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Morgan County Charter School System ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Putting the Pieces Together “It’s always the small pieces that make the big picture”


Dear Stakeholder,

We take this opportunity to provide an annual snapshot of our school system. We value the opportunity to share the glows, grows, and areas of improvement. We have a great school system and feel the need to share with you the positive areas of achievement. However, we also recognize that we are not perfect and need to share areas of future focus and improvement. This report provides a comprehensive view of the Morgan County School System. Accountability has been the focus of the education for several decades. No Child Left Behind emphasized the need to provide more accountability to all students. This report is designed to share key data points which are measured on a quarterly/annual basis. These indicators are researched constantly to help guide corrective actions. Transparency is important in today’s environment, and we feel it is important to make sure our stakeholders to have an annual snapshot of Morgan County Charter School System. While we enjoy sharing the positive aspects of our school systems; we also feel the obligation to share areas of concern and need for improvement. Providing an annual report in this manner will help guide our celebrations and lead opportunities for conversations. The economic viability of Morgan County depends on a vibrant and progressive school system. We share in this report the innovations which are occurring in our school system. Our ultimate desire is that this report will clarify the vision the future holds for teachers, students, parents, and community. The artifacts found in this report provide inspiration that while not perfect; we are extremely fortunate to have a great school system. The Morgan County Charter School System appreciates our stakeholders. We want to provide you the most accurate information to help you advocate for our students, teachers, and staff.

Sincerely,

James R. Woodard, Superintendent Morgan County Charter School System

Members of the Board of Education: Brad Evans, Erica Veasley, Keith Howard, Andrew Ainslie, III, Nelson Hale, with School Superintendent James Woodard


01 Table of Contents

02 Our Focus 03 Our Focus 04 Rigorous and Engaged Classrooms

“Who in the world am I? Ah, that’s the great puzzle” - Lewis Carroll

05 Rigorous and Engaged Classrooms 06 Teaching and Learning 07 Teaching and Learning 08 Student Support 09 Student Support 10 Maintenance and Facilities 11 Finance and Operations 12 Safety and Discipline 13 Athletics 14 Initiatives 15 Career Pathways 16 Community Relations 17 Community Relations

Morgan County Schools: Who Are We?

18 College and Career Readiness Index

19 Graduation 20 End of Course Milestones

3,138

4

21 End of Grade Milestones

Total Students

Schools

Board of Education Nelson Hale, Chairman, District #2 Andrew Ainslie III, Vice Chairman, District #4 Brad Evans, District #5 Keith Howard, District #3

49%

12.0%

Eligible for free or

Receive Special Education

reduced lunch

services

2.0%

493

Have limited English Proficiency

System Employees

Erica Veasley, District #1 Dr. James Woodard, School Superintendent

1


Our Focus

The mission of the Morgan County Schools is to ensure that all students will be successful in their learning and personal development through a system characterized by extensive community and parental involvement, quality resources, and exemplary staff, a safe and caring environment and challenging, individualized instruction encompassing advanced technology.

The faculty, staff and students of the Morgan County Charter School System demonstrate their commitment to this mission on a daily basis.

The Cornerstones for the Puzzle of Student Achievement 2


Our Vision: The Morgan County Charter School System will be an exemplary learning community whose graduates are prepared for college, career, and life.

Seventy-two percent (72%) of Morgan County voters approved the Education Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (ESPLOST), which brought $3,400,000 to our schools last year! 3


Rigorous and Engaged Classrooms

Our achievement goal is to ensure curriculum mastery to meet and exceed state performance levels for all students, eliminating the achievement gap between student subgroups. -Jean Triplett Assistant Superintendent for Teaching and Learning

Project Based Learning

Professional Learning

MCCSS is implementing STEAM Project-based Learning K-12 in science classrooms.

Aligns to each school’s School Improvement Plan goals and the District Three Year Plan.

GLLSI Five cohorts of District, School, and Teacher leaders have attended training with the Georgia Leadership Institute for School Improvement.

Professional Learning Last year, 480 Professional Learning activities outside the school system were funded through local, state, and Federal dollars.

281

79%

66%

Certificated Staff

Percentage of Certified Staff with advanced degrees

Percentage of Certified Staff

4

with 11—21+ years of experience


New initiatives throughout the system are being implemented through our Instructional Technology and Teaching and Learning plans. Since our new schools will boast state-of-the-art technology, upgrading Media Centers at the Elementary and Primary schools has become a priority. Our Media Centers are evolving to become Learning Centers where learning communities can meet in order to access spaces and resources. We are shifting the focus from “books only” and moving it towards STEAM, technology integration, digital resources, and changing spaces.

CrossRoads Alternative Education Program is a necessary and vital part of the school system. Four teachers and a paraprofessional work with middle and high school students who have been expelled from their home schools. Students are able to continue their educational program while at CrossRoads and their credits transfer when they return to their schools. Volunteers from the Steffen Thomas Museum have “adopted” this school and have exposed the students to many fascinating art projects designed to build self-confidence and skills.

Nine Morgan County teachers and staff have become Certified Google Educators. They have completed extensive online training and passed two Google Certification Exams. These educators demonstrate an extensive knowledge of the Google Core Applications, and are recognized as Google Leaders throughout the nation. This knowledge is important because the training and focus are on student engagement and consequently, student learning. Our educators are working on completing a trainer exam and video application which will allow them to be Certified Google Trainers (presently there are only 3 in Georgia and 555 in the United States)!

5


Teaching And Learning

The visual and performing arts (art, band, chorus and drama) taught in our schools enjoy a lofty reputation throughout the state, as well as at home. Music and Visual Arts students are regularly selected for the Georgia Governor’s Honors Program and All State Ensembles.

Band

Art

The 6-12 Band curriculum is vertically aligned to promote retention, success, and progression for the 400+ students enrolled!

Visual Arts is offered to students kindergartenhigh school with rigorous inquiry into art history, contemporary art and cultural contexts.

Music

Drama

MCCSS students are engaged through exploration and exposure of the elements of music from kindergarten to high school.

Middle and high school Theater Arts students prepare and perform for their schools and compete at regional, state, and national competitions.

6


“The IB program combined rigorous academic courses, advanced research and writing skills, and community involvement to create an all-inclusive pathway that helped us become more active in our education and community.� -Lizzie Mahoney, MCHS Class of 2014

The International Baccalaureate is a two-year program designed to develop the intellectual, personal, emotional, and social skills needed to live, learn, and work in a rapidly globalizing world. The International Baccalaureate program has internationally-recognized high standards of teaching, pedagogical leadership, and student achievement. MCHS offers eleven Advanced Placement classes utilizing college-level curricula and examinations. Last year, MCHS produced 21 AP Scholars, 7 AP Scholars with Honor, and 4 AP Scholars with Distinction (based on AP examination test scores).

Number of IB Diploma Graduates 2014 - 2016 20 15 9

2014

2015

2016

Percentage of Test takers scoring a 3 or more on an AP exams 47% 45%

42%

2014

2015

2016

Sixteen percent (151 students) of the MCHS student body participated in Dual Enrollment classes through the Move on When Ready program. This program gives our students the opportunity to be enrolled in high school and at a participating postsecondary institution in Georgia while earning high school and college credit simultaneously.

39% 39% ofof MCHS Student Body

28% of 11th & 12th graders

383

135

Students taking AP classes

Students taking one or more IB classes

7

IB Diploma Recipients


“We ensure the success of our students through a variety of professionals, programs, services, and resources.� -Sarah Burbach, Assistant Superintendent

Student Support

Student Support and Community Relations

Special Education

School Nutrition

The entire continuum of special education services and delivery models is offered. Seventy-eight (78) percent of special education students are served in regular education 80% or more during the school day.

MCCSS boasts a strong School Nutrition Program, winner of the 2016 Golden Radish Award for our farm to school accomplishments!

School Nurses School Counselors

Each school has a Registered Nurse on location for the entire school day, every day.

There are 2 certified counselors at every school in the system.

360

54%

37

Special Education students

School Lunch

Aged 3-21

Participation Rate

English Language Learners

8


Special Programs support every student! Attendance is a major focus in all schools. This year an A ttendance Task Force comprised of school system administrators, the District Attorney, Magistrate Judge, Superior Court Judge, Sheriff, City of Madison Police Chief, and representatives of Family Connection, Department of Juvenile Justice, and the Department of Family and Children’s Services designed an Attendance Protocol to support our schools’ efforts to reduce absenteeism and tardies. Each school has an active Response to Intervention 4-tiered model to provide academic and behavioral support to “at risk” students. Gifted students are ser ved through a var iety of delivery models at each school. Eligibility is based on mental ability and achievement scores or on the multiple-criteria model adding creativity and motivation. State-funded Remediation support is provided in reading and math during the school day through the Early Intervention Program (EIP) for grades K-5 and the Remedial Education Program (REP) for grades 6-12.

218/7%

80

18%

Students (K-12) eligible to receive services from the Program for the Gifted

Students enrolled in PreK Program at MCPS

Students (K-12) receiving

9

Remedial services


Maintenance and Facilities

We are proud of the improvements and investments we have made in all of our facilities. Our buildings are clean and wellmaintained by a dedicated staff who work year-round to ensure that the learning environment is always professionally maintained for our students and staff. -James Woodard, Superintendent

Ground-breaking for new Transportation Facility to open in Spring, 2017

Winners of the “Johnny Cox Golden Broom Award” — Custodial staff at Morgan County Primary School

2016 EverGREEN Award from the Morgan County Greenspace Commission

52 CDL “Bus-Approved” Licensed Drivers

1894

1782

# miles driven per day by school busses

# of students transported every afternoon on school buses

10


We continue to manage our allocations efficiently without increasing the millage rate and received the Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting from the Georgia Department of Audits.

Finance and Operations

FY16 Budget Summary: Total Revenue: $30,622,498. Total Expenditures: $28,714,311.

The budget process involves input from each School Governance Team, Advisory Councils, and school system employees. The Board of Education and superintendent set the vision and use input from these groups to set priorities for the system’s educational program. Funds are allocated based on federal, state, and local mandates, the state salary schedule, and the system’s strategic plan. The local property tax millage rate is established to generate revenue to fund what the state funds do not provide. The Board of Education must operate under a balanced budget.

$8,835.71

$889,325.00

15.264

2015 Per Pupil Expenditure

Amount generated by one mil

Current Millage Rate

11


Safety And Discipline

“The main goal of the system Discipline Committee is to continue

the ongoing conversation about discipline with our stakeholders to ensure that our practices are consistent and appropriate for each school and grade level.” -Ryan Rickard, System Discipline Committee Chair

PBIS

Raptor

All MCCSS schools are seeking certification to become PBIS (Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports) schools.

MCCSS uses the Raptor system at all schools to track visitors and control campus security.

Crisis Intervention

Safety Committee

All schools have access to an intensive Crisis Intervention Plan developed by our counselors which is activated when needed.

All schools are represented on the Safety Committee that meets regularly to discuss and solve current safety issues.

Morgan County’s Average Star Rating by school

The State of Georgia assigns a Star Rating to each school based on data about Attendance, Discipline, and Stakeholder feedback. 12


The Morgan County Charter School System provides opportunities for students in grades 6-12 to participate and compete in a variety of sports programs. The system’s athletic program seeks to use athletics as a means to extend the student’s educational experiences beyond the classroom; create a comprehensive approach that streamlines sport programs from grade 6 through grade 12; impact student athletes in a positive manner; and build and maintain sport programs that routinely compete at championship levels. -Doug Connelly, Athletic Director

Boy’s Sports

Girl’s Sports

Football

Fastpitch Softball

Cross Country

Cross Country

Swimming*

Swimming*

Wrestling

Competition /Spirit Cheerleading

Basketball

Basketball

Soccer

Soccer

Track and Field

Track and Field

Baseball

Volleyball

Golf

Golf

Tennis

Tennis *MCHS only

Notable Accomplishments - 2015/16 and 2016/17 (Through October 2016) Academic Years Two Team State Championships One Individual State Championship One State Runner-Up Finish and a Third Place Finish

21 Student-Athletes Signed with Colleges to Compete in Intercollegiate Athletics

29%

20

Percentage of students participating in athletics at Morgan County High School

Number of GHSA athletic programs offered at Morgan County Schools

25% Percentage of female students participating in athletics.

13

Athletics


Initiatives

Morgan County is a leader in educational initiatives such as STEAM, Project-based Learning, Technology, and our “coming soon� College and Career Academy.

Morgan County High School: A College and Career Academy will open

STEAM Our students are enjoying the inquiry and exploration provided by STEAM project-based learning units.

college and career opportunities for all of our students.

One-to-One Provides students with individual technology options to facilitate teaching and learning.

Project Based Learning allows students to investigate and respond to an authentic, engaging and complex problem.

14


One of the necessary elements for economic development is having a skilled or trainable workforce. The planned Morgan County College and Career Academy will help fulfill that need for our community. We are excited about this latest improvement to our outstanding school system and look forward to integrating our students into the workforce for tomorrow. -Robert Hughes President and Economic Development Director Madison-Morgan County Chamber of Commerce

Career Pathways

The impact our College and Career Academy will have on our school system will be seen across all grade levels K-12 and beyond. Students will be given more options to earn post-secondary credit and industry certifications during high school; while identifying and understanding how academics are integrated and applied in the work force. We will have employability skills embedded across the curriculum, as well as access to state of the art labs. With these components working in unison, students will be better equipped for a successful future. Current CTAE Programs

Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Ag Mechanics, Horticulture, Agribusiness/Animal Science Hospitality and Tourism Culinary, Sports and Entertainment Marketing Information Technology Computer Science, Web/Graphic Development Health Sciences Allied Health and Medicine, Biotechnology ROTC AFJROTC Manufacturing/Engineering Education and Training* Teaching as a Profession Human Services* Cosmetology Arts, A/V, and Film* Audio and Video Technology and Film * Part-Time Programs

$3,4633,333

$621,655

39%

College and Career Academy Grant

STEAM Innovative Grant

Class of 2016 Career Pathway Completers

15


What is a Charter School System?

Community Relations

Morgan County Schools have a Charter between the school system and the State Board of Education. The school system gains flexibility to innovate programs in exchange for increased academic accountability. Charter systems are characterized by school-based leadership and decision-making through local School Governance Teams.

Local School Governance Teams

Charter School System MCCSS has been a Charter School System since 2011, allowing innovations focused on improving student achievement.

LSGTs exist at every school. These teams make decisions regarding personnel allotments, budget, operations, and other school functions.

System Leadership Team Accreditations

Made up of the chairs of each School Governance Team and the system Executive Council. Serves as an advisory body to the superintendent.

All schools accredited with quality by the Georgia Accrediting Commission and AdvancED.

16


Working closely with the Superintendent and the Board of Education, The Morgan County Foundation for Excellence in Public Education raises funds to implement programs of academic excellence in all our schools, benefiting all our students. Last year, MCFEPE awarded over $18,500 to our schools and students!

Partners in Education is a voluntar y r elationship between local businesses and community organizations who partner with the Morgan County Charter School System to prepare our students to pursue life in society, the world of work, and post-secondary education.

The Madison-Morgan County Boys and Girls Club has been a cornerstone of the community since opening its doors in 2008. It provides a safe, structured and positive environment for young people after school, during holidays and summer vacation. The Club provides a secure place to learn and grow by establishing ongoing relationships with caring adult professionals while offering lifeenhancing programs and character development experience, as well as hope and opportunity. Mentoring One Morgan is a unified effor t to utilize community r esour ces to fulfill the needs of children across the spectrum of education: academics, character, and healthy lifestyles.

Morgan County Family Connection is a collabor ative gr oup wor king together to improve the results for youth and families in Morgan County.

Morgan County 4-H Clubs assist youth in acquir ing knowledge, developing life skills, and forming attitudes that will enable them to become self-directing, productive and contributing members of society. This mission is accomplished, through "hands on" learning experiences, focused on agricultural and environmental issues, agriculture awareness, leadership, communication skills, foods and nutrition, health, energy conservation, and citizenship. 17

Community Partnerships


College and Career Readiness Indicators Beginning in 2012, the State of Georgia began issuing College and Career Readiness Indicator (CCRPI) scores for Districts and Schools around the state. Over the years, the scoring system has evolved from a system heavily weighted towards test scores to one more balanced with measures of success beyond the K-12 experience. It is difficult to compare one year’s scores to the next as changes to the indicators and weights of indicators are constantly in flux. However, Morgan County continues to be a leader of similar sized systems throughout the state.

District Overall Score -

74.1

Morgan County Elementary School

Morgan County Middle School

79.4

69.9

Morgan County Primary and Elementary Schools recognized as Title 1 Reward Schools in 2016

Morgan County High School

70.5 4th of 8

90%

Rank of District Overall score among surrounding districts

The number of possible Progress category points earned by MCES 18

1st of 20 Rank of MCHS in percentage of 2016 graduates with college level class experience among RESA high schools


The Class of 2016 (215 students) at Morgan County High School was awarded over $150,000 in scholarship monies

Graduation

Graduation Cohort Rate 2012 - 2016

89.5

87.8 87

85.6

82.7

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

69%

Percentage of 2014 Graduates attending Post Secondary Schols

3rd of 8 Rank of Graduate Cohort Rate among surrounding school districts

82.7% Percentage of the Class of 2014 students NOT requiring college remediation 19

1437 Average SAT for Class of 2016 (based on 2400 scale score)


End of Grade (3rd-8th)

Milestones

The Georgia Milestone End

of Grade Assessments

(EOGs) are summative assessments assigned to students in Grades 3 – 8. Students are required to take assessments in English Language Arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. Assessments include both constructed response as well as enhanced selected response questions allowing for a more valuable measurement of student understanding.

Distribution of Achievement Levels for End of Course Milestones Assessments 2016 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

6%

10%

9%

31%

31%

32%

32%

30%

27%

28%

Morgan County

RESA

State

Distinguished

6%

10%

9%

Proficient

30%

31%

31%

Developing

34%

32%

32%

Beginning

30%

27%

28%

30%

34%

22 of 24 65% End of Grade Assessments administered online

Number of grade level test subjects where the percentage of Morgan County students scoring Proficient or Above meets or exceeds the state average 20

50.2 Average Growth Percentile of students on the 2015 End of Grade Assessments compared to academically similar state level peers


The Georgia Milestone End of Course Assessments (EOCs) are summative assessments assigned to high school students in ten courses as designated by the State Board of Education. High School students are required to complete an End of Course Milestone in 9th Grade Literature, American Literature, Coordinate Algebra, Analytic Geometry, Biology, Physical Science, United States History, and Economics. The End of Course Milestone is assigned two scores; one score based on the Department of Education scoring scale and a second score based on a grade equivalent scale. This second score is used as twenty percent of the final course grade calculation.

End of Course (9th-12th)

Milestones

Distribution of Achievement Levels for End of Grade Milestones Assessments 2016 100% 90% 80% 70%

10%

11%

9%

32%

31%

28%

37%

36%

21%

23%

27%

60% 50% 40%

36%

30% 20% 10% 0%

Morgan County

RESA

State

Distinguished

10%

11%

9%

Proficient

32%

31%

28%

Developing

37%

36%

36%

Beginning

21%

23%

27%

100%

1813

44.3

End of Course Assessments administered online

Number of End of Course tests administered

Average Growth Percentile of students on the 2016 End of Course Assessments compared to academically similar state level peers

21


Morgan County Board of Education Central Office

Dr. James Woodard, Superintendent 1065 East Avenue Madison, GA 30650 (706) 752-4600 www.morgan.k12.ga.us

“Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.�

-Henry Ford

Morgan County Charter School System

Morgan County Charter School System Annual Report 2016  

Putting the pieces together.

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