Page 1

STRATEGIC

PLAN


www.ecotourismkenya.org

Celebration

of our

20th

PHOTO : SANCTURY OLANANA

y r a s r e v i ann


Ecotourim Kenya

TABLE OF

CONTENTS CHAPTER ONE 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Background of Ecotourism Kenya 1.2 Role of Ministry of Tourism 1.3 EK Mandate 1.4 EK Programs

CHAPTER TWO

CHAPTER FOUR 4.0 EK Strategic Program Areas and Implementation Plan 4.1 Strategic Priority Areas

Head Office: KATO Place, Longonot Rd, Upper Hill, Nairobi P.O. Box 10146 – 00100, Nairobi, Kenya Wireless: 020 257 4059 Cell: 0726 366 080 / 0725 652 270 E-mail: info@ecotourismkenya.org www.ecotourismkenya.org

4.2 Standards and Best Practices Program 4.3 Membership and Communication Program 4.4 Leadership and Mentorship Program 4.5 Research and Advocacy Program

2.0

Contextual Analysis

2.1

EK’s External Environment

2.2

External Environment Risk Assessment and Contingency Plans

2.3

EK’s Internal Environment

2.3.1

EK’s Environmental Policy

5.0 EK Strategic Plan Management

2.3.2

Stakeholder Analysis

5.1 Corporate Governance

2.3.3

SWOT Analysis

2.3.4

Key Issues from the Contextual Analysis

5.2 The Role of the Board and Board Committees

4.6 Community Enterprise Development Program

2.3.4.2 Strategic Growth Action Points

5.5 Programs Monitoring and Evaluation

3.1 Vision 3.2 Mission 3.3 Overall Goal 3.4 Core Values 3.5 EK Slogan

BRAND EFFECTS EAST AFRICA Mirage Plaza, Mombasa Rd Opp. Capital Center. P.O. Box 36158 – 00200, CSQ, Nairobi, Kenya Cell: 0722 352 350 / 0734 352 350 Tel: +254 020 211 0780 / 510 0407 E-mail: info@brandeffectsea.com www.brandeffectsea.com

5.3 Programs Coordination 5.4 EK Organogram

3.0 Strategic Direction of EK

Eco Tourism Kenya Strategic and Action Plan is designed and printed by:

CHAPTER FIVE

2.3.4.1 Broad Strategic Focus Areas

CHAPTER THREE

ECO TOURISM KENYA

PRODUCTION MANAGER : PRESTON MUHANDO ART DIRECTION : ELIUD MAUMO

CHAPTER SIX 6.0

Resource Requirements and Mobilization

6.2

Funding Sources

6.2.1 Membership Subscriptions 6.2.2 Certification Dues 6.2.3 Grants and Partnerships

The contents in this publication are not necessarily those of the editor nor of any other organisation associated with this publication. no liability can be accepted for any inacuracies or omissions. COVER PHOTO : KICHECHE BUSH CAMP

6.2.4 Cost Saving and Efficiency Measures

ECO TOURISM KENYA 1996–2016

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ECOTOURISM

KENYA

JOURNEY IN 20 YEARS

Highlights and Achievements 1

1992

• Workshop on sustainable development and tourism held and the idea of an Ecotourism society is born.

2

1996

• Ecotourism Society of Kenya (ESOK) is formally registered and Council of Founder members established. This is a first for the region. Membership recruitment begins.

3

1997

• ESOK co-hosts an international ecotourism conference- Ecotourism at a Crossroads. ESOK is mandated to be the industry association responsible for standards and to provide leadership in the practice of ecotourism

4

1998

5

1999

• ESOK co-hosts National Ecotourism Conference.

• ESOK receives seed funding from FORD foundation to strengthen the secretariat. The first independent secretariat is established.

6

2000

• Research and consultations on development of an ecorating scheme begins.

7

2001

• ESOK signs a funding agreement with UNDP for promotion of ecotourism and conservation of biodiversity through income generating initiatives. The Community Outreach Program is initiated through a survey of areas with potential for ecotourism.

8

2002

• The Eco-rating scheme is launched with tremendous support from the tourism industry. • ESOK co-hosts the International Year of Ecotourism Conference (IYE).

9

2003

• ESOK launches The Kenya Safari Codes and Coast Codes, in collaboration with FoC, KATO, KWS and KPSGA. • Uaso Cultural Center and Isecheno Bandas projects are initiated in Archers Post and Kakamega Forest respectively under the Community Outreach Programme.

10

2004

• Regional surveys conducted to identify existing/planned ecotourism initiatives in the country.

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2005

• Eight regional ecotourism workshops held to promote ecotourism and more than 200 CBOs involved in conservation and tourism reached. • National ecotourism conference held in Nairobi with attendance of more than 100 community representatives • Eco-warrior award is introduced to reward outstanding contributions by tourist accommodation facilities, CBOs, tour operators and individuals to conservation of threatened biodiversity and social investment.


12

2006

• ESOK changes its name to Ecotourism Kenya (EK) and launches a new logo. • EK hosts The Great Mara Debate in Nairobi.

13

2007

• EK co-hosts a National Conference on Climate change. • The Green Directory is launched. This directory houses a unique listing of green goods and services available in East Africa.

14

2008

• Review of the Ecorating application and evaluation process carried out. • The Eco-rating scheme goes regional in East Africa with several facilities being certified in Tanzania and Zanzibar. • EK completes a survey on the ‘Market Ready’ status of various Community Based Tourism Enterprises (CBTE’s) around the country. • EK co-sponsors two major Conferences (Ecostorm-Maasai Mara and Travellers Philanthropy).

15

2009

• Host a successful National Ecotourism Conference on the theme ‘Tourism Business in a Changing Climate.’ • Awards the 2009 Eco Warriors during the climax of the National Ecotourism conference.

16

2010

• The Ecotourism Kenya Members Guide is launched, that promotes Ecotourism Products and profiles Ecotourism Kenya Members

17

2011

• EK Launches its fifth Program area in May, Leadership and Mentorship Program that provides members and opportunity to gain experience and nurture their skills on the fundamentals and practice of ecotourism. • EK co-hosts two meetings: Tourism Sustainability Program for Tour Operators in Nairobi with ANVR, Travelife and IDH and Responsible Tourism Day in Malindi with Mlilo Community Tours. • Produces it first Ecotourism Magazine, Naturals. • EK conducts a project on ‘Developing a Marketing Strategy for Community Based Tourism Enterprises ‘and ‘Market Access Training and Support Program’ of various Community Based Tourism Enterprises (CBTE’s) around the country.

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2012

• EK successful hosts the Annual Ecotourism Conference under the theme, ‘Integrating Business Practices for the Modern Traveler’. • EK conducts a study on over 76 Community Conserved Areas around Kenya. • EK Coast Office Is launched in Diani that will coordinate EK programs at the Coastal Region. • EK Produces the First Ecotourism Kenya Coast Guide.

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2013

• EK co-hosts the Ecotourism & Sustainable Tourism Conference in Kenya in partnership with The International Ecotourism Society (TIES) and Ministry of Tourism.

20

2014

21

2015

• 5000 copies of the Green Directory printed; 1,000 distributed at ITB and WTM in 2014/2015 and 4,000 distributed in trade fairs and exhibitions in Kenya including Durban, SA.

• Ecotourism Kenya, KATO, Travelife and CBI Netherlands initiates a tour operator sustainability program based on the Travelife for Tour Operator certification currently in use in Europe. • Ecotourism Kenya receives a grant from AWF to lead in the development of minimum sustainability standards for destinations in Kenya (Green Destination Guidelines). • Ecotourism Kenya, FECTO and Centre for Collaborative Consumption and Production (CSCP) Germany submitted and succeeded in obtaining funding for a Switch Africa Green project in Kenya. The 30 months project worth $250,000 commenced in July 2015 and is expected to be complete by April 2018.

• FORD provides funding to facilitate community participation from Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania at the Travellers Philanthropy conference in Arusha, Tanzania.

PHOTO : TORTILIS CAMP - NIELS VAN GIJN


Forward Message from the Cabinet Secretary of Tourim

I

congratulate the Eco-Tourism Society of Kenya for the launch of this Strategic Plan (2016-2020) which outlines the roadmap on interventions to enhance standards and best practices in the tourism sector. As we all know, the world over is currently grappling with the effects of climate change which pose a fundamental threat to the places, species, and people’s livelihoods. Kenya, and indeed the horn of Africa region at large, has in the last few years come face to face with the unprecedented challenge of climate change impacts and the corresponding socio-economic losses to our communities. Climate Change is a threat to the achievement of sustainable tourism and Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) not only in Kenya but the world over. I am happy to note that the launch of this Strategic Plan is in line with the Government’s strategy of positioning the country as a sustainable tourism destination. Kenya’s economy is highly dependent on climate sensitive sectors including agriculture, tourism, and energy. The tourism sector plays an important role in the national economy contributing about 27% of the foreign exchange earnings and 12% to the GDP. The sector is largely nature-based and the wildlife populations are highly susceptible to climate variability and change. As Government, we believe in the value of conserving the country’s natural environment, and support players who continue to uphold sustainable tourism practices in positioning Kenya as a global leader. Indeed, the two Sustainable Development Goals of ensuring responsible consumption and production as well as Climate Change, and others touch directly on the tourism sector, hence the need for concerted efforts. The success of the ecotourism conservancy model which balances the needs of communities, tourism enterprises and protect vital habitat including wildlife corridors is a clear demonstration that sustainability is becoming a key differentiator in the tourism marketplace. Indeed, destinations that impact the local community positively with minimal impact on the environment are gaining preference among many travelers and offer an enriching experience. The Government will continue to support eco-friendly initiatives that promote sustainability of the sector. These commendable initiatives such as Standardization and classification processes being undertaken by the Tourism Regulatory Authority will complement government efforts to secure the country’s development and the tourism sector against the risks and impacts of climate change. As Kenya prepares to usher in the Year 2017-which has been declared by the United Nations World Tourism Organization as the year of Sustainable Tourism for Development, I call upon all stakeholders in the tourism industry to work together towards positioning Kenya at the forefront of an eco-friendly tourist destination. For Sustainable Development Goals to be realized, we all need to do our part in contributing towards a sustainable future. GOD BLESS KENYA

Hon.

Najib Balala, EGH

Cabinet Secretary

Ministry of Tourism


PHOTO : COURTESY

Abbreviations & Acronyms CBTEs

Community Based Tourism Enterprises

CSR

Corporate Social Responsibility

EK

Ecotourism Kenya

GDP

Gross Domestic Product

IGAD

Inter-Governmental Authority on Development

KATO

Kenya Association of Tour Operators

KPIs

Key Performance Indicators

KEPSA

Kenya Private Sector Alliance

KRA

Key Result Area

KTB

Kenya Tourism Board

KTF

Kenya Tourism Federation

LMP

Leadership and Mentorship Program

MTPs

Medium Term Plans

OVIs

Observable and Verifiable indicators

PESTEL

Political, Environmental, Social, Technological, Economic, Legal

S.G

Strategic Goal

UNDP

United Nations Development Program

RAP

Research and Advocacy

MCP

Membership and Communication Program

SBP

Standards and Best Practices Program

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

7


Message from the

Chairman

I

consider it an honour to write the forward to our 2016-2020 Strategic Plan. This strategic plan will serve as a roadmap for our programmes as it summarises our key strategic outcome for the next five years. The key goal of the strategic plan is to ensure stability of the organization so that it can continue doing the work for which it was established in 1996 – Linking Communities, Tourism and Conservation. Kenya is a country blessed with rich cultures, diversity of communities, abundant wildlife, breath-taking landscapes and a vibrant business community. However it also faces massive pressures to the environment at unprecedented levels from the fast growing population, escalating land prices, mega infrastructure projects that have led to issues such as sand dredging from our oceans and sand harvesting from our rivers, deforestation, lack of government incentives to protect habitat, corruption and overdevelopment of tourism facilities. Therefore it’s vital that Ecotourism Kenya along with other organizations, companies and citizens focused on sustainability continue to engage with government, leaders, companies and communities to protect our environment before it’s too late. In the last 20 years there have been significant advances by our Ecotourism members in developing sustainable tourism models such as the conservancy concept, which has seen a partnership with local communities leading to the protection of vast areas of key wildlife habitat while offering a quality tourism experience for guests on par with anything offered elsewhere in the world. I congratulate the properties that have attained a bronze, silver or gold eco-rating as this shows their commitment to the environment and communities and especially for those that have the coveted gold rating, as they are truly leaders of responsible tourism. The launch of this strategic plan coincides with the 20th birthday of the Society. I take this opportunity to recognize and appreciate those who had the vision and the dedication to launch The Ecotourism Society of Kenya, as it was then known. Since then various Chairmen, Board and committee members have contributed significantly to the success of the organization along with support and a positive working relationship from the Ministry of Tourism, Kenya Tourism Board, NEMA, Tourism Fund, AWF, CBI Netherlands among other key agencies. Perhaps most important are the staff led by the CEO, both past and present, that have made the difference and contributed greatly to our success. Finally, an organization such as ours is only as strong as its members and I thank you all for the support over the years. And my hope is that you we will continue to support your association, Ecotourism Kenya, to an even greater degree so we can ensure that our country secures it’s habitat in partnership with the communities for generations to come and to continue to lead in sustainable tourism.

Dr. Mohanjeet Brar, PhD.

Board Chairman Ecotourism Kenya


A

Acknowledgement Message from the CEO

s Ecotourism Kenya marks 20 years since inception, we derive pleasure in the knowledge that we have been part of the efforts to make responsible tourism a reality in Kenya. We have done this through availing knowledge about ecotourism to communities, tour operators, policy makers and the society at large. Even so, it is true that the tourism/conservation industry is evolving and each stage of evolution presents peculiar challenges to the practice of ecotourism in Kenya. This therefore calls for innovative strategies, new approaches and being relevant. It is on this backdrop that EK is launching this strategic plan to guide our programme activities for the coming five years. You will notice in this strategic plan 2016-2020 that the vision of Ecotourism Kenya has been amended to reflect the dynamic nature of our organization. We now aspire to be – A leader in the knowledge and practice of responsible tourism. While reflecting on our past achievement and in charting a way forward, this vision will transcend beyond the timeframe of this strategic plan. We appreciate the EK Executive Board for the policy direction and participation at strategic meetings and workshops organized to get input on this plan. We are also grateful to the various committee members and staff who willingly shared their perceptions about our past and current program areas and where they felt needs more emphasis going forward. The draft document was shared with our members and valuable input was obtained that helped shape the final outcome as presented to you here. Last but not least, we appreciate the role played on pro bono by Jackson Wachira to facilitate the strategic plan workshop and drafting of the strategic plan. It is our intention to use this tool to strengthen our mandate and create lasting partnerships with tourism practitioners and relevant agencies – both public and private. We need every support available as we embark on the third leg of navigating ecotourism and related sustainable tourism development concepts in Kenya.

Grace Nderitu

Chief Executive Officer


1

CHAPTER ONE

1.0 Introduction

1.1 BACKGROUND OF ECOTOURISM KENYA Founded in 1996 as Ecotourism Society of Kenya (ESOK) and later adapting the name Ecotourism Kenya (EK) in 2006, EK was the first ecotourism society in Africa and a leader in the fields of voluntary tourism certification, and community asset building through tourism projects.

ECOTOURISM KENYA ACTS AS THE CONFLUENCE OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY, COMMUNITIES AND CONSERVATION WHILE PROMOTING RESPONSIBLE MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES.

Strategic Plan 2016-2020

It is also involved in sustainable tourism planning, and campaigns, community mobilization and sensitization, product identification and development and environmental/social audits. EK works in partnership with many professionals from its membership. It enjoys support from the Ministry of Tourism, Kenya Tourism Board and tourism practitioners. It has over the years enjoyed support from development partners including UNDP, NEMA, Tourism Fund, CBI Netherlands, AWF and FORD Foundation. With nineteen years of experience in ecotourism, EK has an intimate understanding of both the complexities and unique opportunities that ecotourism can provide to local populations, the environment, investors and the business of tourism. Through a strong social, business and environmental awareness EK has been able to cater for its membership and industry. It has provided relevant and practical guidance for attaining sustainable solutions to challenging issues in tourism development to both communities and tourism practitioners. Equally important has been the creation of lasting partnerships with tourism practitioners and interested parties. EK acts as the confluence of the tourism industry, communities and conservation while promoting responsible management of resources.

TOURISM 1

• Awareness Creation • Policy Advocacy • Research & Capacity Development • Leadership & Mentorship

COMMUNITY 2

• Mapping of Community Based Tourism products, Services & Attraction Sites • Capacity Building of CBTEs

CONSERVETION 3

• Standards Promotion & Certification of Tourism Operators • Conservation Advocacy against over development in parks & wildlife corridors and supporting the protection and creation of habitat for wildlife

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ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016


PHOTO : ECOTOURISM KENYA

Strategic Plan 2016-2020

1.2 ROLE OF THE MINISTRY OF TOURISM Under the Constitution of Kenya 2010, the Ministry of Tourism is tasked with overall tourism sector development in the following 3 areas: 1. Policy development, 2. Marketing and Promotion, 3. Protection of the environment and natural resources in a sustainable manner

1.2.1 EK MANDATE Based on the above, EK works in tandem with the third role of the Ministry of Tourism to: 1. Ensure that tourism organizations maintain environmental friendly standards and industry best practices 2. C reate awareness and sharing information relevant to the growth and development of tourism business and individual member interests 3. Empower young professionals joining the tourism industry with leadership skills through the mentorship approach 4. Contribute to industry knowledge and learning through research and organization capacity development 5. S upport Community Enterprise Development to enable communities access direct benefits from the tourism products in their environs

1.3 EK PROGRAMS EK carries out its mandate through a programmatic approach with each program geared towards achieving its Vision and Mission. There are five programs namely: 1. Standards and Best Practices Program 2. Membership and Communication Program 3. Leadership and Mentorship Program 4. Research and Advocacy Program 5. Community Enterprise Development Program

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

11


2

CHAPTER TWO

2.0 Contextual Analysis

Strategic Plan 2016-2020

THIS CHAPTER DISCUSSES THE CONTEXT IN WHICH ECOTOURISM KENYA OPERATES BY LOOKING AT LEVELS OF INFLUENCE BOTH EXTERNAL AND INTERNAL INDUSTRY ENVIRONMENTS AND RECOMMENDS THE STRATEGIC FOCUS AREAS THAT EK WOULD NEED TO CONSIDER FOR SUSTAINABLE OPERATIONS AND ORGANIZATIONAL GROWTH.

2.1 EK’S EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT EK is influenced externally by the following regional and national policy instruments: 2.1.1 Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) tourism master plan

VISION 2030 ECONOMIC PILLAR STRATEGIC SECTORS THE PILLAR IS TO BE ACHIEVED THROUGH SIX STRATEGIC SECTORS, NAMELY: TOURISM AGRICULTURE MANUFACTURING

2.1.2 Tourism Act 2011

WHOLESALE & RETAIL TRADE

2.1.3 Ministry of Tourism strategy document (2013 – 2017)

FINANCIAL SERVICES

2.1.4 Vision 2030 and the Medium Term Plans (MTP) 2.1.5 Wildlife Conservation Act 2013 Vision 2030 is the development blue print for the country. Its aim is to transform Kenya into a middle-income country and make it a prosperous global competitor.

BUSINESS PROCESS OUTSOURCING

ECONOMIC PILLAR IS EXPECTED TO SUSTAIN

10% GROWTH PER ANNUM UPTO THE YEAR

2030

TOURISM’S CONTRIBUTION

EK falls mostly under the economic pillar, which aims at achieving and sustaining an average growth rate of 10% per annum up to the year 2030. The pillar is to be achieved through six strategic sectors, namely: tourism, agriculture, manufacturing, wholesale and retail trade, business process outsourcing and financial services. According to the KEPSA/ World Bank economic survey (2013) tourism alone contributed 14% of the country’s GDP and contributes 12% of total employment. The economic pillar is meant to uplift the living standards of Kenyans, most of who live in poverty, and create jobs to address high unemployment of youth among other national challenges. Eco Tourism Kenya through the community enterprise development program ascribes to this pillar of the Vision 2030.

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ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

12% 14% TOURISM CONTRIBUTION TO TOTAL EMPLOYMENT

TOURISM CONTRIBUTION TO THE COUNTRY’S GDP


PHOTO : TORTILIS CAMP - GAME DRIVE

2.2 EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT RISK ASSESSMENT AND CONTINGENCY PLANS EK IS ALSO FACED WITH THE CHALLENGE OF MANAGING EXTERNAL RISK FACTORS THAT ARE ANALYZED BELOW USING THE PESTEL APPROACH. CONCERNS

MITIGATION

POLITICAL

• Changes in government and commitment • Corruption • Political instability • Security

• Advocacy • Alignment to the law • Political non-affiliation

ECONOMIC

• Interest rates, exchange rate fluctuations, • Funding difficulties

• Diversification of funds • Coming up with programs that align to current affairs • Creation of an endowment fund • Use of USD to cushion against weakening shilling

SOCIO-CULTURAL

• Ethnicity • Excessive development in the national parks and reserves • Subdivision and development outside national parks and reserves

• Advocacy on positive ethnicity and over development • Programs to appreciate diversity • Support community conservancies and initiatives that protect habitat

TECHNOLOGICAL

• Real time communication and information sharing

• Update website regularly and be active on social media platforms

ENVIRONMENTAL

• Natural disasters • Climate change

• Align with the situation to create dialogue and action platforms

LEGAL/POLICY

• New, unexpected regulations and policies

• Align with legislation and lobby where appropriate • Communicate new regulations and policies to membership as rapidly and clearly as possible

OPERATIONAL

• Working in a new environment • Ineffective management • Professional negligence • Human errors/ incompetence • Safety being compromised • Infrastructure failure • Poor monitoring and evaluation or slow delivery

• Update organizational policies and operating procedures i.e. Recruitment, Communication, Compliance and motivation

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

Strategic Plan 2016-2020

RISK FACTORS

13


2.3 EK’S INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT INTERNALLY EK’S WORK IS INFLUENCED BY ORGANIZATION POLICIES, STAKEHOLDERS, GOVERNANCE AND SUBSEQUENT OPERATIONAL CONCERNS AS HIGHLIGHTED BELOW:

2.3.1

EK’S ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

Strategic Plan 2016-2020

The principle concern of EK is to ensure incorporation of sound environmental and social practices in new and existing tourism enterprises. EK seeks to increase recognition of environmental and social issues in the development of responsible tourism in Kenya and in all work that it undertakes. Toward this end, EK intends to remain at the forefront in the implementation of environmental legislation and regulations in tourism development, and to promote socially responsible principles applicable to tourism enterprises.

2.3.2

STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS

STAKEHOLDERS

14

STAKEHOLDER EXPECTATIONS

STAKEHOLDER ROLES

EK BOARD

• EK to be self-sustaining • EK to have a growing membership • EK to be viewed as a leader in Ecotourism in Kenya and globally

• Oversight • Linkages • Representation

EK STAFF

• Job security and Satisfaction

• Manage Programs • Maintain EK image

EK MEMBERS

• Information pertinent to sustainable business • Networking

• Enhance EK policies • Champion responsible tourism operations

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT

• Tourism Policy& Tourism Action Plan implementation

• Enhanced stakeholder participation in planning and implementation

COUNTY GOVERNMENT

• County ecotourism policy framework support

• Support to CBTEs • Play an active role in formulating an ecotourism policy for county governments

KTF

• Active participation • Policy implementation

• Facilitate dialogue • Capacity building

KTB

• Tourism promotion

• Capacity enhancement

KATO

• Value added tour operations

• Enhance responsible operations

KAHC

• Engage potential members on certification scheme

• Promote responsible operations through the certification scheme

OTHER INDUSTRY PLAYERS

• Partnerships

• Promote joint ventures

TOURISM FUND

• Partnerships in training

• Capacity building

AWF

• Partnerships in conservation

• Support to CBTE development

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016


The analysis is aimed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of EK. The strengths will enable EK to accomplish its mandate and achieve the strategic objectives. The weaknesses on the other hand must be addressed so as not to be a hindrance in realization of strategic objectives during the strategic plan period. Both are summarized herein: 2.3.3.1

EK STRENGTHS

1. National outlook as a leader in ecotourism 2. Goodwill from the industry players and stakeholders 3. Recognition by the government and government agents 4. Location of the Secretariat 5. Established Eco-rating scheme 6. Growing membership

As EK sets to implement its strategic plan, it will take cognizance of possible opportunities and threats. Opportunities are the operational potentials that EK will exploit in order to achieve its stated objectives. Threats are the external operational challenges that are likely to hinder EK from realizing its mandate. An analysis of the opportunities and threats are outlined below 2.3.3.3

EK OPPORTUNITIES

1. Partnership with international peer organizations 2. Align to the global sustainable development goals 3. Vision 2030 flagship programs 4. County responsible travel forums 5. Need for an ecotourism policy and a legal framework 6. P ublicize the partners already engaged with EK to boost potential partners/funders’ confidence

7. National tourism policy anchored on sustainability

7. P ublicize EK strengths and achievements to show value to members

8. Established Eco-warrior awards

8. Expand membership region wide

9. Established green directory

9. I ncrease visibility to all potential accommodation facilities through an introduction of an entry level for eco-rating membership

10. First ecotourism society in Africa and first to develop an eco-rating scheme in the region 2.3.3.2

EK WEAKNESSES

Strategic Plan 2016-2020

SWOT ANALYSIS

PHOTO : SANCTURY OLANANA

2.3.3

10. EK to take the lead and convene other industry players in policy and advocacy on emerging issues e.g. climate change, marine conservation, agri-business, eco-entrepreneurship, etc.

1. Limited resource mobilization capacity 2. Slow uptake of EK programs by stakeholders

2.3.3.4 THREATS TO EK OPERATION

3. A vailable certifications and industry wide programs do not address a broad spectrum of stakeholders in the industry

1. Travel advisories and terrorism

4. Lack of sustainable funding

2. Competition and role duplication by peer organizations

5. Limited international recognition

3. E ffects of Climate change on tourism’s base resources and by extension on members

6. Limited documentation on EK success stories 7. Limited EK visibility (regional scope)

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

15


PHOTO : SOLAR PANELS_KAREN BLIXEN CAMP

2.3.4.2 STRATEGIC GROWTH ACTION POINTS EK HAS ENORMOUS OPPORTUNITIES FOR GROWTH. THIS CUTS ACROSS REGIONAL, NATIONAL, AND INTERNATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS. THE ACTION POINTS HEREUNDER ARE APPROACHES THAT EK WILL EMPLOY TO EMBRACE OPPORTUNITIES WHILE WORKING WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF ITS STRENGTHS:

2.3.4

KEY ISSUES FROM THE CONTEXTUAL ANALYSIS

Strategic Plan 2016-2020

KEY CHALLENGES CURRENTLY FACING EK INCLUDE; 1. A bsence of a conclusive Organizational Strategic Plan; the previous strategic plan 2006-2011 has expired

2. L everage the National tourism policy that is anchored on sustainability to advocate for an ecotourism policy and a legal framework (RAP)

2. I nadequate Organizational Capacity; this includes the personnel capacity and skills.

3. G row membership by conducting County-level responsible travel forums (MCP)

3. L ack of an enabling legal framework; there exists no National Eco-tourism strategy.

4. P ublicize the partners already engaged with EK to boost potential partners/funders’ confidence through the already established green directory (MCP)

4. Inadequate funds to carry out EK’s full mandate. 5. EK needs to focus on climate change effects on ecotourism

2.3.4.1 BROAD STRATEGIC FOCUS AREAS 1. Up scaling the standardization of tourism operators. The KEPSA/World Bank economic survey (2013) recommended that the Ministry of Tourism enhances sustainability standards of accommodation, “The EAC accommodation standards could ideally be integrated with standards for sustainability, a priority area for the new national tourism strategy. However, rather than to start from scratch, it might be better to leverage the existing Eco-Rating Certification Scheme administered by Ecotourism Kenya which was launched in 2002 and has already certified 86 establishments”. 2. Increase joint ventures with international tourism & environmental promotion agents for development of standards by aligning to the global sustainable development goals 3. E nhance active participation in the implementation of Vision 2030 flagship programs by developing strategic partnerships with local agents that empower youth, women and PLWDS 4. Promote responsible tourism at the County level

16

1. M aximize on being the first ecotourism society to develop global peer partnerships and alignment to the Global Sustainable Development Goals (RAP)

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

5. U tilize the goodwill from the industry players and stakeholders to convene other industry players in policy and advocacy on emerging issues e.g. climate change, marine conservation, agri-business, eco-entrepreneurship, etc. (RAP) 6. C apitalize on skills and experience available within the membership to provide input to EK programs. (MCP) 7. L everage partnerships with international peer organizations to create sustainable funding for EK projects (RAP) 8. A lign to the global Sustainable Development Goals to promote international recognition (RAP) 9. E xpand membership region-wide through documentation and sharing on EK success stories so as to increase EK regional visibility (MCP) IN THE FACE OF THREATS TO EK EXISTENCE, THE ORGANIZATIONS SHALL UNDERTAKE THE FOLLOWING APPROACHES AS A MITIGATION STRATEGY: 10. Optimize goodwill from the industry players and stakeholders to mitigate against the effects of travel advisories (RAP) 11. Identify and promote certification and industry wide programs that address a broad spectrum of stakeholders in the industry so as to overcome competition and role duplication by peer organizations (SBP)


Increasing joint ventures with International tourism & environmental promotion agents

PHOTO : KICHECHE WALKING


3

CHAPTER THREE

3.0 Strategic Direction of EK

THE CHAPTER DESCRIBES THE STRATEGIC STATEMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH EK. THIS IS WHERE EK ANCHORS ITS POLICIES AND IT FORMS THE REFERENCE POINT FOR THE STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2020.

Strategic Plan 2016-2020

3.1 VISION

To be a leader in the knowledge and practice of responsible tourism 3.2 MISSION

To link tourism, conservation and communities for sustainable tourism development through awareness creation, networking and promotion of best practices in responsible tourism operations.

3.4 CORE VALUES EK PROMOTES SUSTAINABLE UTILIZATION OF RESOURCES BY TOURISM PRACTITIONERS BY PLACING EMPHASIS ON: 1. Respect for the environment and natural habitats 2. Respect for local people and cultures 3. Equitable sharing of responsibilities and benefits 4. Sustainable tourism development

3.5 EK SLOGAN

Linking Communities, Tourism and Conservation

3.3 OVERALL GOAL EK’S STRATEGIC GOAL IS TO PROMOTE RESPONSIBLE TOURISM PRACTICES THAT WILL CONSERVE KENYA’S NATURAL ENVIRONMENT AND IMPROVE LIVELIHOODS OF ASSOCIATED COMMUNITIES. THIS IS ENHANCED THROUGH THE FOLLOWING STRATEGIC GOALS: S.G 1:

Enhance Industry Standards and Best Practices

S.G 2:

Increase Awareness and Share Information on Quality Tourism Sites, Products and Services

S.G 3:

Nurture Appropriate Leadership Skills, Knowledge and Attitude in Responsible Tourism

S.G 4:

Strengthen Ecotourism Organizations’ Conservation Capacity and Sustainability

S.G 5:

Improve Community Tourism Enterprises PHOTO : TURTLE BAY BEACH HOTEL

18

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016


Celebration

of our

20th

anniversary


The Ecotourism Kenya 2016-2020 strategic plan focus Achieving measurable results while linking tourism, conservation and communities for sustainable tourism development through awareness creation, networking and promotion of best practices in responsible tourism operations

1 Increasing competence in the organization by identifying efficient and effective means of working through provision of information as well as regular updates of the organization data.

2 To effectively link communities, tourism and conservation for sustainable tourism development in Kenya.

3 To be the vehicle to build the capacity of community initiatives around cultural heritage and scenic attraction sites

PHOTO : TORTILIS CAMP - NIELS VAN GIJN


4

CHAPTER FOUR

4.0 EK Strategic Program Areas and Implementation Plan

4.1 STRATEGIC PRIORITY AREAS

Strategic Plan 2016-2020

The Ecotourism Kenya 2016-2020 strategic plan has a focus on achieving measurable results while linking tourism, conservation and communities for sustainable tourism development through awareness creation, networking and promotion of best practices in responsible tourism operations. EK aims to achieve this through standards and best practices enhancement, Information Sharing, Leadership Development, Research and Advocacy as well as Tourism Enterprise Development. EK will build on its past experiences as it carries out its mandate in the next five years. The five thematic areas bring out a description of the strategic objectives, strategies and respective key results in each of the priority areas. A detailed implementation plan is provided in the annexes.

4.2

STANDARDS AND BEST PRACTICES PROGRAM

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: ENHANCE INDUSTRY STANDARDS AND BEST PRACTICES Certification has been defined as the “process of providing documented assurance that a product, service, or an organization complies with a given standard”. Certification of tourism products, services, organizations or facilities in the sector is intended to influence tourism actors to adopt practices that can help in the attainment of the social, economic and cultural objectives of tourism. The overall aim of EK in certification is to raise the standards on how tourism in general is practiced.

22

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

STRATEGIES TO BE PURSUED ARE: Standards development Standards adoption by industry stakeholders Brand development Brand Marketing & Recognition Eco-rating Eco-warrior awards Codes of conduct (Kenya safari code & Coast code) Facilities & tour operator certification Stakeholder capacity building Green Destination Standards and Certification Scheme

Key result: • Enhanced standards contributing to industry best practices • Green Hotels and Certication Scheme


4.3

MEMBERSHIP AND COMMUNICATION PROGRAM

Strategic Plan 2016-2020

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: INCREASE AWARENESS AND SHARE INFORMATION ON TOURISM SITES, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES EK aspires to be the hub of sustainable tourism information both down and upstream. This will create awareness of the tourism sites, products and services as well as informing the providers on the emerging issues in the tourism industry. Strategies to be pursued are: 1. Social Media

6. Eco Warrior Awards

2. Green directory promotions

7. County responsible travel forums

10. Online resource center

3. Newspaper stories

8. Annual Ecotourism Conference

4. EK and external newsletters

9. E cotourism curriculum development in partnership with education

11. Information sharing across ecorated properties

5. EK Documentary

institutions

KEY RESULT: CONTINUOUS AND TIMELY COMMUNICATION WITH INDUSTRY PLAYERS AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC

4.4 LEADERSHIP AND MENTORSHIP PROGRAM STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: NURTURE APPROPRIATE LEADERSHIP SKILLS, KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDE IN RESPONSIBLE TOURISM The LM Program (LMP) aims to equip fresh graduates with apprentice experience before they formally join the tourism industry. It also is geared towards creating an appreciation of ecotourism among students in various institutions of higher learning. Strategies to be pursued are: 1. E cotourism societies in five (5) institutions of higher learning 2. Eco Clubs in high schools around conservancies and parks 3. Consortiums with industry experts

4. V olunteer & placement programs in the Kenyan tourism industry targeting local & international volunteers. ( EK aspires to provide the LMP with gender balance as a key criteria for selection of candidates)

KEY RESULT: DEVELOPED LEADERSHIP SKILLS AND ATTITUDE TOWARDS ECOTOURISM

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

23


RESEARCH & ADVOCACY PROGRAM

PHOTO : MEDINA PALM

24

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

4.5 RESEARCH AND ADVOCACY PROGRAM

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: STRENGTHEN ECOTOURISM ORGANIZATIONS’ CONSERVATION CAPACITY AND SUSTAINABILITY Research and Advocacy is a key component in the growth and survival of any organization. The Research and Advocacy program at EK seeks to innovatively provide solutions to ensure the organization’s continuity and progress. The programs objective is to increase competence in the organization by identifying efficient and effective means of working through provision of information as well as regular updates of the organization data. The R&A program will ensure that EK maintains a leading position in the tourism industry. Strategies to be pursued are: 1. Establish new networks 2. Identify emerging issues pertinent to sustainable tourism 3. P rofile and develop partnerships with global peer organizations for sustainable funding for EK projects 4. Monitor and audit the National Tourism Policy 5. Optimize industry players and stakeholders goodwill 6. Align to the global sustainable development goals 7. Partner with EK members for capacity enhancement 8. E stablish an online information databank on sustainable tourism best practice specific to the region KEY RESULT: RESEARCH AND ADVOCACY CONTRIBUTING TO A SUSTAINABLE TOURISM ENVIRONMENT

4.6 COMMUNITY ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: SUPPORT COMMUNITY ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT Ecotourism is now defined as “responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment, sustains the well-being of the local people, and involves interpretation and education” (TIES, 2015). Ecotourism Kenya is thus guided by the vision of being a leader in the knowledge and practice of ecotourism as well as by the mission of effectively linking communities, tourism and conservation for sustainable tourism development in Kenya. The community enterprise development program is the vehicle to build the capacity of community initiatives around cultural heritage and scenic attraction sites. Strategies to be pursued are: 1. Development of standards and best practices for CBTE 2. Training and capacity building 3. Conducting partner needs assessments 4. Building understanding and trust among partners KEY RESULT: COMMUNITY TOURISM ORGANIZATIONS’ UNLEASHING THEIR ENTREPRENEURIAL POTENTIAL


PHOTO : MARA-PORINI-CAMP


5.0 EK Strategic Plan Management THE STRATEGIC PLAN SHALL BE MANAGED AND IMPLEMENTED BY THE EK SECRETARIAT. EACH PROGRAM WILL FOCUS ON THE RESPECTIVE STRATEGIC AREAS AND STRIVE TO DELIVER ON EFFICIENCY AND EFFECTIVENESS. THE PROGRAM STAFF WILL BE TASKED WITH THE RESPONSIBILITY OF AVAILING PROGRAM TOOLS AND REPORTS ON TIME FOR TIMELY ORGANIZATION DECISION MAKING.

Strategic Plan 2016-2020

5

CHAPTER FIVE

5.1 CORPORATE GOVERNANCE EK has a structure that allows members to elect or nominate capable people to the management board during the annual general meeting. The board comprises of 7 elected and up to 3 co-opted members drawn from among the industry players and who are EK registered members.

5.2 THE ROLE OF THE BOARD AND BOARD COMMITTEES THE BOARD OF ECOTOURISM KENYA IS MANDATED TO DO THE FOLLOWING: 1. Provide oversight to the general running of EK 2. E nsure that all programs are well supported through board committees 3. Approve procurement of equipment and general merchandise 4. Oversee appropriation of financial resources

5.3 PROGRAMS COORDINATION The programs that form the basis of work at EK will be coordinated at the secretariat headed by the CEO. Each program shall have a program officer in charge of day to day running and reporting.

26

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016


5.4

EK ORGANOGRAM HEREUNDER IS THE ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE OF EK FOR THE PLAN DURATION: EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE (BOARD) CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER TECHNICAL COMMITTEES CONSERVATION 3. PR & MARKETING

1. FUNDRAISING 2. ECO-RATING &

FINANCE & ADMIN MANAGER

PROGRAMS MANAGER

PROGRAM OFFICER (SBP)

PROGRAM OFFICER (MCP)

PROGRAM OFFICER (RAP]

ASSISTANT PO

INTERNS

INTERNS / CONSULTANTS

PROGRAM OFFICER (LMP] INTERNS

PROGRAM OFFICER (CEDP] INTERNS

THE ORGANOGRAM ENVISIONS AN ORGANIZATION WITH TEN MEMBERS OF STAFF. HOWEVER, EK WILL ENGAGE INTERNS AND VOLUNTEERS FROM TIME TO TIME TO OFFER SUPPORT SERVICES TO PROGRAM WORK.

5.5

PROGRAMS MONITORING AND EVALUATION

The success of this Strategic Plan depends significantly on how the planned activities and output are effectively monitored and evaluated. The various committees of the EK board shall oversee the implementation of the Strategic Plan within the plan period and subsequently advise the board and secretariat on implementation. Monitoring will be guided by observable and verifiable indicators (OVIs). The tools that will be essential for monitoring and evaluation shall include monthly, quarterly and annual reports, activity reports, survey reports as well as questionnaires and key informant interviews, focus group discussions and transaction records among other relevant tools.

PHOTO : ECOTOURISM KENYA

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

27

Strategic Plan 2016-2020

ADMIN ASSISTANT

4. COMMUNITY OUTREACH 5. ADVOCACY


6

CHAPTER SIX

6.0 Resource Requirements and Mobilization

THIS CHAPTER HIGHLIGHTS THE FINANCIAL OUTLAY REQUIRED FOR SUCCESSFUL IMPLEMENTATION OF THE STRATEGIC PLAN. IT ALSO LOOKS AT POSSIBLE APPROACHES TO RAISING FUNDS BOTH LOCALLY AND INTERNATIONALLY FOR THIS STRATEGIC DISPENSATION.

6.1 FUNDING REQUIREMENTS YEARS 2016 – 2020

Strategic Plan 2016-2020

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

2016 ‘000’

2017 ‘000’

2018 ‘000’

2019 ‘000’

2020 ‘000’

TOTAL AMOUNT (KSH.’000’)

STANDARDS & BEST PRACTICES

4,795.92

5,002.22

5,351.96

5,514.55

5,895.28

26,559.92

MEMBERSHIP & COMMUNICATION

1,202.96

1,563.11

1,631.26

1,802.83

1,877.97

8,078.13

84

172.4

187.64

204.30

222.53

870.87

1,212.96

2,023.61

2,124.79

2,197.24

2,307.10

9,865.70

0

306

321.30

337.37

354.23

1,318.90

5,010.67

5,461.88

5,676.66

5,937.67

6,213.17

28,300.06

12,306.51

14,529.21

15,293.61

15,993.95

16,870.28

LEADERSHIP & MENTORSHIP RESEARCH & ADVOCACY COMMUNITY ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION TOTAL

6.2 FUNDING SOURCES Successful implementation of this strategic plan will depend not only on the quality and commitment of EK staff but also on the availability and efficient utilization of the resources. The following will be the main funding sources: 6.2.1

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS

EK currently collects membership fees from new members and annual subscriptions from the existing ones. The secretariat and related sub-committee will be urged to increase membership by a reasonable percentage every year to meet the annual budget requirements. 6.2.2

CERTIFICATION DUES

EK evaluates accommodation facilities for responsible tourism operation practices at a cost. The charges enable EK to facilitate the logistics required for this exercise. The secretariat and related sub-committee will be urged to increase target accommodation facilities and tour operators by an achievable annual percentage every year to meet the annual budget requirements. EK will also develop other relevant standards (Tour Operators,

28

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

Green Destinations, Green Hotels), that will bring additional funding through certification. 6.2.3

ECO-WARRIOR AWARDS

Ecotourism Kenya will continue promoting best practices by awarding the leaders in responsible tourism in various categories (as stipulated in the selection criteria) and organizing sensitization forums at regional and national levels. Participation in the awards ceremony will attract sponsorships from participants and corporate bodies. 6.2.4 GRANTS AND PARTNERSHIPS EK will bid for financial assistance from Government Ministries and their Agencies, and International Development Partners where deliberate efforts will be made to strengthen partnerships as well as lobby them to fund programs related to their development plans. EK will seek funding individually as well as in joint partnership with likeminded organizations.


PHOTO : MARA INTREPIDS CAMP

6.2.5 COST SAVING AND EFFICIENCY MEASURES EK plans to pursue cost saving measures during the planning period that include: improved coordination of joint and individual programs implementation, prudent procurement procedures and ensuring effective and efficient use of availed resources.

Strategic Plan 2016-2020

Continued prudent use of resources will be further guaranteed by continuous strengthening of the financial and other management capability of relevant secretariat staff.

PROMOTING BEST PRACTICES BY AWARDING THE LEADERS IN RESPONSIBLE TOURISM

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996–2016

29


PHOTO : ECOTOURISM KENYA

ANNEX 1:

PROGRAMS IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

THIS TOOL BRINGS INTO SYNERGY EK’S STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, THE KEY RESULT AREAS (KRA) IN EACH PROGRAM, OBJECTIVES RELATED TO THESE KRA’S AND THE RESPECTIVE STRATEGIES. 1.6.1

STANDARDS AND BEST PRACTICES PROGRAM (SBP)

GOAL: ENHANCE INDUSTRY STANDARDS AND BEST PRACTICES KRA 1: STANDARDS STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1: FACILITATE STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT & ADOPTION AS INDUSTRY BEST PRACTICES KEY STRATEGIES

SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES Generate experts input on standards

STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT

STANDARDS ADOPTION BY INDUSTRY STAKEHOLDERS

EXPECTED OUTPUT Brainstorming and pre development critique sessions

Bench mark with well performing Bench marking reviews global standards

KPIs Note from the brainstorming and predevelopment critique sessions Identification of global best practices

Develop ideal standards for the industry

Standards development and draft A draft ecotourism standards sharing sessions document

Sensitization forums

Industry participation in standards critique

No. of participating individuals and organizations

Endorsement by industry players and government agencies

A tourism practice standards document

Availability of a standards working document

KRA 3: TRAINING AND SENSITIZATION STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1: FACILITATE REGIONAL TRAININGS AND SENSITIZATION FORUMS KEY STRATEGIES STAKEHOLDER CAPACITY BUILDING

30

SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES

EXPECTED OUTPUT

KPIS

Gap analysis

Structured needs assessment

Identified industry gaps

Training and sensitization

Regional stakeholders participation

No. of stakeholders participating in the training and sensitization forums

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016


KRA 2: CERTIFICATION STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1: EVALUATE AND CERTIFY ACCOMMODATION PROVIDERS AND TOUR OPERATORS KEY STRATEGIES

BRAND DEVELOPMENT

SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES

KPIS

Ensure the development of a brand that will attain local and international recognition

Partnerships with government institution e.g. KTB, NEMA, KENAS etc. and International associations in the industry e.g. GSTC

• GSTC membership • Recognition by Government associations e.g. TRA, KTB, NEMA, etc. Inclusion in partners’ marketing tools e.g. KTB’s exhibitions and publications

Creating visibility for certification scheme

Participation in conferences

Calendar of relevant activities

Increase regional reach for certification scheme

Regional sensitization forums presentations at partner AGMs (e.g. KATO, KAHC)

Calendar of relevant activities

Better use of social media

Increased inquiries and participation of the scheme and improved results from social media analytics

Creation of a new entry level/ category hence increasing potential new facilities

• Increase in revenue • Increased number of facilities in new regions • Incorporation of other types of accommodation facilities e.g. bandas, home stays, etc.

Manpower recruitment and development

Trained eco-rating assessors

No. of professional assessors recruited and retained for the exercise

Tour operators’ certification

Significant uptake by tour operators

No. of tour operators certified

City hotels certification

Inclusion of urban hotels in the scheme

No. of urban hotels in the scheme

BRAND MARKETING & RECOGNITION

ECO-RATING

EXPECTED OUTPUT

Destinations criteria certifications Rating of destinations

No. of rated destinations

ECO-WARRIOR AWARDS

Recognize eco- tourism best practices

Successful & attractive ecowarrior award event

No. of stakeholders participating in the award scheme

CODES OF CONDUCT (KENYA SAFARI CODE & COAST CODE)

Development of the Kenya safari & Coast code of conduct

Approval of Kenya safari & Coast code of conduct

An inclusive Kenya safari & Coast code of conduct

FACILITIES & TOUR OPERATOR CERTIFICATION

Eco rating of tour operators and accommodation service providers

Tour operators and accommodation service providers eco rated

Increase in the number of tour operators and accommodation service providers eco rated

STAKEHOLDER CAPACITY BUILDING

Promote standards and best practices in the industry

Information shared through online hub and stakeholder forums

Number of industry practioners accessing information

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

31


1.6.2

MEMBERSHIP AND COMMUNICATION PROGRAM (MCP)

GOAL: INCREASE AWARENESS AND SHARE INFORMATION ON TOURISM ATTRACTIONS, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES KRA 1: COMMUNICATION STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1: ENSURE CONTINUOUS AND TIMELY COMMUNICATION WITH INDUSTRY PLAYERS AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC KEY STRATEGIES

SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES

EXPECTED OUTPUT

KPIS

SOCIAL MEDIA

Use of social media as a communication tool

Active social media platforms

No. of e-shots, face book updates and tweets, social media analytics

GREEN DIRECTORY PROMOTIONS

Enlist participation of EK members

Members using the green directory for visibility

No. of members in the green directory

NEWSPAPER STORIES

Develop eco-tourism stories for public consumption

EK Stories appearing in various

EK AND EXTERNAL NEWSLETTERS

Publish an EK newsletter and contribute articles in industry magazines

EK DOCUMENTARY

Develop and share a documentary of EK achievements An articulate documentary and benefits of sustainable tourism

print media Quarterly publications

No. of published stories No. of publications

Available and shared EK documentary

KRA 2: TRAINING & CAPACITY BUILDING STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1: ENSURE CONTINUOUS AND TIMELY COMMUNICATION WITH INDUSTRY PLAYERS AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC KEY STRATEGIES

SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES

EXPECTED OUTPUT

KPIS

ECO WARRIOR AWARDS

Conduct an annual eco-warrior award ceremony

Successful eco-warrior event

Participation in the warrior award ceremony

COUNTY RESPONSIBLE TRAVEL FORUMS

Organize County responsible travel forums

Participation in the county forums

No. and composition of participants in the forums

ANNUAL ECOTOURISM CONFERENCE

Facilitate an Annual Ecotourism conference

Well attended conference

No. and composition of participants in the conference

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2: ENHANCE VISIBILITY IN INSTITUTIONS OFFERING TOURISM COURSES ECOTOURISM CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT IN PARTNERSHIP WITH EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

32

Establish a centre for sustainable CSED partnership with a local eco-tourism development (CSED) university

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

Signed and progressive partnership agreements


PHOTO : ECOTOURISM KENYA

1.6.3

LEADERSHIP AND MENTORSHIP PROGRAM (LMP)

GOAL: NURTURE APPROPRIATE LEADERSHIP SKILLS, KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDE IN RESPONSIBLE TOURISM KRA 1: LEADERSHIP STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1: DEVELOP LEADERSHIP SKILLS AND ATTITUDE ON ECOTOURISM KEY STRATEGIES

SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES

EXPECTED OUTPUT

KPIS

ECOTOURISM SOCIETIES IN INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING

Develop partnerships with institutions of higher learning

Registered and running societies

No. of colleges and universities with active ecotourism societies

ECO CLUBS IN HIGH SCHOOLS

Promote eco-clubs in high schools

Registered and running ecoclubs

No. of high schools with active eco-clubs

CONSORTIUMS WITH INDUSTRY EXPERTS

Hold eco talks in the universities facilitated by industry experts

Successful regional eco talks

No. of eco talks held

KRA 2: MENTORSHIP STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1: ENHANCE APPRENTICESHIP SKILLS TO INDUSTRY NEW ENTRANTS KEY STRATEGIES VOLUNTEER & PLACEMENT PROGRAMS IN THE TOURISM INDUSTRY

SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES

EXPECTED OUTPUT

Mentor and place fresh university High turnover of well-trained graduates for apprenticeship participants

KPIS No. of volunteers / participants in the program

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

33


1.6.4

RESEARCH AND ADVOCACY PROGRAM (RAP)

GOAL: STRENGTHEN ECOTOURISM ORGANIZATIONS CONSERVATION CAPACITY AND SUSTAINABILITY KRA 1: RESEARCH STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1: IDENTIFY NEW RESEARCH AREAS TO CONTRIBUTE TO A SUSTAINABLE TOURISM ENVIRONMENT KEY STRATEGIES

SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES

EXPECTED OUTPUT

ESTABLISH NEW NETWORKS

Seek for research partnerships with institutions of higher learning, mapping out all ecotourism sites such as facilities, destinations, etc.

• Signed agreements with colleges and universities • Joint research programs

• Number of MoUs signed and active between EK and Institutions of higher learning

IDENTIFY EMERGING ISSUES RELATING TO NATIONAL RESPONSIBLE TOURISM POLICY

Benchmarking what others are doing globally on ecotourism trends

Long-term national policy on responsible tourism

EK participation in influencing National policy on responsible tourism

GLOBAL PEER ORGANIZATION PROFILING AND PARTNERSHIP DEVELOPMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE FUNDING OF EK PROJECTS

Identify peer organizations globally and establish partnerships

Project support from global development partners

No. of partnerships developed

PROVIDE CURRENT INFORMATION ON ECOTOURISM

Document major concerns and emerging trends in ecotourism

Emerging issues documented and shared

Number of Eco bites shared through social media platforms Set-up of online information database

TRAVEL ADVISORY MITIGATION STRATEGIES DEVELOPMENT

Conduct a forum of industry players and stakeholders to contribute to brainstorm on possible mitigation strategies

A forum held on travel advisory mitigation

A mitigation strategy document

ALIGN EK FOCUS TO THE GLOBAL SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS

Engagement in policy and advocacy issues on responsible tourism

Active advocacy on sustainable development goals

EK’s contribution to policy and advocacy on responsible tourism

POLICY AND ADVOCACY CONVENTION ON EMERGING ISSUES

Engagements with county governments e.g. contributing input to tourism bills on responsible tourism

County tourism bills having clauses on responsible tourism.

No. of convention participants

34

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

KPIS


OUR VISION

To be a leader in the knowledge and practice of responsible tourism

PHOTO : KAREN BLIXEN CAMP


KRA 2: CAPACITY ENHANCEMENT & PARTNERSHIPS STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1: CARRY OUT CAPACITY ENHANCEMENT OF MEMBER ORGANIZATIONS KEY STRATEGIES PARTNERSHIP WITH EK MEMBERS FOR CAPACITY ENHANCEMENT

1.6.5

SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES Organize knowledge sharing forums

EXPECTED OUTPUT Frequent knowledge sharing forums

KPIS No. of forums held

COMMUNITY ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (CEDP)

GOAL: IMPROVE COMMUNITY TOURISM ENTERPRISES KRA 1: TRAINING COORDINATION STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1: CARRY OUT CAPACITY ENHANCEMENT OF MEMBER ORGANIZATIONS KEY STRATEGIES

TRAINING AND CAPACITY BUILDING

SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES

EXPECTED OUTPUT

KPIS

Conduct survey to assess capacity gaps on ecoentrepreneurship

Organization capacity assessment report

No. of organisations for which capacity assessment reports completed

Developing customized training curriculum

Successful curriculum development sessions

CBTE curriculum document

Partner with like-minded organizations to conduct joint training ventures to build eco capacity of enterprises

Signed partnership agreements & training plans with peer organizations

Joint training ventures held

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2: BUILD COLLABORATIONS AND NETWORKING PLATFORMS KEY STRATEGIES

SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES Conduct partnership needs assessment

Partnership needs assessment report

DEVELOP REGULAR DIALOGUE AND KNOWLEDGE SHARING WITH PARTNERS

Establish a forum for organizations with a CBTE component

A vehicle for dialogue and

Buy in discussions with partnering organizations

36

EXPECTED OUTPUT

ASSESS PARTNERSHIP NEEDS

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

knowledge sharing

Action oriented partner meetings

KPIS Clear results and recommendations of partnership needs assessment produced

CBTE partners forum established

No. of plenary discussions held


ANNEX

2:

STRATEGIC PLAN DEVELOPMENT TEAM PHOTO : ECOTOURISM KENYA

THE FOLLOWING PERSONS PARTICIPATED IN THE STRATEGIC PLAN DEVELOPMENT. THE WORK WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN COMPLETE WITHOUT THEIR VALUABLE INPUTS AND COMMITMENT:

ECO TOURISM KENYA SECRETARIAT STAFF

BOARD MEMBERS

ANNEX 1.1: BOARD MEMBERS AND EK SECRETARIAT STAFF NAME

DESIGNATION

Dr. Mohanjeet Brar

Chairman (2014 – 2017)

Elizabeth Kimotho-Waweru

Secretary (2011 – 2016)

Jacinta Nzioka

Treasurer (2015/2016)

Chania Frost

Executive Committee Member

Edith Bosire

Executive Committee Member

Elizabeth Gitari

Executive Committee Member

Ali Allport

Executive Committee Member

Herbert Mwachiro

Executive Committee Member

ANNEX 1.2: EK SECRETARIAT STAFF NAME

DESIGNATION

Grace Nderitu

Chief Executive Officer

Lynnet Kamonde

Accountant & Administration Officer

Terryanne Mutindi

Membership & Communications Officer

Joyce Kiruri

Eco-rating Program Officer

Andrew Karanja

Eco-rating Program Officer

David Okul Danda

Projects Coordinator

Michael Mbithi Luwali

Administrative Assistant

ECOTOURISM KENYA 1996 – 2016

37


ECOTOURISM KENYA

CERTIFICATION

LIST OF ECO-RATED FACILITIES AS AT APRIL 2016

Strategic Plan 2016-2020

LEVEL OF CERTIFICATION : GOLD

LEVEL OF CERTIFICATION : SILVER

HOTEL NAME

COUNTRY

LOCATION

HOTEL NAME

COUNTRY

LOCATION

Amboseli Porini Camp

Kenya

Amboseli

Banana House

Kenya

Lamu

Basecamp Masai Mara

Kenya

Masai Mara

Baobab Beach Resort and Spa

Kenya

Mombasa

Campi ya Kanzi

Kenya

Chyulu Hills

Bateleur Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Cottar’s 1920’s camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Ekorian’s Mugie Camp

Kenya

Laikipia

Elephant Pepper Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Eagle View, Mara Naboisho

Kenya

Masai Mara

Elsa’s Kopje

Kenya

Meru

Encounter Mara Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Joy's Camp

Kenya

Samburu

Exploreans Mara Rianta

Kenya

Masai Mara

Kicheche Laikipia Camp

Kenya

Laikipia

Governor's Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Kicheche Mara Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Great Rift Valley Lodge

Kenya

Naivasha

Kitich Camp

Kenya

Samburu

Il Moran Governors Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Lake Elementeita Serena Camp

Kenya

Naivasha

Kicheche Bush Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Lewa Safari Camp

Kenya

Laikipia

Kicheche Valley Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Medina Palms

Kenya

Watamu

Kichwa Tembo Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Olarro Lodge

Kenya

Masai Mara

Kilaguni Serena Safari Lodge

Kenya

Tsavo East

Porini Lion Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Kilima Camp

Kenya

Amboseli

Porini Mara Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Kipungani Explorer Camp

Kenya

Lamu

Sanctuary Olonana

Kenya

Masai Mara

Little Governors Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Sasaab Samburu

Kenya

Samburu

Masai Mara

Kenya

Laikipia

Mara Bush Camp & Little Mara Bush Camp

Kenya

Sirikoi Lodge Sweetwaters Serena Tented Camp

Kenya

Laikipia

Mara Bush Houses

Kenya

Masai Mara

Tawi Lodge

Kenya

Amboseli

Mara Engai Wilderness Lodge

Kenya

Masai Mara

Kenya

Masai Mara

Tortilis Camp

Kenya

Amboseli

Mara Explorer Camp

Turtle Bay Beach Club

Kenya

Watamu

Mara Intrepids Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Masai Mara

Mara Serena Safari Lodge

Kenya

Masai Mara

Mara Siria Luxury Tented Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Mara Toto Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Kenya

Masai Mara

Mara Plains Camp

Kenya

LEVEL OF CERTIFICATION : BRONZE Afro Chic Diani Beach

Kenya

Mombasa

Naboisho Camp

Amboseli Sopa Lodge

Kenya

Amboseli

Olare Mara Kempinski

Kenya

Masai Mara

Ashnil Aruba

Kenya

Tsavo West

Kenya

Masai Mara

Distant Relatives Ecolodge & Backpackers

Kenya

Mombasa

Ol Seki Hemingways Mara Camp Porini Rhino Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Kiboko Luxury Camp

Kenya

Naivasha

Rekero Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Lake Naivasha Country Club

Kenya

Naivasha

Sala's Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Lake Naivasha Sopa Resort

Kenya

Naivasha

Samburu Intrepids Camp

Kenya

Samburu

Larsen’s Camp

Kenya

Samburu

Sanctuary Ol Lentille

Kenya

Laikipia

Loisaba Cottages

Kenya

Nanyuki

Sarova Mara Game Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Malewa Lodge and Kigio Camp

Kenya

Naivasha

Sarova Shaba Game Lodge

Kenya

Samburu

Mara Sopa Lodge

Kenya

Masai Mara

Saruni Samburu Camp

Kenya

Samburu

Naibor Camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Saruni Mara camp

Kenya

Masai Mara

Ol Tukai Lodge

Kenya

Amboseli

Satao Elerai Camp

Kenya

Amboseli

Samburu Game Lodge

Kenya

Samburu

Serena Mountain Lodge

Kenya

Mt. Kenya

Samburu Sopa Lodge

Kenya

Samburu

Severin Safari Camp

Kenya

Mombasa

Sand River Camp Masai Mara

Kenya

Masai Mara

Severin Sea Lodge

Kenya

Mombasa

Satao Camp

Kenya

Tsavo West

Subira House

Kenya

Lamu

Voyager Beach Resort

Kenya

Mombasa

Solio Lodge

Kenya

Laikipia

Voyager Ziwani Camp

Kenya

Mombasa


ECO-RATING CERTIFICATION BEST PRACTICES

Solar lighting lamps at Porini Mara Camp

Solar water heating system at Tawi Lodge

Waste Separation chamber at Tawi Lodge

Waste Separation bins at Porini Rhino Camp

Water holding dispensers for serving guests - Kicheche Laikipia Camp

Low shower filter heads to reduce on water flow


Strategic plan 2016 2020  

EcoTourism Kenya Strategic Plan 2016-2017

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