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smash words What’s in a Roller Derby Name? by Kait Heacock

“A Game of Brutal Beauty” It’s a Saturday night and The Hangar at Oaks Park is sold out. Excited crowds of fans spill over the bleacher seats into the aisles and onto the floor, where they set up chairs or throw down blankets, ready to camp out for the next two hours. All types of people are here—men and women, young and old, tatted and non-tatted. Some are energetic, some rowdy, and some a little tipsy, but they all share one common desire: to see a group of women kick some ass. The Rose City Rollers (a collective made up of the Break Neck Betties, Guns N Rollers, Heartless Heathers, and High Rollers) has been entertaining sports fans since the early 2000s, back when the second wave of roller derby enthusiasm swept cities like Austin, Seattle, and Portland. By now, most Portland residents have attended a roller derby bout, know somebody involved, or have at least heard of the sport. What many may have not considered is what the sport is doing to provide Portland women with encouragement and a place to showcase their abilities. RCR’s slogan says it all: “A Game of Brutal Beauty.” This is a sport that gives women the opportunity to display a unique hybrid that many modern women strive for—strength and beauty, femininity and masculinity. Where else can a woman choose to wear fishnets and elbow somebody in the ribcage? Ellen Beaman (aka Texine), RCR’s PR Manager, understands the dual roles that she and her fellow skaters must balance. Texine is a skater for the hometown team High Rollers and the traveling team Wheels of Justice. She knows that roller derby is a big commitment. Every skater must balance their relationships, families, and jobs with training and bouts. As a skater who invests four hours per week with her hometown team and an additional six hours to her

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traveling team’s commitments, Texine explains that “Roller derby wins every time.”

Sisterhood Meets Survival of the Fittest RCR draws a wide range of women to try outs. Some used to be figure skaters, speed skaters, and hockey players, while some had no previous skating experience before trying out for roller derby. Texine joined three years ago, after attending a bout and falling in love with the sport. What Texine found at RCR—more than just a sport or a hobby—was community. Having grown up with mostly male friends, roller derby was the first time Texine experienced sisterhood. Sisterhood aside, there is still a strong sense of competition. This is a contact sport where a tough image—from your roller derby name to your uniform—can take you far. Because weak skaters get bullied on the track and are separated from the pack, Texine explains, “You want to have the appearance of being tough.” This is why names like Teqkilla, Toxic Haste, Megahertz, and Soulfearic Acid are used on the track. This is a place for women to delve into their badass side, whether it’s a character or an extension of their personalities. Audience members expect this from the roller derby. Even if they don’t play the sport, women who come to bouts want to see women who project themselves as tough. They want to get involved—to skate, to volunteer, or at the very least buy a season pass. “The energy is palpable,” says Texine. This is a rare sport where women are the stars. Some may question how “empowered” a skater can feel in a pair of short shorts, but Texine believes the RCR uniforms are both utilitarian and contribute to the sport’s overall message of women owning their bodies. The length of their shorts and the overall tightness of their uniforms help the

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skaters to skate faster. Do they need the fishnets or smoky eyes? No, but Texine thinks they get the point across: “I’m sexy and attractive, but I’m also tough.” Not only one type of woman wears these uniforms on the track. RCR celebrates all body types as beautiful and strong. No other sport encourages women to feel this good about their bodies.

Junior Ass Kickers In the last three years, RCR has expanded its community to reach a younger age set. The Rosebuds is RCR’s junior roller derby league and includes The Death Scar Derby Dolls, The Little Red Riveters, The Rainbow Bites, and The Undead Avengers. Made up of skaters aged 12-18, the Rosebuds league provides a supportive community for young women during an often difficult part of adolescence. As a coach for the Rosebuds, Texine has seen first hand the positive impact the junior roller derby has on the skaters. “They can be supported and celebrated for who they are,” she says. A lot of these skaters are lesbians who have still not been accepted in their high schools. The Rosebuds is a safe place for them, a community where they can let their guard down and invest their time and energy in this unique sport.

Team Roller Derby At the end of each match, members from both teams nominate an MVP from the other team. This is a final reminder that at the end of the night, all competition is put aside and the skaters can enjoy the camaraderie of their sport. RCR skaters work together and look out for each other. No matter what team each woman plays for, Texine says that ultimately, “We’re all on team roller derby.”

Volume 13 Issue 7


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What the F? by Jyoti Roy

How do you define feminism? This question is as relevant as it has ever been, with the GOP war on women showing how far we have not come in some areas of women’s rights. But is feminism only about women, as some popular depictions in the media indicate? For me, “feminism” is being actively opposed to any form of oppression faced under a patriarchal system, a patriarchal system being one that reduces people to binaries (such as ‘women’ and ‘men’, the former being superior) and dictates assumptions about what being a ‘woman’ or a ‘man’ is. It is not about excluding men. It is about actively fighting against the effects of institutionalized misogyny, which affects all genders and sexualities. The media perpetuates certain stereotypes of feminism that cause a lot of people who hold feminist values shy away from the term. Most recently, the IFC program Portlandia portrays feminists as staunch, women only, unattractive, and out of touch. As a feminist I find this portrayal funny but frustrating, and I wonder, is it hurting feminism more than helping it? Portlandia’s parody of a feminist bookstore is filmed on location at In Other Words, the only non-profit feminist bookstore and community center in America. Located at 14 NE Killingsworth Street and opened in 1993, it is also one of the longest-running feminist bookstores in the country. I spoke with one of their board members, Kimberly Meinert, about Portlandia’s portrayal and what it means for their space. Rearguard: How did IOW end up as a filming location for Portlandia? Kimberly Meinert: It’s my understanding that the Portlandia folks contacted In Other Words directly. They were relatively vague at first, stating that they were filming a couple scenes for a pilot episode of a TV show that poked fun at Portland. They were pretty clear that they were working on a limited budget and that they weren’t even sure if IFC would pick up the show. Rg: Was it a hard decision to make? KM: The filming of the original pilot took place several years ago at this point, so it is hard to remember, but I recall that there wasn’t much discussion about it-- we were pleased that some independent video artists and actors were interested in using In Other Words as a backdrop, and we figured why not let them try to make something of it. They said they didn’t even know if their project would make it beyond the pilot episode. Rg: How much input did IOW get on the portrayal of a feminist bookstore in Portlandia? KM: In Other Words was never consulted about how we were portrayed in Portlandia, it just happened-- in the TV show, the space is called “Women and Women First”. This is ironic since our tagline used to be “Women’s Books and Resources” however we very consciously wanted to move away from excluding folks who do not identify as women. Now that old stereotype has been solidified on national television!

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Rg: What were staff and board reactions to the portrayal? KM: We all think that Portlandia is pretty hilarious. Despite the bra-burning stereotype I think it’s safe to say that the vast majority of feminist-identified folks have a real good sense of humor about these sorts of things. Rg: What were IOW customer and supporter reactions? KM: Ever since Portlandia aired last year, we’ve had a lot of new folks coming into the space wanting to know if this is really where Portlandia was filmed. Many people like to come in to IOW and make jokes about using the restroom, which is a reference specifically to the Season One episode where Steve Buscemi’s character comes in to use the restroom and the staff inform him that the restroom is only for paying customers. In reality, we are a community center, so many folks come in to use the space without paying for it, which is an intentional part of our organizational model to remain accessible to a wide spectrum of economic backgrounds. We’re able to remain a free and low cost community organizing space thanks to the generosity of our donors, the majority of whom give small gifts less than $15 – we are truly funded by our constituency. Rg: Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein, stars and creators of Portlandia, attended a fundraising event for IOW, how did that come about? KM: Last summer, we found ourselves in a dire financial situation where we had to lay off staff and immediately after the layoff took place there was a news article in one of the weekly papers that portrayed In Other Words as a sinking ship. Carrie Brownstein and Fred Armisen actually read that article and wanted to help us stay afloat, since they truly stand behind and support the value of local community centers. A couple weeks later, In Other Words was contacted by a representative from the Independent Film Channel who stated that Carrie and Fred wanted to help us out and offered to host a fundraiser during one of their “off” days when they weren’t filming Portlandia. When I asked Meinert for a definition of feminism she said that In Other Words is an advocate of the phrase “feminism is for everybody,” emphasizing that there is not one body, one gender, or one sexuality that can define feminism, and that it is an essential part of progressive, activist, left-leaning politics. ‘Feminism is for everybody’ actively denounces the ‘women only’ portrayal of feminist bookstores and community spaces by Portlandia. That said, what Portlandia is good at is gently poking fun at the extremes of progressive politics, where an over-commitment to openness creates an ironic loop back to being narrow-minded. Recently Mary Bisbee-Beek, who teaches Advanced Marketing in Portland State’s MA in Book Publishing, was an extra in a second-season Portlandia episode in which the feminist bookstore ‘Women and Women First’ celebrated their 10-year anniversary after answering an ad for extras

April 2012

in Willamette Week on a lark. Bisbee-Beek is also a board member for Calyx Press, a feminist press based in Corvallis. She says that her being cast in this particular episode was just a happy coincidence. I asked her if she thought the Portlandia portrayal of feminists was an unfair one. She said she didn’t view the parody through the lens of feminism, but from the standpoint of bookstores. Shelquestionef if they were slamming independent bookstores through the portrayal of ‘Women and Women Firstt as being “a dump” or its staff as underachieving (Fred Armisen’s character defines success as selling 1000 books in ten years). But she questions if they are really slamming things at all? Bisbee-Beek sees the parodying as “social commentary with humor injected.” So does Bisbee-Beek consider herself a feminist? Well, she is pro-choice, progressive, strong, independent, and entrepreneurial.bBut, as someone who does not like to be limited by labels she turned the question back on me. “How do you define feminism?” She asks.

Portland is a great place to be a feminist! Feminist Agenda PDX http://feministagendapdx.wordpress.com/ This site is a directory of feminist activism in Portland, OR and a guide for organizations to volunteer with, a calendar of events to attend, groups and clubs to connect with, organizations to give in-kind donations of used items to, and resources for taking your ideas to create something amazing! Bitch Media: Feminist Response to Pop Culture www.bitchmagazine.org 4930 NE 29th Ave. – Portland, OR Bitch Media’s mission is to provide and encourage an engaged, thoughtful feminist response to mainstream media and popular culture. Radical Women http://www.radicalwomen.org/portland.shtml Bread & Roses Center: 6834 NE Glisan – Portland Radical Women (RW) is a socialist feminist, grassroots activist organization that provides a radical voice within the feminist movement, a feminist voice within the Left, and trains women to be leaders in the movements for social and economic justice. In Other Words http://inotherwords.org/ Events: http://inotherwords.org/events

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A Writer, Like the Machine?

An Interview with Evan P. Schneider by Eva Soto

Rearguard: A Simple Machine, Like the Lever is your first book, published in December of 2011 by Propeller Books, an independent small press whose founder, Dan DeWeese, is an instructor at Portland State. Could you tell us a bit more about your writing career up to that point? Evan P. Schneider: I got my official writing start somewhere back in Colorado around the year 2000, when I started writing in this little all-weekly newspaper doing book reviews. I…noticed they had film, events, and restaurant reviews, but almost nothing about books. I had been reading the New York Times on Sundays for about 6 or 7 years at the time, and I especially read through all the book reviews. So one day, while reading the weekly newspaper I thought: “Why do they not have book reviews? I’m going to write for them.” I really didn’t know what it took to be a book reviewer, but I e-mailed them to introduce myself directly as a book reviewer. …I assumed the identity and submitted my first 300-word review from the book The Confessions of Max Tivoli, at the time a new piece of fiction, and said: “Please, feel free to run this in your paper, and let me know what you think.” Finally, they replied saying they were going to run it in their next issue. This is how I started writing book reviews on a weekly basis for three to four years until I moved to Rhode Island to attend graduate school. There, I did the same thing: I picked up a weekly newspaper that had no book reviews and I submitted a couple for their consideration. I’ve been working for them remotely since then. Rg: Would you consider your experience writing book reviews as a key part of your education as a writer? ES: Absolutely. One of my favorite things about book reviews is that they often talk about the author’s life, or the author’s world experience, their process of writing. Were they married? How many hours a day did they write? I couldn’t get enough of that information. Thinking about how other writers create, it’s amazing. Rg: I previously interviewed Lisa Wells, another local author who just published her first book last year through Perfect Day Publishing. She postponed going to college and instead took a more self-directed approach to education through reading and traveling. You, on the other hand, went to college. Can you tell us a bit more about that experience?

Evan P. Schneider demonstrating that Portland weather is conducive to pensive activities indoors.

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ES: I really just went to college because I was enamored with academia. I literally never skipped one day of class (he laughs), which is a very dorky thing to admit. I knew I wanted to go back to grad school, even when I accepted a job as a high school teacher. The same thing that Lisa was doing at the library, I was doing at the University of Rhode Island instead. I certainly don’t think that either of the options is better, but different. Education is key. Knowing what’s come before you is key, but how you do it, that doesn’t matter. Rg: Do you make a living from your writing? ES: At some point I realized that I most likely wasn’t going to live off of my writing. Writing jobs just don’t pay that much. You have to have achieved that point in your career. There are some people who can do that, piece together a whole career, either through speaker engagements, or newspaper articles and columns, or featured op-ed things, and books. Others also do academic work at some institution like Dan DeWeese. We have full-time jobs doing something else and writing is something that we do, we love, and we are, but we don’t make our money doing that. When you free writing of monetary concerns, you are often more free to do more artistic work because it’s more about the art than about the consumer. Rg: You wrote your first book while working full time, so I’m guessing that you have enough room in your life to dedicate time to writing projects. ES: Oh yeah. I got in the habit of using my mornings, the time of day that I am the most lucid. At 4:30am, 5am, 6am, if I’ve had coffee, I feel like I’m super crisp to write, and then I can go to work and do what I have to do. Rg: How did you get DeWeese interested in A Simple Machine, Like the Lever? ES: Somewhere along the way I discovered that the world of publishing is more about relationships than you think, and sort of cultivating those relationships with editors or other writers. Your best bet is often knowing what is happening and when somebody is looking for something. You can work and submit your project, but if you don’t know that the publisher is looking for something specific at the moment, or if they just published something like what you’ve done, they may love your work but it’s not going to work. I had known Dan DeWeese for quite some time and I had helped him edit [Propeller Books’ first book], Mary Rechner’s Nine Simple Patterns For Complicated Women. He told me that he was going to be putting out a book once a year and that he wanted to see what I was working on. And that’s how A Simple Machine, Like the Lever became the next Propeller Books work. Rg: Would you say that Portland is a very supportive place for the creative minds? ES: Yes, I’d probably say that it’s one of the best cities for publishing and writing, maybe right after New York and San Francisco. Portland is a city with both well-known writers as well as emerging artists. I just find it a remarkable community of artists of all kind. I think you have two facets of the city that make it so that writers converge upon it. One is the weather, especially the rainy months, because it makes it very conducive to writing, reading, and doing pensive activities indoors. And then with Powell’s being here for as long as it has…[it’s] often considered the best independent store in the US. I’m also struck by the number of events that you can go to. I can probably safely say that I could go to one reading or literary event every night of the year if I wanted to.    Rg: Finally, for the emerging artists that might be reading this interview, do you have any specific advice for them? ES: First and foremost, I would probably say read. It really seems to me that when you read, you’re watching somebody else craft or tell a story, and you will watch yourself critique the story and think: “I can do this”, or “this makes me think of something I would like to do.” If you don’t read often enough, moments of inspiration might not come as frequently. [It’s also] hard to act when you want to be a writer because no one is forcing you to do it. No one cares if you do it or not. All of the motivation has to come from within and one of the only things I find to sustain that is continuing to read. Secondly, find a way to get with a group of people who are also trying to do what you want to do and somehow become accountable for that. Once you get to know people who are doing writing activities…it’s very easy to stay motivated. If you have accountability from others who are expecting something from you because they are excited about it, you just keep on doing it. Read a lot first. Set deadlines for yourself, try to refine [your writing], and if you want to submit it to a whole bunch of places that’s fine, but if you don’t, that’s fine too. Share it with some other people or, if you think it’s ready, send it to a couple of places, and then see what happens later. Work, work, work a lot.

April 2012

Volume 13 Issue 7


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Photo courtesy of Amos Mac, photographer, RADAR Productions.org

On The Road with Author Michelle Tea For fifteen years, writer Michelle Tea has brought the sharpest queer performers to your town. You’re welcome! by Cooper Lee Bombardier Since 1997, author Michelle Tea has stood at the helm of Sister Spit, the raucous queer roadshow. I caught up with Michelle on the first day of the 2012 tour. As noted on our Twitter and Facebook feeds at the beginning of the month, Sister Spit performed in Portland on April 10th and 12th. Cooper Lee Bombardier: Michelle, hello! How are you? Michelle Tea: Hi! I’m really great and my life is stressful and exciting, as it always is at the start of tour. I am in my girlfriend’s house in San Francisco drinking coffee and preparing for our kick-off show mere hours from now! CLB: How many tours have you done, Sister Spit and otherwise? What do you like about touring? MT: This will be my 13th [cross-country] tour. Lucky 13! I love being on the road, I feel free and in my element in this particular way. I love traveling! I love getting to dress up for a show every night! I love the weird intense group bonding that occurs on a tour! I LOVE staying in hotels, a lot. But I dislike being away from my love! That’s really the only part that stinks. 
CLB: These days, it seems like your tours are done in a much more sustainable way than we did it back in the 1990s. How did those changes come about from the early days of Sister Spit? How do you keep energy up around touring, not just the physical act of driving and performing, but all of the pre-tour organizing and booking work that goes into it? How do you keep from burning out on it? MT: The changes came with time, and having the tour booked not by a version of me that was living in some sort of crisis mode with massive scarcity issues and low standards, but having it booked by people who are professional and recognized that over the year Sister Spit had built itself into dare I say a BRAND, which only means that people know our name and understand what they are getting when they get us. And tour managers have been able to use that properly to get us paid and continue to elevate the professionalism of the tour, mainly by bringing us to Universities that can afford to cover our honorarium while making shows free! Everyone gets paid now, as opposed to that $80 we all made for a month of insane 24-hour-a-day work in 1997! 

Energy is funny - I run a little manic and have always felt that my excess energy was put to use perfectly on the road! But now I am MEDICATED, and last year was my first tour on Celexa, and I got TIRED. Which is normal tour is exhausting, people get tired, but traditionally I don’t! So that was weird. I drink a lot of Sugar Free Red Bull and black coffee! And getting to bring a brand new crew of my favorite artists across the country each year, the constantly changing makeup of the van and our shows, that keeps me from burning out! CLB: What are some venue/city stops that you are most looking forward to on this tour? MT: Tucson always, because it is one of my most favorite cities in the world and there is great thrifting and we’re staying at the Hotel where the Dillinger gang hid out and were caught by the law. Portland is a favorite city and we always have amazing shows so I’m psyched about that, too! In Denver my girlfriend is visiting so I am most excited

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about that! And Western Mass, because it’s so pretty and we have a day off to stay in one of my favorite hotels and get a cheap massage and thrift and see Dori Midnight, my witch! CLB: What are some tour highlights so far? Any juicy tidbits? Do you still pull a tarot reading for a tour itself? MT: Our first show is in a few hours! And tonight is our group dinner where we all meet each other. Having Dorothy Allison and then Justin V Bond is going to be insane and thrilling for us and for everyone! I don’t read tarot on the tour anymore. If it’s going to be hard, I don’t want to know! But I am bringing a deck with me. I always do. And a miniature astrological ephemeris. CLB: Author Dorothy Allison is on the tour this year. How is it to tour with a writer who is such a beloved icon to so many people? MT: I am basically going to be Dorothy’s personal assistant, her lady’s maid, butler, concierge, whatever she needs to be comfortable! It can be a rough experience and I want to make it as smooth for her as possible. She is literary royalty! We are honored. 
CLB: As a prolific author yourself, how do you balance your own work as a writer with all of the projects that you do which support and promote other artists, such as RADAR Productions and Sister Spit the Next Generation? How are you able to accomplish so much? Do you ever sleep? MT: I sleep! I love to sleep! I wish I didn’t, I wish I was like Tom Ford who goes to bed at midnight at wakes up at 4:30am every day! Basically, my writing gets the short shrift because with RADAr andrRADAR-related things like Sister Spit there are other people’s fortunes hanging in the balance, so I tend to jump on those sooner and writing later. But I am on a writing deadline while on this tour so I’ll be editing a manuscript mornings and nights, I think. And I accomplish all I do with the help of other people, especially RADAr’s Managing Director, [Elizabeth Pickens,] without whom nothing would happen! 
CLB: What projects are you working on right now, if you want to share? What should your fans be on the lookout for? MT: I have the first in a young adult fantasy series coming out on McSweeney’s in January, this one called A Mermaid in Chelsea Creek. I’m working on another YA book, Little Faggot, and also a weird experimental apocalyptic memoir that will be out in 2014 on Sister Spit Books/City Lights. And I’m blogging about trying to get pregnant on xoJane. com each week! CLB: You’ve always worked your ass off on your writing, and you’ve always been so supportive of your friends’ creative

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endeavors. Now you are a beloved literary icon to countless fans out there, and have inspired so many people and made them feel seen with your writing and your own personal journey. What is it like for you to be a literary hero to so many people? Does your visibility create pressure to write or perform a certain way, or does it open up new channels for your creative output? 
MT: I only feel pressure to keep producing work, which I think is pretty common with writers, but not for it to be any certain kind of work. I feel really supported by my readers, like I think they’ll follow me into different territory - they’re readers! I feel so lucky to have readers! I don’t really think of being a hero but it is a really exciting concept! I am such a fan of my,heroes; it’s too sweet to think of being on the other side for someone else! Also, it is easy to support my friends, because they are so wildly talented! CLB: Anything else you’d like to share with the fine folk of Portland State University? MT: I love Portland! Thank you for being you!

Sister Spit 2012 Performers: • Host Michelle Tea • Dorothy Allison* • Mx Justin Vivian Bond • Brontez Purnell • Erin Markey • Cassie J Sneider • Kit Yan *Dorothy Allison joins Sister Spit West Coast tour April 1 – 15; Mx Justin Vivian Bond joins Sister Spit rest of the country tour April 15-30.

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Disjecta's Portland Biennial: A Spring Festival of Art by Lacey Friedly Every year, cherry blossoms spontaneously decorate Portland’s sidewalks and streets. Every two years, this outpouring of color and life has a human counterpart: a citywide celebration of art known as the Portland Biennial. This year’s biennial is no exception as a springtime largescale art exhibit, scattered in multiple venues throughout the city. From February 26 through May 19, 24 artists and teams are showcasing their work at five locations across Portland. The events are coordinated by Disjecta Interdisciplinary Art Center, with exhibits selected by the show’s curator, Prudence Roberts. Cris Moss, creator and curator of the Donut Shop art shows, curated the first all-city Biennial in 2010. This year, the number of featured artists has jumped to 24 from 18. Although this year’s Biennial is already under way, there is still a chance to see the second half. With nearly 300 submissions to choose from for this year’s Biennial, Roberts selected two dozen representatives of the best art in the city. The exhibits involve a broad range of contemporary media, including visual and performance art. Ariana Jacobs, whose work was featured at the Helzer Art Gallery from March 5 to April 14, presented a collection of conversations between liberals and conservatives about political beliefs. Erik Geschke, whose work you can still catch at Disjecta through April 28th, is an assistant professor at Portland State and multi-media artist who has exhibited both nationally and internationally. A group of mixed-media artists (including Portland State instructor Wendy Red Star and MFA graduate Vanessa Calvert) will be exhibited at

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White Box, in the School of Architecture and Allied Arts of the University of Oregon in Portland, from April 1 to May 19. On Thursday, April 5, I visited the White Box gallery to check out this show. According to Tomas Valladares, the gallery coordinator, the event has had a wonderful turnout. ”We had 300 people at the opening,” said Valladores, “and probably fifteen more trickled in by the end of the first day.” In addition to Vanessa Calvert’s fantastic melting furniture sculptures and Wendy Red Star’s interactive video exhibit that dances with life, showing scenes from the Crow Indian reservation in Montana, White Box is also the temporary home of Sang-Ah Choi’s work, which experiments with concepts like Real and Fake and shows how art moves through time; Daniel Duford’s ongoing body of work called The North American Codex that examines our cultural subconscious; and Vanessa Renwick’s video and sound-based installation, which felt like a personal gift to me. Her installation, Medusa Smack, is an environment permeated with strange music where the viewer can lie on furry beanbags in a dark room and watch the foreign, liquid movements of jellyfish projected on a tent overhead. The piece is connected to a quote from Japanese author Haruki Murakami: “What we see before us is just one tiny part of the world. We get into the habit of thinking, this is the world, but that’s not true at all. The real world is a much darker and deeper place than this, and much of it is occupied by jellyfish and things.”

April 2012

2012 Portland Biennial Times and Locations Ariana Jacob Helzer Art Gallery, PCC Rock Creek 17705 NW Springville Rd. Through April 14 Mon-Fri 9 am to 5 pm; Sat 10 am to 4 pm § Hand2Mouth (performances) Disjecta 8371 N Interstate Ave. Fri April 20 & Sat April 21, 8 pm § Erik Geschke, Brian Gillis, Anna Gray and Ryan Wilson Paulsen, Grant Hottle, Hand2Mouth, Arnold J. Kemp, Matt McCormick Mack McFarland, Susan Seubert Disjecta 8371 N Interstate Ave. Through April 28 Fri-Sun, 12 to 6 pm § Vanessa Calvert, Sang-ah Choi, Daniel Duford, Wendy Red Star, Vanessa Renwick White Box 24 NW First Ave Through May 19 Tue- Sat, 12 to 6 pm

Volume 13 Issue 7


Rearguard Rough Draft