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Guides SHARE ‘SNAPSHOTS’ FROM THEIR MEMORY BANKS THE BRAINERD-LAKES AREA IS BLESSED W I T H M A N Y L A K E S A N D R I V E R S and has

perhaps one of the most diverse and excellent fisheries anywhere. Anglers have too many options and one person could never fish all of the ponds, small and large lake systems, or the hundreds of miles of streams and rivers. Some fish weekends; others only fish the water they live on; and some are fortunate to get paid to be on the water every day. We call the guys “guides” who are out daily, showcasing the lakes and teaching people to fish. Over decades of time on the water, they have witnessed or been involved in “stuff.” Their interesting stories recount a tiny glimpse of careers in the sun and wind. Some of those adventures follow. Gary Roach, Merrifield: Gary guided Nick Adams and Sue Brown in the Camp Confidence Fishing Classic a few years ago. Gary and Nick had fished together and known each other for more than 30 years.They had a routine down where Nick would say,“Gary, I have to relieve myself.” Gary, driving a big Lund, had a wash-down system (hose with a heavyGary Roach — the early duty spray nozzle) built into years. The D-Bar-D photo the boat. Nick asked Sue to features the familiar faces turn around. She did, and a of Ron Lindner (left), Al few seconds later Gary hit Lindner (second from right) the water with a jet of spray joining Roach (right). The while Nick began his busiLund tri-hull was Roach’s first ness. Sue, not knowing the guide rig. routine or that Gary even had the hose in hand, thought one thing about a 77-year old man, and exclaimed,“Oh, my God!” Upon realizing what happened, laughter filled their section of Gull Lake. Tony Roach: Yes, related to Gary, with a busy summer and winter guide service for individuals and groups – roachs-

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guideservice.com, 763-226-6656. It happened one hot, flat calm day on Mille Lacs. He might blame his wife for the new plastic sandals she gave him, the kind with no traction, but Tony is kind and blamed the sandals and the fact he had removed the carpet.The vinyl floor reduced any traction the sandals had. Back-trolling his tiller Lund, with two clients in front of him, a client hooked a nice walleye and both men were occupied with the “fight.”At the same time,Tony reached over to wash night crawler goop off his hands and, off-balance, slipped and quickly exited the boat. Luckily, he grabbed a handle and was hanging on with the boat still in gear.They heard his yelling and were surprised not to see him in his familiar perch. After shifting into neutral and hoisting him aboard (after netting the fish), all had a good laugh. Now, eight years later, he still guides the duo but they bring him reminders, like orange life jackets and water-tight cases for his cell phone.“That was the only time anybody ever fell out of my boat, and it was me!”Tony said. George Cooper, Jr.: Decades of guiding taught Coop to expect anything, but not this. He was fishing about 25 years ago with Bob, a regular client who weighed 525 pounds. Bob set his new rod and reel on the edge of Coop’s boat and,“Poof, over it went,” he said. Quick as could be, Big Bob stripped and jumped in, trying to recover it. He didn’t find it and Coop couldn’t budge him into George Cooper Jr. holding a the boat.They tried a monster, 24.5-pound northern nearby bog, but with Bob’s pike he caught in 1986. weight, down went the bog, covering him in weeds and algae. Coop had Bob tie on a life jacket and rigged his anchor rope around him. He towed him two miles back to the ramp.“What a sight that was,” Coop recalled.

Fishing Guides Share ‘Snapshots’ from their Memory Banks

Outdoor Traditions - Spring 2013  

Outdoor news from the Brainerd Lakes Area: Early Season Largemouth Bass •Fishing Guides Share ‘Snapshots’ from their Memory Banks •No More ‘...

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