in Open for Business magazine, to bring you the latest happenings from Eugene’s growing tech community, as 2018 kicked off with some significant announcements. Local software company, Quote Software Inc., sold for an undisclosed price to ConstructConnect, a provider of construction information and technology. ConstructConnect is a subsidiary of Roper Technologies Inc., a publicly traded company with a market cap of more than $27 billion. Then, just a day later, Eugene-based IDX, a leading provider of real estate search applications, announced the acquisition of California-based Agent Marketing LLC for $6 million. “IDX Broker will keep Agent Marketing’s California office but will fill new positions in Eugene as the subsidiary grows,” said Chad Barczak, IDX CEO. In complement to mergers and acquisition news, Eugene-based SheerID announced an $18 million series B round—$18 million is a significant amount of funding in any market in Oregon, across any type of industry. It validates the Eugene area as a home for growing tech companies, and it bolsters the area’s credibility as a place where tech companies can raise venture capital, even though it’s outside Silicon Valley. New companies are being recruited to the area by the Technology Association of Oregon, the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce and other partners in economic development. Tech companies are attracted to the area by world-class internet infrastructure called EUGNet, a collaborative startup ecosystem and outdoor amenities. There are more than 400 tech firms now in Lane County. The industry’s local average annual wage is $71,620—nearly double the average Lane County wage of $41,534. Employment growth is expected to be 28 percent over the next 10 years. This makes tech the highest paying and fastest growing industry in Eugene. Downtown Eugene Tech Tours is the largest open house of tech companies in Oregon. Keep an eye out for the 2018 event this fall by visiting techoregon.org. Photos: Athena Delene

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SEC TO R ST R AT EG I E S

SEC TO R ST R AT EG I E S

Todd Edman of Waitrainer and Whit Hemphill of Wildtime Foods talk business at the first Food and Beverage Networking Night, held at Oakshire Brewing last fall.

Students gather insights on careers with the timber industry at Murphy Plywood. As a part of the 2017 Manufacturing Day, regional collaborators came together to support the school-to-work pipeline by connecting 150 students with tours of local industry partners.

FOOD AND BEVERAGE SECTOR: LANE COUNTY IS HUNGRY FOR COLLABORATION Article by MICAH ELCONIN, SEASON TO TASTE CONSULTING || Photo by ROBERT SCHERLE

In July 2017, I was selected by the Lane Sector Strategies Team to solidify Lane County’s place as a food and manufacturing hub. Our first task was to convene a 23-member industry advisory board to inform work that supports 157 companies, employs 3,865 people and brings over $169 million dollars in wages to the area. Collaboration is happening at an unprecedented level and energy is high throughout the community. Quarterly industry happy hours are ablaze with conversation among rooms packed full of industry members. The sector is rallying support around our new sector strategy work, as we broker connections and develop creative strategies for collaboration.

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Local colleges are gearing up to inspire the next generation of food and beverage professionals. In February, Lundquist College of Business hosted a food and beverage career day, featuring over 30 regional firms. Lundquist is also offering a food business course in the spring and a food business student club is in the works. Leveraging its expertise in culinary arts and manufacturing education, Lane Community College is collaborating with local industry to develop industry specific advanced manufacturing courses. Businesses have gained access to programs to bolster their navigation of increasingly complex health and safety regulations. A cohort of local firms are working together under the guidance

of Oregon Manufacturing Extension Partnership to build out food safety protocols required under the new Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), and Northwest Food Processors Association is bringing a 2.5 day course to Eugene in April focused entirely on similar subject matter. A FSMA Roundtable support group also launched in March. My next step will be building an industry association to further unify and promote local businesses, as I plan to earn more national attention for local firms as we dive into larger projects.

MANUFACTURING SECTOR: JUMPING IN WITH BOTH FEET TO FILL JOBS Article by JOSHUA MONGÉ, EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Manufacturing businesses form a cornerstone of our local economy, employing 13,864 people in our region— and that number is growing. In recent years, the local manufacturing industry has expanded operations and seen a growth in jobs and increased wages, despite the challenge of low unemployment rates making it difficult to fill open positions. For those in apprenticeships and trade schools, the tight labor market means improved chances for employment and higher earnings than those without training and certification. In an effort to “move upstream” to solve workforce development issues facing local businesses, we have again convened partners to plan and execute a

second Manufacturing Day celebration. Representatives from the cities of Eugene and Springfield, both Chambers, Lane County, and community partners are coming together to facilitate industry tours that will inspire our future workforce. On Oct. 5, 2018 hundreds of students will tour manufacturing businesses and see firsthand the high-quality job opportunities available. As part of the Eugene Chamber’s “Focus on: Manufacturing” program we are continuing to provide support to Lane Education Service District, Lane Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM), Lane CTE, and Connected Lane County. This year, we have helped with several opportunities to connect industry and students and look

forward to future projects, such as career fairs, externships, internships, job shadows and industry tours. In 2018, the Eugene Chamber is relaunching our formal business retention and expansion program. Through this work, the chamber will proactively engage businesses to identify needs and challenges that may be impeding employment and business growth. The goal of the program is to provide connections, information and real solutions to the problems facing businesses every day. Our team is excited to hit the pavement to learn from business leaders and hear the needs of industry. If you would like to participate, please contact Joshua at joshuam@eugenechamber.com

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WORK FORC E

WORK FORC E

ALLIANCES & RE INVESTMENTS How businesses and schools are sparking students’ interest and developing Eugene’s workforce Article by SOPHIA MCDONALD BENNETT  |  Photography by STEVE SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY

If you spend any time talking to Eugene businesses about the challenges they face, it doesn’t take long for workforce issues to come up. It’s hard to find people. It’s even more difficult to find qualified people. When you do find someone, competition is high enough that it may not be long before they find a better-paying job elsewhere. The struggle to find good employees is exacerbated by Lane County’s low unemployment rate—it was 4.6% in October 2017, but there are longer-term trends at play, too. Young people often have a limited view of the jobs that are available to them. Even those who are interested in jobs in manufacturing and the traded sectors don’t have ready access to training or career pathways. The perception held by many graduates is that jobs can only be found in major urban areas, larger than Eugene. A number of institutions, including the workforce board and local schools, are working with business leaders to reverse these troubling trends—positive signs for Eugene employers desperate for more and better-qualified employees.

PARTNERSHIPS RULE When the employment picture looks grim for companies, “we have to get more creative about how we bring talent in and train talent up,” says Kristina Payne, executive director of Lane Workforce Partnership. Her organization and many others are looking to do just that. Last year, Lane Workforce Partnership, the Technology Association of Oregon (TAO) and the Oregon Employment Department joined forces to launch Apprenti, one of the first tech apprenticeship programs in the United States. The program will help people gain skills in needed technology fields without the expense of a college degree. They hope to have 45 participants during the three-year pilot phase of the program. Payne and her colleagues are highly involved in making sure local graduates have the skills companies need when they finish school. “We’re continuing to engage with Lane Community College and the deans and programs at the University of Oregon, so we can articulate what the needs of the industry are,” she says. “A program at a college is not going to change based on the needs of one business, but we as the workforce board can convene people from across an industry to look at changing needs.” >

North Eugene High School student Kai Camidge (right) has his work inspected by teacher Tyler Tjernlund during metalworking class, in which students are taught advanced processes used in the industry. The curriculum covers advanced machining and machine set-ups, welding and fabrication—skills students can take to the workforce.

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WORK FORC E

With the passing of Measure 98 in

“These grants will help more students prepare for college and career. I’m very pleased to see the ongoing expansion

2016, Eugene School

of hands-on, applied learning to

District 4J will

more schools around the state. These

receive $2.5 million

programs are good for students,

for career and technical education (CTE). Funds will be invested in:

HIRING TEACHERS

WORK FORC E

good for businesses, and good for local communities.” - Acting Deputy Superintendent Colt Gill Oregon Department of Education

More programs are popping up to keep those qualified workers in Eugene. “We have talent in town, but people don’t necessarily stay here because they don’t know about the opportunities,” says Payne. “One of the things people can do is make sure young people know about the opportunities available in their companies.”

LEFT: Kristina Payne, executive director of Lane Workforce Partnership, works closely with Lane Community College, University of Oregon, Technology Association of Oregon (TAO) and Oregon Employment Department to create career paths for students through innovative programs, like Apprenti, one of the first tech apprenticeship programs in the United States. RIGHT: Dr. Gustavo Balderas, superintendent of Eugene School District 4J, says the state’s investment in career and technical education (CTE) and local partnerships are helping to prepare the next generation for careers early on.

Partners, like the Eugene Chamber, TAO, and Lane Workforce Partnership, have worked with Elevate Lane County to take high school students on tours of businesses. They have a similar program to connect University of Oregon students with Eugene-based technology firms. Manufacturing Day and Construction and Utilities Career Day are other examples of programs that inform young people about the jobs available locally.

CTE REINVESTMENT A GAME CHANGER

PROVIDING TEACHERS WITH BETTER TRAINING

Another reason to feel optimistic about the long-term growth in Eugene’s workforce is the renewed interest and investment in career and technical education (CTE). Measure 98, which passed in 2016, dedicates a significant sum to help school districts better prepare high school students for well-paying, meaningful careers. Eugene School District 4J is set to receive $2.5 million for CTE education. According to Superintendent Dr. Gustavo Balderas, funds will be invested in things such as hiring teachers, providing them with better training and updating equipment. “High schools have some pretty dated equipment that’s no longer relevant in the real world,” he says. “Today’s auto technology is very different from the auto technology of 30 years ago. We’re helping districts improve the equipment that kids will be working with to make it more relevant to the real world and Eugene right now. >

UPDATING EQUIPMENT TO BE MORE RELEVANT TO CURRENT TECHNOLOGIES

RIGHT: North Eugene High School student Nat Milnes is taking Introduction to Computer Science, taught by teacher Anthony Harlan. Computer science and other courses at North Eugene—such as digital media, physics, child development, health and culinary arts—are part of College Now (CN), a Lane Community College (LCC) program through which students can earn transferable college credit while in high school, in addition to the credit they earn toward graduation. E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |  O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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In 2017, Elevate Lane County provided 3,048 students with career-connected learning and supported over 2,000 professional development hours for educators outside the classroom. With a reach extending beyond greater Eugene into communities like Cottage Grove, Veneta, and Florence, there is no better time to get involved.

Lane County has prioritized training students for careers in computer science, healthcare, and manufacturing occupations. As part of that effort, it’s important for schools to engage with the business community, so they can understand the specific skills and types of training students need. Many business leaders have found it hard to get involved in these efforts, because multiple school districts were clamoring for their support. Elevate Lane County is trying to streamline the process by setting up county-wide advisory groups from various industries. “That efficiency in communication is something that’s been really improved,” says Balderas. “It’s making it easier for businesses to get involved.” This and the many other partnerships highlight a critical point: Collaboration between the business community, nonprofits, agencies and schools is what’s making the state of the workforce better today. It’s also what will help to strengthen it in the future. Continuing these programs and building new ones will go a long way toward improving high school graduation rates and lessening Eugene’s employment woes, now and into the future.

The Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce is significantly invested in workforce development with efforts focused on student training and connections to industry, as well as programs focused on attracting and retaining young, talented professionals. In addition to workforce programs, the Eugene Chamber advocates for public policies that align with priorities of the business community, such as Measure 98, which delivered much-needed funding for career and technical education programs to school districts around the state.

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RECRUITMENT & RETENTION Perks pique interest, culture preserves talent Article by VANESSA SALVIA  |  Photography by ATHENA DELENE

Ping pong tables, gym memberships, catered lunches, kegerators and fully stocked fridges—those perks are nice, but the problem is, they don’t reflect the company’s culture and values or how employees are actually treated. Celeste Marshall, director of human resources at IDX, a provider of real estate software applications, says her company offers those perks, but they make sure that prospective employees know how they’re expected to actually perform as part of the team before they’re hired. For instance, IDX utilizes detailed job descriptions to weed out the wrong candidates before they even apply.

“Companies will use benefits to say, ‘Look, we’re so great,’ but what employee retention comes down to is approachable leadership, clear vision, people that feel comfortable exploring and, by default, because everybody’s moving in the same direction, they’re pushing each other and helping each other,” she says. “We have all the perks minus a ping pong table, but the culture is not only the ping pong table, and that gets overlooked.” >

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IDX has been named among Oregon’s top places to work.


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IDX, Jones & Roth and Summit Bank have all been named among Oregon’s top places to work multiple times by various publications. While each of those companies offers a variety of perks, they also put resources into making sure that prospective employees fit their company culture and that existing employees feel supported and have a voice. Accounting firm Jones & Roth has about 110 employees firm-wide, with 15 additional seasonal employees at tax time; 70 employees work in Eugene, 24 in Hillsboro and 12 in Bend. They begin recruiting at the college sophomore level and have built up their hiring process to ensure they’re discovering a candidate’s communication skills, teamwork and work ethic at each step.

“We have spent a lot of time on the recruiting process to identify what we feel are qualities for success and set our recruiting process up to look for those,” says Tricia Duncan, Jones & Roth CPA and director of operations. “All of our

questions and events are built around giving us opportunities to see those skills.” 24

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IDX

GYM MEMBERSHIPS

BASKETBALL HOOP

KEGERATOR

PING PONG TABLE

COMPANY CULTURE

Potential new CPAs are interviewed at on-campus events, followed by email interviews, phone interviews and, finally, inperson interviews. “Each time we dig a little deeper to talk about our culture and how they fit in,” Duncan explains.

I think one reason that people stay at Summit is that we really use our culture as a litmus test for people that we’re hiring,” he explains. “If they match up with the culture, then it’s a good place for them and it works out great for Summit.”

Because there are so many employees, they create teams of eight to 10 people that meet for a calendar year. “One purpose is communication,” Duncan says. “A staff accountant that’s been here six months is probably not going to raise their hand in a 100-person meeting, but they will in a small group. That helps team morale and retention by having transparency.”

Wanichek says the bank does some things that are not typical of other banks, such as not having formal structures of authority. “We’re authentic, we’re hard-working, we’re very service-oriented and, for a bank, we’re very entrepreneurial and innovative,” he says. “Some people who have been working at banks might not be particularly

Summit Bank, with 52 employees in Eugene and 12 in Bend, has spent a lot of time identifying what they stand for as a bank and making sure that new employees are comfortable with a bank that calls itself “bold” and “entrepreneurial.” Craig A. Wanichek, Summit Bank president and CEO, says people thrive where they believe in their work. “This year we spent a lot of time on our culture, because

comfortable with a fast-growing, fast-moving place so that’s why we make sure people know that our culture is not rigid.” The team holds weekly teleconferencing meetings between locations to discuss performance, accountability and the bank’s core values. “We spend a lot of time talking about what that means to us and why teamwork, collaboration, and community make this a fun place to work,” he says. “The key to retention, for us, is that being part of the team means that everybody buys into what we’re doing.”

So, while the attention may be on the fun perks and added benefits, it’s the companies who take that a step further by intentionally connecting those benefits to the organization’s culture that drive effective recruitment and retention strategies.

10 Hiring and Retention Habits of Highly Successful Businesses

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Write clear, Become detailed job involved in the descriptions for every community through position in your Take the time to volunteerism and company. define your company events. culture and don’t confuse it with your benefits. Involve your If you have a large office, whole team in break out some small meetings. groups that meet regularly, so employees are less Schedule time for your inhibited from bringing leadership team to meet up concerns. with employees one-onProvide a one, on a regular basis mentor for new both for large and employees. Make your small issues. expectations Evaluate an clear in all employee’s work, based areas. on what is produced Be transparent and not how much about the company’s time they spend in finances, goals their seats. and growth.

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WORK FORC E WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF COMMUNITY

CREATING A

COMMUNITY

SUCCESSION

SUCCESSION PLANNING?

In Eugene, we are fortunate to have a community of diverse business leaders that spans several generations, who are actively engaged in moving forward a shared vision of our region. By taking a thoughtful approach to succession planning, we’re ensuring that our community will continue to grow and evolve. HOW DO WE ENGAGE THE NEXT GENERATION OF COMMUNITY LEADERS?

Actively identify and create opportunities for future leaders in unexpected places. Ask yourself: Who are the ones already showing up to lend their voice and insights to move business and the community forward? How do we produce opportunities to position them for growth?

Engaging the next generation of aspiring business and community leaders

Encourage momentum for projects and programs that will help Eugene leverage the best growth opportunities ahead of us and overcome the barriers that have limited the pace of progress.

Pass along insights that will help the next generation of leaders find a better sense of balance between careers, civic engagement and community responsibilities. Ensure that engagement continues in shaping our future community after the leaders of today retire, by getting young professionals involved now. Promote smart decisions that will ignite innovations in business, social services and local government. It’s important that we commit to paying attention to young professionals with a passion for this city and put opportunities in front of them to develop, strengthen and cultivate connections. Let’s leverage the innovations of the last several decades and create a legacy that will last far beyond our time in the boardroom.

Leadership looks different now. There are diverse perspectives, unexpected gamechangers and nextgeneration professionals to be brought into the fold. Mentor, sponsor and engage young professionals. Schedule coffee once a month and talk about what it looks like to lead in business and in the community. In doing so, you’ll be preparing our future leaders to grow our businesses, develop our economy and shape our community as a whole.

LOOKING TO CONNECT WITH THE NEXT GEN?

The Eugene Chamber’s Young Professionals program is already engaging a new generation of aspiring business leaders. Join us at the YP Summit, on June 12, to meet the young professionals who are ready to step-up. Find out more at EugeneYPSummit.com

BY BRANDY RODTSBROOKS, EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

WHY DO WE NEED COMMUNITY SUCCESSION PLANNING? Succession planning is a hot topic of conversation in boardrooms and businesses across our region. As the boomer generation prepares for retirement and Gen X and Y move into leadership positions, how do we cultivate the next generation of business front-runners to carry forward the great companies that support our local economy and Eugene as a community? A quick Google search will deliver templates, consultants and thought-leaders with opinions to share as business leaders dive into succession planning. Building a thoughtful strategy to recruit and develop the next generation of managers for key roles in an organization makes good sense. As business leaders focus on succession planning for their individual businesses, what is the outlook for businesses and their support of their communities as a whole? The truth is, doing business has changed a lot from one generation to the next. It was only a few decades ago that corporate social responsibility was considered a novel concept,

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with businesses innovating to align their practices to reflect a set of values that connected them to their community. Now, an entire generation has grown up with business and community alignment as a standard—a generation that is actively make purchasing decisions, career choices and volunteer commitments that support business and community integration. As younger generations move into positions of leadership, the assimilation of business and community is shaping the way they engage. Many young professionals today are bringing with them a high level of enthusiasm, not only to the boardroom but also as they engage at city council meetings and when volunteering with local nonprofits. They are excited to collaborate, innovate and build their companies and cities. And, they want and need mentors. This shift presents new opportunities, in terms of how we cultivate our next generation—not only for business success, but for building and sustaining a healthy community. What we need now, more than ever, is a thoughtful approach to community succession planning.

Tuesday, June 12th Hilton Eugene

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MENTORSHIPS MATTER How to find and get what you need from mentors

Article by CAROLINE CUMMINGS, VENTURE CATALYST FOR OREGON RAIN || Photo by PALO ALTO SOFTWARE

I like to say, “Everyone should have a mentor and be mentored.” It’s because mentorship works. I’ve seen it help many people achieve success, personally and professionally. I attribute much of my own success to having mentors. These are people I call on to help me think through challenging situations. And over the years, I’ve had many mentors with a variety of expertise, including finance, leadership, sales, marketing and investing. Between literature and film, business and politics, we are surrounded by great examples of mentor relationships. And yet, most people don’t know how to find and get what they need from a mentor.

When we decide we need a mentor, our first impulse is to ask the most successful person we know. But that isn’t the best path. Before you make any calls, spend some time thinking about exactly what you want to achieve. Then, ask people in your network if they know someone with that expertise. Once you have a lead, begin by asking them out for coffee and an informational interview; tell them you’d like to know what steps they took in their career, because you’re interested in doing something similar. After this initial (less than 30 minutes) meeting, if you feel there’s potential for a strong, mutual rapport, then you can ask them to be your mentor.

You might say, “I’d like to spend the next three months becoming better at sales, and I would be honored if you would help me. Would you be willing to meet with me for 30 minutes every other week?”

“EVERYONE SHOULD HAVE A MENTOR AND BE MENTORED.” The key to a successful mentor relationship is establishing timelines,

It’s also important to establish boundaries and be transparent about your goals. Since I’ve co-founded and led startups, and now help run a seed capital fund, entrepreneurs regularly ask me to mentor them or help find them a mentor. The more prepared they are and understand what areas they want to improve, the easier it is for me to help match them with the right mentor. When it’s time to conclude the relationship, be sure to send your mentor a thank-you note, preferably handwritten. Thank them for their time and point out, specifically, how they helped you advance your goals.

This would also be an appropriate time to ask them for connections to other potential mentors, because there are so many ways that you can continue to develop personally and professionally. Locally, the Eugene Young Professionals program and Business After Hours events—both hosted by the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce—are great places to connect with potential mentors. Also, the RAIN Eugene Accelerator has a large database of mentors for startups.

guidelines and following through on your commitments. For example, I will assign tasks for my mentees to complete by our next meeting, and if they don’t do those

Sign-up for the next meeting of the Eugene Young Professionals or Business

tasks, or stop communicating with me, I

After Hours and connect with local business leaders and mentors. Visit the

have to have a conversation with them

Chamber calendar for monthly events at EugeneChamber.com.

about how the relationship is not working.

Caroline Cummings (left) spends her free time mentoring at-risk youth and young women new to the business world.

THE PHIL AND PENNY KNIGHT CAMPUS FOR ACCELERATING SCIENTIFIC IMPACT A $1 billion vision to turn discovery into impact

Caroline Cummings is a serial entrepreneur who has been

for Oregon RAIN (Regional Accelerator & Innovation

the CEO and co-founder of two technology companies in

Network), where she connects entrepreneurs to the

Eugene. She’s raised close to $1 million in angel capital

resources they need to start and scale their ventures.

for her ventures and has coached other entrepreneurs on

Additionally, she’s the venture associate for the new seed

how to raise capital. Caroline is also the Venture Catalyst

fund Willamette Valley Capital.

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accelerate.uoregon.edu

When the first phase of the Knight Campus opens in 2020, researchers and students will tackle global challenges in a world-class space designed specifically to support interactive interdisciplinary discovery. Made possible by a $500 million lead gift from Penny and Phil Knight, BBA ’59, and augmented with $50 million in state bonds, the Knight Campus will support an estimated 750 new jobs, representing $80 million in estimated statewide annual economic impact. The campus will transform the region into a hub for innovation, with research seeding start-up companies and talented graduates attracting existing industry to the area.

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DESIGNATE A CHAMPION AND FORM A TEAM. While not always the case, human resources is often the change agent for many diversity and inclusion practices. But to be most effective, it shouldn’t be the only place where these practices and initiatives are carried out. “One of the real benefits that people can get from it is having it be a real team, not just one person, not just a policy on paper. It can affect so many parts of the business—innovative, creative thinking,” says Voorhees. “It’s shared responsibility at all levels.”

“THE WORLD WE LIVE IN HAS GROWN MORE DIVERSE. AS SUCH, A COMPANY THAT CLOSELY MIRRORS

SIX SIMPLE WAYS TO TAKE A MORE ACTIVE APPROACH

THAT WORLD—ITS CUSTOMERS,

Article by SABRINA HALSTEAD

FUTURE EMPLOYEES AND BUSINESS

More and more, companies are moving beyond passive diversity and inclusion practices and taking an active approach to these efforts. It’s not just because it’s the right thing to do; these efforts can also yield positive financial results. In fact, a McKinsey & Company report, published in 2015, examined the relationship between diversity and financial performance, and drew two compelling conclusions (among others): The top quartile of racially and ethnically diverse companies are 35 percent more likely to financially outperform their respective national industry medians, and the top quartile of gender diverse companies are 15 percent more likely to financially outperform their respective national medians. The benefits of embracing diversity and inclusion practices, however, are bigger than just financial performance, says Andrea Voorhees, employee benefits consultant with USI Insurance Services. “It’s good for the employee base—having people feel appreciated is really going to help everyone in the long term. It’s going to help the employees, it’s going to help the HR department, it’s going to help the company, and it’s going to help the customers that they’re serving. If employees are happy, that’s going to reflect all around—360 degrees,” Voorhees says. Taking action and implementing diversity and inclusion practices in the workplace doesn’t have to be complicated. There are simple things that business leaders can do to initiate or ramp up their efforts.

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MAKE THE CONVERSATION A PRIORITY. To really build comfort and trust, and to form a strategic approach to implementing diversity and inclusion practices, companies have to commit to having the conversations and creating a safe space for those conversations. “For us, in our journey, the first step was having that conversation,” says Anetra Brown, Equity and Engagement Manager with United Way of Lane County. “It shifted from, ‘OK, we value this,’ to ‘OK, so what does it look like to value it?’”

CONSIDER HOW YOU’RE FINDING EMPLOYEES AND HOW YOU’RE KEEPING THEM. This includes where you’re posting job openings, what the balance is like between recruiting internally and externally, what benefits you offer that a diverse employee population will value, helping you to retain those employees. “Voluntary benefits are important; it gives employees flexibility in how much it costs them, what kind of coverage they want—it takes the whole family situation into account,” says Voorhees. Additional benefits to consider could include daycare, doggy daycare, legal options, dependent benefits, paid time off and more. Think about your employee demographics and what they would value.

PARTNERS—IS NATURALLY BETTER

ESTABLISH GOALS AND MEANINGFUL METRICS. Like any other aspect of your business, it’s important to set goals and track your progress, so that you can clearly see if your efforts are yielding the results you’re after. “There are two sides to it: the qualitative side and the quantitative side,” says Voorhees. “The qualitative side is the ‘it’s the right thing to do,’ and getting everyone’s opinion or consideration. But then the quantitative side is really the business argument for it.” Think about your company’s mission and values, what you want to achieve, and how diversity and inclusion practices could help you get there. Consider making goals and metrics-tracking a committee responsibility.

BE PREPARED TO TAKE ACTION. The goals you set and the data you choose to track shouldn’t be arbitrary. Conversations, committees, training and metrics are positive steps in the right direction, but if you’re not prepared to take action based on data outcomes, you risk losing your employees’ trust. “You have to ensure that you’re getting the right people and actually listening to them,” says Voorhees.

POSITIONED TO SUCCEED.” - Thomson Reuters

TRAIN YOUR EMPLOYEES. Your employees should understand how diversity and inclusion impact the workplace and how they fit into that equation. Providing training opportunities can help build effective communication and problem-solving skills among diverse teams. One of the places where training has come in for United Way of Lane County is simply creating a common language around diversity, equity and inclusion. “These are really hot terms right now—equity, diversity, inclusion,” says Brown. “And sometimes we use them interchangeably, but they have different meanings.” By providing training, you give your staff the opportunity to get on the same page with what this looks like, what it means to the company, and the work they’re doing.

ADDITIONAL READING Looking to dive a bit deeper into the research behind the business impacts of diversity and inclusion? We recommended the following studies: MCKINSEY WHY DIVERSITY MATTERS https://goo.gl/1WhcTo HARVARD UNIVERSITY: THE ECONOMIC RATIONALE FOR SOCIAL COHESION https://goo.gl/SNihTW THOMSON REUTERS BUSINESS CASE FOR DIVERSITY https://goo.gl/uZCXsg

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HELLO NEIGHBOR.

MOVERS & SHAKERS

CELEBRATING LEADERSHIP

AT OREGON COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION Article by BRITTANY QUICK-WARNER, CEO OF THE EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

When the name Mandy Jones comes up, most people have a story to tell of her leadership. In her time as a business leader in our

Mandy Jones

community, she has helped OCCU grow to the second-largest state-

Ron Neumann

chartered credit union in Oregon. She has offered leadership and thoughtful advocacy for nonprofits who have supported incredible

production services, finance, technology, business intelligence and

causes. She has inspired business leaders to think differently about

administrative functions, including compliance, risk management,

how they build businesses and community.

security, continuous process improvement and facilities. Prior to

Mandy has been with OCCU for 17 years, 12 of those as CEO. In that time, the credit union grew from $730 million to $1.7 billion in assets, and membership expanded 61% from 93,000 to more than 150,000. During her tenure as CEO, Mandy has spearheaded support for OCCU’s major community-giving activities and involvement, including its Community Outreach for Employees (CORE) Volunteer

becoming executive vice president in 2017, he served as OCCU’s chief financial officer and oversaw finance, technology, business intelligence, administrative functions and human resources. Similar to Mandy, Ron is committed to community. He currently County’s Board of Directors. Recently, he was appointed as a Board Member for the Credit Union Benefits Alliance and is also a member

and donations for Children’s Miracle Network, United Way of Lane

of the Governmental Affairs Committee of the Northwest Credit

County and hundreds of nonprofits, as well as the more than $1

Union Association.

million in scholarships to PathwayOregon at the University of Oregon.

“The OCCU Board of Directors worked hard to fulfill its

Her leadership as the Immediate Past Board Chair of the Eugene Area

responsibilities to hire the next CEO. We envisioned OCCU in

Chamber of Commerce and with the credit union and community

2025 and asked ourselves what skills and qualities would be needed

boards has furthered programs that build our local economy.

to achieve that vision. Then we watched Ron demonstrate his

opportunities and inspired growth. She is a tough act to follow. Fortunately, her thoughtful style of leadership has brought forward a new leader to carry on OCCU’s commitment to community values and economic growth, Ron Neumann. Ron will succeed Mandy as CEO on April 2, 2018. Ron has been with OCCU since 2010, most recently serving as executive vice president. In that role, he has overseen lending and lending services, credit and

GOOD THINGS ARE HAPPENING.

serves on the Executive Committee for the United Way of Lane

Program, Volunteer Day, Shred Fest and OCCU’s active programming

Her contributions to our local business community has built new

YOU’RE CONNECTED. WE’RE CONNECTED.

leadership abilities,” said Beverly Anderson, Chair of the OCCU Board of Directors.

“It became increasingly clear that he had exactly what we needed. Ron has the vision, talent, enthusiasm and leadership to take OCCU into the future.” As Ron takes the reins, he’s honored to follow in Mandy’s footsteps. His leadership will continue OCCU’s journey to live their brand and practice their core values while serving their membership and community.

Located in the US Bank Building:

EUGENE’S RESOURCE FOR CLOUD HOSTING

MANAGED SERVICES: HELPDESK | DISASTER RECOVERY CLOUD SERVICES: YOUR BUSINESS NETWORK DELIVERED Mandy Jones (right) is the immediate past chair of the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce’s board of directors. Her leadership helped to support our Chamber and our members through a challenging year and a leadership transition of our own.

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www.continu.net

541.607.3789

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A community of collaborators, game-changers, movers and shakers: Here’s a look at this quarter’s Chamber happenings, as we work to build networks, move forward projects, and elevate both businesses and professionals. CELEBRATION OF BUSINESS // Congrats to Liz Cawood, our 2017 First Citizen. Her incredible community impact has made Eugene a better place. CELEBRATION OF BUSINESS // Carmen Lessley of South Eugene High School, pictured with her parents, Bryan Lessley and Tina Stupasky, was recognized for her incredible accomplishments as our Future First Citizen. CELEBRATION OF BUSINESS // Chamber Ambassadors, like Stacy Walker of State Farm, volunteer to welcome guests and celebrate the accomplishments of our business community. WOMEN BUSINESS LEADERS // Tyler Holden and Elaine Harvey of Key Bank enjoy an inspiring program on “how to thrive in chaos” at the Women Business Leaders luncheon. HIPPIE HEMP // For Nicole Kreck and her husband, Lance, the opening of their new business, Hippie Hemp in downtown Eugene, was the realization of a long-time dream. EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE // We are proud to have such a dedicated group of professionals on our 2018 Board of Directors to help LEADERSHIP EUGENE-SPRINGFIELD // The group tours the EWEB Steam Plant and learns more about the riverfront redevelopment project, as a part of Land Use and Tansportation Day. LEADERSHIP EUGENE-SPRINGFIELD // After a day at FOOD For Lane County, learning about health and human services, the team enjoys a well-deserved lunch. Left to right: Geno Franco, Mindi Barta, Michael Hutchinson, Susan Lopez, Kevin Sittner, Kara McDaniel, Aimee Butler and Jared Swezey. LEADERSHIP EUGENE-SPRINGFIELD // Moderator Matt Sayre of TAO with panelists Kim Gibson-Clark of Coconut Bliss, Casey Roscoe of Seneca Saw Mills, Mark Frohnmayer of Arcimoto and Avril Watt of JCI (not pictured).

Don’t miss a minute, visit EugeneChamber.com for a calendar of events.

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B I Z Z B UZ Z

B I Z Z B UZ Z

PROMOTIONS & NEW HIRES Move-in Comfort welcomes both Florence Gaughan and Lorraine Boose to their team. As Office Manager, Florence will provide administrative support of business operations. She brings a wealth of experience in office operations and customer service to the position. Lorraine is our Community Outreach liaison. Lorraine brings more than 25 years of experience in community outreach, home visitation and resource referrals. MoveIn Comfort provides downsizing and moving services to older adults and has recently added busy professionals to their clientele.

Craig Wanichek, president and chief executive officer of Summit Bank, announced the promotion of Chris Hemmings. His responsibilities include running the bank’s internal accounting functions as well as deposit operations and depository regulatory compliance. He will also work with bank’s Central Operations and Treasury Management team to enhance Summit’s operational and eBanking infrastructure. “Throughout his time at Summit, Chris has been a vital contributor to our team,” said Wanichek. “We have the highest confidence in his ability to help the bank continue to grow and succeed in his expanded role.”

Garrett S. Ledgerwood

has become a partner with Hershner Hunter, LLP. Garrett joined the firm in 2014, after practicing with the multinational law firm of Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver and Jacobson. Prior to starting in private practice, he clerked for the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Columbia. Garrett graduated from Texas Tech University in 2001, cum laude, and the Washington and Lee University School of Law, summa cum laude, in 2009, where he was Editor in Chief of the Washington and Lee Law Review. Garrett focuses his practice on creditor’s rights and bankruptcy and advises businesses and lenders in commercial finance transactions.

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Oregon Pacific Bank

is proud to announce the addition of Amber White and Kate Salyers to the bank’s corporate team. Amber will be assuming the role of Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer as the bank’s current CFO Joanne Forsberg retires at the end of December after 19 years of service. Kate will be filling the position of Senior Vice President and Credit Administrator to assist with the bank’s growing lending needs. “We consider ourselves very lucky to add such talent to our local banking team,” says Ron Green, President and CEO of Oregon Pacific Bank.

Liz Lawrence has been

elected to the Board of Directors of Lane Arts Council. Liz is the Associate Director for Finance and Development for the McKenzie River Trust. For 15 years, she has worked with nonprofits and grassroots community organizations to create meaningful social and environmental change.

ShelterCare is pleased to announce new board officer and members. Jacob Fox, executive

director of the Homes for Good of Lane County, has been elected secretary of the ShelterCare Board of Directors. The board also announced that community leader Gerry Gaydos, partner, with the law firm of Gaydos, Churnside and Balthrop; Sujata Sanghvi, strategic health actuary and health care consultant; and Christine Cunningham, community volunteer and a consumer liaison, have accepted appointments to the ShelterCare Board of Directors.

Nicholas Lawlor has joined the Jamie Paddock Group at Elite Realty Professionals as a Buyer

Specialist. Nick, a CPA, was previously an executive for Eugene-based manufacturing and distribution companies.

as Board President, Steve Frichette as Vice President & Secretary and Colette Ramirez as Treasurer.

C.W. Walker & Associates, Inc. is pleased to announce Diana Bray as an addition to their broker crew.

ShelterCare has named Katharine Ryan program

manager for its Housing, Health and Wellness/ Medical Recuperation programs and Kyle Rodriquez-Hudson as program administrator for Garden Place, ShelterCare’s secure residential treatment facility. “Katharine and Kyle are outstanding professionals who bring deep concern and compassion to their work with some of our community’s most vulnerable citizens,” said Susan Ban, ShelterCare’s executive director. “We are pleased both are on the ShelterCare team to help our consumers find pathways to live their best lives.” Since June 2017, Eugene

Symphony Board of Directors has welcomed

five new members to its now 33-member board:

Harriet Cherry,

retired community leader

Erin Dickinson, active volunteer

Michael Roscoe, President of Great Falls Group, Inc. Dr. Doneka Scott,

Associate Vice Provost for Student Success at the University of Oregon

Andrew Stiltner

regional brand manager for Elizabeth Chambers Cellar, Silvan Ridge Winery, and Hinman Vineyards.

Oregon Supported Learning Program

is pleased to announce new board member

Amy Baker, owner of Threadbare Print House as well as the new board officers Scott Parkinson

E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |  O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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B I Z Z B UZ Z

BUSINESS NEWS Inn at the 5th, to unveil a brand-new Pendleton

Suite at the property, along with a new “blanket menu,” giving guests an array of Pendleton woolen blankets to choose from and use during their

stay. Pendleton recently opened a retail shop that straddles the market and hotel lobby, inspiring both parties to expand guest exposure to this special local commodity with the addition of the new Pendleton Suite and blanket menu.

Summit Bank (OTC Pink: SBKO) reported net income for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017 of $3.28 million, or a 15 percent increase in earnings over $2.86 million in 2016. “Like many other banks across the nation, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 had a negative impact in 4th quarter of 2017; however, we anticipate the Act will reduce our marginal tax rate in 2018 to 28 percent from 38 percent,” said Craig Wanichek, President and CEO. “The additional benefit from the Act will also result in a greater capacity to continue to make economic investments in our

two primary markets of Eugene/Springfield and Central Oregon.” The Science Factory, which opened in 1961, has formally changed its name to Eugene Science Center. This change follows a decision in September of 2016 to focus its mission and vision more heavily on supporting STEM education (science, technology, engineering, math) throughout Lane and surrounding counties. “We have ambitions to grow our programs and footprint to have a greater impact using STEM principles as a bridge to learning, playing and creating a space for exploration,” say Tim Scott, Executive Director. Graduates of Central Oregon Community College’s Registered Nurse program now have a pathway to earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Northwest Christian University. COCC RN graduates can immediately enroll in NCU’s RN to BSN online classes. “We are excited to offer Central Oregon Community College RN graduates the opportunity to earn a BSN though Northwest Christian University’s growing RN to BSN program,” said Joseph D. Womack, Ed.D, president of NCU. “Our administration and faculty are pleased to partner with COCC as we work together to improve healthcare throughout Oregon.”

BANKING IS BETTER WHEN IT’S LOCAL. www.SBKO.bank

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B I Z Z B UZ Z

KUDOS BrightStar Care of Lane County received

the 2018 Best of Home Care Provider of Choice and Employer of Choice awards. Home Care Pulse grants the Provider of Choice and Employer of Choice Awards to the top-ranking homecare providers based on satisfaction scores gathered from interviews with our clients and care professionals. For more, visit: brightstarcare.com/lane-county

Local radio group, McKenzie River Broadcasting, announced that the KKNU-FM morning team, “Barrett, Fox & Berry,” has been chosen as a 2018 inductee into the Country Radio Hall of Fame in Nashville. The strength of Country music in the Eugene-Springfield market is not just about the music, it has a lot to do with this trio who have been a powerhouse in the market for several years and continue to be a leader with key demographics.

2018 marks the 30th anniversary for Systems West Engineers, a leading mechanical, electrical, and commissioning engineering provider in Oregon. Founded in 1988, Systems West Engineers has evolved from a small engineering firm providing energy analysis and retrofit design to a dynamic consulting business offering complete mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, commissioning and

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B I Z Z B UZ Z

energy-related services for the built environment. Local projects include the University of Oregon’s Ford Alumni Center, Tykeson Hall, Autzen Stadium and Knight Campus (currently in progress), Eugene City Hall and Downtown Library, and Hamlin Middle School.

Mini Grant Recipients:

KUDOS

Steven Korin

Guaranty RV Super Centers has been recognized with a national award from Newmar Corporation for a second consecutive year. Guaranty is proud to be one of only five dealers in the country to win this prestigious recognition. Named in honor of Newmar founder Mahlon Miller, the award recognizes those dealerships that most embody the spirit of customer service. In addition, Guaranty received the Circle of Excellence award for 2017 from Winnebago Industries Inc., which recognizes select dealers for excellence in customer satisfaction. Guaranty will also be receiving the 2017 Platinum Dealer Award for Customer Satisfaction.

Billie Perreir

George Rode Repair Shops was named the 2018 Bold Steps Award winner during Mayor Lucy Vinis’ recent State of the City Address. Each year, the City presents the Bold Steps Award to a Eugene-based business that operates with a “triple bottom line approach”–those who measure success based on supporting their people, environmental stewardship, and economic prosperity. For more about Bold Steps, visit eugene-or.gov/508/Bold-Steps-Award-Program

Inn at the 5th, a luxury boutique hotel located in the heart of downtown Eugene, Oregon, is thrilled to be named the No. 15 hotel in the country by TripAdvisor. This is the second year in a row the property has made the Top 25 U.S. Hotel list. Travelers’ Choice awards are the highest honor TripAdvisor can give. Based on reviews and opinions from millions of travelers, the awards placed Inn at the 5th in the top 1 percent of hotels worldwide.

Willagillespie Elementary School

Sutton RV of Eugene has received Airstream’s

highest honor for exceptional customer sales and service. The family-owned Eugene company is the only dealer of the iconic silver Airstream travel trailers in Oregon to earn the distinction of Five Rivet status. “Obtaining Five Rivet status is a mark of excellence and is recognition of our commitment to providing a great experience for all of our customers,” said George Sutton, owner of Sutton RV. Eighteen Lane County educators have been awarded mini-grants from Northwest Community Credit Union. The winners were selected from 273 submissions the credit union received as part of its annual Project Community program. “Education is crucial for strong local communities. We’re committed to helping teachers and students throughout Oregon,” said Northwest Community Credit Union President and CEO John Iglesias.

Cesar Chavez Elementary School

Kate Brady

Danebo Elementary School

Elmira Elementary School

Katrina Callahan

Eugene Christian School

Stacie Wicks

Fairfield Elementary School

Jacquelyn Bratland

Irving Elementary School

Golda LoBello

North Eugene High School

Jannine Johnson Dain Nelson

Willamette High School

Audrey Hartsfield

Willagillespie Elementary School

FinishLine Software is celebrating its 10-year anniversary. FinishLine Software provides a simple yet powerful punch list management app for the construction industry and real estate developers. FinishLine currently has over 9,000 users throughout the U.S. and Canada, plus 9 other countries. Please visit punchlist.net for more information. EVENTS Eugene Symphony announced its 53rd Season,

which includes works never before heard in Eugene as well as events like the film Star Wars: A New Hope, live with orchestra. The first season

planned by Music Director & Conductor Francesco Lecce-Chong also includes three works by Leonard Bernstein in celebration of the American legend’s centennial. For more visit: eugenesymphony.org

Lane Arts Council, in partnership with the City of Eugene Cultural Services Division,

is excited to announce the 2018 Winter & Spring Workshops for Artists & Arts Organizations!

April 10 | Instagram with Impact

Presented by Bri Bulski (Little Arrow Studio) and Debbie Williamson Smith (Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art) 3-5 pm, 942 Olive Street building.

May 15 | All About Artist Residencies (panel discussion)

Panelists: Carrie Hardison (Sitka Center for Art & Ecology), Julia Oldham, and Kathleen Caprario, 3-5 pm, 942 Olive Street building. Workshops are held at either the Hult Center Studio or 942 Olive St building. Sign up for a single workshop for $20, or register for multiple workshops for a discounted price. UO School of Music & Dance students and alumni register free. For more information and registration, visit: lanearts.org/workshops

Through April 29, 2018 | Keith Achepohl: Vision of Nature/Vessel of Beauty

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art on the University of Oregon campus presents the exhibition. This extensive body of work in painting, drawing, and collage by the Eugene, Oregonbased artist Keith Achepohl was inspired by three weeks spent at the Morris Graves Foundation Artist Residency in 2011, followed by a second stay in 2016. ”Seldom has an artist been so inspired by a residency,” says Jill Hartz, JSMA executive director and co-curator of the exhibition. ”It’s been thrilling to see each new work as it’s been completed, and then to step back and see how it all holds together and creates its own world.”

GRANTS The Community Arts Grant is seeking

applications for projects that emphasize accessibility and provide unique programming that takes place in the City of Eugene. The grant program is funded by the City of Eugene Cultural Services Division and administered by Lane Arts Council. Lane Arts Council is accepting applications through May 8, 2018.

Judy Kerner

Churchill High School

Dawn Henderson

Spring Creek Elementary School

Staci Hagel

Elizabeth Page Elementary School

Shelby Masterson

Guy Lee Elementary School

Kathleen Weaver

Hamlin Middle School

Heather Dillon

Mt. Vernon Elementary School

David Frost

Springfield High School

Peter Bowers

Latham Elementary School

E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |  O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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A QU IC K N OTE

CHAMBER EVOLVED NOW IS THE TIME

By Brittany Quick-Warner CEO Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce

C

hange is one of those things that people

YOUR BUSINESS IS CHANGING.

OUR CHAMBER HAS CHANGED.

either love, or they hate. Usually, it’s

• Industry is changing rapidly, with new

• We still miss Dave. Every. Single. Day.

for the same reason—it makes them

technologies impacting the way we work,

But we know that he would want us to carry

uncomfortable. Our first instinct as humans

produce materials, deliver services and

forward his legacy by evolving, by stepping

is to seek stability, to find level ground, to

communicate to customers.

up to do this work to the very best of our

avoid change at all costs. But sometimes when changes comes at you sideways and takes you by surprise, you have no choice but to accept it. If there is one thing I have learned this past year, it’s that change is inevitable. When

• The face of the workforce is changing. Recruiting and retaining the right employees

• We are going to succeed, because we have a

shift for employers and employees.

smart team, incredible volunteers and some of

• Competition has become fierce, and

are really capable of doing.

innovation seems like the only way to stay on

businesses. Whether you find yourself battling unexpected competition in the market place or helping your organization and community overcome the loss of a trusted leader and mentor, how you show up and face change defines who you are and what you become.

• Our members are the new face of our Chamber. They are helping to guide the

facing disruptions to their business models.

development of a new strategy that will move

OUR COMMUNITY IS CHANGING.

forward our mission of building our local

• We’ve been talking about it for a while,

entire community.

this shift in our community—the challenges and opportunities we’re facing. We are on

change, our organization, staff, volunteer

to rise to meet the challenges and potential

leadership and members had to proactively

that presents.

presented. We discovered our tenacity and passion for this community, as well as a drive to pick up this work and move it forward.

leaders supporting us every day.

methods that have worked for generations are

the cusp of incredible growth and we need

and uncover the opportunity that change

the most engaged members and community

top. Even industries that have tried and true

Which is why last year, in the face of

and courageously battle through uncertainty

our best shot.

has become more challenging, as expectations

stability is not an option, we find out what we

It’s as true in our personal lives as it is in our

abilities. We are absolutely going to give it

economy to ensure the well-being of our

Decades of foundation-laying, coalitionbuilding and great leadership have brought us to a place in our history where we get to decide our next steps. How are we leveling up as a Chamber, as businesses and as a

• Creativity and innovation are at the center of

community? What have we learned from the

all we do, and business leaders are uniquely

past, and how are we going to use what we’ve

positioned to step in to help solve the big

learned to create a better future?

issues facing our community.

It’s time to evolve, and it’s going to take

We came together in a way that positioned

• Great opportunities are ahead to develop

courage, creativity, commitment and

our Chamber and our business community

infrastructure that will create incredible

compromise. This year, we faced change.

to evolve.

spaces for people, business and nature to

Now we’re focused on what we’re able to

collide—spaces that will bring vibrancy to our

accomplish moving forward.

There is no better time for us to be having this discussion. Now is the time to evolve.

downtown, riverfront and public spaces.

“The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems.” – Mahatma Gandhi 42

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We want to hear from you. What does our best future look like? Use #ChamberEvolved to share your vision.


PO BOX 1107 EUGENE, OR 97440-1107

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T U R N N U M B E R S I N T O S T R AT E G I C D E C I S I O N S

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5 POLICY INSIGHT

How small businesses can benefit from environmental and social practices.

A look at Eugene’s constrained housing market, convening the experts and a construction excise tax that works.

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16 LIFE IN OUR REGION

HEALTHY BUSINESS

OPPORTUNITY RISES IN THE WEST

16

COVER STORY / Experts across industries came together to help us highlight the spectrum of professionals that is uniquely Eugene for Open for Business this quarter. Cover photo | Athena Delene

10 QUERY & QUOTES Tim Scott of Eugene Science Center delves into their recent rebrand, fundraising and future improvements, focused on STEM and serving the entire community. And, Geoff Ostrove of TJ’s Gardens, the first vertically integrated cannabis company in Oregon, shares what it means to be part of the community and pioneers in a progressive movement.

Stephanie Seubert, Chair-Elect Partner, Evans, Elder, Brown & Seubert, Inc. Mandy Jones, Past-Chair Retired, Oregon Community Credit Union Nigel Francisco, Treasurer CFO, King Estate Scott Lindstrom, Vice-Chair, Organizational Development, Exec. Vice President, Jerry’s Home Improvement Center Cale Bruckner, Vice-Chair, Economic Development President, Concentric Sky

6 CHAMBER VISIONARIES President and CEO of Lunar Logic Celeste Edman and President and CEO of OCCU Ron Neumann on thoughtful leadership and collaboration as keys to success.

Thomas Pettus-Czar, Vice-Chair, Business Advocacy Owner, The Barn Light Amanda Walkup Partner, Hershner Hunter, LLP Betsy Boyd Assoc. VP of Fed. Affairs, University of Oregon Casey Barrett General Manager, 5th Street Public Market Cheryl Boyum CEO, Cascade Health Solutions

38 HERE & THERE

Chad Barczak CEO, IDX Broker

12 SECTOR STRATEGIES

Snapshots of events, happenings and goings-on that reflect our Chamber and our ever-changing business community.

Dr. Gustavo Balderas Superintendent, Eugene School District 4J

Manufacturing, Food + Beverage and Tech: happenings and what’s on the horizon.

40 BIZZ BUZZ

36 MOVERS & SHAKERS

Promotions, new hires and news you can use.

Jason Lafferty General Manager, SnoTemp Cold Storage

46 A QUICK NOTE

Ralph Parshall General Manager, Mercedes Benz of Eugene

Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce CEO Brittany Quick-Warner on our uniqueness.

Trace P. Skopil CPA Partner, Moss Adams

Eugene Emeralds embrace alternative identity as Los Monarcas as players step up to the plate at Tuesday home games this summer.

Greg Lyons CFO, Western Shelter Systems

E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |  O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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POLIC Y I NSIG HT

OPEN FOR BUSINESS

CONVENING THE EXPERTS TO LEARN MORE

Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce

Comprehensive Printing Solutions Traditional Offset

Digital

Wide Format

+ + + + +

Binding Fulfillment Direct Mail Web-to-Print So Much More!

phone [541] 687–1184 toll free [800] 382–1184 web qslprinting.com

need for more affordable housing in our community. However, they

Chamber Staff Brittany Quick-Warner, CEO

going to be effective in funding subsidized, low-income housing if

Barb Brunton Business Manager Beth Tassan Administrative Support Brandy Rodtsbrooks Director of Marketing & Communications

market-rate housing projects weren’t going to “pencil” for builders and developers. It goes without saying that the tax was highly controversial, and many argued that we weren’t going to build our way out of this

BETTER HOUSING POLICY: By Tiffany Edwards, Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce

lowest, most affordable level of the existing supply.

Public policy and business advocacy work don’t always garner front

Housing developers explained that the current market only allows

Sarah Delp Economic Development Specialist

falls under the radar.

Advertising Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce 541.484.1314

Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce 1401 Willamette St. Eugene, OR 97401 541.484.1314 Open for Business A publication of the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce (USPS-978-480). Open for Business is published quarterly by the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce in March, June, September and December. Circulation: 3,800.

engaged in happens behind the scenes, over many months and often

As specific issues come up locally or at the state level, we work closely with and focus our outreach efforts on affected business sectors, our Chamber Board, our Local Government Affairs Council and our Young Professionals Network. Occasionally an issue will rise to the level of outreach to the broader Chamber membership. When the Chamber

Open For Biz - May 2018 YMCA Ad.indd 1

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O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S  |  S U M M E R 2 018

be built. We wanted to understand why so little new construction of “missing middle” housing and other types of housing in such high demand was stagnant. Through a series of in-depth meetings with home builders, affordable housing providers, planners and developers, it became apparent that there are significant cost barriers that impeed building. They include policy and procedural inefficiencies, lack of land supply and costly appeals processes, just to name a few.

A CONSTRUCTION EXCISE TAX THAT WORKS

research and strive to make data-driven decisions. We think it is

If a CET is going to be effective, we need to figure out how to remove

important for our members to know that we are actively and constantly

some of the current barriers to building. Ideally, this will stimulate the

engaged in advocating for policy changes and improvements on behalf

market and increase the overall housing supply and, in turn, increase

of the business community.

the total amount collected by a CET.

I will take this opportunity to share one recent example of our advocacy

Over the course of several months, the Eugene Chamber, Home

efforts, to help illustrate the work of the Eugene Chamber and how

Builders Association of Lane County and Better Housing Together

active business participation can have an effect on policy decisions

(a community coalition of housing advocates) worked collectively

being made in our community.

to educate Eugene’s mayor, city councilors and city staff about the

OUR CONSTRAINED HOUSING MARKET

significant barriers to building and advocated for policy and procedural

Back in December of 2017, city staff presented information to the mayor and Eugene City Council, who clearly stated their desire to find a solution for our community’s dire need for housing at the lowest end of the spectrum. One recommended solution came in the form of a construction excise tax (CET) of one percent on new residential and commercial construction costs to fund new construction of

changes that could be implemented prior to the deployment of a tax. Instead of passing the proposed CET right away, and after significant advocacy from the Chamber and others, the City Council voted unanimously on April 9, to direct the city manager to identify barriers to building that could be removed or lessened, prior to implementation of a tax. These will be presented to the City Council in a package of solutions, which may likely include a CET proposal, but will address

subsidized housing projects and other low-income housing programs.

The subscription price is $25, included in membership. Periodicals Postage Paid at Eugene, OR.

The Legislature had recently lifted the pre-emption on cities’ and local

the housing issues we are facing in a more holistic manner.

jurisdictions’ ability to tax construction, and other cities, like Portland,

In the next six months, the Eugene Chamber will continue to act

Corvallis and Medford, were already taking advantage of the new

as a convener for various stakeholders, bringing people together on

policy. Eugene would certainly be next.

both sides of this issue, to address barriers to building. We will work

However, as the Chamber began to research this issue and engage in

to shape new policies and simultaneously broaden support for a

conversations with other stakeholders, we developed serious concerns. In a market where demand had never been higher, the fact that very

5/3/2018 1:48:07 PM

for high-end housing or publicly subsidized low-income housing to

Open for Business © 2018

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 1107, Eugene, OR 97440-1107.

Serving Eugene since 1887.

to make a shift in the market. This would create more vacancies at the

engages in advocacy around relevant issues, we prioritize thorough

few projects were being built, even with existing incentives, such as the

eugeneymca.org NewYMCA.org

housing. What is needed is more housing and more housing diversity, at every level, to increase supply across the housing spectrum, in order

page headlines. Much of the advocacy work the Eugene Chamber is

Tiffany Edwards Director of Business Advocacy

crisis by only subsidizing costly new construction for low-income

A CASE STUDY FOR CHAMBER ADVOCACY

Joshua Mongé Director of Economic Development

Printing QSL Print Communications 541.687.1184

The Eugene Family YMCA nurtures 600 kids from 16 area schools and is Lane County’s largest afterschool childcare provider.

believed that adding an additional cost in the form of a tax was hardly

Amanda Yankovich Director of Membership

Design/Layout Turell Group 541.685.5000 turellgroup.com

BUILDING FUTURE INNOVATORS

The members we spoke with understood and appreciated the desperate

Publisher Brittany Quick-Warner, CEO

Multi-Unit Property Tax Exemption (MUPTE), meant that something wasn’t right.

reasonable CET to help fund critical housing initiatives.

Looking to lend your voice to help find solutions for our constrained housing market? Email Tiffany Edwards at tiffanye@eugenechamber.com E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |  O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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C H A M B E R V ISIO N A RI ES

CHAMBER VISIONARIES LEAD THE WAY By Chamber Visionary

By Chamber Visionary

Ron Neumann,

Celeste Edman,

President & CEO of OCCU

President & CEO of Lunar Logic

When I moved to Eugene

When I think of the Chamber’s

22 years ago, I was drawn to

current evolution, it’s easy to

the tremendous assets this

connect it to my own evolution

community offers, including its

as a business leader in our

diversity, access to impressive

community. In the last 20 years,

education, a thriving arts scene,

I’ve seen my leadership style shift

strong business sector and

and evolve as new experiences

outdoor recreation at every turn.

have changed my perspective and

We represent a community of

ways of engaging.

remarkable opportunity!

Twenty years ago, I stepped up

With new developments on the University of Oregon campus,

saying, “What this project needs is leadership.” And before I knew it,

continued growth of Downtown Eugene, a blossoming tech sector and

raising my hand and opening my

new development surrounding 5th Street Public Market, Eugene is

big mouth had landed me my first leadership role.

undergoing an electrifying evolution. This added momentum, coupled

I was a brash, unproven, fly-by-the-seat-of-my-pants leader who got a

with our already-thriving local business community, will help our

lot done quickly. That worked for a while, but it wasn’t long before

leaders galvanize to meet the needs of our collective future.

I hit a wall. To hit the next set of goals, I needed feedback, resources and direction. I needed to learn how to form a team and collaborate.

As business leaders, it is our role to keep opportunities plentiful. By proactively embracing change and continuing to work together to

Now, sitting in a room full of business people, listening to a

support the growth of a vibrant, diverse community, where people

discussion about economic development, I can see that the 20-year-

feel safe and stable, we help create and sustain market-wage jobs,

old me would’ve grown impatient and expected immediate results.

attract and retain talented employees and encourage and support small businesses. This type of growth will enable us to attract new industry to our area and retain young leaders in our community for the long term.

My leadership style today has evolved. I’ve learned that listening to multiple stakeholders, understanding resources and working collaboratively are far more effective in the long run. My response now

At OCCU, we know that change will ultimately help us to better

is more measured and seeks to understand. I ask a lot of questions.

serve our members. One of our brand pillars centers on putting

I know that the outcomes we want as a community take time.

what’s best for our membership at the forefront of our decisions. Our

The work of building this community takes time and getting there

collaboration with the Eugene Chamber and the rest of the business

takes a different type of leadership­­–one that recognizes the benefit of

community is one way we can deliver on this promise. Together,

working together for the betterment of many. It is imperative that we

we create meaningful change, and we continue to pull the future

take the time it takes to thoughtfully, intentionally review and discuss

closer. Collaborating and getting involved helps us to become more

what should and could be done. Developing strategies that a variety of

knowledgeable on the important issues and challenges, as we work to

people can help execute is necessary to sustain programs and for

leverage our collective resources.

long-term growth.

I hope you will join me in continuing to make Eugene a prosperous community and an even better place to live for all. Together, there is no question, we are stronger!

Buy Smart, Sell Smart, Build Smart.

It’s exciting to see the coming together of thoughtful leadership and new energy to get things done. These moments of collaborative collision points happening right now in Eugene are what will move forward the future of business and I, for one, can’t wait.

Thank you to the 2018 Chamber Visionaries: Anne Marie Levis, Funk/Levis & Associates Casey Barrett, Obie Companies Celeste Edman, Lunar Logic Chris Boone, Boone Insurance Associates Craig Wanichek, Summit Bank Ron Neumann, Oregon Community Credit Union

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Join us in creating the best-possible future for our community. Spread the word using #ChamberEvolved

MARCIA EDWARDS, MBA Residential Real Estate Broker

YOUR BUSINESS. YOUR CHAMBER. YOUR COMMUNITY.

541-221-1454 • RealEstateSmart.org • me@marciaedwards.com


M E M B E R VOIC E

DOING BUSINESS, DOING GOOD

Better Transit. Better Neighborhoods.

CONNECTING CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY TO OUR UNIQUE HOME

The community asked for better transit connections and shorter travel times. The new EmX West line is providing both. Since its September 2017 launch, the service has provided 700,000 rides. That’s an average of 3,600 rides per weekday, helping people get to and from work, school, services, shopping and recreation. New business activity is also happening in west Eugene, and motorists, pedestrians, and bicyclists are able to travel safely along improved corridors.

By Carolyn Stein, BRING There is a lot to love about Eugene. Our city

car dealership that supports teen driver safety

is known for great food, a thriving arts scene

education are examples of strategic giving.

and spectacular natural beauty. We are also

While donating money is always appreciated,

known as a community that is both socially

employers can also offer in-kind support

and environmentally conscious and we expect

and paid time off to employees, so they can

the places where we shop, dine and work to

volunteer at the organization of their choice.

reflect those values.

ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP

Corporate social responsibility, or CSR, goes beyond meeting basic legal and ethical standards of operating a business; it includes functioning as a strong community citizen that shows concern for the public by “doing good.” While CSR is most often related to large corporations, small businesses can also benefit from responsible social and environmental practices.

own reward, it makes business sense to incorporate environmentally friendly practices into your operations. In Eugene, food-related businesses can donate unused food to food banks and compost the rest through the city-run Love Food Not Waste program. These practices reduce waste, improve your environmental performance and show concern for the community that we call home.

One of the most important ways a small

COMMUNICATION

is getting involved with service organizations and projects. This is easy for local companies that have roots in the community where they operate. By taking part in local events and activities, companies can enhance their visibility and attract new customers.

GIVING Giving is another opportunity for businesses to show their support for their community.

Communicating your CSR efforts is the key to a successful program. Sharing your success on your website, social media and other outlets has the benefit of keeping employees and customers engaged. Studies show that young professionals want to work for companies that support their values and that customers are willing to pay more for services and products that align with charitable interests and protect the environment.

Though not a requirement, it is common for

With the rise of social media and review sites,

businesses to return some of their earnings to

Eugeneans have more power than ever to

local nonprofit organizations that align with

identify companies that are good community

their company’s mission. A clothing retailer

citizens. Adopting a CSR program is an

that collects gently used coats for veterans or a

effective way to remain competitive.

Carolyn Stein is executive director for BRING, an entrepreneurial nonprofit organization, and the creator of Rethink Business, a hands-on technical assistance and certification program for businesses that want to reduce waste, save money and improve their environmental performance. To learn more about the BRING Rethink certification program and how it can improve your business, visit bringrecycling.org.

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THANK YOU

While being responsible is often its

INVOLVEMENT business can showcase social responsibility

Thank you to the community for supporting this vision. Welcome aboard!

Michael and Angie Marzano at Hot Mama’s Kitchen + Bar Eugene restaurateurs, Michael and Angie Marzano, host fundraising nights, donating a portion of the day’s sales to local nonprofits. The couple’s two restaurants are Rethink Certified through a local certification program that improves environmental performance, and they actively look for ways to reduce their environmental impact.

The power of one. The power of many. Hershner Hunter is a comprehensive business law firm with specialty areas to match your unique needs. So you’re not just getting one attorney, you’re getting the power of an entire firm behind you.

541-686-8511 | HershnerHunter.com


QU E RY & QUOTES

QU E RY & QUOTES

NEXT-GEN SCIENCE AT EUGENE SCIENCE CENTER QUOTED: Tim Scott, Executive Director

PHOTOGRAPHY: Steve Smith Photography

YOU JUST COMPLETED A REBRAND FROM THE SCIENCE FACTORY TO THE EUGENE SCIENCE CENTER. WHY DID YOU TAKE THAT PROJECT ON, AND ARE THERE OTHER EXCITING CHANGES COMING IN THE NEXT YEAR?

through fun and engaging experiences. We’re hoping to get a fiber optic connection to support all of the amazing things our growing tech community is doing. For instance, our 40-foot dome planetarium is a unique projection platform – one of the largest in the entire Pacific Northwest. I’d love to see how we can use this dome as never before, whether through visualizing complex data, immersive digital art and 360-degree movies, or using it as an educational resource for all the sciences. We’ll be able to project a 40-foot skeleton on our dome, rotate it and fly through it. Actually, kids will be able to fly through it and our universe using an X-box controller. That’s pretty cool.

When I became director in 2016, we were calling ourselves the Science Factory Children’s Museum and Exploration Dome. We had numerous discussions to determine if we wanted to focus on the general purpose of a children’s museum, which is to learn through play, or the purpose of a science museum, which is STEM education that’s fun. We unanimously decided to focus heavily on not just STEM education, but also empowering people to use science in their daily lives to better their communities. We then started calling ourselves, simply, the Science Factory. I soon learned that there are quite a few organizations in the world with Science Factory in their name and that many people didn’t know what Science Factory was; this put us on the rebranding path that led to the Eugene Science Center. We were lucky to work with Partnered Solutions IT on the new brand, which forecasts our hopes for the future, in that, we want to become a world-class science center with a greater impact on our community. We’re in the process of raising $900,000 to improve our current assets, such as our planetarium, exhibits and restrooms, and to create some great new experiences, like an outdoor science park and outdoor classroom, a discovery room, and a fabrication shop to create our own exhibits.

Engaging with children at a young age, and nurturing it as they grow and develop, helps create the critical-thinking leaders we’ll need in the future to solve the problems we’re creating today. We’re not in the business of creating the next generation of scientists. We want people to think like scientists by remaining curious, investigating their world, experimenting, not being afraid of failing and thinking critically about issues that affect their communities. We’re interested in conveying how the scientific investigation approach makes discoveries and solves problems, and I think instilling that approach at an early age helps lay a robust foundation in analyzing issues and solving problems.

EUGENE IS GETTING QUITE A REPUTATION FOR ITS ROLE IN

WHICH CHAMBER EXPERIENCE HAS IMPACTED YOU OR YOUR

SCIENCE-BASED CAREERS WITH THE GROWING TECH SECTOR AND

BUSINESS THE MOST THIS YEAR?

NEW KNIGHT CAMPUS, AMONG OTHERS. HOW DO YOU SEE THE

Networking through Chamber events has been extremely beneficial, especially since I’m still so new to the community. It’s been great to meet business professionals and learn about the ways we can collaborate to make our community stronger. It’s also been great for our organization to help us get the word out about our recent rebrand and all the changes taking place at the Eugene Science Center.

EUGENE SCIENCE CENTER FITTING INTO THAT LANDSCAPE? I like to think of us as the public, informal education hub that will link all of the STEM-focused entities together, while infusing our vibrant art scene into the mix. We’re working hard to strengthen connections with the new Knight Campus. This not only benefits the university, but also the entire community. For example, we’re a great resource to help satisfy the National Science Foundation’s broader impact criteria for local research, which helps the university in obtaining and fulfilling grants and benefits the community by allowing us to learn about the amazing research to take place on campus,

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WHY IS IT SO IMPORTANT TO ENGAGE CHILDREN IN SCIENCE WHEN THEY ARE YOUNG?

The Eugene Science Center’s Foundation for the Future campaign is raising funds that will strengthen and expand their community impact. Visit: eugenesciencecenter.org/foundation-for-the-future/

GROWING COMMUNITY AT TJ’S GARDENS

QUOTED: Geoff Ostrove of TJ’s Gardens

PHOTOGRAPHY: Courtesy of TJ’s Gardens

TELL ME HOW YOUR COMPANY GOT STARTED AND HOW IT LANDED IN EUGENE?

WHAT MAKES YOUR ORGANIZATION UNIQUE OR STAND OUT FROM THE COMPETITION?

TJ’s is named after its founders, Travis MacKenzie and James Orpeza. Together, these two friends and business partners have built one of the largest stable of award-winning genetics. They’ve also been recognized as one of the most decorated cannabis grows in the country. Their dedication to creating something positive and progressive is evident in every offering.

According to BDS Analytics, TJ’s Gardens is now the No. 1 selling cannabis flower brand in the state and the No. 6 overall cannabis brand in the state. With four gardens, an extraction lab, edibles kitchen, distribution company, two retail dispensary locations, and a home delivery service, TJ’s Gardens was the first completely vertically integrated cannabis company in the state, and we are proud of the fact that we’ve reached that level of success while being based in Eugene.

Travis got his start in the Eugene cannabis industry as a labor of love for his wife, Cham, who suffered from debilitating migraines after surviving an accident that resulted in a brain injury. Cham’s neurologist strongly suggested she try medical cannabis, and so Travis started growing a few plants. The cannabis he produced proved effective for Cham’s pain management and stopped most headaches before they became excruciating. Thanks to treatments that consisted solely of cannabis, the frequency of Cham’s migraines was reduced by 90 percent. After seeing these positive results and benefits, Travis became motivated to help others and soon pursued a larger location, so he could grow for more patients. He was inspired to aid and educate his community in a way that would allow him to have the most impact. On his journey to get to the next level, he crossed paths with James in Eugene. Prior to meeting Travis, James had also been growing medical cannabis for patients for many years. James was involved in numerous smaller partnerships with other grow-operations that sought out his consultation, implementation and grow expertise. Through his very first patient’s experience with cannabis, James quickly understood the cannabis plant had much more to offer than a good high. He realized that his growing talents could be applied for a bigger purpose, on a much larger scale. When James started collaborating with Travis, he had more than 25 years of indoor and outdoor growing experience under his belt. James was responsible for bringing a “beyond organic” approach to growing in the gardens. This approach has become a foundation for all of TJ’s practices. The knowledge and innovative techniques he brought to the table were pivotal in turning TJ’s great flowers into truly amazing products. Together, Travis and James have proven to be an unstoppable force.

YOUR ORGANIZATION IS INVOLVED IN SEVERAL COMMUNITY ISSUES AROUND DOWNTOWN. WHY DO YOU FIND STRENGTHENING OUR DOWNTOWN TO BE AN IMPORTANT ISSUE TO FOCUS ON? TJ’s is very engaged with the Eugene community. We are involved with the Downtown Eugene Merchants, the City of Eugene’s Sunday Streets events, the Whiteaker Community Market, Cascadia Wildlands and other community organizations. Our mission is to help facilitate happiness in our community. We believe that the best way to do that is to engage local organizations in a way that helps to promote sustainability and livability. WHAT CHAMBER EXPERIENCE HAS IMPACTED YOU OR YOUR BUSINESS THE MOST THIS YEAR? We participate regularly in the Local Government Affairs Council (LGAC) meetings, and we try to attend as many other Chamber events as possible. However, the one we are most excited about is the Willamette Angels Conference, held this year at the Downtown Athletic Club in May. TJ’s Garden founders, Travis MacKenzie and James Orpeza (left), infuse their company with a higher purpose. From their contributions to community initiatives, like downtown Eugene, to their employee volunteer days, TJ’s is growing an industry and investing in our community.

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SEC TO R ST R AT EG I E S

Vibrant sector strategies, committed partnerships and inspired community leadership are helping to drive the growth of targeted industries and our regional economy. The Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce is proud to be a part of the Lane County Sector Strategies team. Each quarter, we’ll learn from the partners moving this work forward.

GROWTH IN MANUFACTURING ADDS TO THE VIBRANCY OF EUGENE’S ECONOMY Article by JOSHUA MONGÉ, EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

The 2017 numbers are out and they say what most people in manufacturing already know, the industry is growing. The number of people employed in manufacturing in Lane County has been growing over 2 percent, year over year for the last two years. Along with that, wages have been increasing from 2.5 percent in 2014 - 15 to over 5 percent in 2016 - 17. Lane County’s strong growth in both wages and employment outpaced statewide numbers in Oregon manufacturing by a few percent. This positive forward movement is exciting to see for an industry that’s so vital to our local economy. We are actively working with regional agencies to help our existing businesses increase resiliency and hedge against closures. Programs are in place to help with business plans, managed growth and supply-chain needs. Specifically, we are actively engaging in preserving a local business to find an owner operator to re-employee around 100 employees. By getting out to businesses to hear their needs and identify when they need assistance, we expect to continue to work behind the scenes to strengthen and support this sector. Interest in the Eugene market is picking up as more calls come in from manufacturing firms outside the area. As tech and the food and beverage market continue to garner attention of “top 10 sites” the word is getting out that Eugene has a diverse economy with opportunity for people from all walks of life. We are answering calls from manufacturers outside the area looking for potential sites, arranging tours with potential businesses and helping to find those that fit the culture of Eugene and will be an asset to the community.

SO WHAT’S NEW FOR MANUFACTURING? In the last few months, the old Hynix plant sold, and we’re excited by whispers of activity from the new owners. Last year, local alternative vehicle manufacturer, Arcimoto went public on the Nasdaq Capital Market with a Regulation A+ offering. This year, they are gearing up for tremendous growth. Our local manufacturers are coming together regularly through our “Focus on: Manufacturing” program to talk about best practices and work through economic barriers that are impeding growth. Seneca Sawmill consistently innovates, bringing on new processes and technology to support their continued growth. Photo courtesy of Seneca Sawmills.

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Behind the scenes, Eugene Chamber staff and our partners at the city, county and other organizations are collaborating to address workforce needs, permitting concerns and inconsistent application of regulations. Working together to address these barriers to economic progress is helping to strengthen local businesses and infuse our community with opportunities.

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SEC TO R ST R AT EG I E S

Food and beverage industry professionals talk marketing. Left to right: Ali AAsum, Ninkasi Brewing; Raychel Kolen, Mountain Rose Herbs; Darcey Howard, Coconut Bliss; Beth Hjelm, UO Lundquist College of Business.

FOOD & BEVERAGE MARKETING INNOVATIONS, QUALITY AND SAFETY Article by MICAH ELCONIN, SEASON TO TASTE CONSULTING || Photo by ATHENA DELENE

Professionals from the over 150 food and beverage manufacturing companies in Lane County gather each quarter for Food Business Unpacked, a showcase of stories from Lane County food and beverage leaders. February’s event focused on marketing innovations in the industry. Ali AAsum, Communications Director at Ninkasi Brewing; Raychel Kolen, Marketing Manager at Mountain Rose Herbs; and Darcey Howard, Director of Marketing at Coconut Bliss, shared a bit about how they leverage technology to build their brands. Beth Hjelm, Senior Director of Strategic Initiatives at UO Lundquist College of Business moderated the panel. This event was a collaboration of Lane Food and Beverage Sector Strategies, Season to Taste,

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RAIN Eugene Redefining Women in Tech, and Ninkasi Brewing. A FSMA (Food Safety Modernization Act) Round Table group launched in March. This group provides food safety managers a forum to collaborate. Eight companies came together to discuss the concept of “continuous improvement” and what that looks like in terms of FSMA compliance. Miranda Bengtson brought examples of tools that SnoTemp uses to collaborate internally and uncover root causes of problems that could compromise safety, quality or legality. Documented use of these tools helps SnoTemp provide evidence of this robust collaborative approach to risk management and continuous improvement, as well as providing an archive for SnoTemp to reference in the future.

Several participants indicated an interest in discussing maintenance programs for the next quarterly meeting. Lane County food and beverage manufacturers employ nearly 4,000 professionals and that number is growing every year. Lane Community College is collaborating with local industry to build out workforce training programs targeting the specific needs of industry. Leadership from Yogi Tea, SnoTemp, Franz Bakery, Ninkasi, DanoneWave, Attune Foods, Singing Dog Vanilla, Queen’s Bounty, Market of Choice, Bagel Sphere and Coconut Bliss have all participated in program development.

Local tech talent contributes more than $360,000 in in-kind support to positively impact community initiatives.

TECH INDUSTRY SOLVES COMMUNITY CHALLENGES AT HACK FOR A CAUSE Article by MATT SAYRE, TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATION OF OREGON || Photo by ATHENA DELENE

Hundreds of entrepreneurs, makers, developers and students came together for a 48-hour work marathon called Hack for a Cause in April. Founded three years ago by Sector Strategy partners, Hack for a Cause has become a platform for the tech industry to offer their expertise to solve challenges in the local community. “Over 200 participants put the event right up there as one of the largest hackathons seen in Oregon in the past 10 years,” said Skip Newberry, President of the Technology Association of Oregon. Dozens of challenges were submitted by local businesses, city governments and civic organizations looking to leverage technology to provide transformative public benefit. Eleven of those challenges were

chosen this year and more than $360,000 in in-kind labor was donated to them.

for the murals that are now canvassed throughout Eugene’s cityscape.

New this year was backing from Mozilla and a partnership with US Ignite, in an effort to spur the development of next-generation Internet and Smart City technologies that leverage gigabit Internet networks, like Eugene-Springfield’s EUGNet.

Innovative tech-enabled solutions were also developed for the NAACP, White Bird Clinic, Parenting Now!, Egan Warming Center, 15th Night, Trans*Ponder and the Emerald Compassionate Action Network (ECAN).

“Mozilla’s mission of ensuring the Internet remains a global public resource that promotes civil discourse, human dignity and individual expression, which directly aligns with the goals of Hack for a Cause,” said Craig Wiroll, Mozilla Gigabit Portfolio Manager. Gigabit-enabled solutions were developed for Adventure! Children’s Museum, Step into [AR] Comics (City of Eugene), and wayfinding

“I am exhilarated to report that ECAN has been blessed by the efforts of five employees of CBT Nuggets … The amazing team of brilliant young people who built this web portal at Hack for a Cause called themselves ‘nerds-of-a-feather,’” said David Hazen, president of ECAN. The tech community and Hack for a Cause 2019 are now accepting challenge submissions at hackforacause.org. What’s your cause?

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LE VER AGING OUR COMPE TITIVE EDGE Article by BRANDY RODTSBROOKS EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Nestled between rolling hillsides and mountain rivers, it’s easy for people outside of our region to see Eugene as a quiet city with a long-held reputation for being a little different. From being considered a haven for hippies to an outdoor mecca, our way of life in Eugene has always been an interesting topic of conversation. Generations of Eugeneans have cultivated a unique sense of identity that is significantly more complex and diverse than the stereotypes often associated with our city.

U N I Q U E LY

EUGENE

In recent years, our way of life has become a magnet, attracting a great deal of national attention to our livability and drawing both professionals and businesses to our region. Since the year 2000, Eugene has added nearly 30,000 residents bringing us to 167,780 in 2017. This growth in population represents an increase of 22%. What is it that makes our city a great place to live and do business? And how is this way of life positioning us for exciting, new opportunities?  >

Left: Eugene is a place of collaboration, invention and creativity. Pictured here, left to right, are the professionals representing Evans, Elder, Brown & Seuburt, CodeChops, Pivot Architecture, IDX and Euphoria Chocolate. Photo by Athena Delene. Top: Hikers take in the picturesque river view from Mt. Pisgah. Bottom: Euphoria Chocolate owner Bonnie Glass and her son enjoy the fountain at Eugene’s downtown Park Blocks. Photo by Athena Delene.

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QUALITY OF LIFE In 2018, Eugene was ranked one of the Top 100 Best Places to Live by Livability for its mild climate, many parks and attention to the environment, along with its artisan food and craft beverage scene, recreational opportunities and focus on the arts. Our quality of life is a large part of what lures professionals to our area and keeps them here. “Overall, I think the breadth of culinary, cultural and outdoor activities, combined with all the conveniences and livability of a small, centrally located city, make us a very desirable destination,” says Diana Wells, downtown visitor services coordinator for Travel Lane County. For many professionals, our growing economy has opened up new and exciting industries that hold opportunities traditionally found in larger metro areas but with all the perks of a small town. In Eugene, you can have both an exciting career and still cut across town in time to enjoy dinner with your family, something often sacrificed in larger cities. This often-elusive balance of work and personal life is attractive to new generations of professionals seeking to have it all. Eugene’s quality of life is something the University of Oregon sells as a benefit for recruitment. “At the UO, we attract students, faculty and staff who want to live in a place with an exceptionally high quality of life, a vibrant economy, and access to culture and the outdoors,” says Vice President of University Communications Kyle Henley. “The sense of place and lifestyle associated with the city and region are part of what helps the UO recruit and retain world-class academics and researchers from around the country and even the globe.”  >

Transplanted business professionals, long-time Eugeneans and visitors who contribute to our region’s tourism economy enjoy everything from picturesque river paths to extraordinary entertainment venues. Eugene’s livability continues to improve, thanks to advocates like Food and Beverage sector strategist, Micah Elconin, top left, and folks like Angela Norman of the Lane County Farmers Market, bottom right. Photos by Athena Delene & Travel Lane County.

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A VIBRANT ECONOMY “We are in a sustained pattern of growth right now, so various sectors of our economy, especially service, tech and real estate, have been booming, says Wells. “Part of that boom is due to increases in tourism and the sheer number of people that are moving to Eugene, working and creating here and contributing to our economy.” The area’s recent growth is spread across a broad range of sectors. Since the recession ended in 2010, jobs in construction, leisure and hospitality, and nondurable manufacturing (think food and beverages) have all grown by more than 25 percent. Health care, professional services and retail aren’t far behind. While this economic boom presents some inherent challenges, like how we will tackle the second-most constrained housing market in the country, it also leads to new opportunities for broadening our range of industries and brings additional benefits to local business with increases in both customers and a larger talent pool. Henley sees economic opportunity in the new, largely donorfunded, Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific

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U N IQU E LY E UG E N E

“Overall, I think the breadth of culinary, cultural and outdoor activities, combined with all the conveniences and livability of a small, centrally located city, make us a very desirable destination.” Diana Wells, Travel Lane County

Impact, an ambitious $1 billion initiative to fast-track scientific discoveries into innovations that improve the quality of life for people in Oregon, the nation and the world. “The Knight Campus will serve as a major economic engine for the Eugene-Springfield area, creating new opportunities for new high-tech companies and outposts of existing companies as we spin off technologies and leverage the excellence of our shared facilities,” Henley says. This kind of launch point for incubating business also serves as a magnet for world-class talent, helping to build a pool of innovative professionals for the next phase in our regional economic growth.

A CONNECTED COMMUNITY There is a tension that exists between a sense of shared identity around key values and an embracing of our uniqueness that continues to invite critical conversations, experimentation and collaboration into the work and life of Eugeneans. It is this tension that is cultivating an ecosystem of creativity and a drive to push past boundaries and on to growth. Collaborations that bring together diverse perspectives have become a driving force in our regional development in recent years. With private, public and nonprofit organizations finding new ways to work together, Eugene is enjoying the benefits of a more connected and cohesive community. Having various interests working together to collectively impact our region plays an important role in the positive momentum that is pushing forward growth in sectors like food and beverage and tech, or community development projects like downtown revitalization. These cross-sector collaborations even work to galvanize support around projects like the Knight Campus, new Riverfront Development or the growth of the Market District.

We benefit as a community from collaboration across sectors where business and community initiatives develop just as easily by connecting with other professionals at a food truck in the Park Blocks as they do in the board room. This break from traditional ways of doing business is helping professionals from the public, private, and nonprofit sectors work together to address community challenges and opportunities in an efficient and productive way.  >

Pedestrian paths and bridges contribute to Eugene’s livability and encourage people to commute on foot and by bike, making it easy to get across town to work or the Farmers Market. The crew at Party Downtown, center, serve up some of the best farm-to-table finds in the region. Center photo by Athena Delene.

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EUGENE’S COMPETITIVE EDGE This type of cross-pollination builds our uniqueness in a tangible way that adds to the magnetic effect that draws professionals, looking to relocate and, in the process creates new ways to approach business development. It fuels engagement in exploring new ideas, supporting entrepreneurs and fostering creative problem-solving in business.

THE KNIGHT CAMPUS ATTRACTING WORLD CLASS TALENT The University of Oregon’s Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact is attracting top-notch talent, lured to Eugene by its scientific innovations and livability.

Whether a person was born here or made the conscious decision to relocate, we are all dedicated to constant improvement for the shared benefits to our businesses and communities. This is our competitive edge.

Recent recruits include: BOB GULDBERG from Georgia Tech, widely known for his research in regenerative medicine, to serve as executive director of the Knight Campus.

To take Eugene to the next level of business and livability, we need to embrace our uniqueness and fully step into a growth mindset. Let’s not retreat to the comfortable corners of stereotypes. Instead, let’s bring together our diverse assets, perspectives and skills to create a future as only we can. 

DAVID MCCORMICK from Yale University, one of the nation’s leading neuroscientists, will lead the UO Institute of Neuroscience and serve as co-director of the Neurons to Minds Cluster of Excellence, alongside UO psychology professor Ulrich Mayr.

Proudly Growing Our Eugene Team

Nobel Prize-winner DAVID WINELAND, who studies quantum physics and, recently joined the UO Physics Department as a Knight research professor.

Engineering Impact As a bioengineer, Robert Guldberg battles degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis, designs advanced orthopedic devices, and helps heal wounded warriors. He’s translating science for society and turning discovery into impact. That’s why we selected him to be the first permanent executive director of the University of Oregon’s Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact, a $1 billion initiative to improve society by rethinking research, science education, and innovation. At the Knight Campus, we will create a new innovative ecosystem to train the next generation of scientists, focusing their efforts around societal needs and clinical promise. Together, we will redefine possibility.

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NONPROFIT SOLUTIONS

& I N V E S T M E N T M A N A G E M E N T • E S TAT E P L A N N I N G Headquartered in Lane County, we have been serving our local business owners and professionals since 1979!

accelerate.uoregon.edu

EO/AA/ADA institution committed to cultural diversity.

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ADVERTORIAL

THREE WAYS TO ACHIEVE A

U N IQU E LY E UG E N E

H EA LT HY L I F E S T Y L E

“Employees who feel that they’re supported and are healthy—they’ll start to talk about it, and they’ll project a strong image of where they work, which will help you recruit and retain valuable employees”

By THE PERSONAL TRAINERS AT THE DOWNTOWN ATHLETIC CLUB

Living a healthy lifestyle requires hard work, motivation and dedication. The Downtown Athletic Club believes that achieving a healthy balance of both an active lifestyle and a vibrant personal life can be easy to implement and maintain. It’s why we offer tips, like the ones below, that help our clients stay on track with their fitness goals while maintaining balance in their lives

ONE  |  ADOPT HEALTHY HABITS, NOT DIETS

Sally Cummings, Wellness Coordinator PacificSource Health Plans

healthy community HEALTHY BUSINESS Employee Wellness Programs Drive Business Success

Article by SABRINA HALSTEAD

Workplace wellness programs and initiatives can have a significant impact on business success. While there are a lot of resources to help companies implement and maintain wellness programs, starting a program can be a lot of work. Depending on the size of the business and the internal resources available, it can be a little costly to kick things off or ramp up wellness programs, but the benefits are certainly worth the investment. Fortunately for local businesses, our community support can supplement internal efforts. The Eugene community prides itself on an active approach to health and wellness, and we are fortunate to have a variety of programs and services available that provide everyone the opportunity to access resources that aid in healthy living. Couple that with a business’ internal employee health initiatives and there is more to gain. RECRUITING Eugene has a national reputation for being dedicated to healthy lifestyles and quality of life. This reputation is helping local businesses attract top talent. While there’s a wealth of talent already rooted in our community, gaining more talent is the goal. Beyond that, a health and wellness-focused community supports a physically, mentally and emotionally healthy workforce. Healthy, active employees take few sick days. Research supports that this focus on health can boost mental acuity, drive and focus, helping employees perform more efficiently on the job.

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“Employees who feel that they’re supported and are healthy— they’ll start to talk about it, and they’ll project a strong image of where they work, which will help you recruit and retain valuable employees,” says Sally Cummings, Wellness Coordinator at PacificSource Health Plans. PRESENTISM AND PRODUCTIVITY “Historically, presentism addressed people who are physically sick, but now we’re looking at it on a broader scale, including depression and anxiety,” says Cummings. Our community’s focus on prevention and a balance of physical and mental wellbeing gives local professionals even more opportunities to handle health issues and achieve wellness goals. “Knowing that they’re supported at work and can ask for days off or have someone to talk to about personal or health issues will increase morale and productivity,” says Cummings. JOB SATISFACTION AND RETENTION When employees feel supported and know that their health and well-being are a priority, the foundation is set for greater employee satisfaction and retention. Take that a step further and foster the connection between your organization and the community, encouraging your employees to get involved.

“At PacificSource, we do a lot with volunteerism,” says Cummings. “We encourage our employees to participate in things that resonate with them. They’re given a chance to make their own choice to get out and get involved in the community. So not only is it a great way to get out and support the community, but it’s one of the ways we show them that we trust them and support what’s important to them.” For local employers, making employee health a priority has numerous benefits and is worth the effort. It’s also worth tapping into the abundant community resources that can help foster or maintain a healthier workforce of productive, engaged employees. 

HEALTHY RIGHT HERE

Improve Employee Health with PEACEHEALTH RIDES

Eugene is now home to a newly launched bike share program, PeaceHealth Rides. This network of more than 35 bike share stations and over 300 bikes allows users to pick up and drop off publicly available bicycles for one-way trips across the city. This program doesn’t just impact health and wellness, it promotes sustainable transit options, while alleviating parking issues and traffic congestion. Group memberships are available for local businesses interested in purchasing discounted annual passes for their teams. For more on how to get your team on board, contact Lindsey Hayward at 541.632.3720.

Diets can be hard on your body, as you quickly change your eating habits. Most dieters tend to think of diets as a temporary goal, not a lifestyle change, making them much more challenging to maintain. Switching this mindset to think about nutrition goals, in terms of regularly making healthy choices will aid in your ability to achieve long-term health goals.

TWO  |  COMMIT TO WORKOUTS YOU ENJOY When it comes to working out, not everyone is going to enjoy doing the same thing. It is important to find a workout that makes you excited about going to the gym. Vary your routine by trying new classes or doing different workouts. It’s important to get active in ways that best suit your lifestyle and fitness needs, whether it’s playing a basketball game with friends, pushing your boundaries with a personal trainer, or enjoying the quiet Zen of swimming laps in the pool. Engage in the activities that make you happy, and it will be easy to keep going.

THREE  |  CONSTANTLY SET NEW GOALS When starting your fitness journey, it helps if you set goals for yourself. These goals should be difficult yet achievable and help you celebrate a pace of progress that will keep you motivated. Once you see those desired results, setting a new goal will help you push yourself a bit further and make you feel motivated by what you’ve been able to achieve. Sharing these goals with others can help hold you accountable and provide a support system that is there to celebrate with you when you hit the mark. At the Downtown Athletic Club, you can find something for all of your physical, mental and social needs. From over 100 fitness classes, to book clubs, to wellness seminars, the DAC has all you need to take those steps toward living a happier and healthier life. DAC NEW MEMBER SPECIAL No initiation fees. No more contracts. $149 Individual ($15 monthly restaurant credit) $224 Family ($25 monthly restaurant credit) Find out more by visiting us online at downtownac.com/membership


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FOOD & BEVERAGE SCENE SERVES UP CREATIVITY THAT IS UNIQUELY EUGENE Article by SOPHIA BENNETT

Portland may have a reputation as one of the best restaurant cities in America, but Eugene’s food and beverage scene has emerged from its shadow and is demonstrating its own impressive success. “People who enjoy eating and drinking their way through a region have a lot of options, especially when it comes to beer, wine, cider and spirits,” says Micah Elconin, who leads a food and beverage sector strategy team convened by over 20 local businesses. “The greater Eugene area is home to numerous best-in-class producers, offering delicious beverages in just about every style you can imagine.” The community’s eateries are delivering on some of the biggest industry trends, which makes Eugene a great place for consumers. “It’s not difficult for our local restaurants to be doing legit farm-totable service,” says Elconin. “We have year-round access to local ingredients. Restaurants are able to use a wide variety of highquality foods that are produced in this valley.” “What’s exciting for us right now is getting the opportunity to work with local food purveyors, breweries, distilleries and vintners on collaborations that complement the great food we’re serving,” says Angie R. Marzano, co-owner of Hot Mama’s Wings and Hot Mama’s Kitchen + Bar. Both locations use meats sourced from Long’s Meat Market, honey and peanut butter from GloryBee and many other local products.

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Another trend that’s really taken off is the move toward dining spaces that are light, airy and open. “I think the main thing people are looking for right now is feel,” says Colby Phillips, co-owner and operator of Tap & Growler, BeerGarden and the new PublicHouse pub and whiskey bar on Main Street in Springfield. “They want to go to a place that feels welcoming, warm, inviting and relaxed.” Parents want places where their kids feel welcome, and Eugene businesses are doing a great job making spaces familyfriendly, he added. Eugene offers a great variety for foodies, as well. Dan Hughes, co-founder and general manager of ColdFire Brewing, credits the plethora of quality food establishments to Eugeneans’ openness and willingness to try new things. “I think people are a little more adventuresome and willing to move outside their comfort zone,” he says. “That builds a culture for small businesses to thrive in. Eugene has a pretty robust history of embracing the new.”  >

Eugene’s food and beverage scene continues to reflect the combination of experimentation and quality that foodies crave. Photos courtesy of Tap & Growler and Beergarden, respectively.


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>  Portland has long been thought of as a capital for culture creatives. “But I think there’s as much or even more creativity in Eugene than in Portland,” says Hughes. “Eugene, in its own merits, and has really begun to show that it’s just as capable of being an incubator and creating really great goods and services that you’d usually associate with a bigger city.” These qualities are among the many things that make Eugene a terrific place to be in the food and beverage industry. The community boasts more than 150 food businesses that generate $1 billion in gross sales every year, making it one of the fastestgrowing economic clusters.

Here at the Chamber, we consider it one of the perks of the job to get to support local business. While it was almost impossible not to make a more exhaustive list, we came up with a few of our favorites.

CHAMBER STAFF FOODIE FAVES Newman’s Fish Market – Cod & Chips Ta Ra Rin – Pad Kee Mao Sizzle Pie – 6 Degrees of Kevin Bacon

The community boasts more than 150 food businesses that generate $1 billion in gross sales every year, making it one of the fastest-growing economic clusters.

Black Wolf Super Club – Everything is delicious, including the fancy drinks Dickie Joe’s – Hamburger Starbucks – Short Soy Mocha

“We have a significant pool of talent and expertise in a number of categories of food and beverage manufacturing. Over 4,000 people are employed by the industry in just our county alone,” says Elconin. Even more talent is in the pipeline, thanks to programs like the Lane Community College Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management program, as well as the University of Oregon Food Studies program and Lundquist College of Business, which hosted a very successful “career in food and beverage” event earlier this year. “There’s an incredible amount of collaboration that occurs amongst businesses in the area,” says Elconin. Combine that with the area’s history of food entrepreneurship and access to quality ingredients, and it’s no wonder so many food businesses get their start here. Consumers and business owners can expect a lot more good eatin’ in the future. “The growth in tourism, tech, food and beverage has elevated consumers’ expectations and also contributes to more diversity, which is great,” says Marzano. “Consumers will continue to see more creative, local gastronomy with food and beverage pairings that enhance the dining experience.” 

Market of Choice – Teriyaki Salmon Skewers, Mama Leone’s Soup & Superfood Salad Mucho Gusto – Burritos & Tostadas Café Yumm! – Original Yumm Bowl King Estate Winery – Garden Salad, Crab Cakes & Homemade Bread Steelhead Brewery – Veggie Calzone Marche Le Bar – Whiskey Sours First National Taphouse – The Meat Loaf Plate La Pearla Pizzeria – Lasagna della Casa Billy Mac’s Bar & Grill – Hot Shrimp Salad Hot Mamas Kitchen + Bar – Teach Me How to Duckie Cocktail ColdFire – Beans of Wisdom & Cumulus IPA Lion & Owl – The Whole Menu

With more great food and beverage stops popping up, this growing sector of our economy is strengthening the magnetic effect of living and working in Eugene.

Tap & Growler – Dungeness Crab Pretzel & Endless Beer Choices The Barnlight – BLT Salad

Photos courtesy of Tap & Growler, Beergarden and Travel Lane County.

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ADVERTORIAL

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GET THE MOST OUT OF SELLING YOUR BUSINESS Sell-side due diligence for food, beverage and agribusiness companies In the food, beverage and agribusiness industries—where there are heightened merger and acquisition activity and intense competition for growth—companies contemplating a sale can often greatly benefit from leveraging sell-side due diligence to advance their strategic goals. Performed correctly, the process uncovers opportunities for sellers to enhance their company’s value prior to a sale, while helping facilitate a faster close time. What are the benefits? Sell-side due diligence is a proactive process that involves identifying and assessing issues and trends that either positively or negatively impact business value from a buyer’s perspective. Business owners gain vital insights this way, establishing a strategic framework for selling a company later on. Armed with the due diligence findings, sellers can address weaknesses prior to a sale, prepare for questions they’re likely to face from buyers and structure the transaction to increase deal value and after-tax proceeds.

What are the key concerns for companies preparing for a sale? Performance metrics, such as gross-to-net sales and gross margin by product, customer and channel, are essential as a company goes to market and will invariably be viewed closely through a buyer’s lens. However, many companies in the food, beverage and agribusiness industries aren’t proficient at properly tracking and accounting for inventory costing and sales incentive activities. Sellside due diligence helps sellers identify and address weaknesses, such as these, that are specific to their company. When to begin preparing for a sale? Businesses should start preparing for a sale three to five years in advance, providing the sellers ample opportunity to begin positioning the company for sale, preparing multiple years of performance data, and putting systems and information in place that’ll be seen as desirable by potential buyers.

By Michael Pihowich, Sell-Side Leader and Managing Director, and David Terry, Partner, Transaction Services of Moss Adams For more, visit Moss Adams online at mossadams.com/about/locations/eugene

Success never tasted so good The perfect recipe for the success of Café Yumm! included Small Business Administration financing from Summit Bank. To see how we can help your business, stop by or give us a call.

SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DIVISION

96 East Broadway in Eugene 541-684-7500 • www.SBKO.bank

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Café Yumm! founders Mary Ann and Mark Beauchamp with Summit Bank SBA Program Administrator Ashley Horner


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“Art is a part of what makes someone a complete, valuable employee.” Eric Braman, Lane Arts Council

Artists, Businesses, Educators & Nonprofits Work to Inspire Creativity Article by LEAH MOORE

If you haven’t made an entry in your gratitude journal today, here’s a freebie: We are lucky to live in a remarkably arts-infused community. Did you hear about the Harmonic Labs City Synth project that partnered with high school robotics students to transform the cityscape of Eugene into a symphony for a First Friday Artwalk installation? How about the collaboration between Broadway Commerce Center and local artists to make arts events possible in downtown Eugene? These are just two examples of the numerous ways in which nonprofits, for-profits, artists and educators are collaborating in our community to drive economic growth, spark creative thinking, educate and make Eugene an attractive place to live and work. Creativity Pays Off Throughout human history, we’ve engaged with the arts to tell our stories, better understand one another and improve our overall quality of life. But many people are given few opportunities to engage in this core aspect of human life during the typical eighthour workday. According to the 2016 Adobe State of Create study, 77 percent of global respondents reported that they feel more pressure to be productive rather than creative at work.

Creating opportunities for employees to engage with the arts and tap into their creativity can radically improve workplace culture and employee satisfaction, while boosting innovation and productivity. Also, in the Adobe study previously mentioned, people who described themselves as creators were more likely to also describe themselves as happy, innovative, confident and problem-solvers. John Barry, executive director of Arts & Business Alliance of Eugene (ABAE), believes that art and culture are major factors in attracting and retaining quality employees. “Art is about enriching our lives,” says Barry. “I think that businesses that invest in the arts and make the arts available to their employees are creating a culture that leads to more productive employees.”

Arts Mean Business Not only do the arts enrich our community, they are an important economic sector in their own right. Arts & Economic Prosperity® 5, a national study that measures the economic impact of nonprofit arts and cultural organizations, found that art in Eugene contributed $62 million and accounted for 2,400 jobs in 2015. Barry foresees creative cultures within organizations being a major success factor for businesses in the future, saying, “The trend in every industry is automation and outsourcing, and what’s going to differentiate companies and employees is their ability to think creatively.”  Craig Wiroll, Gigabit portfolio manager for the Mozilla Gigabit Community Fund, also perceives arts integration and cross-sector collaboration to be vital in the future. “Right now is the time to pivot towards inclusivity of all perspectives and take best practices from all sectors into your organization, if you want to grow. New generations are requiring businesses to blur the lines between “for profit” and “for social benefit.”  >

“We believe that we’re all connected to the arts,” says Liora Sponko, executive director of the Lane Arts Council. “It’s really part of all of our lives and essential to our lives.”

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It’s time to get creative! Check out these programs and events that connect business to the arts in Eugene.

LANE ARTS COUNCIL

Creating unforgettable experiences for the nation’s top AV companies from the heart of Eugene

First Friday ArtWalk Businesses can participate in First Friday ArtWalk by becoming a venue, sponsoring or helping to sponsor or organize a special event. lanearts.org/participation

THAT’S STRETCH SHAPES

First Friday ArtTalk, Lane Arts Council These free events provide community members with an opportunity to hear from influential artists, designers and arts leaders. lanearts.org/friday-arttalk

ARTS & BUSINESS ALLIANCE OF EUGENE

From STEM to STEAM in Workforce Development Arts education is making a big comeback in the development of our future workforce. “Art is a part of what makes someone a complete, valuable employee,” says Eric Braman, the arts education program coordinator for Lane Arts Council. That concept often begins in school. “By bringing art into the classroom, we’re not trying to make every student an artist, but rather help them gain these skills of creative thinking, innovative problem-solving and these skills of engaging and persisting.” One area where this shift is evident is in the movement to upgrade STEM — the widely-used acronym for science, technology, engineering and math — to STEAM with an added “A” for art. Today’s students are being trained to integrate arts into nearly every subject, even in areas where the role of art hasn’t always been recognized. STEM subjects and careers “become so much richer and compelling and inclusive when you integrate art,” says Craig Wiroll of the Mozilla Gigabit Community Fund, which has funded numerous STEAM-powered projects in Eugene, including Gigabit Artist Residencies, an initiative with Lane Arts Council to bring working artists into schools and teach digital storytelling. “People often think of classic technology and programming as a blinking green dot on a black screen and that really doesn’t get young people engaged. It can be, and is, much more than that. Sometimes, it is hard to see what is possible with binary code, because the world we live in isn’t binary.” 

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Arts & Business Loan Program Arts organizations, artists and commercial businesses working with the arts in Eugene can qualify for low-cost, quick-turnaround loans to establish new projects, improve infrastructure or finance special projects. artsbusinessalliance.org/loanprogram Arts & Business BRAVA BRAVA events (Businesses Recognizing Arts Vision & Achievement) happen twice annually. Two awards are presented each year to recognize exceptional contributions to the arts and noteworthy arts and business collaborations. artsbusinessalliance.org/brava

MOZILLA GIGABIT COMMUNITY FUND Apply for funding Organizations working on projects that utilize next-generation technologies and highspeed, low-latency to impact education or workforce development may be eligible for a Gigabit grant. learning.mozilla.org/en-US/gigabit/apply Gigabit events These global and local events facilitate collaboration and conversation. learning.mozilla.org/en-US/gigabit/events

PHOTO: RICHARD TERMINE

Students in Lane Arts Council’s Product of Eugene apprenticeship program learn creative skills and career readiness through one-on-one mentorships with professional product designers.

Arts & Business Creative Academy These seminars co-led by representatives from the arts and business sectors help participants address common business challenges through the application of artistic practices or by engaging with the arts. artsbusinessalliance.org/creative-academy

stretchshapes.net • 888.370.0202


MOVERS & SHAKERS

THE JOURNEY TO TRANSFORMATION EUGENE EMERALDS EMBRACE ALTERNATIVE IDENTITY AS LOS MONARCAS Article by ALLAN BENAVIDES, EUGENE EMERALDS

more inclusive with the local Latino population.

“A common theme of migration bounced around the table. The monarch butterfly performs one of the most spectacular journeys and has become a subtle and beautiful symbol for the migrant community.”

This past March, Minor League Baseball (MiLB)

This is a complete transformation of the Emeralds

Never ones to shy away from out-of-the-box promotional ideas or zany theme nights to engage our fans during the summer, the Eugene Emeralds focus on being an integral part of the community, ingrained in the heart of Eugene/Springfield. This summer, that focus continues with the Emeralds unveiling an alternative identity aimed at being

revealed the on-field identities of the 33 teams participating in its new “Copa de la Diversión™” (“Fun Cup™”) season-long event. “Copa de la Diversión” serves as a key component of MiLB’s “Es Divertido

with the goal of welcoming even more people into the Emeralds, and now the Monarcas, family. We encourage all members of the select games and make community history in Eugene.

Latino fan engagement initiative.

The team wanted to make sure that

With the more than 120,000 fans that

the logo helped tell this unique story

Ems have a unique platform to inspire and create an experience that every member of this community can enjoy. We believe that everyone should feel welcome in this community, no matter their background. This new opportunity will align with these values. For all six Tuesday night home games at PK Park, the Emeralds will transform into Los Monarcas de Eugene, complete with new uniforms, food and music, creating an exciting atmosphere at the stadium. All-new merchandise will also be available to fans with the

of migration and its beauty. Within representing the 33 Latin countries and the state of Oregon, which became the 33rd state in the union. Also, in the logo, are odes to Oregon’s state forests, the Three Sisters, and the sun and moon. The Ollin, which is an Aztec symbol representing movement and action with all of your heart, is at the forefront of the logo. To distinctively launch this new initiative and visually celebrate the diversity that defines MiLB communities nationwide, MiLB and each of the participating teams created culturally related on-field personas

The focus of the new brand revolves around the multi-national

shaping and leading MiLB markets today.

population in Oregon is growing at a robust rate. Since 2000, the

that honor their respective Latino communities that are building,

All “Copa” teams will adopt these new personas via on-field jerseys

Latino population has grown by 72 percent.

and caps during designated “Copa de la Diversión” games during the

The Eugene Emeralds worked closely with an advisory panel,

MiLB.com/copa, featuring each participating team’s unique identity

composed of leaders in the local Latino community to discuss this new “Copa” identity.

Located in the heart of the downtown EUGNET.

the monarch’s wings are 33 white dots,

new Monarcas emblem.

ethnicities that make up our Latino community. The Latino

IT Services I Managed Services I Cloud Hossng

local community to join us for these

Ser Un Fan®” (“It’s Fun to be a Fan®”)

attend our games every single year, the

A Partner You Can Count On.

2018 season. MiLB also introduced a new “Copa”-specific website, and the story behind its selected on-field persona, with links for fans to purchase and pre-order any of the on-field caps, branded apparel and tickets to the “Copa” ballpark events.

Help make community history in Eugene by joining Los Monarcas at each Tuesday home game. June 19th, July 3rd, July 17th, July 24th, August 14th Pre-order your Los Monarcas gear at MiLB.com/copa

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800 Willameee St – Ste B50 541-607-3789 www.connnu.net

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A community of collaborators, game-changers, movers and shakers: Here’s a look at this quarter’s Chamber happenings, as we work to build networks, move forward projects, and elevate both businesses and professionals.

SMALL BUSINESS CRAWL // bell+funk informed the crowd during the Chamber’s first Small Business Crawl. It was one of many stops, including Claim 52 Brewing, Summit Bank, North + West and The Barn Light. BRING RETHINK CERTIFIED // The Chamber became BRING Rethink Certified again. We are proud to run an organization focused on sustainable solutions. YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORK // A group of game-changers gather at Oregon Wine LAB, as young professionals connect and engage at YPN. For more on the new YP programming, visit eugeneyp.com LEADERSHIP EUGENE-SPRINGFIELD // Congratulations to the graduates of the 2017-18 Leadership Eugene-Springfield program. These community leaders have worked all year to broaden their knowledge of and engagement in our community. We look forward to seeing the positive impact of their future community leadership. BRAVA BREAKFAST // We’d like to extend our congratulations to the crew at Imagination International Inc. for winning ABAE’s Dave Hauser Business Patron Award at the Arts & Business BRAVA – Business Recognizing Arts Vision and Achievement event. SMALL BUSINESS CRAWL // We ended the evening with a talk from Thomas Pettus-Czar, owner of The Barn Light, who spoke on the role of the Chamber and the importance of advocating for our community. HUMAN FOOSBALL // Engaging in a thriving downtown is important to the Chamber. With all the City of Eugene’s EUGfun activities, like the Human Foosball tournament, it can be really fun, too!

Don’t miss a minute, visit EugeneChamber.com for a calendar of events.

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B I Z Z B UZ Z

B I Z Z B UZ Z

PROMOTIONS & NEW HIRES The Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce

is pleased to announce the promotion of Amanda Yankovich, formerly the Events Manager, to Director of Membership. Amanda will be crafting strategies to increase value and engagement in our members. “We are thrilled to have Amanda in this role. In the last six months, Amanda had stepped up to handle events while bringing on board new members. Her knowledge of our members and ideas on how to better serve them will be a strong move forward for our Chamber,” says Brittany Quick-Warner.

Brian Steffen has been

hired as the new Chief Executive Officer for the Eugene Family YMCA. Mr. Steffen brings more than 12 years of management experience in the nonprofit sector, overseeing strategic partnerships, major project construction, fundraising, housing inequities and operational efficiencies. The Y is Eugene’s longest running nonprofit organization (131+ years in Eugene), focused on healthy living, youth development and social responsibility.

Heather Wall has been named chief nursing officer at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend in Springfield. She had been serving in that role on an interim basis since February. As CNO, Heather oversees all RiverBend nursing operations, working with physicians, hospital leaders and nursing teams to enhance clinical performance, quality and safety, caregiver engagement, and improving the patient and family experience.

Jan Vondrachek has joined Serenity Lane as the

new Director of Strategic Initiatives. Jan will oversee multiple programmatic initiatives and provide strategic inputs on all areas of operations. She brings 22 years of industry experience to her new role. Prior to joining Serenity Lane, she was the Vice President of Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation’s Pacific Northwest Operations.

PeaceHealth recently announced that Mary Kingston, RN, FACHE, will join the

organization on July 30 as chief executive of the PeaceHealth Oregon network. Mary is a seasoned

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health care leader with 30 years of broad executive experience, with more than 10 years dedicated to leadership in Catholic health care. In anticipation of the 5th Street Public Market expansion and with other developments on the horizon, Obie Companies has significantly expanded its leadership team. Irene Alltucker has been named director of real estate. Kevin Belden has joined the team as construction manager, overseeing construction projects for the existing market and future projects, including the market expansion. Nicole Roselio has been promoted to director of marketing for all Obie entities, including two hotels and the 5th Street Public Market. Jenny Ulum is public affairs counsel, serving as a liaison between the company and community stakeholders.

Joe Carmichael, VP/Commercial Relationship Manager, Troy Reichenberger, VP/ Commercial Relationship Manager, Dave Williams, VP/ Commercial Relationship Manager, Kristin Short, VP/Relationship Banking Officer, Joshua Samples, AVP, Portfolio Manager, and Andrea Dolby, Relationship Banking Assistant. The Eugene office of Moss Adams LLP is proud to announce the following promotion and new hires:

Alicia Andrews has been promoted to Tax Senior. Alicia, a graduate of the University of Oregon, joined Moss Adams in June of 2003.

Joe Mark, a seasoned

health care executive with 35 years of leadership experience, has been hired as interim chief executive for PeaceHealth Oregon Network. PeaceHealth Oregon is conducting a national search for a permanent chief executive.

Executive Director. School Garden Project helps Lane County Schools develop on-site vegetable gardens and teach science, reinforce STEAM skills and promote healthy eating habits.

Director of Programs and promoted Emrielle VanCleave to Program Manager of the Uhlhorn Program. Romero oversees all of the agency’s human services and housing programs. VanCleave manages the day-to-day operations of the Uhlhorn program to ensure quality services are provided to individuals with an acquired brain injury.

Oregon Pacific Bank took a large step toward growth within the Eugene and Springfield markets today, announcing the hire of eight new employees to add to the bank’s Eugene office. The new employees hired are: John Raleigh, EVP/Chief Lending Officer, Vicki Gray, SVP/Relationship Banking Team Leader,

Director, beginning in the 2018-19 season. Lecce-Chong will maintain his position as Music Director and Conductor of Eugene Symphony, conducting nine of the 12 concerts in Eugene’s upcoming 2018-19 season, as planned. “We know that Francesco will achieve great success in this new opportunity and bring even more ideas and energy to his role here at Eugene Symphony,” says Eugene Symphony Executive Director Scott Freck.

Mindy Bell has joined School Garden Project of Lane County as its new

ShelterCare has named Jayne Romero

Kevin Lundgren has been named branch manager of River Road KeyBank branch, located at 1980 River Rd in Eugene. In this role, he will be responsible for day-to-day operations and coaching his team, as well as providing financial services, including investments and mortgages, to both small business and consumer clients.

Santa Rosa Symphony has announced Francesco Lecce-Chong as its fifth Music

Lane County is proud to

announce the addition of Angie Marzano, formally of BRING Recycling. Angie will be assuming the role of Waste Reduction Specialist; working on local waste reduction and recycling policy.

Lane Arts Council’s board of directors welcomed

Becky Schwarzkopf

as their newest member. Becky is a real estate and business lawyer at Arnold Gallagher P.C. and currently serves as Chair of the Silva Endowment Committee at the Oregon Community Foundation. Hillary Tully joined Lane Arts Council staff as their Admin and Development Assistant. She holds bachelor’s degrees from Florida State University and a Master’s in Folklore from the U of O.

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Real Estate Professionals is pleased to welcome Jasmine Hatmaker, Betty B. Golden and Spencer Hauser to their team at 2300

Jesse Summers has joined the award-winning Funk/Levis & Associates as an Account

Assistant and Junior Copywriter. Summers will use his skills in communications and creative wordsmithing to help achieve marketing goals for clients. “We’re thrilled to add Jesse to our team,” says Anne Marie Levis, President and Creative Director. “Jesse is a talented writer and we’re excited to have another accomplished graduate from the University of Oregon’s SOJC join our agency.”

Sarah Brolsma Whitfield has joined the award-winning Funk/Levis & Associates marketing team as a Digital Marketing Manager. She will be using her skills to help the agency’s clients be more competitive by amplifying their digital presence. “Sarah is a tremendous addition to our team,” says Anne Marie Levis, President and Creative Director. “Her knowledge of digital marketing trends and strategy will help us better serve our clients.”

Oakmont Way in Eugene.

Arts and culture. Start-ups. Nightlife. These are the building blocks of a thriving downtown community and Eugene has them in spades. We’re proud of how far we’ve come. We’re even more excited about where we’re going.

Angela Witty, Cody Luna, Samantha Maslin, Samantha Sorensen, Viky Saysamone and Zach Wilson were hired as a Staff Accountants in October 2017.

PeaceHealth is proud to announce the following board appointments: Marge Hamilton, Ph.D., president of Lane Community College; Gustavo Balderas, Ed.D., superintendent of Eugene School District 4J; Bob Pelz, M.D., chief of

staff, PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend; and Christa Danielson, M.D., chief of staff, PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center, University District, have been appointed to the PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center Community Health Board.

DowntownEugene.com E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |  O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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B I Z Z B UZ Z

BUSINESS NEWS PeaceHealth and Ronald McDonald House Charities are collaborating to build

and operate a new 20-room guest house on the RiverBend campus, within just a few minutes’ walk to the main hospital. The new single-story, 24,000-square-foot Heartfelt Guest House will include two, 10-room wings—one for the families of pediatric and NICU patients, the other for families of adult patients. The house is being funded 100 percent by donations, with expected completion in spring of 2019.

Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) has received the following grants to train

and support new volunteer advocates: Reser Family Foundation ($10,000); Oregon CASA Network ($4,772); Spirit Mountain Community Fund ($5,000); Taco Bell Foundation for Teens ($2,300); Great Rotary Raffle ($45,000); RBC Wealth Management ($5,000); Eugene Active 20-30 Club ($2,000); Trust Management Services ($10,000); McKay Family Foundation ($10,000); Weyerhaeuser Company Foundation ($2,500); Northwest Natural Gas ($2,500); Central Lutheran Foundation ($2,000); Storms Family Foundation ($2,500); Cottage Grove Community Foundation ($3,400); Walmart Supercenter W. 11st, Eugene ($1,000); and Western Lane Community Foundation ($2,000).

Oregon Pacific Bank has voiced intent to acquire a branch of its own in downtown Eugene. Currently, the Bank operates out of a professional suite in the Eugene Citizen’s Building. “We have been operating in the Eugene market since 2015,” says Ron Green, President and CEO of Oregon Pacific Bank. “We have developed something very special out of our professional banking office over the past three years, but the timing is right for us to take the next step and grow into a ground-level building of our own.” Kernutt Stokes is announcing the launch of Private Accounting Services, providing part-time, or “fractional” chief financial officer and virtual accounting services to small and medium-sized businesses and nonprofits. The accounting support and financial analysis will help businesses make data-based decisions that shape the direction and potential success of their organizations. The new practice is being led by two highly experienced former CFOs, Erik C. Parrish and John W. Nepute. Summit Bank (OTC Pink: SBKO) reported net income for the first quarter of $1.15 million or 28 cents per fully diluted share. Comparable earnings for the first quarter of 2017 were $762,000 or 20 cents per fully diluted share, representing an increase of 51 percent to earnings and 37 percent to earnings per fully diluted share. Fully diluted earnings per share for the trailing four quarters totaled 89¢.

Friends of Buford Park & Mt. Pisgah, whose mission is to protect and enhance native ecosystems and compatible recreation in the Mt. Pisgah area, held their annual Native Plant Sale in May. With the help of hundreds of volunteers, they wildcraft seeds from the greater Mt. Pisgah area and use them to propagate over 100 species of wildflowers, grasses and shrubs. Summit Bank (OTCBB:SBKO) announced

Eugene Ballet officially broke ground on the

new Midtown Arts Center at the corner of 16th Avenue and Pearl Street in Eugene on May 10. The groundbreaking comes two years after Eugene Ballet began raising funds to support its home, scheduled to be completed in the fall of 2019. The new Midtown Arts Center will include nearly 30,000 square feet of increased rehearsal and expanded office space for eight of Eugene’s leading nonprofit arts organizations, surrounded by 30+ privately-owned, townhouses and condominiums.

that its Board of Directors approved a 5 for 4 stock split of the company’s shares of common stock, payable in the form of a stock dividend. The ex-dividend date is June 4 with shareholders of record as of June 11 receiving an additional share for every four shares they own. “Given Summit’s strong financial results in the first quarter of 2018 and the increase in our stock price since the last stock split, the Board reviewed a number of options to thank our shareholders for their support,” says Board Chair Paul Weinhold. “We believe the time is right for a one-time split to increase the stock’s marketability and liquidity by making it attractive to a larger number of potential investors.”

Papé Material Handling, part of The Papé Group, Inc., has acquired the complete assets

of Pacific Material Handling Solutions’ six Yale dealerships in Northern California including in Modesto, Sacramento, Salinas, Stockton and Union City. Papé Material Handling is now Northern California’s official Yale Dealer. “Pacific Material Handling Solutions Inc. customers can rest assured that Papé Material Handling will offer unparalleled customer service and the best selection of Yale equipment to meet their material handling needs,” says Chris Welte, President of Papé Material Handling.

PeaceHealth Rides is pleased to announce

the official launch of Eugene’s first rental bike share program. A fleet of 300 sturdy blue bicycles rolled onto city streets in April and has already out-performed expectations. Title sponsor PeaceHealth and its program partners—JUMP Bikes, the City of Eugene, Lane Transit District and the University of Oregon—are proud to offer an active, healthy and green transportation option to Eugene residents and visitors.

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Grammy Award-winning cellist Zuill Bailey visited several schools, nonprofits and businesses during his week-long Eugene residency. Eugene Symphony Executive Director Scott Freck says, “Zuill is not only an incredible artist, he’s also deeply passionate about sharing his music far and wide, as evidenced by this whirlwind tour of Eugene-area schools, businesses, and human and health service providers. His approach is fully aligned with our mission of enriching lives through the power of music.”

Drawn Creative Agency opened its new

offices in the Whiteaker to clients and community members. The new offices were built to help the creative team bring flexible workspace and intentional design to better serve clients, including an on-site workshop, photography space, and open offices that foster collaboration.

E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |  O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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B I Z Z B UZ Z

KUDOS Northwest Christian University’s Center for Leadership and Ethics honored Eugene business leaders Joe and Cathleen Karcher, Rexius and Relief Nursery as the 2018

nonprofit organization that serves residents and individuals of Lane County impacted by cancer. The Foundation’s goal is to empower, strengthen and sustain those in our community through education, support and financial assistance.

recipients of the Exemplary Ethical Leader Awards, the Center’s highest honor. “The Exemplary Ethical Leader Awards recognize individuals, businesses, and nonprofit organizations for establishing a culture where honorable and ethical business practices are the foundation for personal, organization and community relevance,” says Susan Soonkeum Cox, Vice President for Policy and External Affairs at Holt International and Center for Leadership and Ethics Advisory Board member.

Paula Cielsielski, MD (retired) has been elected to the Eugene Family YMCA’s Board of Directors. Dr. Cielsielski served the community for years as an internal medicine doctor and served as Chair of the Lane County Medical Society. The Y is Eugene’s longest running nonprofit organization (131+ years in Eugene), focused on healthy living, youth development and social responsibility. Ditch Witch Northwest, a Papé Company, Marilyn Heiken, an attorney at Johnson Johnson Lucas & Middleton, was elected

to serve as the District 2 representative to the Oregon State Bar House of Delegates. “I am honored to be elected to represent our region and join this forum on important issues,” says Marilyn Heiken. “Being involved in helping the Bar govern is an exciting opportunity and I look forward to making a difference.” Heiken has more than 25 years of experience representing people who have been harmed. She has helped people obtain justice for medical malpractice, wrongful death, motor vehicle collisions, nursing home abuse and civil rights violations.

Movassaghi Plastic Surgery & Ziba Medical Spa Practice Administrator Niloo Marashi was recently elected to the Board of the Oregon Cancer Foundation, a 501(c)(3)

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was named No. 1 for parts volume out of 170 Ditch Witch dealerships throughout the world, as well as being ranked in the top 10 for providing exemplary customer service. The announcement was made during the recent Ditch Witch Parts and Service Conference in Tulsa, Oklahoma. “I am proud of our entire Ditch Witch Northwest team for their dedication to delivering solutions that keep our customers moving,” says Steve Jergentz, General Manager of Ditch Witch Northwest. “I am pleased our members have been recognized internationally for their outstanding work.”

The McKenzie River Trust has selected new

officers to leads its 15-member board of directors. Louise Solliday, retired director of the Oregon Department of State Lands, is now the board’s president; Jim Regali, a retired physician, is vice president. Other officers include: Christian Beck, secretary, an investment advisor with Charles Schwab, and Doug DuPriest, a retired attorney with Hutchinson Cox, is the treasurer. “Louise, Jim, Christian, and Doug are passionate and experienced professionals with a deep commitment to the McKenzie River Trust’s mission to help people protect and care for the lands and rivers they cherish in western Oregon,” says Joe Moll, McKenzie River Trust’s executive director.

banks headquartered in Oregon to make the list this year. “It is an honor to again be recognized by our colleagues and Oregon Business Magazine as one of the 100 Best Companies to Work for in Oregon,” says Craig Wanichek, Summit Bank’s President and Chief Executive Officer. “This recognition helps validate the emphasis we put on a strong internal culture. We value the 100 Best program because it helps us focus on our colleagues. I could not be more proud of our team for working together to make Summit Bank such an excellent place to thrive.”

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541-685-5000 | turellgroup.com The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) announced the 2018 National

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Medal for Museum and Library Service winners, the nation’s highest honor for museums and libraries for service to their communities. Among the 10 winners is the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History. IMLS honors the extraordinary community contributions of the Museum by bestowing upon them the highest and most prestigious award given to both museums and libraries by the federal government.

GRANTS Eugene Symphony is to receive $15,000

grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to support its 2018-19 concert and weeklong residency with the multi-Grammy Award-winning ensemble Eighth Blackbird. This project is also being supported by the Herbert A. Templeton Foundation. The project is designed to deepen audience appreciation for contemporary music; provide unique artistic development opportunities for students in area music programs; and promote ESA’s efforts to bring high-caliber music enrichment experiences to historically marginalized populations and nontraditional concert patrons.

Summit Bank, with offices in Eugene and Bend, announced today that it was recognized for the second year in a row by Oregon Business magazine as one of the 100 Best Companies to Work for in Oregon. Summit Bank is one of two E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |  O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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A QU IC K N OTE

EMBRACE UNIQUE OUR FUTURE DEPENDS ON IT By Brittany Quick-Warner, CEO Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce

I

t’s hard to believe that it has been nearly

As our country becomes more divisive,

and field facility, an exciting expansion of

nine months since I’ve been in this new

more polarized than ever, it is going to

the 5th Street Public Market, proposals for

position at the Eugene Chamber. In an

take strong leadership from the business

incredible new recreational facilities for

effort to understand how our members hope

community, from our elected officials and

kiddos and families at Golden Garden Parks,

to see our community and Chamber evolve,

from community members to ensure that we

Civic Stadium, and the YMCA, transportation

I have spent hundreds of hours over the last

can stay focused on forward movement and

and master plan redevelopments for

few months meeting with leaders of member

achieve a shared vision for our future.

Glenwood, and focused efforts on continued

companies and organizations across our region. I have learned more in the past ten months than I could have ever imagined, and I am just beginning to scratch the surface.

Eugene has a reputation for being a progressive community, which by definition

downtown revitalization in both Springfield and Eugene.

implies an openness to change, growth and

Each of these projects represents something

forward movement. In reality, some folks in

bigger than the physical structure and

What I know is this: Eugene is a unique and

our community have a really hard time with

something much bigger than ourselves. They

wonderful place to live. What I have learned is

that. Now is not the time to settle for gridlock

represent an opportunity for us to embrace

that our region is undergoing a tremendous

or “how we’ve always done it.” In business,

our uniqueness and celebrate the past, but,

change, and business leaders are full of

without progress, your company is dying. We

most importantly, to come together and move

hope for the future of our community. But

must accept, as a community, that in order to

forward to create a better community for those

it is going to take us coming together and

overcome some of these challenges we have

who come after us.

embracing our uniqueness to get us there.

to push past the partisan politics, make some

Our population is growing. Our economy is growing. And our hopes and dreams for the future are getting bigger, too. Along with

hard decisions and pursue a vision for our community with passion and vigor, no matter which side of the aisle you’re sitting.

growth, almost always comes growing pains,

Right now, at this moment in our history, we

and we are, unfortunately, not immune. We

have an opportunity to think bigger, further

desperately need more housing, higher wages,

out in the future, about how the decisions we

more resources for public safety and to reduce

make now will benefit those to come. Sitting

our carbon footprints. Knowing where we

on our doorstep are transformational projects,

want to be and our strategy for getting there is

like the Knight Campus for Accelerating

critical, but we can’t overlook the importance

Scientific Impact, a redevelopment of our

of how we get there.

beloved riverfront, a best-in-the-world track

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We want to hear from you. What does our best future look like? Use #ChamberEvolved to share your vision.


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EUGENE ARE A CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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EUGENE 2021 THE FUTURE IS NOW

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CO NTE NT S

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COVER STORY / There’s a buzz in the air as the city prepares to host the largest sporting event in the world in three short years. And, while many of the private and public projects underway are not directly associated with the event, there’s an excitement and urgency to make Eugene the best it can be for everyone to see. Photography by Quip.

FEATURES 16 30 34

THE FUTURE IS NOW

Chamber Board of Directors

BUILDING A LEGACY Public and private projects are underway that promise to provide jobs, ignite the economy and build community.

20X21EUG MURAL PROJECT Color and collaboration: the city aims to create 20 or more world-class outdoor murals by the 2021 IAAF World Championships.

BUSINESS OR PLEASURE The countless attributes that make Eugene the perfect place to live and work also make it a traveler’s dream come true, and that’s good for business.

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Chris Boone, Chair President, Boone Insurance Associates Stephanie Seubert, Chair-Elect Partner, Evans, Elder, Brown & Seubert, Inc. Mandy Jones, Past-Chair Retired, Oregon Community Credit Union Nigel Francisco, Treasurer CFO, King Estate

OUR COMMUNITY MEMBER VOICE Are you ready to welcome the world to Eugene? Tap in, get involved and prepare your business for 2021.

QUERY & QUOTES Scott Altenhoff of Eugene Parks and Open Space hopes to plant a seed about climate change in the process of planting 2,021 trees in Eugene to offset projected carbon emissions that come with hosting the largest sporting event in the world. And, Greg Ausland of Ausland Group discusses the company’s design-build process and how it benefits clients, from planning and architecture to engineering and construction.

SECTOR STRATEGIES Food + Beverage, Tech and Manufacturing: happenings and what’s on the horizon. MOVERS & SHAKERS By taking a three-prong approach to overhaul Eugene Young Professionals, through revamped programming, thoughtful content and mindful networking events, young professionals are reaping the benefits of a value-added Eugene YP.

YOUR CHAMBER POLICY INSIGHT Dig deep and raise your voice on issues that matter to you, as we tackle the many projects and initiatives that will turn our 2021 dreams into realities. CHAMBER VISIONARIES President and CEO of Summit Bank Craig Wanichek and Vice President

Scott Lindstrom, Vice-Chair, Organizational Development, Exec. Vice President, Jerry’s Home Improvement Center Cale Bruckner, Vice-Chair, Economic Development President, Concentric Sky Thomas Pettus-Czar, Vice-Chair, Business Advocacy Owner, The Barn Light Amanda Walkup Partner, Hershner Hunter, LLP Betsy Boyd Assoc. VP of Fed. Affairs, University of Oregon Casey Barrett Vice President, Obie Companies Cheryl Boyum CEO, Cascade Health Solutions Chad Barczak CEO, IDX Broker

of Obie Companies Casey Barrett on the benefits of investing in employees and community.

Dr. Gustavo Balderas Superintendent, Eugene School District 4J

HERE & THERE Snapshots of events, happenings and goings-on that reflect our Chamber and our ever-changing business community.

Greg Lyons CFO, Western Shelter Systems

BIZZ BUZZ Promotions, new hires and news you can use.

Jason Lafferty General Manager, SnoTemp Cold Storage

A QUICK NOTE Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce CEO Brittany Quick Warner believes there’s something to be said for playing to your strengths: embrace them and be bold.

Ralph Parshall General Manager, Mercedes Benz of Eugene Trace P. Skopil CPA Partner, Moss Adams

E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |   O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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Barb Brunton Business Manager Brandy Rodtsbrooks Director of Marketing & Communications Emily Rea Member Engagement Coordinator Joshua Mongé Director of Economic Development Matt Wunderlin Marketing & Event Coordinator

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Sarah Delp Economic Development Specialist Tiffany Edwards Director of Business Advocacy Advertising Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce 541.484.1314 Design/Layout Turell Group 541.685.5000 turellgroup.com Printing QSL Print Communications 541.687.1184 Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce 1401 Willamette St. Eugene, OR 97401 541.484.1314 Open for Business A publication of the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce (USPS-978-480). Open for Business is published quarterly by the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce in March, June, September and December. Circulation: 3,800. Open for Business © 2018 The subscription price is $25, included in membership. Periodicals Postage Paid at Eugene, OR.

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POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 1107, Eugene, OR 97440-1107.


POLIC Y I N SIG HT

YOUR VOICE, YOUR ADVOCACY EUGENE’S SUCCESS DEPENDS ON IT

the area. And, the Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact

By Tiffany Edwards, Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce

WE CAN’T DO IT WITHOUT YOU

In July, I attended a national conference for the Association of

In preparation for Oregon21, there will be a significant need for

Chamber of Commerce Executives. In one of the breakout discussions,

support from the business community for transportation projects and

we were asked to share the business advocacy issues that we would be

other infrastructure. State funding from the legislature to ensure the

focusing on in the coming year.

transient lodging tax dollars are appropriated where they’re needed

I listened intently as participants discussed their very diverse business-

will require advocacy. Public safety needs, specifically concentrated in

community challenges – everything from housing and homelessness

downtown Eugene, will require resources in order to be met, and other

to natural disaster recovery and healing from tragedies like school and

downtown policy initiatives will need support. Wouldn’t it be great if,

police shootings. While we share some of these challenging issues

within the next three years, we could turn downtown Eugene into a

with the rest of the nation, I chose to share some of the exciting and

place that truly feels safe and welcoming for all, so the world can see

transformational initiatives for which our region is currently embarking.

what a collaborative, unique and special community we’ve built?

IAAF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS OF 2021

What can you do to participate in shaping these critical decisions

This event will be here before we know it. While the ride may not be perfectly smooth, it will be exciting and full of hope and opportunity, none the less. Eugene has a reputation and history of strong debate and diversity of values, which is why it’s imperative that the business community continues to dig into these issues and use our voices to make our opinions and hopes clear for the many projects and initiatives along the way. We must be active participants in the public process to ensure success, not only for this monumental event but for the economic development efforts that will move us into the future. Many things are planned to be completed or well-underway by 2021. The EWEB Riverfront Redevelopment and Riverfront Park is expected to be far enough along in the process for locals and visitors, alike, to be reaping the benefits of this public-private partnership by the summer of 2021. The 5th Street Market Expansion and its new Gordon Hotel will host visitors and draw shoppers, sightseers and sports fans to

should be up and running by 2021. But these are just the beginning.

that will set the course for the future of Eugene? First, get informed. Pay attention to the news and current events. Second, subscribe to newsletters, other communications and social media tools that are providing information. Email me at tiffanye@eugenechamber.com, to be included on the distribution list for updates and details on the Chamber’s advocacy efforts. Lastly, become active in the efforts of the Chamber and our many partners by submitting letters to the editor, letters, emails, public testimony and other communications to city councilors, legislators, neighborhood leaders and other decision makers. There’s no doubt, this is just the beginning of a long and potentially bumpy road. Luckily, the destination is well worth the effort.

Looking to lend your voice to help leverage Eugene’s opportunities for growth? Email Tiffany Edwards at tiffanye@eugenechamber.com E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |   O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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C H A M B E R V ISIO N A RI ES

GIVING TO THE COMMUNITY PAYS OFF IN BIG WAYS By Chamber Visionary Craig Wanichek, President & CEO of Summit Bank The most influential people are the ones who leave behind great legacies, live on through their values, principles, philosophies and achievements. Many legacies are born in Eugene. The Hult Center, Oregon Festival of American Music, and the Oregon Bach Festival were all created by passionate community members. The first Nike running shoe was made in Eugene. Steve Prefontaine, who achieved American records in seven different distance track events, inspired our town to become known as “TrackTown, USA”, which led to our community being chosen as the first USA-based host of the IAAF World Championships to be held in 2021. Summit Bank was also created in Eugene. It was formed by a group of local, independent entrepreneurs and high-achieving business leaders who believed in making their own legacy. As a local business, we believe that one of the greatest legacies we can

the City of Eugene “Bold Steps” program, which honors Eugene-based

create are happy, thriving colleagues. We recruit from and partner

sustainable businesses.

with the University of Oregon’s Lundquist College of Business and

Another way we can leave a legacy is by taking care of our community.

Northwest Christian University to find talent for our company. We

At Summit, we pay our colleagues to take time off to volunteer for

strive to provide a great workplace for our employees. We think we’re

nonprofits and arts organizations for which they are passionate. As a

on the right track, as we were recognized for the second year in a row

company, we match charitable donations that our colleagues make to

as one of the 100 Best Companies to Work for in Oregon.

organizations that matter to them.

We can all leave a legacy to help our community be a sustainable

As a community-based business, we continue to identify and act on

place to do business. For Summit, we decided our greatest sustainable

ways to create a powerful community that will last for generations. Our

contribution means partnering with BRING to become Rethink

pledge is to continue to be the local community bank for businesses

certified. This year, Summit Bank was also recognized as a finalist for

and professionals in Lane County.

YOUR BUSINESS. YOUR CHAMBER. YOUR COMMUNITY.

Read more from our Chamber Visonaries and others in our Chamber at Work section at www.EugeneChamber.com

Thank you to the 2018 Chamber Visionaries: Anne Marie Levis, Funk/Levis & Associates Casey Barrett, Obie Companies Celeste Edman, Lunar Logic Chris Boone, Boone Insurance Associates Craig Wanichek, Summit Bank Ron Neumann, Oregon Community Credit Union

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C H A M B E R V ISIO N A RI ES

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE FROM A NEW PERSPECTIVE By Chamber Visionary Casey Barrett, Vice President of Obie Companies I’ve had the good fortune of working directly with a man I consider a tremendous visionary – Brian Obie, president of Obie Companies and my grandfather. Since I was 13 years old, I’ve worked in the family business, starting with sweeping floors and now, almost two decades later, as vice president and co-developer of the 5th Street Public Market Expansion. Through my grandfather, I’ve seen the power of community and the Chamber’s role in it. That’s why I wanted to serve on the Chamber board and why we’re all working so hard to bring this Market Expansion project to fruition. Like the Chamber, this project builds and creates community. The project includes The Gordon Lofts, a 127-unit apartment building. Housing is new for our company and the construction environment is challenging right now. But it’s a risk we’re willing to take, because we think it’s important to the health of our city’s downtown. We’re equally excited to be partnering with Homes for Good on their 55-unit apartment building, just west of The Gordon Hotel site. Homes for Good provides the affordable housing component to go along with our market-rate apartments, helping to give downtown Eugene the diverse housing mix it currently lacks. As a new father, I know my vision for the future and my role in it is evolving and changing. I’m looking out over a longer horizon and

thinking about the world and the community that I want for raising my son. A baby adds a whole new dimension to life and gives me a new perspective on the work we do. It makes me more committed than ever to finding ways to facilitate growth and still maintain the elements of this community that we all treasure.

Join us in creating the best-possible future for our community. Spread the word using #ChamberEvolved

Together, we’re shaping the future of our community. A well-planned transportation system supports a thriving community. You’re invited to provide input on five major transportation corridors at the following open house events: 30th Ave. to LCC Corridor - Mon., Sept. 24, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Eugene Public Library, 100 W. 10th Ave. River Rd. Corridor - Tues., Sept. 25, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Kelly Middle School, 850 Howard Ave. Coburg Rd. & MLK Jr. Blvd. Corridors - Wed., Sept. 26, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Monroe Middle School, 2800 Bailey Ln. Highway 99 Corridor - Thurs., Sept. 27, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Willamette High School, 1801 Echo Hollow Rd. Can’t attend these events? Share your thoughts via our online open house through Oct. 10 at MovingAhead.org. A project of the City of Eugene and Lane Transit District MovingAhead.org


M E M B E R VOIC E

ALL EYES ON EUGENE

IS YOUR BUSINESS READY FOR OREGON21? By Jeannine Erving, TrackTown USA Incredibly, our state and community are three

What does Oregon21 mean for your business?

land on their list for future travel (and big

short years away from welcoming the world in

It could mean a lot. Ideally, businesses

spending). If you are inspired to show our

2021. We were awarded the honor of hosting

would be considering not only the potential

guests this wonderful place – where we live,

of the IAAF World Championships Oregon21,

economic impact, but the global platform

work and play – hopefully, you’re galvanized

the crown jewel of the sport of track and field.

provided by this once-in-a-lifetime event, and

to take action.

It is the third-largest sporting event in the world behind the Olympic Games and FIFA

how we might make advancements that will leave a lasting legacy.

Consider the impact; reach out the Oregon21 Local Organizing Committee (LOC) to get

World Cup. Neither the Olympics nor World

Ponder the potential for our region, how our

involved; and ready your business to capitalize

Cup occur in 2021, making Oregon21 the

community will build excitement, and how

on this opportunity. The Oregon21 LOC will

largest sporting event in the world that year

our local food, wine, and craft beer vendors

deliver the championships with certain-to-be-

and the first time ever to be hosted in the

will wow visitors. Hotels will be teeming.

unforgettable athletic performances, while

United States. This is a countdown for all

Contractors, engineers and electricians will

you do whatever your business does best –

citizens, not just sports fans and for Chamber

be needed. Medical specialists will be caring

collectively, let’s all be ready to welcome the

members – it is a call to action.

for athletes. And, local technicians will

world to our home.

If you attended the 2016 Olympic Trials, imagine that experience but bigger, and

be assisting in delivering an international broadcast.

now in a spectacular, state-of-the-art facility

The global cumulative television audience

at Hayward Field – accommodating some

for the 2017 IAAF World Championships

30,000 spectators. Imagine up to 214

in London was 940 million viewers. Now,

participating countries, 2,000 athletes and

picture our name, Oregon21, aired on

3,000 media outlets, all descending upon the

television broadcasts and social media

state. And of course, imagine the spectators,

channels, viewed by billions in countries

with approximately 60 percent of visitors

around the world. For those unable to make

traveling from outside Oregon.

the trip for the event, our state may now

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To be a part of this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity in some way, or to tell us how your business is preparing, email Jeannine Erving, Oregon21 LOC, jeannine@gotracktownusa.com.


QU E RY & QUOTES

DESIGN-BUILD

AUSLAND GROUP: BUILDING A CULTURE OF INNOVATION QUOTED: Greg Ausland, Ausland Group

PHOTOGRAPHY: Courtesy of Ausland Group

TELL US ABOUT AUSLAND GROUP. WHAT BROUGHT YOU INTO DOING BUSINESS IN EUGENE? Headquartered in Grants Pass, Ausland Group provides design-build services, which means we integrate planning, architecture and engineering with construction, all under one roof, for commercial projects. To us, success means more than just “on-time and on-budget.” We believe in bringing worldclass innovation and integration to locally scaled development projects. Our heritage spans three generations and is 70-years strong. We are proud of our heavy construction history and our unparalleled commitment to innovation and client success. I grew up in Eugene and worked for Ausland on projects as a teenager, which inspired my education and 30-year career in engineering. In 2014, I opened Ausland’s Eugene office to meet the demand here. I felt that my community, where I grew up, was well poised for an integrated design-build practice. Today, Ausland employs about 100. Our offices in Ashland and Eugene have about 10 employees, and we’re growing. I’m thrilled to be leading one of the most innovative and integrated teams in our region. WHAT MAKES YOUR ORGANIZATION UNIQUE? The architecture, engineering and construction worlds are typically siloed. Our design-build model provides a collaborative flow, from land-use planning, design, permitting, bidding and construction, which is unique. This collaboration between project disciplines facilitates client advocacy through inbuilt cost controls, reduced risk, timely delivery assurance and quality controls. We also provide typical commercial construction and engineering services, as well. WHAT IS IT ABOUT YOUR ORGANIZATION THAT MAKES YOU PARTICULARLY PROUD? Our culture. We thrive on a culture that celebrates technical proficiency and fosters client advocacy. For the Eugene staff, I have an internal vision: Listen to the client, think out of the box, work hard, mobilize our skills, and have fun along the way. This was on display when we delivered Venue 252 in the Whiteaker neighborhood of Eugene. The project re-purposed a 20,000-SF

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historic planing mill into a burnished event center in 90 days. As you walk through the doors of our Eugene office, you realize you have walked into something special. We have created an environment where professionals are empowered to problem solve and technical competence is celebrated. A culture of trust and advocacy is infused into everything we do. We have developed a cohesive team that cares about helping their clients achieve their vision. Our main priority is to maintain and continue to foster this work environment and culture. WHAT OPPORTUNITIES ON THE HORIZON FOR EUGENE ARE YOU AND YOUR TEAM MOST EXCITED ABOUT? We are excited to be part of the sustainable growth of this community. Across the company, we have more than 50 diverse projects in various stages, ranging from a new boutique lodge, to breweries, to school renovations. I am most inspired by the energy around creating a thriving downtown in Eugene, reconnecting it to the riverfront and the IAAF Track and Field World Championships in 2021. The opportunities that are presenting themselves now are some of the most exciting in generations. At Ausland Group, we are hungry to be part of creating a vibrant city and building a lasting future. HOW DO YOU SEE THE CHAMBER IMPACTING YOUR BUSINESS OR THE EUGENE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT? The Chamber provides great opportunities for members to make valuable connections. We are very appreciative that the Chamber is here, as a resource, to share our vision and help connect us to the community that can benefit from our expertise. We also appreciate the opportunity to give back to Eugene and that the Chamber provides multiple avenues for businesses to make our community sustainable and vital. Ausland Group provides design-build services and integrates planning, architecture and engineering with construction, all under one roof. To see some of their local projects, visit: AuslandGroup.com


QU E RY & QUOTES

LASTING LEGACY 2021 FOR 2021: TREES TO OFFSET EMISSIONS QUOTED: Scott Altenhoff, Eugene Parks and Open Space

PHOTOGRAPHY: Courtesy of the City of Eugene

TELL US ABOUT 2021 FOR 2021: WHAT IS THE PROJECT AND HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH IT? The 2021 for 2021 project is a community-wide tree-planting and green infrastructure initiative led by Eugene Parks and Open Space. Our objective is to plant 2021 giant sequoia trees in advance of the IAAF World Track & Field Championships – when the eyes of the world will be upon us – in order to offset some of the associated carbon emissions. We hope to engage the community, raise public awareness about climate change, and highlight the critical role that green infrastructure play in addressing them. Strategic investments in green infrastructure are one of the most enduring and cost-effective things that cities can do to promote community well-being and prosperity. With this initiative, we can make our region more attractive, resilient to natural disasters, and conducive to long-term health and well-being. HOW WILL THIS OFFSET THE CARBON FOOTPRINT OF THE IAFF 2021 TRACK & FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS? As trees grow, they take up remarkable amounts of CO2 and sequester it in their tissues. If we plant a sufficient number of the right types of trees in the right places, and keep them alive and growing, we can make a significant difference and leave an enduring legacy. In addition, the trees will produce considerable shade (reducing energy costs for cooling) and filter harmful particulate matter from the air (aiding human health and helping to promote walking and biking). HOW DO YOU SEE THIS PROJECT HELPING TO BUILD A LEGACY FOR EUGENE? We’d like to show the world that it is possible to build and operate sustainable cities and meet triple-bottom-line requirements. It’s hard to fathom just how much these games will elevate our economy and international reputation. If we pull together as a community and work hard on shared, long-term goals, we can really set our region up for long-term prosperity. Numerous studies

have shown that investments in green infrastructure are one of the smartest investments that cities can make. HOW CAN THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY HELP SUPPORT THIS PROJECT? The business community can help support it in a number of ways. A great first step would be to fully embrace the triple-bottom-line. Secondly, learn about the concepts of green infrastructure (GI) and low-impact development (LID) and consider how these concepts could be employed. This could be as simple as figuring out where a few trees could be planted, but also might include some rain gardens or bioswales. Lastly, we are accepting donations to offset costs and would be grateful for any financial assistance, which would qualify as a charitable donation. HOW CAN THE CHAMBER HELP SUPPORT THIS INITIATIVE? The Chamber can support this initiative by continuing its great work to build stronger connections and collaboration among the commercial/business sector and the various other sectors in our region (e.g., governmental, education, healthcare, nonprofit, etc.). If we are going to achieve great things and address the challenges that face us as a community, it’s going to “take a village.” We will need to tap into the power of collective impact. We view the Chamber as a shining example of a highly effective backbone support agency.

Urban Forestry staff with young sequoias at the City of Eugene Public Works Yard. Students from Camas Ridge Elementary School planting sequoias next to Amazon Dog Park with nonprofit partners, Friends of Trees and Partners for Sustainable Schools.

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Vibrant sector strategies, committed partnerships and inspired community leadership are helping to drive the growth of targeted industries and our regional economy. The Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce is proud to be a part of the Lane County Sector Strategies team. Each quarter, we’ll learn from the partners moving this work forward.

Senior Regional Associate at Agriculture Capital Tyson Davies, right, connects with UO students at Food Business Unpacked.

Kim Johnson gives RAIN Eugene mentor Sean Johnson a tour of Bohemia Food Hub. Young organic hazelnut trees planted at My Brothers Farm in Creswell.

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Left to Right: Corey Thomas, managing director at RUN AMZ; Larry McGrath, sales manager at Brew Dr. Kombucha; Nadine McCrindle, marketing director at Picky Bars; Marty Parisien, co-founder of Singing Dog Vanilla. (Photo by Athena Delene)


SEC TO R ST R AT EG I E S

FOOD AND BEVERAGE: ENVISIONING BIG THINGS IN EUGENE Article by BY MICAH ELCONIN, SEASON TO TASTE CONSULTING

Increased connectivity between industry members has spurred the launch of new projects that will further solidify Eugene as a food and beverage manufacturing hub. Kim Gibson Clark, CEO of Coconut Bliss summarizes this well: “The strength, unity and collaboration that we foster on a local level sets us up for success on a national and global level.” The University of Oregon’s Institute for Policy Research and Engagement (IPRE) recently concluded that Eugene’s core has several critical ingredients to create an Innovation District based on Brookings Institute definitions. The food and beverage industry is one of the principal anchors to this activity. Industry is gathering around efforts to establish a Southern Willamette Valley Food Business Development Center in downtown Eugene. The center is envisioned as a hub that will accelerate launch and scaling of local food companies. Open spaces are another important part of this discussion. Collaborations are building around edible landscaping projects in downtown Eugene. This winter, students at the University of Oregon will work with Eugene Parks and Open Spaces to explore private/public partnership opportunities. The sector is buzzing with activity in rural areas of Lane County, as well. Bohemia Food Hub in Cottage Grove continues to grow. Renovations are supporting core tenants, including Real Live Foods, Sohr Performance, and Hot Winter Hot Sauce, while other emerging brands begin utilizing the space. “Ever since joining the movement at Bohemia Food Hub, my business has continued to pick up momentum and gain visibility,” says Joey Jaraczewski, CEO of Sohr Foods. Local organic hazelnut farmers formed an organization to support deeper collaborations, including a cooperative organic processing facility. The project is catching the community’s attention. Taylor Larson, of My Brothers Farm in Creswell says, “The Organic Hazelnut Growers Association gets contacted constantly by folks who are excited about going organic. They want to know that they’ll have reliable processing options and market outlets before making the leap – that’s what we’re working so hard to secure.”

The Lane County Sector Strategy Team (LCSST) is a team of professionals representing workforce development, economic development, business and education. The LCSST works collectively, in an effort to better support critical industries in Lane County. We believe we can achieve more and have a greater impact in our community by working together. For more, visit: bit.ly/2PhYKpU

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Eugene’s tech community continues to celebrate record growth.

TECH TOURS OPEN THE DOOR TO EUGENE’S FAST-GROWING INDUSTRY Article by MATT SAYRE, TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATION OF OREGON || Photo by ATHENA DELENE

A thousand job seekers, technology enthusiasts, and students will tour tech companies in downtown Eugene on Sept. 20. This annual event is the largest of its kind in Oregon and offers a unique opportunity for the public to see the products and meet the people behind greater Eugene’s fastest growing industry: technology. Three years ago, this event marked the definitive critical-mass moment for the region’s burgeoning tech sector. Since that time, dozens more tech companies have expanded here and average annual wages have increased to more than $74,000. Companies set to participate this year include new downtown Eugene arrivals Inseego, Sentinel One, and STEALTHbits.

Favorites from last year that are returning include: Pipeworks Studio, Sheer ID Software, AHM Brands, IDX, Bell & Funk, Concentric Sky and Arcimoto. In addition to tech company participation, organizations that can help individuals get the skills necessary to access highdemand jobs at tech companies will also be participating. Apprenti, the first registered tech apprenticeship program in the nation will be there to share information. Representatives will also be on hand from Elevate Lane County. This past summer, as part of the Elevate program, Sentinel One and other local Technology Association of Oregon member companies hosted high school teachers and students for internships. The Elevate program is building

capacity in local high schools to help students get the skills they need to unlock careers in the tech industry. Tech Tours will kick-off on Sept. 20, at 5:10 p.m., at Kesey Square with an address from Mayor Lucy Vinis and Jake Weatherly, CEO of SheerID and local TAO board chair. Registered event participants will then be able to tour local tech companies until 8 p.m., followed by an after-party at Level-Up Arcade, hosted by IDX. Registration and more information about Tech Tours can be found at https://bit.ly/2uzbLUj

Over the last year, nearly two dozen new tech companies have established roots in Eugene & Springfield. Sector Strategy efforts have helped the local workforce access an incredible number of new, high-paying local job opportunities at these companies, which have an average annual pay of $74,343.

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SEC TO R ST R AT EG I E S

Lane Community’s new six-month stackable programs are adding flexibility to career and technical training, improving the workforce pipeline.

MANUFACTURING WORKFORCE TO BENEFIT FROM CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION IMPROVEMENTS Article by JOSHUA MONGÉ, EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Growth continues to drive demand for workforce development in our local manufacturing sector. It’s clear that what we have now is not sufficient to meet our future needs. Fortunately for Lane County, partners are continuing to work together to find innovative ways to prepare our future workforce. Lane Education Service District (ESD) has hired a new Regional Career and Technical Education (CTE) coordinator, Shareen Vogel, to renew efforts to tailor CTE programming to the needs of local industry. This program will embrace the success of the Elevate program and model itself after the current STEM hub, implemented by Heidi Larwick of Connnected Lane County. New opportunities for job shadows, industry

tours, internships, externships and advisory committees will be available.

hires students, employers can help employees meet their educational goals.

“Shareen is deeply committed to working with education and industry partners to support all our young people in the attainment of highly skilled careers of the 21st century,” says Carlos Sequeira Executive Director of Instruction, Equity, Partnerships for Lane ESD.

“Here at Lane, we are working to streamline our programs into stackable sub-units to allow greater flexibility for completion. This is part of our larger efforts to incorporate a Guided Pathways approach that connects learning from high school to career,” says Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs Paul E. Jarrell, PhD.

New leadership at Lane Community College is making improvements to the CTE program to grow educational opportunities and provide students with relevant job skills. New offerings include stackable six-month certificates that allow students to meet milestones and have the flexibility of being employed, without negatively impacting the goal of a two-year certificate. The hope is that as industry

Better integration in the K-12 and community college systems build an improved pipeline in CTE. Innovations, like dual certification, new CTE classes, advisory panels, and increased industry access to students, is creating the workforce of the future.

“Here at Lane, we are working to streamline our programs into stackable subunits to allow greater flexibility for completion. This is part of our larger efforts to incorporate a Guided Pathways approach that connects learning from high school to career.” – Paul E. Jarrell, Ph.D., Vice President Academic and Student Affairs

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BUILDING A LEGACY INVESTING IN EUGENE Article by BRITTANY QUICK-WARNER

Our growing community is presenting incredible opportunity for legacy development. As we look to our future, the chance to build on our past achievements and cultivate regional prosperity is tremendous.

Rendering courtesy of Obie Companies.


E UG E N E 2021

From private/public infrastructure developments, like the Market District expansion and redevelopment of our riverfront to community-led projects, like a new YMCA and a Midtown Arts Center, and the robust University District development, our region is preparing to make its mark as an epicenter for innovation and creativity.  >


E UG E N E 2021

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E UG E N E 2021

MARKET DISTRICT EXPANSION A vibrant urban core has far-reaching economic implications for our entire region. With the expansion of the Market District, the potential to increase engagement in downtown is enormous. The Market District plans include The Gordon Hotel, an 83-room boutique hotel, The Gordon Lofts, a 127-unit apartment building, 40,000-square-feet of commercial space and 50 units of workforce housing in partnership with Homes for Good. Construction will begin in January with completion expected in 2020. The team at Obie Companies has a clear vision for creating a vibrant urban neighborhood. “We understand what makes the 5th Street Public Market a destination. Now is the right time to build upon that strength. We recognize

“WE RECOGNIZE THE NEED FOR DOWNTOWN HOUSING, PRESENTING US WITH AN OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE THE GREATER COMMUNITY.” CASEY BARRETT Vice President, Obie Companies

the need for downtown housing, presenting us with an opportunity to serve the greater community,” says Casey Barrett, vice president of Obie Companies. The 5th Street Market and Inn at the 5th certainly attract visitors, but the development also works to infuse opportunity for locals. “The vast majority of our shops and eateries are owned by local Eugeneans. When you support the tenants in the Market District, those dollars are staying in our community,” says Barrett. Thanks to strong community, business support and dedicated elected officials, the Obie redevelopment project has already overcome initial barriers and is ready to move forward. >

The transformation of vacant blocks into a thriving Market District will positively contribute to the economic prosperity of downtown and surrounding areas. In June, dozens of Chamber members and business leaders engaged Eugene City Councilors and successfully advocated for this project to move forward. Rendering courtesy of Obie Companies. Photos by Quip.

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E UG E N E 2021

RIVERFRONT DEVELOPMENT With a blend of public and private investments, the

The development includes a new riverfront park with

collaborative venture of developing the riverfront will

connections to the regional trail system; a riverfront

create an active mixed-use urban neighborhood.

plaza with a destination restaurant; and a variety of

“We were pleased to enter an exclusive negotiating agreement with the City of Eugene last summer, which gave us the chance to work with our design partner, SERA Architects of Portland, in close collaboration with city staff, to create a refined site plan consistent with the

market-rate and affordable homes. The 1930s-era steam plant would be renovated to preserve the area’s historic character. Encompassing approximately 16.5 acres, the neighborhood would be developed in phases, with key elements completed in time for 2021.

city’s long-term goals, particularly those articulated in its

The infrastructure investment and approximately $100

2010 Master Plan,” says Jim Atkins, principal at Williams/

million in private capital investment in the district will

Dame & Atkins Development.

create short- and long-term jobs and generate new tax

Williams/Dame & Atkins Development has successfully

revenues that will benefit everyone in Eugene. >

completed projects in Portland’s South Waterfront and Pearl districts, as well as in south Los Angeles. Their focus on understanding the community and market realities adds to our confidence that the project will be met with both creativity and enthusiasm.

After decades of involvement from the business community and championing the redevelopment of this critical riverfront property, capable developers were selected, and Eugene City Councilors approved deal points that will help our community see this project come to fruition. Renderings courtesy of the City of Eugene.


Keep business thriving. Our business goals are all about helping you achieve your business goals. Let’s get to work. MyOCCU.org/Thriving

Insured by NCUA


E UG E N E 2021

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“PAIRING A THRIVING ARTS AND CULTURE HUB WITH NEW HOUSING SUPPORTS THE CURRENT NEED FOR HOUSING IN THE HEART OF EUGENE.” JOSH NECKELS Executive Director, Eugene Ballet

E UG E N E 2021

MIDTOWN ARTS CENTER Eugene Ballet, in partnership with local philanthropist Alex Haugland, are building the new Midtown Arts Center. This facility will support the administrative offices and rehearsal facilities for Eugene Ballet and eight of Eugene’s leading non-profit arts organizations, including Chamber Music Amici, Eugene Concert Choir, Eugene Opera, Instaballet, Lane Arts Council, Orchestra Next, Oregon Mozart Players, and Pacific International Choral Festivals. “Pairing a thriving arts and culture hub with new housing helps supports the current need for housing in the heart of Eugene,” says Josh Neckels, executive director at Eugene Ballet. “It will also create a solid foundation for these nonprofit arts groups that function both as attractive incentives for new businesses and investments in Eugene.” Scheduled for completion in 2020, this 30,000-square-foot center will serve as the heart of the larger project, which will include 40 market rate condominiums. The new Midtown Arts Center will provide space to create more than 20 new nonprofit arts jobs. In addition, nearly 200 employees and contractors will be utilized during the construction of the facility. Once completed, the Midtown Arts Center will draw 500+ students and their families to classes, and 70+ residents will increase activity at nearby businesses. >

The Eugene Ballet is raising the funds necessary to purchase and build out the portion of the building allocated for the New Midtown Arts Center. Pledge your support by contacting Lisa Bostwick at 541485-3992 or lisa@eugeneballet.org. Renderings courtesy of Midtown Arts Center.

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E UG E N E 2021

PHIL AND PENNY KNIGHT CAMPUS FOR ACCELERATING SCIENTIFIC IMPACT The University of Oregon’s Phil and Penny Knight

economic activity, which will support more than 1,300

Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact is an

jobs. When fully operational, the Knight Campus will

ambitious $1 billion initiative to fast-track scientific

drive nearly $80 million in annual economic activity

discoveries into innovations. The project aims to

and support more than 750 jobs. The Knight Campus

reshape higher education by fostering stronger ties

will position our region as a creative powerhouse for

across disciplines and within industries to expedite

scientific discovery and innovation.

scientific innovation. This approach will create new educational opportunities, spin-off technologies and companies, and improve quality of life across the globe. The Knight Campus is attracting national attention

“The Knight Campus will serve as a launch point for incubating new Oregon-based companies and as a training ground for a new generation of scientific entrepreneurs.” says Henley. >

for its innovative approach to engaging and growing a new generation of scientists. “The Knight Campus is a game-changer for the UO, for Eugene and even for the state; and its impact will continue to grow and expand in the coming years,” says Kyle Henley, vice president of University Communications. During peak construction, the Knight Campus will

To further catalyze discovery and scientific impact, OHSU President Joe Robertson and UO President Michael Schill have called for increased partnerships between OHSU and UO faculty. Three areas are currently being explored: research collaborations, educational programs and administrative policies. Renderings courtesy of UO.

directly contribute about $100 million in annual

“THE KNIGHT CAMPUS IS A GAME-CHANGER FOR THE UO, FOR EUGENE AND EVEN FOR THE STATE.” KYLE HENLEY, Vice President University of Oregon Communications

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“We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give.” – Winston S. Churchill

When we give to others, we make our community a better place. At Mercedes-Benz of Eugene, we are proud to support the work of several local organizations that provide care, compassion and opportunity to people in Lane County. These include The Relief Nursery, Volunteers in Medicine, Bridgeway House, University of Oregon, The Shedd Institute and many more.

2200 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. • 541.687.8888 • mbeugene.com E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |   O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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E UG E N E 2021

HAYWARD FIELD When the eyes of the world are on Eugene during the IAAF World Championships of 2021, they’ll be focused on the athletes and a new state-of-the-art track and field stadium. The renovation of Hayward Field will set a new standard by creating a world-class sports venue, training and competition facility. “When complete, Hayward Field will be nothing less than the finest track and field facility in the world, emblematic of the risk-takers and innovators who have made Oregon great,” said Michael H. Schill, president and professor of law at the University of Oregon. The intent is to honor the strong heritage of Hayward Field. The new stadium boasts an increase in capacity with 12,500 seats and an additional expansion of up to 30,000. Fully funded by private donors, with a lead gift by Phil and Penny Knight, the new field broke ground this summer and will be complete by spring, in time for the 2020 U.S. Olympic Team Trials – Track & Field, which was awarded to Eugene in August. >

“HAYWARD FIELD WILL BE NOTHING LESS THAN THE FINEST TRACK AND FIELD FACILITY IN THE WORLD.” MICHAEL H. SCHILL President and Professor of Law, University of Oregon

Runners, jumpers and throwers, hoping to add to the 20 world records set at Hayward Field, will enjoy state-of-the-art locker rooms, practice spaces and athletic medicine rooms. Students and researchers in the Department of Human Physiology will make groundbreaking discoveries in new laboratory and classroom spaces. Renderings courtesy of UO.

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BANKING IS BETTER WHEN IT’S LOCAL. www.SBKO.bank


E UG E N E 2021

EUGENE FAMILY YMCA The Y has been supporting our community since 1887. During that time, it has been a trusted resource for healthy living, youth development and communitybuilding. It’s also the largest provider of after-school childcare in Lane County. The existing facility is more than 60-years-old and averages more than 21,000 visits a month. Having outgrown its space, the Y is embarking on a legacy project to build a 65,000-square-foot facility that will double its capacity to provide services and subsidize

“YOUR Y WILL CONTINUE TO INNOVATE TO ENSURE WE ARE INFLUENCING TODAY’S YOUTH AND INDIVIDUALS TO HELP CREATE TOMORROW’S BEST EUGENE.”

critical health and education programs.

BRIAN STEFFEN CEO, YMCA

The new Y will include a flexible floor plan with an array of wellness and exercise rooms, an indoor aquatic center, pre-school classrooms, and a multi-generational

Long-term advantages to the overall health of the

activity center. The new building will help the Y fulfill

community will improve workforce contributions to

its mission of providing health and wellness and youth

our economy.

programs for all. “At the Y, we believe in relentless innovation. Your Y will continue to innovate to ensure we are influencing today’s youth and individuals to help create tomorrow’s

Eugene is on the edge of substantial opportunity. It’s how we come together to thoughtfully manage growth and cultivate culture that will establish a legacy for years to come. 

best Eugene,” says Eugene YMCA CEO Brian Steffen. Short-term economic gains include employing local workers on a significant construction project, while concurrently employing 300+ individuals with Y-related work.

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Influence the Capital Campaign for the NEW Y right now. Contact Lisa MacMaster at lmacmaster@eugeneymca.org or 541-686-9622. For more information about the project, visit newymca.org. Renderings courtesy of Eugene Family YMCA. Photos by Quip.


The Oregon Community Foundation provides tax-deductible options to help create a brighter horizon for Oregon’s future.

oregoncf.org


E UG E N E 2021

COLORFUL, COLLABORATIVE STREET ART WELCOMES THE WORLD TO EUGENE Article by ALEX CIPOLLE || Photos courtesy of 20X21 EUG MURAL PROJECT

A boy napping in the tall grass with his hound. Tigers as wispy as smoke scaling an enormous red expanse. A couple dancing in black in white. The face of pioneering track and field athlete Jesse Owens, multifaceted like a diamond. These are just some of the stories told in paint on the walls of downtown Eugene. These stories didn’t exist a few years ago. They grew out of the 20x21EUG Mural Project, an initiative of the City of Eugene Cultural Services Public Art Program and are funded in part by the City of Eugene Parking Program. The vision? To create at least 20 murals by internationally renowned artists before the 2021 IAAF World Championships, the biggest sporting event Eugene has ever hosted. “If Eugene is this place where there are world-class sporting events, there’s no reason it couldn’t be a place for world-class art,” says Thomas Pettus-Czar, owner of The Barn Light and a key player in the 20x21EUG Mural Project.  >

Top Left: Hailing from the United Kingdom, Matt Small’s 8-by-8-foot portrait of African-American track and field legend Jesse Owens is a masterpiece of found pieces. Using recycled materials found at BRING, as well as wood from the recently dismantled Hayward Field, Small created a three-dimensional portrait unlike any other. Photo by Maricel Teague. Top Right: Eugene artist Ila Rose looks upon her two-sided work, painted onto the 40-foot-tall sawdust silo at Elevation Bouldering Gym at 348 W 3rd Ave. Geometric patterns and multiple hues ads depth and character to the figures portrayed on a dramatic green and yellow backdrop. Photo by Athena Delene. Bottom: Steven Lopez’s eye-catching mural on the WildCraft Cider Works warehouse at 254 Lincoln St. was unveiled in 2016. A University of Oregon graduate and now a resident of Los Angeles, Lopez seeks to discover the possibilities of utilizing wildlife as a stage for human interpretation. Photo by Athena Delene.

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E UG E N E 2021


E UG E N E 2021

Artists from places as far as Brazil, China, the Netherlands and New York have traveled to Eugene to leave their mark. So far, 18 large-scale murals have been completed. “It’s the best thing that has ever happened to Eugene,” says Bayne Gardner, a local muralist who completed his own 20x21 mural at the Falling Sky building at 13th and Willamette, in partnership with property owner Justin Bauer. “The city is really doing it right.” Gardner also participated in the second “20x21 Presents Eugene Walls,” a weeklong mural festival held at the end of July. Joining Gardner were artists Alexis Diaz of Puerto Rico, AIKO of Japan, and WK Interact of New York (by way of France), as well as legendary American photographer Martha Cooper, known for her images capturing the street art scene of 1970s and 80s New York City. Matthew Smalls arrived earlier in the summer to complete his multimedia mural of Jesse Owens on the wall of Urban Therapeutics off Willamette Street. Artist H11235 of Nepal, whose mural can be found on West 7th Avenue and Charnelton Streets, arrived after the festival, along with Afghanistani artist Shamsia Hassani, who created a mural at 24th and Willamette. Behind any citywide project is a dedicated team, which, in this case, in addition to Pettus-Czar and Bauer, is a committee made up of Paul Denis Godin of Katalyst Resolutions, Joseph Moore of GMA Architects, Debbie Williamson-Smith of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Jessica Watson of the Lane Arts Council and City of Eugene Public Art Manager Isaac Marquez. “What it’s really doing is elevating our art scene to new levels,” says Williamson-Smith, the communications director for the committee. She says the creative energy is contagious; businesses, such as Party Downtown, have been inspired to commission their own murals outside the project, and a Visual Arts Festival was held this July. “Art is begetting art.”

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Pettus-Czar is tasked with finding businesses and property owners to partner with artists and donate a wall for a canvas. “We always allow for the building owners to approve the image that goes up on their wall beforehand,” he says. The experience has been a positive one for these sponsors, as walls with murals typically don’t get tagged or covered in graffiti, a sort of code amongst artists. Many of these business sponsors develop friendships with their partner artists, some even hosting them in their own homes. “It’s been their gateway to art appreciation,” Pettus-Czar says. “Art is an important aspect of a healthy community,” he continues. “Generally, it’s what makes a community or city healthy and interesting. This kind of project – where you’re fostering artworks, which are typically on a massive scale, public art works, that anyone from any background, 24-7, can appreciate – is the best thing.” 

Top Left: Hua Tunan, from China, turned Vistra Framing and Gallery’s wall on West Fourth Avenue into a bright red canvas, in which he painted an epic battle between tigers and a dragon. He used dynamic brushstrokes and creative use of spray paint to depict motion and energy. Photo by Athena Delene. Top Right: Bayne Gardner, of Eugene, turned the corner of Willamette Street and East 13th Avenue into an urban art gallery using color, nature and Northwest flair. He is one of five artists who participated in the Eugene Walls week-long event in July of this year. Photo by Ben Schorzman. Middle: Artists from all over the world gathered together to celebrate at the 20x21 Artists Reception at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art. Left to Right: Justin Bauer, Bayne Gardner, Sally Levin, Martha Cooper, Alexis Diaz, Angel Lopes, Aiko and Stefan Ways. Photo by Athena Delane. Bottom: Businesses have also contributed artwork to the public landscape, like the Imagination Mural Project. Imagination International partners with schools and youth organizations and works with local muralist Bayne Gardner to create murals in the Eugene-Springfield area. Photo by Maricel Teague.


E UG E N E 2021

Interested in connecting your business to the 20x21 EUG Mural Project? HOST A MURAL

If you are a building or business owner with a

nice, big wall that you’d

love to see an incredible mural on, contact

Thomas Pettus-Czar

with the mural project committee at

thomas@thebarnlight.com

FINANCIAL SUPPORT Help the project meet its goal of raising 50

percent of the operating

budget through business sponsorships and

in-kind donations. If

you are interested in

partnering to support this great project, contact

Debbie Williamson-Smith with the mural project committee at

debbiews@uoregon.edu

For more information, and mural locations, visit 20x21EUG.com.


E UG E N E 2021

BUSINESS OR PLEASURE? IT DOESN’T MATTER. YOU CAN WORK AND PLAY HERE! Article by LEAH MOORE | Photos courtesy of TRAVEL LANE COUNTY

When you live in a place that has so much to offer – natural splendor, sporting events, festivals and fairs, craftspeople and artists, locally sourced food and drink – it’s easy to take it for granted, as a part of daily life. But many of the factors that make Eugene a wonderful place to live and work also make it a vacationer’s wonderland. “The attributes that visitors support – our restaurants, our attractions and activities – are the things that we really enjoy as residents here, too,” says Kari Westlund, President and CEO of Travel Lane County, our nonprofit destination marketing organization. Travel Lane County markets our area – Eugene, Cascades & Coast – as a destination, not only for leisure travelers but for conferences, conventions and sporting events. “Tourism and hospitality serve all of the other industry sectors,” says Westlund. “This really comes to light when you think about meeting space; the ability to have dinners and functions, educational gatherings, scientific symposia, and facilitation around sporting events. You need to have hotels, you need to have meeting space, you need to have restaurants. Whether we’re visiting, or we live here, we’re using all those assets all the time.”

A GROWING INDUSTRY

The economic impact of the travel and hospitality industry in Lane County is stunning. Last year, visitors accounted for $676 million in travel and hospitality spending, a sector which employs nearly 10,800 people. The industry has experienced steady growth over the past eight years and continues to bolster our local economy while encouraging development that’s beneficial for both visitors and residents alike. The University of Oregon is the largest generator of visitors with its conventions, sporting events, cultural institutions, music and theater programs, visits to see friends and family and more. As the university grows and expands its programs and offerings the number of visitors is expected to grow, as well. Another driver of tourism and hospitality growth is Eugene’s status as TrackTown USA and its ability to attract major track and field events. These large, sometimes multi-day events result in millions of dollars of visitor spending, an estimated $37 million for an Olympic Team Trials event, and generate substantial awareness of Eugene as a travel destination.

“IT’S A GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR US TO INTRODUCE THE EUGENE AREA TO THE REST OF THE WORLD.” Kari Westlund, Travel Lane County

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E UG E N E 2021

TRACKTOWN USA ON THE WORLD STAGE

OPPORTUNITIES ABOUND FOR EUGENE BUSINESSES

In August 2021, Eugene will host the IAAF World Championships Oregon21, an international track and field event that occurs in a different city every two years. The event is expected to attract 2,000 participants from as many as 214 different countries, as well as tens of thousands of visitors, and will draw significant media attention.

There are dozens of ways businesses benefit from tourism, whether it’s directly, through visitor spending, or indirectly, through overall economic impact, increased trade opportunities, community development projects, or meeting and event space. All sectors can work together and reap the rewards of making Lane County a more attractive place to visit.

“It’s a great opportunity for us to introduce the Eugene area to the rest of the world,” says Westlund, adding that Travel Lane County’s work will coincide with a state-wide tourism marketing effort. According to Travel Oregon’s research, 59 percent of people who visit Oregon actively seek out Oregon-based products after they return home. Oregon21 is expected to be a catalyst not only for increased tourism to the state but for economic development around trade, as well. “We have a great opportunity to tell our story around our maker economy and the artisan-style goods that we create in this state,” says Westlund.

In preparation for Oregon21, consider ways that you can help create an international sense of welcome. For the community as a whole, Oregon21 is an opportunity for learning, community engagement, and relationship-building that will have a long-lasting impact both for residents and future visitors. 


MOVERS & SHAKERS

LAUNCHING THE NEW YP EMPOWERING YOUNG PROFESSIONALS TO THRIVE Article by Todd Waters, AHM BRANDS AND CHAIR OF EUGENE YOUNG PROFESSIONALS || Photo by Quip

Those who call the Eugene area home have

underway, were discussed at length in

much to be excited about in the coming

changemaker sessions and in panel

years. Major development projects are in the

settings. Local thought-leaders provided

works, and it doesn’t take much walking,

insights into the Phil and Penny Knight

biking or driving around Eugene to see the

Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact,

changes. It is apparent that the growth and

the Obie expansion project in downtown

change occurring now will significantly

Eugene, and the Riverfront Development

influence the legacy of our vibrant city.

project.

Eugene’s growth has given rise to an

Becoming informed about these issues

evolution and maturation inside the

and projects is the first step for many of

Eugene Young Professionals group – a

us. With awareness comes choice and an

member-based networking and professional

opportunity to reflect on what each of us

development group supported by the

as individuals envisions for the future of

Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce.

Eugene.

This summer marked the kick-off of a new

To borrow from the opening keynote

and improved YP group that is focused on

speaker at the 2018 YP Summit, Liz

encouraging young professionals in our

Bohannon, there comes a time when

community to get involved, get connected

planning must give way to doing – where

and play a part in helping Eugene realize

another step must be taken and those

its full potential. Through revamped

who feel so compelled need to spring into

programming, thoughtful content and

action. Many YPs have already taken that

mindful networking events, Eugene YP is

next step. Some by signing up to become

empowering young professionals to thrive

members of the new Eugene Young

in both their professional and personal lives. These changes were first felt at the 2018 Young Professionals Summit in June. Now in its third-year, the YP Summit provides a full-days’

Professionals group and others by lending their voice to issues they are passionate about at Eugene City Council meetings, through public testimony.

worth of content and activities built for young professionals with the

Eugene YP offers opportunities for young professionals to initiate

ultimate goal of providing the jumping-off point for attendees to learn,

positive change in our community – as they grow personally and, in

grow personally and professionally, and discover new ways to invest in

their careers – which is sure to leave a legacy.

the future of our community. This year, over 500 young professionals came together to discuss what’s ahead for Eugene. Topics, such as finding solutions for a more welcoming downtown and the various visionary development projects

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To learn more about the Eugene Young Professionals group and how you can get involved, visit www.eugeneyp.com and follow along on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for all things YP.


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A community of collaborators, game-changers, movers and shakers: Here’s a look at this quarter’s Chamber happenings, as we work to build networks, move forward projects, and elevate both businesses and professionals. JOINT CHAMBER GOLF TOURNAMENT // Each summer, the Eugene and Springfield Chambers join forces at the golf course. With fun Tee & Green sponsors, like Home2Suites, it’s a day that can’t get much better. YP SUMMIT // This year’s YP Summit drew more than 500 young, local professionals for a day of personal and professional development and community change-making. OAKWAY BLOCK PARTY // Over 300 professionals came out to experience the Block Party on Oakway’s Boulevard of Shops for our August Business After Hours. With grand openings, great food and even better networking, it was an event to remember. BUSINESS AFTER HOURS // What’s better than soaking up summer on the roof of the Skybar? Not much, according to the close to 400 professionals who joined up at the Hyatt Place in July. WE ARE YP // Thanks to an active and engaged committee of young professional volunteers, we held our largest YP Summit yet and launched new and innovative YP programs. For more, visit eugeneyp.com. JOINT CHAMBER GOLF TOURNAMENT // Sponsors like Janie Anderson and Veronica Hastings from Security Monster really bring the fun to the Joint Chamber Golf Tournament. EXCITING KEYNOTES // This year’s YP Summit attendees were inspired by a keynote from Liz Bohanna, founder of Sseko Designs. Using her unlikely story of a journalist-turned-shoe-maker, Liz shared her passion for creative leadership, conscious consumerism and social enterprise. DREAM TEAM // Talk about a dream team, Mandy Jones of OCCU formerly, Anne Marie Levis of Funk Levis, Jennifer Solomon from Relief Nursery and the Chamber’s own Brittany Quick-Warner hit the golf course.

Don’t miss a minute, visit EugeneChamber.com for a calendar of events.

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E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |   O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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B I Z Z B UZ Z

PROMOTIONS & NEW HIRES PeaceHealth has announced the following: Jennifer Cannon, a nurse practitioner in family medicine, and Dr. Robert Moss, a

hospitalist with specialties in internal medicine and pulmonary critical care, at Peace Harbor Medical Center in Florence; Tabitha Childers, nurse practitioner in family medicine at Cottage Grove Community Medical Center; Dr. Thomas Bugbee and nurse practitioners Andrea Louisell and Shannon Brecik to the urgent care team. Dr. Angela Zallen at RiverBend as a pediatric hospitalist. Kristen Lindeman, a nurse practitioner, on the pediatric surgery team at RiverBend Pavilion. Kaitlin Glaeser, a nurse practitioner at RiverBend’s intensive care unit. Dr. Karim Hussein has joined the cardiology team at RiverBend’s Oregon Heart & Vascular Institute. Dr. Sara Batya in the neurology department; Dr. Katrina Groves in the family medicine department at the Cottage Grove Community Medical Center. Dr. Nora Kirschner has joined the Peace Harbor Medical Center as a hospitalist; Dr. Hong Le has joined the Medical Group’s urgent care team; Nelda Ogden, a nurse practitioner, has joined the Medical Group’s geriatric department. Gina Owens, a nurse practitioner, has joined the Medical Group’s family medicine team at Peace Harbor Medical Center; Samantha “Sam” Paramore, a nurse practitioner, has joined the Sacred Heart Medical Center’s ICU department as an intensivist; Dr. Scott Russi has joined the Peace Harbor Medical Center as a relief general surgeon.

Sarah Kordon, CFP, CRPS, has joined Merriman Wealth Management as

a wealth advisor to provide comprehensive financial planning and investment management services to new and existing clients. Sarah is a Certified Financial Planner and Charted Retirement Plan Specialist with 18 of experience in financial services.

Aimee Butler, CFP, joined Merriman Wealth Management as a wealth

advisor. She has 15 years of financial planning experience and was previously branch manager and executive director of Practice Development Consulting at Waddell & Reed in Eugene.

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The ShelterCare board of directors have elected officers for the 2018: Eric Van Houten, chief operating officer at Cascade Health Solutions, was elected president. He will serve a two-year-term; Jacob Fox, executive director at Homes for Good, was elected vice president; and retired University of Oregon legal counsel Melinda Greir is the new board secretary.

Oregon Contemporary Theatre has welcomed three new members to its board of directors.

Ruth Erickson is a physical therapist with PeaceHealth; Chelsey Megli is director of Talent Management for Advancement at the University of Oregon and an actor who has appeared on the OCT stage; Frank Koch is proprietor of Koch Decision Consulting and a former geologist with Chevron.

FinishLine Software

is pleased to announce the addition of Marci Seghetti to its team. As an account executive, Marci will be responsible for managing and developing the new client program. She brings over 30 years of sales experience, mainly in the electronics industry, as well as the construction industry.

Habitat for Humanity of Central Lane welcomes Kellie DeVore as executive director.

With more than 20 years of nonprofit leadership and management, Kellie has experience in higher education, health care, financial stability and community-based organizations. Through her career, Kellie has developed and implemented programs aimed at improving and protecting access to services and care, driven by a passion to improve the lives of people in the community.

Kernutt Stokes, a Eugene-based CPA firm, has promoted three staff members: Jennifer Cranford has been promoted to tax manager from tax senior associate; Paisley Ward has been promoted to accounting and assurance senior associate from general associate; and Hillarie Woods has been promoted to tax senior associate from general associate. Ausland Group has welcomed five new members to their growing design-build team: Kate Miller, design project manager; Michele Bullinger, CAD drafter; Kara Bijesse, administrative and marketing assistant; Kayla Bundy, architect intern/designer; Charlie Kroning, senior engineering manager.

Michelle Erickson joins Journey Tree Financial Planning & Investments as a

financial planner. Erickson has more than a decade of experience in banking and financial planning. Erickson holds her Series 7 and Series 66 licenses. Jennifer Paterson also joins Journey Tree as its administrative assistant, bringing more than 15 years of customer service and administrative assistant experience.

Eugene Civic Alliance is pleased to welcome Bridget Franek to the ECA team. In her new

role as community development officer, Bridget will help increase community awareness of the Campaign for Civic Park, overseeing fundraising initiatives and developing partnerships with local organizations.

Travel Lane County

welcomed two new staff members. Katie Morton joined Travel Lane County’s convention and sports marketing department as a marketing coordinator in July; Holly Claypool joined the Travel Lane County Tourism Marketing department and will be working in visitor services as a lead adventure specialist.

Johnson Johnson Lucas & Middleton (JJL&M) announces the hiring of Israel Echeverria, the newest addition to

its legal team. Echeverria will be working with the firm’s workers’ compensation and personal injury attorneys as a paralegal. Israel Echeverria has more than 14 years of legal experience. He is bilingual in Spanish and English, and has extensive experience in language translation.


Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications)

1. Publication Title

2. Publication Number

OPEN for Business: A Publication of the Eugene Chamber of Commerce 9 7 4. Issue Frequency

Quarterly

3. Filing Date

8 _ 4

8

August 21, 2018

0

5. Number of Issues Published Annually

6. Annual Subscription Price

4

$25

Statement of Ownership, Management, BContact I Z and Z Person B Circulation UZ Z BrittanyPublications) Quick-Warner (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester

7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication (Not printer) (Street, city, county, state, and ZIP+4 ®)

Willamette 1.1401 Publication Title

KUDOS PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend has earned the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines® – Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award for the 17th consecutive year. The hospital also earned a place on the Target: Stroke Elite Plus Honor Roll for the second year in a row, an award that recognizes medical centers for their success in and commitment to providing excellent care for stroke patients, according to nationally recognized, evidence-based guidelines.

Ben Farber, chief nursing officer at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center, University District, was one of 10 individuals honored

through the Catholic Health Association’s Tomorrow’s Leaders program. The program recognizes and supports the achievements and potential of highperforming leaders, age 40 and under.

BrightStar Care of Lane County has earned accreditation from The Joint Commission, the same organization that accredits the nation’s best hospital, as well as the 2018 Best of Home Care – Provider of Choice, and Employer of Choice Awards from Home Care Pulse, a national third-party quality and satisfaction research firm. Lastly, Forbes has just named BrightStar Care as one of the best franchises in America. Northwest Christian University’s online Master of Business

Administration (MBA) degree program has been ranked third in Oregon by Online MBA Today, a comprehensive resource for students seeking an MBA online. Online MBA Today ranked online MBA programs at Portland State University and Oregon State University No. 1 and No. 2 in Oregon, followed by NCU at No. 3.

Merriman Wealth Management is celebrating its 35th anniversary

this year and was recognized as one of the Top 300 Registered Investment Advisers (RIAs) by Financial Times in 2018. Financial Times uses a number of quantifiable and objective measures of investor-centered criteria to select the top firms, including assets under management (AUM), AUM growth rate, years in existence, compliance record, industry certifications and online accessibility.

Nick Balthrop, of Gaydos, Churnside & Balthrop, P.C., has been named a 2018 Oregon Rising Star

in the Super Lawyers Magazine. The Rising Stars list is comprised of attorneys who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement and recognizes less than 2.5 percent of attorneys in each state. Nick has practiced with the law firm of Gaydos, Churnside & Balthrop, P.C. since 2015.

Summit Bank was named one of the top 50 most innovative banks in the

United States, according to the Independent Community Bankers of America magazine. Summit was specifically recognized for their commitment to sustainability and for being a great place to work.

Funk/Levis & Associates has been recognized with a 2018 Gold Aster Award and a 2018 APEX Award for Excellence for its work with The Corvallis Clinic. The Clinic’s Sleep Medicine folder, designed by Funk/Levis, took home the Gold Aster Award in the Pocket Folder category for its layout and design, message effectiveness, product quality and functionality.

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4. Issue Frequency 5. Number of Issues Published Annually Brittany Quick-Warner, CEO, 1401 Willamette St. Eugene, Oregon 97401 8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (Not printer) Quarterly 4 Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

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I certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are paid above a nominal price. 17. Form Publication Statement of Ownership PS 3526,ofJuly 2014 (Page 2 of 4) ✔

If the publication is a general publication, publication of this statement is required. Will be printed

Publication not required.

Q3/Sept 20 in the ________________________ issue of this publication. 18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner

Date

Brandy Rodtsbrooks

8/22/18

I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties).

E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |   O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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B I Z Z B UZ Z

BUSINESS NEWS PeaceHealth and Lane County Public Health have partnered on an innovative initiative to reduce illness and death from pneumonia in Lane County. Hospital patients at high-risk for pneumonia, including people over age 65, smokers and people with diabetes, are being offered a vaccination for bacterial pneumonia before they leave the hospital. The program launched in June at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Centers at RiverBend and University District.

Soup Nation Soup Carte is handing over the ladle to new owners. After more than two decades in business, untold gallons of soup and national recognition on Food Network’s Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, the iconic cart will be taken over by new owner, Screamin’ Jay’s, which will continue to serve Soup Nation’s most popular soup, the 3 Cheese Tomato.

Lane Arts Council announces $56,125 in grants to arts organizations and projects in the Eugene area. The Community Arts Grant Program is funded by the City of Eugene Cultural Services Division and administered by Lane Arts Council. The Community Arts Grants help ensure diverse and accessible arts opportunities and experiences for Eugene artists, audiences and participants. Grant recipient Wordcrafters in Eugene will present a Fiction Fantastic contest for young writers to showcase their creativity and publish their written works. Northwest Christian University and Chemeketa Community College have

signed an articulation agreement that clears a pathway for graduates of the community college’s registered nursing program to enroll in NCU’s Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science of Nursing (RN to BSN) online program. The fifth cohort of NCU RN to BSN students will graduate in December 2018.

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PeaceHealth began seeing Kaiser Permanente insured patients in July, as part of

an ongoing collaboration for healthcare delivery and coverage in Lane County. Kaiser Permanente is now expanding health plan enrollment with large group employers and will be offering plans to individuals and small employer groups this fall with enrollment effective in January.

PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center

at RiverBend ranked sixth in a national contest to determine the most beautiful hospitals in the United States. With 11,215 votes, RiverBend was chosen among 68 finalists from across the country. RiverBend was the only finalist in Oregon.

Lane Community College received a $25,000

Oregon Pacific Bank has signed a lease for the property located at 59 East 11th Street in downtown Eugene and is planning a remodel, with the goal of opening the new branch in fall 2018. The bank’s current office at 975 Oak Street in Suite 625 at the Eugene Citizen’s building will be vacated once the new branch is open. The new Eugene branch will feature many amenities that the Bank’s current office is unable to provide, including designated parking spaces for clients, a drive-up lane, drive-up deposit-taking ATM, and a night depository. Ditch Witch Northwest, a Papé company, has purchased Ditch Witch Equipment Company, Inc., in Sacramento, effective July 13, 2018. No terms of the acquisition will be announced. The Papé Group, Inc., has acquired all Ditch Witch territories in Washington, Oregon, Montana, California and western Nevada, as well as northern Idaho, making Ditch Witch West one of the largest Ditch Witch dealers. Oregon Pacific Bancorp and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Oregon Pacific Bank, reported

a net operating income of $1.4 million for the six months ending June 30, 2018, compared to $546 thousand for the six months ending June 30, 2017; this equates to $0.20 earnings per share (EPS) as compared to $0.13 for the same period in 2017 — a 53.85% increase in EPS, which includes 2.62 million of additional shares, following the bank’s capital raise in fall 2017.

ShelterCare is opening the new Uhlhorn Day Services Center. This is the area’s only local

day services center that accepts Medicaid to care for people living with Alzheimer’s, dementia, Parkinson’s disease, traumatic brain injury and other cognitive disabilities.

EWEB grant for energy management scholarships. Students may apply for scholarships of up to $5,000 for first-year tuition and expenses. Applicants must reside within the EWEB service area, have financial need and show academic aptitude. Program costs are estimated at $11,227 including $1,000 in specific fees and $10,227 in resident tuition and general student fees.

Shake Smart, a student-founded start-up

from San Diego State University, is coming to

The Duck Store at the Rec. Shake Smart

features a highly customizable menu to meet a variety of dietary needs and taste preferences. Shake Smart will open at The Duck Store at the Rec in mid-September.

Scott Sanders, CFP, CRPC and Jesse Coffee

CRPC have started a new financial advisory firm, the Sanders Coffee Group of TRUE Private Wealth Advisors. The firm was established to provide unbiased advice and to always place the needs of their clients first. As an independent firm, they are committed to offering their clients greater choice, pricing and objectivity. The company’s primary focus and expertise is providing financial planning to individuals, families and business owners, as they navigate through retirement and other life transitions.


The power of one. The power of many. Hershner Hunter is a comprehensive business law firm with specialty areas to match your unique needs. So whether you’re a small start-up, a growing area employer, or an established business, you’re not just getting one attorney, you’re getting the power of an entire firm behind you.

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E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |   O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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Local Community Banking Near You! We are thrilled to open up our new branch in downtown Eugene, coming this Fall, 2018!

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A QU IC K N OTE

DON’T SIT ON THE

SIDELINE

H

By Brittany Quick-Warner, CEO Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce

ave any of you ever taken the

A STRONG VOICE FOR BUSINESS

StrengthsQuest evaluation? Of

In our efforts to represent and advocate on

all the personality and leadership evaluations, it is my favorite. It

centers around the idea that if you know your key strengths and focus on those, rather than your weaknesses, you will be able to accomplish more. It’s a strategy successful companies and organizations adopt, as well. Figure out what you are really good at and do more of that. Most people I talk with who have taken the evaluation are not too surprised by their

behalf of the business community, we want to make sure we have it right. This means spending time talking to and understanding local businesses and sharing local testimonials and data that support our strategic initiatives. It also means elevating the exposure of business leaders in our community, so their voices and vision are leading the way.

INNOVATIVE STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE OUR ECONOMY

expanding our reach and impact. During this year of transition, we are looking internally, as well, for ways to do our jobs better. We are building a dream team with incredible staff in the right places. This focus has helped us achieve success and think strategically about where and when

results, because its usually identifies the traits

In order for our business community to come

to get involved. It is helping us identify and

that come most naturally to you. I wasn’t

together and move the needle on key issues,

balance our core strengths, so we can help

really either. One of my top five strengths was

we need to identify which initiatives and

move our community forward.

involvement. I believe this strength and value

strategies will have a measureable impact. We

encapsulates why I love my job. Involvement

have focused on engaging in purposeful and

as a strength is all about one thing: not sitting

actionable projects and developing innovative

on the sideline.

programs and events that will help us move

For the Chamber, involvement is finding solutions to the issues facing our community, and inspiring others to get involved. It is bold leadership and the willingness to take a stance on important issues. As a Chamber and as a business community, we need to prioritize

forward. Whether it’s the launch of our new Eugene Young Professionals program, hosting our first Economic Summit, leading initiatives through Better Housing Together, advocating for ridesharing services, or supporting numerous development projects,

Developing a growing community takes time, intentional movement and continued involvement. I believe we are moving in the right direction. Our business community, city staff, elected officials, and Chamber all have to be involved, focused and strategic in our movements to respond to growth and opportunity in a positive, transformational way.

we are dedicated to innovative strategies that

If we are going to realize the great

transform our economy.

opportunities in front of us, we need bold leadership. That means, we can’t sit on the

leadership.

ENSURING WE HAVE A HEALTHY ORGANIZATION

By pairing involvement with strategy and

As a small team with a big vision, our

focus, we can have meaningful involvement

organization and its health are key to

in the right places at the right time. This year,

executing our mission and serving our

as we spend time thinking critially about

members. For a strong Chamber, we must

the evolution of the Chamber to better serve

have a strong brand and reputation in the

our members and our community, we have

community. With a new creative strategy, we

focused our energy on three key areas:

have refreshed our communications and are

and insist on being involved in the process, not wait to evaluate the solutions. Now is the time to both exemplify and advocate for bold

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sidelines.

We want to hear from you. What does our best future look like? Use #ChamberEvolved to share your vision.


PO BOX 1107 EUGENE, OR 97440-1107

left to right: BRENT LAIRD, CPA DONALD LANCE, CPA, PARTNER BENTON COLLINS, CPA JONATHAN POWELL, CPA MEGHAN LACEY, CPA

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The CPAs and advisors at Kernutt Stokes are creative thinkers, problem solvers, and innovators. We provide insight and guidance based on our decades of experience. And while financial data and reporting are part of our work, it’s what happens next that keeps our clients coming back year after year. Give us a call and find out how the CPAs at Kernutt Stokes are different.

kernuttstokes.com | 1600 Executive Parkway, Suite 110, Eugene, Oregon | 541.687.1170


EUGENE ARE A CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

FOR

VOLUME 17, ISSUE 4 USA $6.25 CANADA $12.25

BUSINESS

TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE

PHILANTHROPY & VOLUNTEERISM

GIVING BACK


WE START BY LENDING AN EAR. We take time to understand your business needs, so we can help solve them. No two businesses are alike. So cookie cutter loans won’t cut it. At Columbia Bank, we work closely with you from the beginning of the loan process to make sure we’re setting you up with the right loan to reach your unique business goals. Which means we do something other banks don’t always do—listen. Visit ColumbiaBank.com.

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RISE WITH THE WEST. Assurance, tax, and consulting offered through Moss Adams LLP. Investment advisory services offered through Moss Adams Wealth Advisors LLC. Investment banking offered through Moss Adams Capital LLC.


CO NTE NT S

18

COVER STORY / For the City of Eugene and many local organizations, sustainability means considering and balancing all three aspects of the Triple Bottom Line to address present needs without compromising the future.

FEATURES 18 25 27 35 08 10 13 44 16

EQUITY | ENVIRONMENT | ECONOMY

Chamber Board of Directors

TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE See how local government and organizations have adopted the triple bottom line philosophy to evaluate their performance to create greater value.

PHILANTHROPY & VOLUNTEERISM When it comes to corporate giving and community service, businesses reap what they sow. This “secret sauce” can be the recipe for success.

GIVING BACK How to build your legacy in four easy steps. 20 UNDER 40 AWARDS Join us in recognizing an impressive line-up of 20 people under the age of 40

46 48 54

Stephanie Seubert, Chair-Elect Partner, Evans, Elder, Brown & Seubert, Inc. Mandy Jones, Past-Chair Retired, Oregon Community Credit Union

who are going above and beyond at work and in the community.

Nigel Francisco, Treasurer CFO, King Estate

OUR COMMUNITY

Scott Lindstrom, Vice-Chair, Organizational Development, Exec. Vice President, Jerry’s Home Improvement Center

MEMBER VOICE Known for its construction and paving services, family-owned Wildish has quietly contributed to more than 100 organizations in the greater Willamette Valley. QUERY & QUOTES Senior Vice President & Retail Division Manager Mike Murphy shares Banner Bank’s commitment to community. And President Allison Straub of Burley Design explains how this Eugene company sells global but keeps it local. SECTOR STRATEGIES Food + Beverage, Tech and Manufacturing: happenings and what’s on the horizon. MOVERS & SHAKERS When Drawn Founder and Creative Director Bryan Taylor began to dream about a new workspace, character and sustainability were top of mind.

Cale Bruckner, Vice-Chair, Economic Development President, Concentric Sky Thomas Pettus-Czar, Vice-Chair, Business Advocacy Owner, The Barn Light Amanda Walkup Partner, Hershner Hunter, LLP Betsy Boyd Assoc. VP of Fed. Affairs, University of Oregon

VEG SALAD CRAFT The best local ingredients, in the heart of downtown.

Casey Barrett Vice President, Obie Companies

YOUR CHAMBER 05 06

Chris Boone, Chair President, Boone Insurance Associates

POLICY INSIGHT Creating stronger policy through effective leadership that brings voices together. CHAMBER VISIONARIES Anne Marie Levis: Our most vulnerable citizens are afforded the same opportunities as their peers when education is equal.

HERE & THERE Snapshots of events, happenings and goings-on that reflect our Chamber and our ever-changing business community. BIZZ BUZZ Promotions, new hires and news you can use. A QUICK NOTE Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce CEO Brittany Quick Warner on going the extra mile, protecting the planet and cultivating prosperity.

Cheryl Boyum CEO, Cascade Health Solutions Chad Barczak CEO, IDX Broker Dr. Gustavo Balderas Superintendent, Eugene School District 4J Greg Lyons CFO, Western Shelter Systems Jason Lafferty General Manager, SnoTemp Cold Storage Ralph Parshall General Manager, Mercedes Benz of Eugene Trace P. Skopil CPA Partner, Moss Adams

E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |   O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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We’re Certified

OPEN FOR BUSINESS

Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce

Traditional Offset Printing

100% Recyclable + Paper Stock + Cover Stock + Rigid Substrates + Banners + Event Signs + Posters

Publisher Brittany Quick-Warner, CEO Chamber Staff Brittany Quick-Warner, CEO Amanda Yankovich Director of Membership

Wide Format

Digital

Brandy Rodtsbrooks Director of Marketing & Communications Emily Rea Member Engagement Coordinator Joshua Mongé Director of Economic Development Matt Wunderlin Marketing & Event Coordinator Sarah Delp Economic Development Specialist

The next time you plan an event, choose the sustainable printer. QSL stocks the largest selection of recyclable print materials in Lane County. Visit qslprinting.com/sustainability to learn more or give us a call at [541] 687-1184.

F U N

|

H E A L T H

|

F I T N E S S

Tiffany Edwards Director of Business Advocacy Advertising Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce 541.484.1314 Design/Layout Turell Group 541.685.5000 turellgroup.com Printing QSL Print Communications 541.687.1184 Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce 1401 Willamette St. Eugene, OR 97401 541.484.1314 Open for Business A publication of the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce (USPS-978-480). Open for Business is published quarterly by the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce in March, June, September and December. Circulation: 3,800. Open for Business © 2018 The subscription price is $25, included in membership. Periodicals Postage Paid at Eugene, OR. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 1107, Eugene, OR 97440-1107.

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POLIC Y I N SIG HT

CREATING STRONGER POLICY EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP BRINGS VOICES TOGETHER By Tiffany Edwards, Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce The best public policies are almost always those that benefit the majority of citizens, not just a small group of active voices. They’re the policies that are the result of careful negotiations, consideration of diverse values and those in which there are no real winners or losers. In Eugene, we have a history of creating long processes, aiming to provide an opportunity for different perspectives to express their wishes and for outcomes that factor in those varying values. Unfortunately, this well-intentioned system can lead to complete paralysis. After months, or even years of debate, we land in the exact place from which we started and with little accomplished. In my observation, the problem we have isn’t a process that fails to recognize the diversity of values, but one that fails to move forward until complete consensus is achieved. Over time, this way of setting policy often creates two camps: winners and losers. It is an approach that makes for a greater divide and loss of a sense of community. Strong and effective leadership helps to bring voices together, values varying perspectives and works to find a middle ground. It recognizes

diverse group, by design. It’s comprised of individuals with a range of backgrounds and political perspectives, not unlike our Chamber membership. The only thing they often share is the fact that they’ve chosen to get up early each Friday morning, to learn, listen and engage. When they deliberate on topics, the discussion is thoughtful and intentional. When they vote, it’s not often unanimous. Recently, after several weeks of research and discussion, LGAC took a number of positions on controversial topics. Prior to deliberations, one member reminded his colleagues that the group must work to represent the values of the 1,300 local businesses that rely on LGAC to take positions on their behalf. He asked that they detach themselves from their personal biases and opinions to consider decisions that benefit the larger business community, as a whole. It was sound advice, and I was proud to be in the company of people who took it to heart. We sometimes come to an unanimous agreement, but that wasn’t the case on this day. The members of LGAC work together; when you are among them, you feel a sense of community. One doesn’t see winners and losers. Nobody complains when the majority of the group doesn’t vote as they may have. They make thoughtful, well-informed decisions, take action and then move on to the next important topic.

when its values aren’t shared by the majority and has the wisdom to

As thoughtful members of a community, it’s important that we do our

concede to a cause greater than itself. Strong and effective leadership

part, as individuals, to adopt values that reflect strong leadership. Being

listens and maintains an open mind.

respectful earns respect—and, when you listen, you’re more likely to be

The Eugene Chamber’s Local Government Affairs Council (LGAC) is a group of 25-voting Chamber members, who meet every week. They

listened to. After all, as Eugeneans, we value our community and our quality of life. We truly do agree on far more than we realize.

are tasked with staying educated on community issues and taking votes that reflect the official positions of the Chamber. This is an extremely

Lend your voice and leadership to the policies shaping Eugene. Connect with Tiffany Edwards at tiffanye@eugenechamber.com

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C H A M B E R V ISIO N A RI ES

EQUAL EDUCATION BENEFITS EVERYONE, INCLUDING BUSINESSES By Chamber Visionary Anne Marie Levis President & Creative Director of Funk/Levis & Associates For me, “good enough” has never been good enough. I seek the exceptional. If I can’t find it, I strive to create it. That’s been one of the

LOW RES IMAGE

joys of living in Eugene for the past 25 years. I’ve been able to create a (sort of) balanced life of working hard at a business I love, raising a family and giving back to the community that my husband and I chose all those years ago. Now and again, I find it important to take time to contemplate my values, how these values are reflected in our work, here, at Funk/ Levis and consider the impact our company makes on the broader community. Our business has always been about doing exceptional and valuable work for our clients. We consider our clients to be our closest friends, and we view ourselves as part of their businesses. We see our work directly impacting the economy, because when our clients succeed, our economy grows. It’s as simple as that. I am so appreciative of the team we have at Funk/Levis, because we’re unified in our commitment to invest in this community. This collaboration and these shared values helped our firm become the first winner of the Emerald Award for Community Caring. Looking back, I realize that winning this award was motivation for us to continue giving back every year. Looking forward, I see the need to refine the opportunities available to our youth, so they can meet the unique demands of our community. I have always been a firm believer that education is the foundation of our democracy and a critical component of this region’s economic engine. A strong educational structure helps level the playing field to ensure that our most vulnerable citizens are afforded the same opportunities as their peers. As a mom, and Eugene 4J School District board member, I recognize that we have a responsibility to find new

ways of keeping our youth interested and involved in their education. Many of these students have more obstacles to overcome than most of us could imagine. It benefits all of us for them to grow up to be successful, contributing citizens. But more than that, they need these tools to live their best lives, now and in the future. This is why my firm was so committed to helping pass the 4J bond measure. We donated our time to this important cause, knowing that investing in schools increases the likelihood that students will stay engaged and be more successful. I invite you to join me on this worthwhile adventure to ensure our young people have the opportunities and help they need, so their education is fun, rather than something to worry about. Whether you choose to contribute by providing jobs for the next generation or donating your time and resources to today’s youth, together we can create a brighter future and an even stronger community.

YOUR BUSINESS. YOUR CHAMBER. YOUR COMMUNITY. Thank you to the 2018 Chamber Visionaries: Anne Marie Levis, Funk/Levis & Associates Casey Barrett, Obie Companies Celeste Edman, Lunar Logic

Read more from our Chamber Visionaries and others in our Chamber at Work section at www.EugeneChamber.com

Chris Boone, Boone Insurance Associates Craig Wanichek, Summit Bank Ron Neumann, Oregon Community Credit Union

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Join us for Quack Chats, monthly pub talks where University of Oregon researchers share their insight in a casual and conversational setting. Quack Chats Pub Talks are on select Wednesdays at the Downtown Athletic Club’s Ax Billy Grill. Upcoming topics include heart health, the science of a good cup of coffee and artificial intelligence. All events are free. Full schedule

uoregon.edu/quackchats

EO/AA/ADA institution committed to cultural diversity.

SINCE

1970 MEET OUR NEW COLLEAGUES FRESH THINKING EXPERIENCED ADVICE

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Eugene | 541.686.9160 | EugeneLaw.com E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |   O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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M E M B E R VOIC E

THE LEGACY OF GIVING

WILDISH FAMILY BUILDS COMMUNITY WITH OREGON COMMUNITY FOUNDATION By Jim Wildish, President and CEO of Wildish

When my dad, Thomas C. Wildish, departed

Norm wanted these contributions to do as

North Dakota for Oregon in the 1930s, he

much good as possible. Fortunately, Oregon

left behind the rolling prairies but not the

Community Foundation provides us with the

commitments he’d made. Dad had promised

essential research we need to do the most

to guarantee the loan for a school building.

good, so that we can stay focused on our

He kept paying on that commitment until it

daily work. We trust Oregon Community

was completed, many years after he moved

Foundation’s local staff. They know us and

away and started a business in Eugene.

understand what we care about, suggesting

Wildish, a family-owned company since 1935, has two family legacies: providing the construction and paving services that Eugene and western states have come to rely on while,

projects we might want to fund throughout the year, informing us about how others are supporting them and providing updates on the programs we contribute to annually.

as quietly as possible, giving back to the

I know that the Oregon Community

communities where we live and work through

Foundation would describe what they do as

charitable gifts. We don’t say it a lot. We

comprehensive and strategic, with statewide

prefer to leave the credit to the hardworking

reach and local expertise. They offer insights,

people who run the nonprofits or coach the

relationships and time to us, which ensures

sports teams, and to our employees, whose

our individual philanthropy has an even

efforts are a key to our success. Yet, we

greater impact in our community. That’s

also realize it’s important to highlight the

a valuable asset to us. Astute financial

difference it makes to our community when

management of the fund ensures consistent

successful people and businesses give back.

growth, so we can continue to do more

Wildish donates to a variety of causes through the company, and we also contribute through the Norman and Olga Evelyn Wildish Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation. Family

Community Foundation applies to nonprofit recommendations ensures that the causes we support are managing their money well, too. The Oregon Community Foundation

Community Foundation fund during his

puts donated money to work in Oregon,

lifetime and bequeathed his assets to it after

fulfilling a mission of improving the lives

his death. Now I, along with my sons and

of all Oregonians through the power of

nephew, have the pleasure of contributing

philanthropy. We’re glad to be a part of it.

through the fund to causes that are important

We’re proud of both Wildish legacies—our

to the Eugene-Springfield area, including

business and our philanthropy. We feel

kids’ programs, the arts, natural resources and

privileged that we get to continue them

health organizations.

through the generations.

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Oregon Community Foundation works with individuals and businesses to create philanthropic funds, awarding $118 million in grants and scholarships statewide in 2018 alone. The organization offers statewide reach with local expertise, providing essential research, strategy and fund management to help donors realize their charitable vision.

good, longer. And the due-diligence Oregon

member Norm Wildish created The Oregon

8

Jim Wildish is President and CEO of Wildish, which includes construction, building, paving and sand and gravel companies. Wildish donations, including those from the Norman and Olga Evelyn Wildish Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation, have benefited more than 100 Willamette Valley organizations.

To learn more about starting a philanthropic fund through The Oregon Community Foundation or contributing to a pooled fund with other donors, visit www.oregoncf.org/donors/donor-overview


QU E RY & QUOTES

WALK THE TALK

BANNER BANK AND ITS COMMITMENT TO COMMUNITY QUOTED: Mike Murphy, Banner Bank Senior Vice President & Retail Division Manager

WHAT IS IT ABOUT YOUR ORGANIZATION THAT MAKES YOU PARTICULARLY PROUD? Banner Bank truly is committed to being the best community bank in Eugene, and we demonstrate that commitment in tangible ways. They include: being actively involved in community organizations throughout Lane County; earning the business of our clients every day by providing exceptional service and value, as well as offering anytime advice to help them reach their goals; appreciating the contributions of our employees and providing them with a quality work environment; and by honoring our legacy in this market as a top philanthropic partner, by continuing to give generously to many local organizations and causes. It’s great to know our clients appreciate our approach—we have the pleasure of hearing their feedback every day. We were recently selected by our clients as the Top Bank in the State of Oregon in Forbes Best-In-State Ranking survey, and earning the designation of Best Regional Bank in America by Money Magazine. BANNER BANK HAS A LONG HISTORY OF PHILANTHROPIC EFFORTS. WHY IS PHILANTHROPY IMPORTANT TO YOU AND HOW DOES IT IMPACT HOW YOU DO BUSINESS? As a community bank, service is at the very heart of our company mission and not just client service—it includes serving and caring about each other, our families and our communities. In 2017, we donated $2.45 million to more than 2,300 community organizations, many of them right here in the Eugene area. Last year, our employees volunteered more than 23,500 hours of their time to local charities. We know when we’re actively involved in the communities we serve, it makes the Eugene community stronger, which benefits all businesses, including ours. HOW DOES BANNER BANK PROMOTE COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION, AND WHAT ARE THE IMPACTS ON YOUR EMPLOYEES AND BUSINESS? At Banner Bank, we’re committed to doing our part to assist those good works by being a strong community partner. We demonstrate our commitment by building deep and lasting partnerships in several ways:

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PHOTOGRAPHY: Courtesy of Banner Bank

• Encouraging employees to give back by volunteering their time and talent. We value community volunteerism so much that we offer every employee paid time off to volunteer during work hours—16 hours for full-time employees and 8 hours for part-time employees. • Actively participating in community projects, like our annual month-long food drive we just wrapped up at all our locations. • Supporting over 100 Lane County non-profit organizations through financial contributions and in-kind donations, including United Way, St. Vincent De Paul, Ballet Fantastique, Oregon Supported Living, Kidsports, and Lane Arts Council. WHAT MAKES YOUR ORGANIZATION UNIQUE? We highly value the community spirit upon which Banner Bank was founded as a small thrift in 1890, and we honor that by continuing to be flexible and creative in how we engage in the community. For example, we trust and respect our employees to guide our choices in every market we serve. Our local Eugene leadership team knows and understands this region, so they recommend the community projects we join and the contributions we make. This ensures we are engaged in meaningful ways that have the greatest opportunity to impact change and help transform lives, which directly ties into our company vision. WHICH CHAMBER EXPERIENCE HAS IMPACTED YOU OR YOUR BUSINESS THE MOST THIS YEAR? I attended the YP Connect Conference this year with three of our younger, high-potential, team members. The Chamber did an outstanding job of providing a valuable learning and networking opportunity. In fact, I left energized about the future of our community, and I heard similar comments from other participants. As a local leader, I am grateful the Chamber is making forward-looking investments in our future leadership.


QU E RY & QUOTES

WHEELS WITH PURPOSE BURLEY DESIGN SELLS GLOBAL BUT KEEPS IT LOCAL QUOTED: Allison Straub, Burley Design President

PHOTOGRAPHY: Courtesy of Burley Design

HOW DID BURLEY GET ITS START? Burley founder Alan Scholz started a small company called Burley Bike Bags in the 70s, selling the handmade bags at Eugene’s Saturday Market, a 30mile commute from his rural home. Determined to live a car-free life, Alan and his wife needed a way to carry his bags and young daughter to the market by bike. Using parts from an old swing set, he built the first Burley bike trailer. Market-goers, cyclists and bike shops began to ask about the bike trailer, and it wasn’t long before orders started pouring in. In 1978 Burley became a worker-owned cooperative. In 2006, members sold the company to my father, Mike Coughlin, and today Burley remains locally owned by our family. Most recognized for our child bicycle trailers, Burley is known around the world for building recreational transport gear that sets the standard for safety, durability, and thoughtful design. WHAT IS IT ABOUT YOUR ORGANIZATION THAT MAKES YOU PARTICULARLY PROUD? Both our people and our products. Our team is a group of stellar individuals that really make Burley who we are. Their passion for our brand and commitment to what we are working to achieve is something that I’m proud of. We are a large brand with a small team, so most everyone wears multiple hats. We are very relationship driven and it shines through in all aspects of our business. In regards to products, it doesn’t get any more rewarding than designing, manufacturing, and selling products that you are proud of and believe in. Burley customers are putting their most precious cargo in their child trailers, and we take that very seriously. BURLEY HAS LONG BEEN CONNECTED TO A SENSE OF COMMUNITY HERE IN EUGENE. WHY IS COMMUNITY IMPORTANT TO YOU AND HOW DOES THAT PLAY OUT IN HOW YOU DO BUSINESS? Burley is a global brand, and although a very small percentage of our sales are local, Eugene is our home. This community has fostered our growth and development over the last 40 years. This is where we live, work, and play. We make a point to establish local business partnerships, from retailers

to banking to printing. We also intentionally commit the majority of our philanthropic efforts locally. Most recently, Mike Coughlin and I founded an affiliate branch of a national organization called Free Bikes 4 Kidz. With Burley as a large supporter of this organization, we are able to both tackle an industry issue of declining cycling participation in youth, while serving local children in the community. We are working to build a legacy; to build the next generation of riders, adventurers and explorers. Eugene is an amazing place to call home, and it’s worth investing in. WHAT OPPORTUNITIES ON THE HORIZON FOR EUGENE ARE YOU AND YOUR TEAM MOST EXCITED ABOUT? Being in the cycling and outdoor industry, we are excited about the continued investment in cycling and walking infrastructure and alternative transportation methods. The primary reason for people not riding bikes is that they don’t feel safe. Although safety encompasses many factors, having designated and protected spaces to bike and walk lays the foundation for people to feel more confident in riding or walking. HOW DO YOU SEE THE CHAMBER IMPACTING YOUR BUSINESS OR THE EUGENE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT? Our ability to attract and retain good employees is made easier when, as a community, we commit to investing time, effort, and money into making Eugene a better place to work and live. Part of that, which I applaud the Chamber for, is simply (although not simple, in fact) a matter of working to change the narrative and diving right into difficult or controversial topics. The Chamber does a good job of facilitating dialogue, developing strategies, and advocating across sectors to work to unite and strengthen businesses and the community at large.

Check out Burley’s new nonprofit project Free Bikes 4 Kidz. Visit fb4keugene-springfield.org

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Vibrant sector strategies, committed partnerships and inspired community leadership are helping to drive the growth of targeted industries and our regional economy. The Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce is proud to be a part of the Lane County Sector Strategies team. Each quarter, we’ll learn from the partners moving this work forward.

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SEC TO R ST R AT EG I E S

APPRENTI CULTIVATES TECH TALENT Article by ALLISON WEATHERLY || Photo by ATHENA DELENE

A new registered apprenticeship program, Apprenti, launched in Lane County earlier this year. Since then, the program has placed apprentices with three local employers: XS Media, City of Eugene, and Homes for Good. Lane Workforce Partnership and the Technology Association of Oregon have joined forces to bring a registered tech apprenticeship program to Lane County.

Apprenti is a registered apprenticeship in the field of IT. In Lane County, the program is powered by the Technology Association of Oregon and Lane Workforce Partnership. Once accepted into the Apprenti program, apprentices receive three to 22 weeks of technical training, followed by one year of full-time, paid, on-the-job training with a local company. Apprenti is for any employer recruiting for occupations, such as network security administrator, IT support professional or web developer. During the paid, on-the-job training, employers pay a discounted wage to offset the additional training provided to the apprentice by the employer. Candidates are pre-screened by Apprenti staff before being sent to employers for interviews. To be considered for the program, candidates must complete a rigorous online assessment that measures math, logic and emotional quotient. High-scoring candidates are placed on a ranked list. There are currently 305 highly motivated individuals on the ranked list for Lane County. These individuals are eager for an alternative pathway to a career in tech. Registered apprenticeship does just that. It combines classroom and on-the-job training, honing the skills needed for a specific occupation. Stephen Parac of XS Media was intrigued at the opportunity. Looking for a motivated Network Security Administrator, he turned to Apprenti and found it to be very worthwhile. “The team found two incredible candidates for us to choose from,” Parac says. “Kyle did fabulous in the training at LCC and started attending some company events before he started on the job. He’s been working full time for six weeks, and we couldn’t be happier.” Find out more about Apprenti at http://bit.ly/2yCzF2u

The Lane County Sector Strategy Team (LCSST) is a team of professionals representing workforce development, economic development, business and education. The LCSST works collectively, in an effort to better support critical industries in Lane County. We believe we can achieve more and have a greater impact in our community by working together. For more, visit: bit.ly/2PhYKpU

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Local leaders meet with Sen. Chinese food buyers tour SnoTemp.

Jeff Merkley at Coconut Bliss.

A GROWING FOOD AND BEVERAGE HUB Article by MICHAL ELCONIN, SEASON TO TASTE CONSULTING

Local food and beverage producers are capturing the attention of an international audience. In August, a Chinese Food and Beverage Buyer Trade Mission came to Eugene. This was the first time such a mission traveled to the Southern Willamette Valley. The group of Chinese buyers had oneon-one meetings with a number of local producers at Hummingbird Wholesale, then enjoyed a lunch at Falling Sky, followed by tours of Snotemp and Ninkasi (they were digging the Prismatic Juicy IPA!). More international buyers are expected in the coming year. U.S. senators are also taking notice. Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon and a group of 20 local industry leaders held a very productive

roundtable conversation at Coconut Bliss. The group discussed opportunities to solidify our region as a food and beverage manufacturing hub. Simultaneously, resources continue to be built out, supporting the marketing of our region and its companies. Travel Lane County, for example, is coordinating the development of a Southern Willamette Valley Food Trail. This project includes a number of trails marketed by Travel Oregon and other partners that include farm-totable, u-pick and farm tours, craft beverage, foraging and other agritourism experiences. Lane Community College is forging forward with its goal to launch a Food & Beverage Manufacturing Program. The college is hiring new faculty with Food & Beverage

manufacturing experience to support the program and industry members are providing guidance in course development. Sat Bir Khalsa, director of global community and human resources development at Yogi Tea, sums things up well: “Our community has been a pioneer and front-runner for natural food and other food categories for many years. We are now collaborating and engaging our talented businesses to benefit the whole. Our work will bring awareness of the breadth and depth of our businesses, will give a voice to our sector, will promote collaboration for sharing resources, and will promote collective success for our communities.”

Lane County is home to 165 food and beverage manufacturing companies, which employ 4,019 people, bringing over $179 million in wages to the area. With firm counts growing at almost 7 percent a year, the industry has created over 1,000 new jobs since 2012. By most estimates, this is a billion-dollar industry that will only continue to grow.

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SEC TO R ST R AT EG I E S

Tours show students modern manufacturing in Lane County and cultivate interest in future career opportunities.

PARTNERSHIPS THAT CONNECT STUDENTS TO CAREER Article by JOSHUA MONGÉ, EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

In October, 200 students, educators and volunteers toured local manufacturing facilities to highlight the career opportunities that exist in our local industry.

County has to offer, illuminating career pathways and desired skills that can fuel a student’s drive to remain in our community and build a career that propels our economy.

These efforts demonstrate the collective power of collaborations between industry, school districts and nonprofit partners working together to build future workforce and economic gains.

In its second year for our community, Manufacturing Day is a collaborative endeavor to help build a workforce pipeline for a critical component of our economy. Demand for tours surged after our 2017 efforts, increasing from 185 students and garnering increased participation from both schools and industry partners.

“We are thrilled to be able to partner again on Manufacturing Day with our community of partners. Career-connected learning events, like this one, are critical for developing the mindsets of students. When we provide contextualized learning opportunities, we start to see students recognize the relevance of their math, science and STEM classes. And when they have the opportunity to explore industries, they start to envision their future,” says Heidi Larwick, Executive Director of Connected Lane County

As products made in Oregon continue to gain ground on a national and international scale, programs such as these help to illuminate the power of a community-wide approach to economic development and further develop the workforce that will solidify the global footprint of our local organizations.

The tours engaged students in the production process, tools, techniques and people who make some of the area’s finest products. Students learn firsthand about all that manufacturing in Lane

For more on the partners and participants of this year’s Manufacturing Day, please visit www.eugenechamber.com

Two-hundred students toured local manufacturers: Euphoria Chocolate, GloryBee, Seneca, Attune, Franz, Swanson, Kingsford, Cutting Edge Illusions, Forrest Technical and Hummingbird Wholesale.

E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |   O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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ADVERTORIAL

Veg Salad Craft The best local ingredients, in the heart of downtown Located steps from historic Kesey square in downtown Eugene, Veg Salad Craft is proud to offer quick-service dining for simple, seasonal and healthy foods. By cultivating relationships with farmers, right here in the Willamette Valley, the Veg mission is to inspire healthy communities by connecting people to real food. Offering a selection of breakfast bowls, salads, parfaits, cold-pressed juices and thoughtfully infused waters—strawberry basil, anyone?—Veg brings the best of Northwest produce and ingredients to our local community in a quick, delicious and convenient way. In business for more than 125 years, Veg proudly partners with Harper Farms, a multigenerational hazelnut farm, just north of Eugene. Passed down through five generations, the farm is run by Bryan Harper, a farming industry veteran who sits on the State Board of Agriculture. By supporting small to midsize local growers with a commitment to sustainability, Veg aims to create transparency around what’s in our food and where it comes from, creating a dynamic connection between consumers and the farmers who grow the food. At Veg Salad Craft, we believe that the choices we make about what we eat, where it comes from and how it is prepared have a direct and powerful impact on the health of the individuals and communities we serve. We want to make an impact and leave the community better than we found it. In addition to hazelnuts, Veg has local partnerships with Tillamook Cheese and Oregon Lox Company. Stop by Veg’s 861 Broadway location downtown and try out an ancient grain bowl or signature Veg salad.

www.vegsaladcraft.com | Open 7 days a week, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Bryan Harper, a fifth-generation hazelnut farmer in Junction City, inspects the first of his 2018 harvest. Photo courtesy of Harper Farms in Junction City.

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Keep business thriving. Our business goals are all about helping you achieve your business goals. Let’s get to work. MyOCCU.org/Thriving

Insured by NCUA


TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE

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TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE

Triple Bottom Line (TBL) practices are not new. It was first coined by John Elkington, who founded SustainAbility, a British consulting firm, in 1994. Elkington stressed the importance of three key factors for businesses and organizations to consider in their decision-making.

EQUITY

ENVIRONMENT

ECONOMY

Respecting employees and the community by being socially responsible, fair and mindful.

Adopting sustainable and environmentally friendly practices to lessen any impact on the planet.

Balancing value against loss to determine the economic value created by the organization.

A GOVERNMENT PERSPECTIVE For many organizations, including the City of Eugene, this

Eugene and Springfield Fire Chief Joe Zaludek says adopting

tied in perfectly when City leaders were rethinking the City

TBL was a natural choice. “I was exposed to the Triple Bottom

Council vision in 2010. Chelsea Clinton, City of Eugene

Line through problem-solving,” he says. “It’s a systems

sustainability analyst, says that the City first started looking

approach to solving a problem. You don’t solve one problem

into better sustainability practices around 2005, evolving

and make three others. You try to solve them all, balance

through community engagement to build the new vision

them, and it’s a better solution overall. Usually, the interest

standards, which framed the TBL principles perfectly.

is also economic—you can save money while you’re doing it

“Since our guiding body is City Council, and it aligns so

and have an optimum outcome.” >

well with their vision, it’s just a good check,” Clinton says. “We might have our system to make sure we’re operating efficiently, but then we also want to think about how we’re serving the public, and we want to do that in a way that services their needs. I think Triple Bottom Line really embodies that—the key values we hear from our community.” E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |   O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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GOOD BUSINESS SENSE

“Going forward, we will hopefully be able to recognize their

Isler CPA adopted TBL about 15 years ago. They brought in Good Company, which specializes in advising companies and organizations in TBL, setting the stage for Isler to earn a

student debt payments,” he says. “We can recognize that with our matching contribution and our 401(k) plan, it’s a good way to add some net worth to our employees.”

spot as one of the 100 Best Green Workplaces in Oregon for

The company offers flexible work schedules, including

ten years in a row.

where their employees work. “We give each employee up

“It’s just part of our culture now,” managing partner, Gary Iskra, says. “All the things we’re doing are just normal to us now.”

to 50 hours a year to do community work, paid time, if it’s during a work day,” Iskra says. “They can be on a board or advise any organization they want. It doesn’t have to be

Isler CPA focuses their “people” lens on their own

one that we pick. It’s whatever their passion is, so we’re

employees. This year, they expanded their parental leave

supportive in that.”

policy and also offer support to their employees who want to take the CPA exam, providing them with the resources to study and take the exam, with a bonus if they pass within a certain time frame. Iskra says that they are currently looking into contributing to an employee’s 401(k), even if they are incapable to contribute due to paying off student loans.

EQUITY AND ENVIRONMENT The City of Eugene looks outward when considering the “equity” principle by focusing a lot of its work around equity, integrating this idea into all projects and initiatives. Clinton says the City is currently working on an Equity in Contracting program, which “exists to increase accessibility of contracting opportunities for all suppliers interested in working with the City of Eugene, with a distinct focus on increasing the number of contracts issued to small, minority, and women-owned businesses,” according to the City’s webpage.

The City of Eugene offers a tool to help organizations begin to think through the implications of the Triple Bottom Line. For more visit: bit.ly/2EF626S 20

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TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE

“The way you do business reflects your values, and I think it helps the council feel like we’re being fairer and reducing barriers for how we do our day-to-day business,” Zaludek says. “The City spends a lot of money locally, and I think it’s only fair to say there should be access to locally owned businesses that might want to take a shot at providing these materials or services.”

A BURNING PASSION Zaludek says that the fire department started small with their sustainability practices, but have big dreams for future projects, thanks to TBL. “In the next five years, we have sixteen vehicles that we’re going to evaluate with Triple Bottom Line thinking to meet the goals of our community, including the Climate Recovery Ordinance (CRO),” he says. “I

The “environment” segment of TBL for the City and Isler CPA

don’t think we would’ve gotten to CRO without TBL. There’s

are similar: reduce in small ways to impact in big ways.

a kind of continuum of thinking and processing on big problems, where we’re trying to make a difference.”

“We don’t have a lot of waste, but we do drink a lot of coffee,” Iskra says. “So, we’re capturing all the grounds and recycling

The Climate Recovery Ordinance works to reduce

them. We have people picking up all the cans and bottles

community fossil fuel usage by 50 percent of 2010 levels by

and recycling them for donations. So, [there are] small things

2030, estimated to require an average emission reduction

that we can do.”

of 7.6 percent each year. Zaludek says that they are looking into the possibility of a hybrid firetruck, inspired by the hybrid ambulances in Seattle.

“IT DOES COME DOWN TO A CULTURAL ACCEPTANCE OF YOUR WORKPLACE, OF YOUR WHOLE TEAM. I THINK START SMALL.”

INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS Both the City and Isler CPA consider their travel time to reduce their carbon consumption, using the digital age to their advantage between meeting with clients, teaching classes and delivering briefs. “We can work anywhere in the world, so that’s been really good,” Iskra says. “It’s a bit of an expectation as a professional service provider that we have that face time with our clients. So, ratcheting [travel] back, we’re a little cautious about that, but they understand and accept it.” >

Gary Iskra, ISLER CPA

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TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE

ELEVATING THE ECONOMY

“Ten years ago, we didn’t think about equity in our climate

For both groups, the bottom line seems less of a breaking point when it works in tandem with the other two bottom lines.

work, and we had to have some tough conversations on our team and say, ‘you know, it’s never going to be the right time to do this,’” Clinton says. “To implement any new system, it

“We obviously couldn’t sustain ourselves without profit,”

takes time. You have to stop and pause and say, ‘what’s it

Iskra says. “It’s not our key goal, and I think it’s nice that when

going to be? How are we going to do this?’ So, I think that’s

we think about our firm, we think about the three aspects

just something we had to acknowledge. We need to slow

generally of the TBL, so when it comes to making decisions,

down—and we want to slow down—because we believe

it’s not always ‘what’s this profit going to be to us?’ or ‘what’s

this is the right thing to do. We want to incorporate this in a

the impact going to be on us financially?’ We don’t gear our

meaningful way.”

decisions toward just that one aspect of our world.”

Iskra also says to take it slow. “It does come down to a

Zaludek says that it’s more important to focus on the big

cultural acceptance of your workplace, of your whole

picture, in terms of profit, rather than the upfront cost alone.

team, and it’s not necessarily a decision that the owners

“Cheaper is not a thing,” he says. “I think it’s value. And it

say they’ve made and everyone’s going to do it and love

might be a few cents more now, but the value of the life cycle

it,” he says. “So, it’s a very incremental process. I think

is better, and you get to the benefits of livability, which is

[organizations should] start small.”

what this community wants.”

The City offers an online tool to help guide organizations

Both recommend to other organizations that they, too, adopt

through TBL principle application. There are other tools

TBL practices, because of the conversations and initiatives

available, as well as local consultants to help you find the

it inspires—but it isn’t a small step.

right path. “I know we’re on the track of the most thoughtful way you

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According to Forbes, % of millennial consumers will spend more money on brands that support a cause they care about. bit.ly/2yVuQkW

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could resolve problems,” Zaludek says. “And I’m proud to be at least within the working edge of some of those solutions.”


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TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE


TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE

Article by LEAH SIKORA MOORE

In the recipe for corporate success, philanthropy and volunteering represent the “secret sauce.” They take organizations to a new level, making them more competitive, more desirable to job candidates and more well-rounded. These are essential elements of the Triple Bottom Line—and they require investment— but, when it comes to corporate giving and community service, businesses reap what they sow. Giving and community service have long been a treasured component of professional life in the Eugene-Springfield business community. “This community is very rich with volunteers, with people who are interested in really serving their community, and there’s a diversity of ways that we can get engaged,” says Noreen Dunnells, President & CEO of United Way of Lane County. This past September, United Way of Lane County celebrated its 25th annual Day of Caring, a county-wide effort that brings businesses and community members together to complete an array of service projects. This year, over 900 volunteers and 40 companies participated in the event, donating upwards of 3,600 hours of time, valued at a staggering $89,000*. > *Calculated using the Independent Sector’s estimated value of volunteer time at $24.69 per hour. Volunteers from 40 local companies gave back to local causes as a part of United Way of Lane County’s annual Day of Caring.

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“Employees want to work with a company that’s not only doing well, but that is doing good in the community” Noreen Dunnells, UNITED WAY OF LANE COUNTY

United Way also connects community members to

Not only does corporate social responsibility move the

volunteer opportunities year-round and recently developed

needle in the community, it moves the needle for businesses

a new strategic vision, focused on ensuring that kids are

on employee recruitment and retention. According to

successful in school and life.

a 2016 study, conducted by Cone Communications on

The impact of a one-day effort, like United Way’s Day of Caring, is significant, but businesses can extend that impact all year long by weaving a service mindset into company culture. At Eugene law firm Gaydos, Churnside & Balthrop, P.C., service and volunteering are incorporated into daily activities. “It’s not something that we just do with our extra time,” says Sheryl Balthrop, managing shareholder. “It’s something that we feel is so important that we work our professional lives around it. It is a primary responsibility, along with everything else that we do.” Employees of the firm participate in company-wide service efforts and are supported in individual efforts to give back through mentoring and time-off during the workday, when needed. “People recognize that it is a privilege to be able to serve,” says Balthrop, who has noticed that employees consistently mention opportunities to make a positive impact in the community as one of their favorite aspects of the workplace.

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millennial employee engagement, 84 percent of millennials want employers to help them identify ways they can become more engaged and active in the community, while 76 percent said they consider a company’s social and environmental commitments when deciding where to work. “Employees want to work with a company that’s not only doing well, but that is doing good in the community,” says Dunnells. Incorporating service-related activities is also an excellent way to develop employee leadership, build creativity and problem-solving skills, keep employees engaged and foster camaraderie. To weave a service mindset into company culture authentically and with meaning, businesses can incorporate these efforts into employee orientations, mentoring and coaching efforts. “Find out what the genuine heart-level interests of your staff and workers are,” recommends Balthrop, adding that volunteerism must be customized to suit individual passions and be driven by more than a desire to check a box or pad a resume.


ADVERTORIAL

How to build your legacy in four easy steps By AIMEE BUTLER, WEALTH ADVISOR AT MERRIMAN

At Gaydos, Churnside & Balthrop, P.C., employees are encouraged to select service opportunities that align with their passions and then support their individual service projects. “We let our staff know that we think it should be something that energizes and encourages them and that we will make a space for that. We encourage other businesses to do that. I think in the long run, such makes everyone happier and healthier,” says Balthrop. Top Left: Volunteers with United Way’s Day of Caring help to support the Friends of Buford Park. Top Right: Nicholas Balthrop, associate attorney at Gaydos, Churnside & Balthrop, focuses his volunteer activities around his passion for agricultural development.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT WAYS TO GIVE BACK, VISIT UNITEDWAYLANE.ORG

I recently heard a TED Radio Hour story on NPR about Lux Narayan, an entrepreneur and data analyst. His organization spent two years analyzing the obituaries in The New York Times, looking for threads of commonality between the people who were featured. Then, his team created a word cloud of the text to show which words turned up most often.

to name a foundation as a beneficiary on an account or gift a portion of retirement funds to create tax savings.

The word “help” is one that showed up in large, bold type, because these people made a positive impact on the lives of others. They helped.

If you want to leave a legacy in our community, try following this process:

Helping and giving back is incredibly important to me. It’s the reason I got into financial planning. Every day, I help others achieve their dreams. Working with hundreds of clients over the years, I have discovered a pattern: many people want to help through philanthropic gifting or volunteerism, but they have a hard time deciding whether to give time or money, and how they should do it. With the help of our own financial advisor, my husband, Greg, and I prioritize our values and goals on how we want to save and give back. Over the years, our priorities have changed. Our days are filled with the family obligations of two elementary school kids and full-time careers. We both volunteer on boards for our respective careers—mine for financial planning and his for the Mid-Town Business Association. When time is short, we give in other ways, through checkbook philanthropy—giving annually to places like my alma mater or to Youth Journalism International.

Eugene, Oregon, has more nonprofits per capita than any community in the country, so the possibilities of how to accomplish this are numerous. Unfortunately, our time and money are finite.

1. Clarify your values. What issues are most important to you? Economic prosperity across the community? Environmental stewardship? Social equity? Something else? 2. Write down your goals. Will you be giving time or money, or both? 3. Find a professional who can help you navigate the ways you can give. There are benefits to the community and your family to consider. 4. Reassess your values and goals over time. It’s not uncommon to find that one cause becomes more important to you as others wane. Lux Narayan finished his radio talk by saying, “Ask yourselves, as you go about your daily lives, ‘How am I using my talents to help society?’” I live this every day in working with my clients, and I welcome the opportunity to assist others in achieving their own legacy of helping. If you are ready to plan your legacy of helping, give Merriman a call at 541-868-3765 or email aimee@merriman.com.

As a wealth advisor, I spend time learning what my clients are passionate about to assist them in finding creative ways to donate to those charities when time or energy runs short. I help people decide when

E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |   O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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Article by VANESSA SALVIA

Local leaders are working hard to help more businesses realize that the benefits of placing sustainability at the center of business strategy outweigh the costs. We talked to Carolyn Stein of BRING, a local resource for materials and knowledge; John Stapleton of Pivot Architecture about designing sustainability into buildings; and Jodi Sommers from Essex General Construction about how greener construction helps everyone.

“The conversation can be about getting a 1/2 percent more productivity out of everyone in the building if I give them good lighting. That’s a bigger number than the electric bill.” JOHN STAPLETON PIVOT ARCHITECTURE


TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE

Architect John Stapleton of Pivot Architecture notes that

employees. In one example he provides, changing lighting

buildings consume the majority of resources, so building

meant disrupting what was perceived as the important daily

design has to be a core solution for sustainability. He says

work for minimal payout. “We needed to introduce language

LEED standards have revolutionized green building, but for

around their language of value,” he explains.

many people it was just a checklist.

He received new reinforcement when people started doing

“As they were operating their building they would say, ‘We

data-driven studies on how lighting affects productivity.

can’t support this’ and start turning things off,” he says.

“Then the conversation can be about getting a 1/2 percent

“Aligning the building with the company’s strategy for using

more productivity out of everyone in the building if I give

it is crucial.”

them good lighting,” he says. “That’s a bigger number than

Stapleton sees his responsibility as ensuring that a

the electric bill.”  >

building’s features emphasize things the company actually cares about and are explained in a way that speaks the client’s language. For instance, a building owner’s perspective might be that the electric bill is just a sliver of the expenses involved in maintaining a building for 500

Left: Howard Elementary’s sustainability focus fell into three areas: energy conservation, water conservation and daylighting. The photovoltaic array on the roof generates clean power for the school. Storm water treatment swales were added around the building and parking areas. Right: By using daylight to enrich a space and reduce energy costs, no lights are needed in many of the teaching and learning spaces at Howard Elementary most days. Center: One of the best ways to be sustainable is to re-use. ShelterCare re-tasked an old warehouse building into their new offices. You can see the great, old wood structure used throughout the building.

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TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE

In 2016, Essex General Construction won former Eugene

electronics. When gift-giving, the company considers only

Mayor Kitty Piercy’s Top Green Business award and the Bold

fair trade items, and they host zero-waste events. “Our

Steps Award, which recognizes Eugene-based sustainable

biggest crowd was 175 people, and the total of waste to the

businesses. “Essex brings sustainability into everything

landfill from that was less than a trash can,” she says.

we do, from how we function in our office to our job sites,” Sommers says. “We are BRING Rethink certified; we use recycled products that are eco-friendly, we recycle, and we’re energy and resource efficient.” Around their west Eugene building, Essex installed plantings and a roof drainage system to reduce and filter rainwater runoff before it flows into storm sewers. They use solar panels, EWEB green power and, Sommers says, that staff recycles “everything possible,” including Styrofoam and

The Mahonia building is designed around the concept of using business to do good and be in service to each other. The structure is clad in metal siding with re-purposed wood. It was designed to include natural ventilation and plenty of daylight—these, paired with straw bale insulation and earth-plaster walls, combine to create a healthy working environment.

Highly sustainable projects they’ve built include Hummingbird Wholesale’s Mahonia Building and three LEED Platinum apartment building projects. Essex’s responsibility extends to the job site. “We always try to deal with the waste that comes off the site responsibly,” she says. “We try and recover any extra material, and we bring it back and save it to donate or to reuse in another project, or just find another use for it.”  >

“We always try to deal with the waste that comes off the site responsibly. We try and recover any extra material and we bring it back and save it to donate, or to reuse in another project or just find another use for it.” JODI SOMMER ESSEX GENERAL CONSTRUCTION


TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE

BRING works to help businesses find ways to reduce waste across all of its operations. Executive Director Carolyn Stein says that may be through waste prevention, dealing with a troublesome waste product, sourcing energy-efficient equipment or reducing toxins. “It’s hands-on technical assistance,” Stein says. “It helps businesses drill down the triple bottom line philosophy, which is helping the planet, doing good for the people and showing how they can have a healthy business, as well.” BRING is well known as the place to source reusable construction materials, whether it’s a unique lighting fixture or reclaimed barn wood. Many of the materials they sell are reclaimed from deconstructions. “We’re kind of a resource all the way around for ways that business can conserve resources or save money,” she says.

The Bold Steps award, celebrated by the City of Eugene, recognizes local businesses leading the way on sustainability. Check out the past and present winners of this prestigious award: http://bit.ly/2Pf54lD

BRING ’s Construction Materials Recovery and Reuse Program captures wood, insulation and other reusable building materials from construction sites. This free service helps contractors reduce waste and save money on disposal costs.

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Rethink is a free, comprehensive program for Lane County businesses, offered by BRING and its partner, Lane County Waste Management. Expert advisors conduct on-site assessments of your current water, waste, energy and transportation practices, then provide recommendations, tools and ongoing support to help your business be more resource-efficient. Information about tax incentives, rebates, and grants are also available. Rethink certification benefits: • Use of the Rethink logo in your marketing materials • Press kit with tools to tell your Rethink story • Social media announcements by BRING • Listing in The Register-Guard newspaper and Eugene Magazine • Entry in BRING’s quarterly newsletter, UsedNews • Inclusion in the Rethink Business Directory • Award plaque made locally by Center for Appropriate Transport • Eligibility for the Eugene Mayor’s Bold Steps Award Learn more at bringrecycling.org


Information and opportunities from Lane Transit District. More at LTD.org

Giving Thanks LTD appreciates the community involvement over these past four months. This input is helping to define what local transit services will look like in the future and how LTD can best serve its community. Additional input opportunities will begin in early 2019. To check out LTD’s projects, go to: LTD.org/projects-and-planning/

THANK YOU LTD.org

SWEET SUCCESS The perfect recipe for Goody’s candy stores included small business financing from Summit Bank. Stop by our office or give us a call to get a taste of how we can help your business.

SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DIVISION

96 East Broadway in Eugene 541-684-7500 • www.sbko.bank

Summit Bank SBA Program Administrator Ashley Horner and Goody’s Owner Ryan Smith

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“We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give.” – Winston S. Churchill

When we give to others, we make our community a better place. At Mercedes-Benz of Eugene, we are proud to support the work of several local organizations that provide care, compassion and opportunity to people in Lane County. These include The Relief Nursery, Volunteers in Medicine, Bridgeway House, University of Oregon, The Shedd Institute and many more.

2200 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. • 541.687.8888 • mbeugene.com


NEXTGEN LEADERSHIP 20 under 40 award winners prove themselves and promote community growth

As our vibrant community continues to grow, the next generation of leaders is stepping up in new ways to build a better future. Each year, incredible candidates under 40 years old who demonstrate hard work, initiative and dedication are nominated for the 20 under 40 awards. In this near-record year of submissions, selecting only 20 high-achieving professionals was a challenge. Join us in celebrating this year’s winners.

Learn more about this year’s winners at 20under40awards.com

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Casey Barrett

Stephanie Coats

Vice President Obie Industries | Age: 31

Real Estate Broker Keller Williams Realty | Age: 30

As vice president for Obie Industries, Casey Barrett helps run the 5th Street Public Market, one of the premier shopping, dining and hospitality destinations in Eugene. Barrett is involved in the company’s expansion which includes two hotels opened since 2012 and the planned expansion of the 5th St Market and new Gordon Hotel. Barrett brings his passion for the community to his work and volunteer efforts, serving on the board of the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce and the Lane County Historical Society.

Stephanie Coats leads a team for Keller Williams Realty where she has helped 539 Lane County families, moved $105 million in volume, and led many in-house initiatives to improve culture, develop training and build community engagement. She is principal broker director for the Eugene Association of Realtors, has served on the Agent Leadership Council since 2010, and is committed to continuing education in her field. Stephanie also supports local outreach, serving on the boards of directors for Ballet Fantastique, Pacific Cascade Federal Credit Union, and McKenzie Business Association.

Dr. Emily Dunn

Ben Farber

Radiation Oncologist Willamette Valley Cancer Institute and Research Center | Age: 37

Chief Nursing Officer PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center University District | Age: 36

Dr. Emily Dunn is a radiation oncologist and the brachytherapy physician lead at Willamette Valley Cancer Institute and Research Center, where she treats patients with cancer and leads important clinical trials. She cares about her patients, putting in time as the physician liaison for WVCI’s Fight Like a Duck campaign and its patient advocacy group. She is also a member of Oregon Cancer Alliance, collaborating with other specialists who evaluate complex cases. A three-time Academic All-American track and field athlete, Dunn volunteered as a doctor at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials. She also supports FOOD for Lane County, Positive Community Kitchen, Soroptimist Club, American Cancer Society, and Oregon Cancer Foundation.

Ben Farber has made improvements that are both measurable and meaningful for patients at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center University District. Farber, who joined PeaceHealth in 2014, is Chief Nursing Officer, leading all nursing departments and has improved care through initiatives that ensure a quicker response and better prepares patients for discharge. He works collaboratively with a local agency to improve care for homeless and mentally ill patients. He has been recognized nationally for his work. Farber continues to advocate for people experiencing health concerns, serving as president of the HIV Alliance board.


Justin King

Garrett Ledgerwood

Director of National Sales King Estate | Age: 39

Partner/Attorney Hershner Hunter| Age: 39

Justin King is an accomplished guitarist and owner of Vinegar Hill Sound, a photojournalist who was embedded in Iraq, and Director of National Sales for the successful winery King Estate. He is growing the winery by rebuilding the sales structure, bringing out new labels and brands, and helping to establish the next steps after the sale of the very successful Acrobat brand. Recently, he became a winemaker under the Seven Rows label. He’s serving a governorappointed, four-year term on the Oregon Wine Board and feels passionate about being on these boards: FOOD for Lane County, Oregon Environmental Council, and SquareOne Villages.

Garrett Ledgerwood practices law at Hershner Hunter, where he became partner in 2017 in just four years. A leader in the firm’s creditors rights practice, he assists lenders in protecting and recovering assets and leads a new focus on assisting business clients in bankruptcy matters. He is chair of the debtor-creditor committee of the Lane County Bar Association. Ledgerwood is engaged in the community, he sings with the Eugene Concert Choir and Eugene Vocal Arts, is a member of Rotary Club of Eugene and has volunteered at United Way, Boys & Girls Club of Emerald Valley, Northwest Youth Corps, FOOD for Lane County and Emerald Village.

Chris Mackey

Jen McFadden

Police Officer/Realtor Eugene Police Department & McKenzie West Real Estate | Age: 36

Director of Marketing & Brand Development Northwest Community Credit Union | Age: 39

Chris Mackey is with the Eugene Police Department, where he’s a member of SWAT and is assigned to the Violent Crimes Unit, primarily investigating crimes against children. He mediates issues between employees and supervisors as part of the executive board for the Eugene Police Employees Association and is one of only four EPD members on the Interagency Deadly Force Investigation Team. Mackey began a dual-role as a realtor for McKenzie West Real Estate, where he donates a portion of his commissions to Kids’ FIRST, which provides care for the child survivors of cases he investigates at EPD.

Jen McFadden worked her way from a teller position at Northwest Community Credit Union to Director of Marketing & Brand Development. Under her supervision, the credit union launched a new website in 2017 and saw deposit growth stemming from two of her different initiatives. McFadden cares about local business and young professionals as the YP Council marketing and communications chair and the YP Summit steering committee for the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce. She previously served on the Relief Nursery’s auxiliary board and teaches financial literacy in schools and community organizations.


Morgan Munro

Amy Newport

Chief Executive Officer Hathaway Munro | Age: 37

Employee Engagement & Community Outreach Manager Kendall Auto Group | Age: 39

Morgan Munro is CEO at Hathaway Munro, where she consults and trains in organizational development, strategy, executive coaching, business assessment, and targeted instruction. In her first year, Munro grew her client list to reach 200 executives and managers. Munro taught leadership and management and advised small business owners for six years at Lane Community College. She’s lending her expertise to the community through volunteer efforts, with KLCC’s new public radio foundation as its board president. Morgan also gives time at a local elementary school and has volunteered at numerous local organizations.

Amy Newport has incorporated charitable work into her job as employee engagement and community outreach manager for Kendall Auto Group. Kendall Cares began under Newport’s leadership and has since donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to local schools and nonprofits, including the Boys & Girls Club of Emerald Valley. Newport’s job also includes directing Kendall’s publicity efforts, building relationships with clients, organizing events and keeping employees engaged. Newport is a youth football coach for NFL Youth Flag, board member of the Boys & Girls Club of Emerald Valley, and serves on Relief Nursery Leadership Board.

Stephen Parac

Martin Rafferty

Chief Operations Operator XS Media | Age: 32

Chief Executive Officer Youth ERA| Age: 32

Chief Operations Officer Stephen Parac has grown XS Media from a startup to a regional Internet Service Provider. The business has grown more than 30 percent in less than 10 years and continues to grow. Parac collaborated with other leaders, helping to bring world-class gigabit Internet to downtown Eugene. He is a mentor for the South Eugene High School robotics team and is involved in Elevate and in the Academy of Arts and Academic’s J-term internship program. Parac serves on the boards of directors for the Eugene Education Foundation and the Technology Association of Oregon. He’s on the technology committee for Eugene Civic Alliance and steering committee for Leadership Eugene-Springfield.

Martin Rafferty founded Youth ERA, a nonprofit that provides training on youth mental health, advocacy and engagement to organizations in 39 states. Initiatives include development of an emergency response process after school shootings, social media peer support services, using staff to look for online risky behaviors to offer immediate mental health support, an online suicide prevention campaign, and integrating virtual reality into Youth ERA programs for teens who are experiencing mental health symptoms or who’ve endured trauma. He serves in advisory roles for other children’s mental health and youth organizations.


Kelly Ranstad

Brandy Rodtsbrooks

CEO/Principal Broker Hybrid Real Estate | Age: 39

Director of Marketing and Communications Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce | Age: 39

Over the past 10 years, Kelly Ranstad, has built the largest independent real estate company in Lane County. As CEO and principal broker for Hybrid Real Estate, Ranstad has 127 active and 16 referral agents and maintains leadingedge technology for the firm. Ranstad has served as president of the Women’s Council of Realtors and principal broker director for the Eugene Association of Realtors. Alongside her 16-year-old daughter, she is starting a new nonprofit to address housing services for vulnerable people escaping violence. She participates other charitable causes, supporting programs such as Brattain House and The ARC of Lane County.

Brandy Rodtsbrooks, director of marketing and communications for the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce, relaunched the OPEN for Business magazine, while also developing a digital-forward approach to communications that help the Chamber and its member businesses. She has had a swift trajectory, working from marketing assistant to leading communications at four local organizations in under ten years. She mentors emerging marketing professionals and volunteers for numerous organizations, including as board chair of MECCA, where she’s leading new development for the nonprofit. She has leveraged her skills to support committees such as the Downtown Marketing Partnership, the Community Health Improvement Plan, and the Financial Stability Partnership.

Josh Smith

Dr. Nicholas Strasser

Partner/Attorney Gleaves Swearingen | Age: 36

Orthopedic Surgeon Slocum Center for Orthopedics & Sports Medicine | Age: 39

Josh Smith began clerking at Gleaves Swearingen during law school, becoming partner after only five years. Committed to his clients and profession, Smith practices employment, construction and property law, and serves on the litigation team. He serves on the firm’s management committee, builds morale as manager of the coed softball team, and helps to bring in outstanding associates. Smith is president of the Greenhill Humane Society’s Board of Directors, where he steered the board during a $5.6 million capital campaign and helps oversee a building project that will greatly improve the care of stray animals.

Dr. Nicholas Strasser is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in foot and ankle at At Slocum Center for Orthopedics & Sports Medicine. He and his wife, Joy, are foster parents providing a safe place for children for the past two years. He is also Orthopedic Division Chief for Sacred Heart Medical Center. Strasser uses his skill to help others, including providing orthopedic coverage at high school football games and volunteering on the medical team for TrackTown USA and the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials. He continues his work to help kids by volunteering for Safe Families for Children of Lane County.


Maressa Surrett

Kaitlyn Tepe

Director of Technology and Digital Solutions International Society for Technology in Education | Age: 38

Director of Marketing and Communications Cascade Health| Age: 31

As director of technology and digital solutions for the International Society for Technology in Education, Maressa Surrett leads the IT department and advises the executive team, while also leading web development, digital experience and data teams. In 2018, she took on additional responsibilities, leading business analytics, big data, and back-end development. Surrett has a second identity in the music industry. She started a regionally-recognized record label, acts as a mentor for female DJs and creates music for Eugene yoga studios. She volunteers for Friends of Trees and the Oregon Asian Celebration and is a member of the Pacific and Asian Community Alliance, and Oregon Asian Council board member.

Kaitlyn Tepe works to ensure the community knows about the compassionate and high-quality health care provided by Cascade Health. Among her significant achievements as director of marketing and communications, is her involvement in the opening of the Pete Moore Hospice House. A member of the senior leadership team and involved in the StrengthsFinder program, she provides coaching to employees to help them develop their strengths. In the community, she is on the steering committee for the Leadership Eugene-Springfield program for 2018-19. She is a volunteer with Trinity House and Festival of Trees and is an active member of First Baptist Church of Eugene.

Caitlin Vargas

Craig Wiroll

Development Director Eugene Mission | Age: 35

Portfolio Manager - Gigabit Eugene/Community Leader Smart Gigabit Communities Mozilla Foundation/US Ignite | Age: 39

During her time as development director for the Eugene Mission, Caitlin Vargas helped the nonprofit reach its five-year plan of a $3M budget in only three years. She was involved in rebranding the organization and starting the Eugene Food Truck Fest, which drew 13,000 people the first year. Vargas’ job includes fundraising, events, communications and more, but she can also often be found working directly with clients and getting to know them. An active community volunteer, Vargas helps FOOD for Lane County, Volunteers in Medicine and volunteered to support the inaugural year of Market Fest. She serves on the YP Summit committee and Eugene Young Professionals Board.

Craig Wiroll played an important role in securing the title of US Ignite Smart Gigabit Community for Eugene-Springfield and created partnerships between educators, technologists, nonprofits and public officials, enabling the area to win more than $200,000 in funding. As the portfolio manager for Gigabit Eugene through the Mozilla Foundation, Wiroll managed a grant portfolio of 11 projects funded by the National Science Foundation and was a community leader for Smart Gigabit Communities with US Ignite. He was a Domestic Policy Council intern for the White House under President Barack Obama. Wiroll’s community involvement has included volunteering at Spencer Butte Middle School, on the board of directors for United Way of Lane County and on the Lane STEM Leadership Board.


20 under 40 Judges’ Comments

Chris Boone Chair Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce I am continually impressed with how many talented young professionals live and work in our community. Being a judge was extremely difficult, as the resume, background, and engagement of every applicant was incredible. I am so proud to live in an area with so much future potential.

Elena Fracchia Wealth Advisor Columbia Bank

Kathy Gibson Vice President Dari Mart

Ralph Parshall General Manager Mercedes-Benz of Eugene

The 2018 nominees are raising the bar and setting a new standard. Their collective impact through their service and leadership is clearly what makes this community such a wonderful place. Thank you for the ways you give back to our community, making it a great place to live, work, and play.

It was an honor to be a judge this year. Each person nominated is exceptional, making a unique contribution to their companies, as well as to our community. Everyone nominated should be proud to be a part of this outstanding group of young individuals.

Every year, I’m impressed with the incredible rising stars in our community. I’ve been a judge since the first year, and this year’s nominees are all deserving. I thank each of them for their contributions and encourage them to keep it up. You’re making our community the best. Thanks!

Matt Sayre Vice President Technology Association of Oregon The near-record number of nominations is a positive reflection of our community, but makes selecting just twenty winners no easy task. This year’s class of 20 under 40 is especially remarkable because it illuminates many diverse paths to career achievement and community leadership. I’m excited to celebrate with everyone December 6th!

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CONGRATULATIONS 20 UNDER 40 AWARD WINNERS! Join us in congratulating the winners of this year’s 20 under 40 awards. These high-achieving young professionals have worked hard to make their communities and businesses better places to live and work. When a community is home to so much dedicated leadership, it’s an indication of great things ahead. It’s inspiring to see another group of dedicated community leaders join the ranks of the 20 under 40 awards.

The power of one. The power of many. Hershner Hunter is a comprehensive business law firm with specialty areas to match your unique needs. So whether you’re a small start-up, a growing area employer, or an established business, you’re not just getting one attorney, you’re getting the power of an entire firm behind you.

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541-686-8511 | HershnerHunter.com

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Learn more about this year’s 20 under 40 winners and how you can nominate next-gen leadership for the 2019 awards by visiting 20under40awards.com


A new kind of health plan for your business Help your employees stay on top of their health with access to award-winning coordinated care,* choice of skilled providers, and affordable, high-quality health plan options in the Eugene-Springfield area.

kp.org/choosebetter/nw *Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of the Northwest’s commercial health plans are the highest rated plans in quality and performance among health plans in Oregon and Washington, according to NCQA’s Private Health Insurance Plan Ratings for 2017–2018.

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All plans offered and underwritten by Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of the Northwest. 500 NE Multnomah St., Suite 100, Portland, OR 97232. ©2018 Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of the Northwest


MOVERS & SHAKERS

DRAWN’S BARD BUILDING SUSTAINABLE, BY DESIGN Article by CASEY HARWOOD, BRAND WRITER AT DRAWN || Photos Courtesy of Drawn

Drawn is a boutique design and brand

wanted it to have just as much character and

removed, rebuilt and reused throughout the

development agency based, here, in Eugene.

even more of an emphasis on sustainability.

building, along with their metal desks and

While you may not be familiar with the agency, you’ve definitely seen its work: Rexius trucks, Opus Grows ads on city buses, Eugene Rec’s brand identity, ColdFire Brewing’s taproom on Mill Street.

When he found the former home of Bourland Printing at 545 Monroe Street, the historic building felt dark and cramped, with low ceilings and narrow corridors, but Taylor saw potential in the 5,000-square-foot space.

The agency’s headquarters used to be on

The significant renovation became a pilot

the third floor of Fifth Street Public Market,

project with BRING’s Construction Materials

surrounded by plenty of aesthetic goodness

Recovery and Reuse Program.

and quality coffee to fuel creativity, but not a ton of space to grow. When Drawn Founder and Creative Director Bryan Taylor decided it was time to seek out a new workspace, he

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a beloved unicorn clock. A former school’s gym bleachers became Drawn’s steps, and seating was built from wood that had been abandoned at a lumberyard. All of the building’s light fixtures are repurposed and have been retrofitted for energy-efficient LEDs. Sinks were procured from Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore, hardware from BRING Recycling, couches were bought from St.

Taylor estimates that 90 percent of the

Vincent de Paul, and an entire wall was saved

goods used in the remodel were salvaged,

before a restaurant remodel and put to work

either from 545 Monroe itself or from other

at Drawn’s new office.

evolving spaces: All of Bourland’s doors were


MOVERS & SHAKERS

Of course, much of the material that Drawn removed from the building was also redistributed and put to use elsewhere, like the concrete slabs that were cut out to build a conference room and repurposed as outdoor benches at the new Mahonia Building (another BRING CMRRP project).

Congratulations 2019 Bold Steps Award Finalists!

“Everything we put into this building has a story that is helping to maintain its character, rather than making everything feel too new and sterile,” Taylor says. “And together, it’s all helping to write the next chapter at this building—from a feed store for 40 years to a printer for almost 40 more, and now, Drawn

Bold Steps Finalists are leaders in sustainability.

for the foreseeable future.”

$

The Bard Building, as Drawn now calls 545 Monroe Street, was named after Gaelic and Celtic storytellers—because that is, essentially, what Drawn does—and the collective and dynamic workspace that helps facilitate that—a dream of Taylor’s, 15 years in the making—has finally come to fruition.

people

planet

profit

Does your business have what it takes?

Learn more or apply at: eugene-or.gov/boldsteps

To learn more about Drawn and see their work, visit www.drawn.com

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A community of collaborators, game-changers, movers and shakers: Here’s a look at this quarter’s Chamber happenings, as we work to build networks, move forward projects, and elevate both businesses and professionals.

We were incredibly excited to help owners Mike and Casey Roscoe celebrate the grand opening of Veg Salad Craft, now open at 861 Willamette Street – another great reason to head downtown for lunch! Jessica McCormick of Lane Workforce Partnership and Allison Weatherly of the Technology Association of Oregon at the Eugene Business Expo, helping to spread the word on the new Apprenti program, connecting workforce with opportunity. Getting around Eugene is getting easier and more fun with the addition of PeaceHealth Rides. The folks from the new bike-share program talk through the benefits of corporate ride packages at the Eugene Business Expo. The next cohort of Leadership Eugene-Springfield kicked off in October. This group of next-gen leaders is learning how to work together more efficiently. We can’t wait to see what they’ll accomplish this year! Eugene-Springfield partners connect with over 200 students, who had the opportunity to tour local manufacturing facilities and learn about the diverse career opportunities available to them in this local sector. Special thanks to our friends at Sheild Catering for making the Eugene Business Expo delicious. Our friends from Connected Lane County thought so, too! Local manufacturers provide opportunities to engage the next generation in exciting and rewarding careers. Manufacturing Day, held annually, is a great way to showcase these opportunities.

Don’t miss a minute, visit EugeneChamber.com for a calendar of events.

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B I Z Z B UZ Z

PROMOTIONS & NEW HIRES The law firm of Gleaves Swearingen LLP is pleased to announce that

Amber M. Suklje has

joined the firm as an associate. Amber earned her J.D. from University of Oregon School of Law, where she received an estate planning concentration and served as the president of the Moot Court Board. Her practice focuses on estate planning and probate. Gleaves Swearingen is a Eugene law firm, serving Oregon and the Pacific Northwest since 1924.

Systems West Engineers welcomes Mechanical Designer

Dorrie Matthews and Mechanical Designer

Jake Cosmillo to our team.

Matthews graduated from James Madison University with a degree in engineering, where she specialized in sustainable systems and design. She has four years of experience working for a naval contractor, where she worked on an array of projects for the U.S. Coast Guard. Cosmillo graduated from the New Jersey Institute of Technology with a degree in mechanical engineering. He has one year of experience as a plumbing and fire protection designer in NY, NY and Vancouver, WA. Complete bios at: systemswestengineers.com/staff.

Anthony Hunt has joined the law firm of

Hershner Hunter LLP

as an associate. Anthony graduated from University of Oregon School of Law in 2018, University of South Dakota Department of Political Science in 2016, and University of South Dakota Department of Psychology in 2013. His practice will focus on business litigation and business transactions.

Ausland Group welcomes two new members to its design-build team. Craig Runyon is Ausland Group’s director of customer success. With a career that spans the journalism, graphic design,

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government and architecture fields, he guides the firm’s marketing and business development efforts. Seth Brown is Ausland’s newest senior construction project manager. Seth brings 30+ years of experience in retail, commercial, office and mid-rise multi-family construction. His project diversity helps him excel in many aspects, from plan constructability, budgeting, estimating, scheduling and value engineering. His knowledge includes extensive site work, ground up, as well as TI improvement projects.

compliance. Schumacher also serves as OCCU’s compliance counsel.

SELCO Community Credit Union recently hired Mitch Friedman as

information technology manager. In this role, Friedman will manage the day-to-day operations of SELCO’s IT infrastructure, including hardware, software, process, and procedures. He will work from SELCO’s headquarters in Eugene, located at 1050 High St. Friedman joins SELCO after honing his IT skills for more than 20 years in Orange County, California.

OCCU has hired longtime Eugene lending expert Russ Bernardo as its new Chief Lending Officer. Bernardo comes to OCCU from Northwest Community Credit Union, where he served in several lending capacities, most recently as Chief Lending Officer. As OCCU’s chief lending officer, Bernardo will oversee the credit union’s growing portfolio of residential and commercial loan products, including home loans, vehicle loans, lines of credit and student loans, as well as OCCU’s debit and credit cards portfolios and services.

Tyler Harris has been promoted to tax senior manager at Moss Adams. Tyler joined Moss Adams in January 2013. He primarily serves clients in the manufacturing and consumer products, and food, beverage and agribusiness industries. Tyler is on the board of directors for Habitat for Humanity of Central Lane and is a member of Lane Leaders.

Deborah Mersino, who has been a member of the OCCU leadership team since 2014, has assumed an expanded role as chief marketing and experience officer. She previously served as OCCU’s Chief marketing officer. In this role, Mersino will oversee marketing, communications, product research and development, technology, and OCCU’s enterprise project management organization – an expanded scope of responsibilities designed to ensure OCCU continues to provide the best customer experience possible. She will also continue to serve as executive product owner of the credit union’s digital banking transformation program, set to launch in spring 2019.

August Klingman has been

Greg Schumacher, who joined the OCCU leadership

team in 2013, has been named chief financial and administrative officer. He previously served as chief administrative officer. In this expanded role, Schumacher will oversee finance, accounting and business intelligence in addition to his current oversight of electronic services, loss prevention, facilities, enterprise risk management, and regulatory

Moss Adams has promoted Kyle Hauser to audit senior manager. Kyle joined Moss Adams in October 2012. He primarily serves clients in the manufacturing and consumer products, and food, beverage and agribusiness industries. Kyle is on the board of directors for BRING Recycling. promoted to tax senior of

Moss Adams. A graduate

of the University of Oregon, August joined Moss Adams in October 2016. He provides tax services to companies in a variety of industries.

Moss Adams has promoted Jaden Ritchie to tax senior. A graduate of Idaho State University, Jaden joined Moss Adams in January 2017. He provides tax services to companies in a variety of industries.


B I Z Z B UZ Z

Kathleen Russo has been

promoted to audit senior at Moss Adams. A a graduate of Montana State University, Kathleen joined Moss Adams in October 2016. She provides audit services to companies in a variety of industries.

Emily (Gray) Martin has been promoted to senior campus recruiter of Moss Adams. A graduate of the University of Puget Sound, Emily joined Moss Adams in May 2014. Before moving into talent acquisition, Emily was a member of the marketing department. Dr. Priyanka Iyer has joined PeaceHealth Medical Group’s endocrinology/ diabetes team. She earned her medical degree in Pune, India, at Armed Forces Medical College, which is affiliated with Maharashtra University of Health Sciences. She completed her residency at John Hopkins University/Sinai Hospital Program in internal medicine in Baltimore. She completed her fellowship in endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and did an additional year of fellowship in endocrine neoplasia and hormonal disorders at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Her areas of interest include advanced thyroid cancer and diabetes. Kernutt Stokes is pleased to announce Haley Lyons has been promoted to partner. She has been with the firm for the past 11 years, most recently as senior manager of audit and assurance services. In her new role as partner, Lyons continues to serve clients in the construction, manufacturing, retail and insurance industries and provides consulting services focused on internal controls and internal audit.

Dr. Morgan Garvin has joined PeaceHealth Medical Group’s urgent care team. She

earned her medical degree at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. She completed her residency in emergency medicine at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Penn. She previously worked as an independent contractor emergency physician at hospitals in the Portland area and in Bandon.

Dr. MaiLynn “Lexi” Mitchell Sanchez has joined PeaceHealth Medical Group’s urgent

care team as a relief physician. She earned her medical degree at Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine. She completed her residency at Christus Santa Rosa Family Medicine Residency Program in San Antonio, Texas. She previously worked at Clay County Memorial Hospital in Henrietta, Texas.

Dr. Swati Gobhil has joined PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend as a hospitalist. She earned her medical degree at Sir Seewoosagoor Ramgoolam Medical College in Belle Rive, Mauritius. She completed her residency in internal medicine at MacNeal Hospital in Berwyn, Ill. She speaks Hindi.

Dr. Lior Feldman has joined PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend as a hospitalist. He earned his medical degree at Sackler School of Medicine at Tel-Aviv University in Israel. He completed the family medicine residency program at Northwell/Health Hofstra School of Medicine in New York. Dr. Feldman previously served as a battalion surgeon in the Israeli Air Force and as chief of medicine in the Israeli Navy. He speaks Hebrew.

Oregon Business & Industry (OBI) is pleased to announce Sandra McDonough as its next chief executive officer. Sandra will take the helm at OBI after serving 14 years as the president and CEO of the Portland Business Alliance (PBA). Prior to her tenure at PBA, she spent 20 years in the energy industry in management positions for PacificCorp and San Francisco-based PG&E Corporation. Sandra was also an OBI board member. Summit Bank is pleased to announce the promotions of Jenny Bennett to senior vice president, marketing and business development and Megan Horvath to assistant vice president, business client advisor. Bennett will serve as a member of the bank’s executive team. Summit Bank is excited to welcome new team members Michaela Marcotte

as director of human resources, Michelle Corona as senior operations officer, and Tyler Anderson as senior client services advisor.

PeaceHealth welcomes psychiatrists, Dr. Roberto Cruz Barahona, Dr. Iris Vanessa Guerrero Urena, and Dr. Fred Kinnicutt to its behavior health department. Dr. Cruz Barahona is an inpatient psychiatrist. His areas of interest include addiction psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine. He speaks Spanish and Portuguese. Dr. Guerrero Urena is an outpatient and consult/ liaison psychiatrist. She earned her medical degree from Universidad Iberoamericana in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. She speaks Spanish and enjoys reading and hiking. Dr. Kinnicutt is a child/adolescent psychiatrist. He has practiced child/adolescent psychiatry for 18 years, including at Mercy Medical Center in Roseburg and, most recently, at bluegrass.org, a nonprofit organization in Lexington.

E U G E N E C H A M B E R .C O M   |   O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S

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B I Z Z B UZ Z

BUSINESS NEWS The Eugene Symphony has announced its

53rd season. “This Eugene Symphony season will always have a special place in my heart as the first one I crafted as a music director,” says LecceChong. “In developing this season, I held on to three ideas: music has the power to transform and transport us; concerts should surprise and delight us; and our performances can inspire thought and dialogue long after the last notes are played.”

Oregon Pacific Bank is pleased to announce

the opening of its new Eugene branch, located at 59 East 11th Avenue in downtown Eugene. The bank’s current Eugene office, which has been operating out of the Citizen’s Building since 2015, is closing, as all staff and operations transition to the new location. Founded and headquartered in Florence, Oregon Pacific Bank has had a presence in Lane County since 1979 and is thrilled to offer a more robust and memorable banking experience in Eugene, with an emphasis on business banking, nonprofit solutions, and trust and estate planning. The new branch will open for business in early to mid-December.

Papé Material Handling has acquired the

assets of Mid-Pacific Industries in Woodland, California, effective Oct. 19, 2018. No details of the acquisition will be announced. “With this acquisition, we bring a new line of products to Papé Material Handling,” said Chris Wetle, president of Papé Material Handling. “Our goal is to provide the best products and the best service for our customers. By adding these Kalmar Ottawa terminal tractors, we are able to keep our customers – and their products – moving.”

Summit Bank reported net income for the

third quarter of $1.4 million or 27 cents per fully diluted share. Earnings for the quarter were 45 percent, or 9 cents per share, higher than third quarter of 2017, when the bank earned $955 thousand, or 18 cents per fully diluted share. Year-to-date earnings for the nine months ended Sept. 30, 2018 were $3.8 million, or 72 cents

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per fully diluted share, compared to $2.7 million, or 54 cents, during the same period for 2017, an increase of 35 percent. Strong performance in both the Eugene/Springfield and Central Oregon market areas, combined with the Bank’s Small Business Administration (SBA) and Equipment Finance Divisions, allowed the bank to achieve its earnings per share growth, while remaining one of Oregon’s fastest growing banks.

PeaceHealth Rides, Eugene’s bike share

system, released a special Sasquatch-themed bike into the wild in September. It is the first of a planned series of “unicorn bikes,” which features colors and designs different than the blue bike fleet. This first “unicorn bike” was the brainchild of two University of Oregon School of Art + Design students.

Turell Group, a Eugene-based marketing agency, recently became BRING Rethink certified. “We’re always looking for ways to improve and make our community an even better place. BRING made us Rethink the way we operate and helped us make simple changes that will have a big impact over time. We’re grateful to have an organization in our community that provides the education and tools needed to take practical steps toward improving our planet,” says Dana Turell, president of Turell Group.

KUDOS Employees of Columbia Bank recently provided 10 Lane County nonprofits with checks for $10,000 in unrestricted funds totaling $100,000 in the market. “As Lane County’s largest and most experienced bank serving the nonprofit community, we are thrilled to be able to provide critical funding for 10 of our region’s most impactful organizations,” said Denise Ghazal, Columbia’s senior vice president and regional manager.

The nonprofits receiving checks are: • ShelterCare • Greenhill Humane Society • NEDCO (Neighborhood Economic Development Corporation) • Springfield Public Library Foundation • Education Together Foundation of Junction City • SMART of Springfield • Habitat for Humanity of Central Lane County • Looking Glass Community Services • Kids’ FIRST Center • Springfield Education Foundation

Debra Velure was sworn as a judge for the Lane County Circuit Court. Gov. Kate

Brown appointed Velure to the Circuit Court on August 15. “I am honored to serve the people of Lane County,” said Velure. “I am committed to protecting the rights of the citizens. Drawing on my experience and the laws of the State of Oregon, I will ensure my decisions are reasoned and fair.” >


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Members first


B I Z Z B UZ Z

The Center Building at the heart of Lane Community College main campus will be christened the Dr. Dale P. Parnell Center for Learning and Student Success, in honor of Lane’s founding president. Parnell was a lifelong and nationally renowned leader in the community college movement. He dreamed of forming a local community college when he was the principal at Springfield High School in 1959, and he never stopped living that dream. He helped win the election that established Lane Community College on Oct. 19, 1964, and he served as its first president. His advocacy for public education continued with state and national positions that helped shape current community college policy.

Eugene Airport

officials are pleased to announce the election of Assistant

Airport Director Cathryn Stephens

as president of the Northwest Chapter of the American Association of Airport Executives (NWAAAE). In her year of service, Cathryn will focus on outreach to students of all ages and diversity to foster interest in future careers in aviation. Cathryn has over 11 years of experience at the Eugene Airport, is an accredited airport executive and serves as a member of the board of directors for AAAE. She previously served as both the president of the Oregon Airport Management Association and as first vice president of NWAAAE.

Kathy Smith, principal of KJ Smith Associates, has received a Gold Facilitation

Impact Award (FIA) from the International Association of Facilitators (IAF) for her facilitation of strategic planning with the Regional Accelerator & Innovation Network Eugene (RAIN Eugene). The award recognizes excellence in facilitation and collaborative techniques that result in positive, measurable results.

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More than 30 Columbia Bank employees provided more than 200 hours of much-needed volunteer services to Womenspace, Greenhill Humane Society and the United Way as part of the United Way of Lane County’s annual Day of Caring event. The effort marks the fifth year in a row for Columbia Bank employee participation in this signature, nonprofit event for the greater Eugene area. “Columbia Bank is thrilled to once again be partnering with United Way of Lane County to help these three critical nonprofits with maintenance and other important activities,” says Denise Ghazal, Columbia’s senior vice president and regional manager.


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A QU IC K N OTE

LOCAL BUSINESSES PUT COMMUNITY FIRST By Brittany Quick-Warner, CEO Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce

O

ur city is home to incredible

like Palo Alto Software, or business people

nonprofits doing ground-breaking

donating time and resources to help find

work to meet the needs of our

solutions to community problems at events

community. It is also home to

like the Technology Association of Oregon’s

dedicated local businesses who aren’t only

Hack-for-a-Cause, you will find business

focused on their bottom line but utilize an

leaders coming together frequently to support

active and engaged approach to improve the

our community.

conditions in our community for employees, neighbors and organizations. In Eugene,

PROTECTING THE PLANET

we do our best to put the needs of our

Make no mistake, we are pushing boundaries

community first, and it’s evident in all we do.

in Lane County, tackling challenges together

Several years ago, when our city committed to policy-making and community-building, following a Triple Bottom Line model, many business leaders in our community didn’t blink. Businesses in our region have been embracing the Triple Bottom Line concept for years and are leading the way in supporting people, protecting the planet, and improving the prosperity of our region.

GOING THE EXTRA MILE

and blurring the lines to reinvent what is possible. Companies like PakTech have innovated and evolved the manufacturing of their products to use recyclable material and prioritized the reduction of their environmental impact. At Bulk Handling

Other companies are voluntarily

and, in the process, invent new solutions.

implementing sustainability programs and

where people feel connected—connected to

programs like BRING’s Rethink program,

the people, connected to the community and

Love Food Not Waste and the mayor’s

connected to a greater purpose for making

annual Bold Steps Award that are pioneering

this region the best it can be. In fact, that

cross-sector collaboration that creates a

sense of connection and empowerment is one

lasting impact.

of the key metrics in attracting and retaining

CULTIVATING PROSPERITY

sponsorship and philanthropy that actively improve our quality of life. Whether it’s people-first policies found at great companies

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O P E N F O R B U S I N E S S  |  W I N T E R 2 018

things differently, and communities across

when local people tackle local problems

While others are embracing and supporting

and are supporting vital services through

receive at national conferences. We are doing

Eugene is a perfect example of what happens

thing really stands out: Eugene is a place

providing their staff paid time off to volunteer

Strategies team about the compliments they

recyclables from the waste stream.

by other businesses across the country.

are happy, healthy and connected. They are

recognition—just ask the Lane County Sector

that enables other companies to extract more

they enjoy doing business in Eugene, one

extra mile to ensure that their employees

in ways that are helping to gain national

the country are taking note.

policies that are being awarded and duplicated

Employers across Lane County are going the

partners in government and nonprofits

Systems, the company produces a product

When I talk to local professionals about why

our workforce.

Businesses are working alongside community

Our business community continues to make impacts and contributions to our region that drive overall economic prosperity and improve the quality of life. As companies thrive, they are growing the number of living-wage jobs and giving back with their time and financial contributions to nonprofits and charities in our community.

Businesses are coming together to take ownership of this place we call home and are crafting a vision of the future, while solving community challenges in ways we’ve never seen. This work never ends—but, if done correctly, it moves us forward together, inch by inch, into something even better.

We want to hear from you. What does our best future look like? Use #ChamberEvolved to share your vision


PO BOX 1107 EUGENE, OR 97440-1107

BRENT LAIRD, CPA (LEFT) DONALD LANCE, CPA, PARTNER BENTON COLLINS, CPA JONATHAN POWELL, CPA MEGHAN LACEY, CPA

“Innovative CPA” is not an Oxymoron. .

The CPAs and advisors at Kernutt Stokes are creative thinkers, problem solvers, and innovators. We provide insight and guidance based on our decades of experience. And while financial data and reporting are part of our work, it’s what happens next that keeps our clients coming back year after year. Give us a call and find out how the CPAs at Kernutt Stokes are different. kernuttstokes.com | 541.687.1170

Profile for Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce

OFB 2018 - All Issues  

Q1, 2, 3, 4 issues of Open For Business, published by the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce, designed by Turell Group. Q1: Pages 1-23 Q2: Pag...

OFB 2018 - All Issues  

Q1, 2, 3, 4 issues of Open For Business, published by the Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce, designed by Turell Group. Q1: Pages 1-23 Q2: Pag...

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