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photo credit: Dave Pirazzi

FRIENDS OF COLORADO LAGOON LANDSCAPE VISION


What is your passion? At Friends of Colorado Lagoon (FOCL), we are passionate about restoring and protecting a unique urban wetland, one of the few remaining pieces of a vast system of estuaries that stretched along much of Southern California’s coast. Historically, this natural system provided many important benefits, including cleaning and transporting rainwater on its journey to the ocean, providing habitat for thousands of birds, fish and other animals, and, as people started inhabiting the coast, providing healthy, diverse recreational opportunities. Much has changed in the last 100 years. The San Gabriel River has been channelized, and most of the historic Los Cerritos Wetlands, originally a 2000+ acre tidal estuary, have been filled, paved and urbanized. The few fragments of Los Cerritos Wetlands that remain are typically small, isolated and degraded. This was certainly the case for Colorado Lagoon when FOCL formed in 1998. Since then, tremendous progress has been made on improving the lagoon. Urban runoff is now filtered and diverted before it enters the lagoon. Decades of contaminated sediment have been removed and banks have been re-sloped to increase the beneficial intertidal zone. Even the restrictive culvert that connects the lagoon to Alamitos Bay and the ocean has been cleaned for the first time ever, giving a partial lift in the tidal circulation that is critical to the lagoon’s health. While all this has been going on, thousands of volunteers have contributed to, and become stakeholders in, the lagoon’s restoration through removal of invasive plant species, native plantings, trail creation, and much, much more. These accomplishments are starting to make a real and significant difference both ecologically and socially. Heal the Bay is reporting a marked improvement in bacterial levels in Colorado Lagoon and has removed the lagoon from their list of the worst beaches in California. The lagoon looks visibly cleaner. Even public perception is starting to shift as people return to the lagoon to relax, swim or connect with nature. We have come a long way but we are not finished yet. The journey has taught us that passion, while important, is not enough. Having a shared vision is just as important, especially for projects of this scope and duration. A shared vision is like a roadmap guiding our actions, informing stakeholders, answering questions, and preventing misunderstandings. I am pleased to present FOCL’s Landscape Vision for your consideration. Creation of the document has already initiated a great deal of thoughtful discussion and introspection, we expect this to continue. This Landscape Vision includes renderings that convey, as only pictures can, what a restored lagoon will look like. As informative as these are, I encourage you to take the time to read the other sections for a complete understanding of where the lagoon has been and where it is going. Sections on history, educational programming, circulation, interpretive elements and habitat reveal that Colorado Lagoon is not just a park for swimming and picnicking. It is a living ecosystem, a home for flora and fauna, and a place of learning and connecting with friends, family, and nature. This is an exciting time for Colorado Lagoon and we hope you will join us in shaping the future of this precious resource. Your comments are always appreciated. With warm regards,

Dave Pirazzi President, Friends of Colorado Lagoon friends@coloradolagoon.org August, 2013


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

FRIENDS OF COLORADO LAGOON Board Members Dave Pirazzi, President Dr. Christine Whithcraft, Vice President Adrienne Mohan, Secretary Norman Zoref, Treasurer Helene Ansel Sue Considine Cindy Desatoff Andrew Kincaid Laurie Pekich-Smith Tina Pirazzi Becky Thorn Ray Thorn

PREPARED BY

ZoLA

ZELL OFFICE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

Special Thanks to the many volunteers and individuals who, over the past decade, have generously donated their time, energy, and resources to the work of restoration and education at the lagoon. FOCL would also like the thank the organizations and agencies that have provided ongoing support for our efforts including: California Coastal Commission, California Department of Fish and Wildlife Office of Spill Prevention and Response, California Native Plant Society, California State Water Resources Control Board, City of Long Beach, Los Angeles County, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Port of Long Beach, REI, Rivers and Mountains Conservancy, Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Southern California Wetlands Recovery Project, State of California Coastal Conservancy, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.


A. INTRODUCTION FOCL Mission Statement and Goals Description and Process History

1 2 3

B. FUTURE VISION Future of Colorado Lagoon Vision of Lagoon Reconnected Community “Nest” Western Arm Bridge Extension Northern Arm Seventh Tee Park and Appian Way

5 7 9 10 11 12 13 14

C. EDUCATION Overview Programs

15 16

D. INVENTORY Site Context Vicinity Map Inventory Map Spatial Qualities

17 18 19 20

E. ANALYSIS Restoration Habitat and Map Circulation and Map Interpretive Elements and Map

21 23 25

F. DESIGN GUIDELINES Trail Cross Sections Site Furnishings Guidelines

27 31

HOW YOU CAN HELP

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TA B L E O F CO N T E N TS

COLORADO LAGOON LANDSCAPE VISION


M I S S I O N S TAT E M E N T A N D G O A L S

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riends of Colorado Lagoon is a coalition of concerned community members working to collaboratively restore and conserve Colorado Lagoon. We work with the City of Long Beach and governing bodies to ensure safe clean water for recreation and wildlife, while engaging and educating the community to create and conserve healthy marine habitats.

I.

Continue our education efforts to create greater awareness and appreciation of Colorado Lagoon as a microcosm of our vital interconnection and dependence on healthy wetlands and oceans.

II.

Help secure funding for design and construction of an open waterway and full tidal exchange between Colorado Lagoon and the Pacific Ocean (through Alamitos Bay).

III.

Engage the community to re-vegetate Colorado Lagoon with native plants.

IV.

Create non-obtrusive educational signage, trails, and inviting places for people to enjoy nature.

V.

Support the City of Long Beach in its exploration of re-sculpting parts of the lagoon for eel grass mitigation, which, along with clean water, creates the foundation for healthy marine habitats.

CO L L A B O R AT E TO R E S TO R E E D U C AT E TO CO N S E R V E 1

photo credit: Mike Dees

Current Goals for Friends of Colorado Lagoon


DESCRIPTION AND PROCESS

A

VISION PROJECT DESCRIPTION FOCL conceived of the Landscape Vision document as a tool to provide strategic and visionary planning for the development of programs and facilities within the Colorado Lagoon. The overarching goal of the Landscape Vision will be to knit together the mission and goals of FOCL with programmatic and physical planning. Restoration of the lagoon is based on community participation to build ownership for the health of our coastal wetlands. Many of the education programs at the lagoon are service-based learning activities. Embedded in the programs and physical development of the lagoon is the message that we are stewards of the land. Protection of public health and enjoyment, along with appreciation and conservation of environmental resources are the primary goals of all lagoon projects. Restoration efforts already completed include diverting contaminated storm drain flows to the sewage system, trash separation devices, culvert cleaning, and the dredging and removal of 80,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment. In addition, native re-vegetation of portions of the intertidal and upland areas of the lagoon have been completed.

VISION PROCESS

To achieve this, the Landscape Vision identifies opportunities and strategies for recreation, restoration, and education in an effort to create a flexible framework for growth. Recommendations include: additional trails, event spaces, interpretive displays, restoration staging areas, and increased opportunities for community nature-based education. Embedded in the Landscape Vision are strategies to enhance and create spatial and visual drama throughout the lagoon area by enhancing engagement at entry points and throughout the trail system; creating places that are varied and exhibits that are experiential. This document reflects the collaborative decision-making process that has defined the future direction for the lagoon.

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INTRODUCTION

Much of the ground work for the Landscape Vision has been based on efforts completed by FOCL and their partners. The City of Long Beach, along with the State Coastal Conservancy, commissioned the 2005 Colorado Lagoon Restoration and Feasibility Study. In 2008, the City of Long Beach, the County of Los Angeles, and the State of California commissioned the Draft Environmental Impact Report. This document was followed by the 2010 EIR Addendum, focusing on the best way to restore full tidal circulation. The base data collection phase of the project began with a thorough review of these documents along with City and County documents such as the City of Long Beach Open Space and Recreational Element of the General Plan, and the Long Beach Bicycle Master Plan. This Landscape Vision is intended to serve as a road map for the evolution of the Colorado Lagoon and to ensure future projects embody the mission of FOCL.


HISTORY

A O

nce part of the historic Los Cerritos Wetlands, the Colorado Lagoon was dredged in the early 1920’s to increase its recreational capacity. In 1932 the lagoon was separated from Marine Stadium by a tide gate installed to maintain water depth for Olympic diving events that were held at the lagoon. In the late 1960’s, the area between what is now the north end of Marine Stadium, and the south end of the lagoon, was filled in due to plans for a freeway and the existing underground box culvert was constructed creating what is now Marina Vista Park.

COLORADO LAGOON

1896 map of California Ranchos.

In an effort to prevent further degradation of the lagoon, FOCL formed in 1998 to improve the proposed Termino Avenue Drain Project (TADP). The planned TADP would have had severe negative impacts on the lagoon. The TADP was eventually rerouted to Marine Stadium preventing further degradation to the lagoon. In addition, filters and diversion systems have been added to storm drains to prevent additional contamination and sedimentation. After the TADP stimulated community involvement, FOCL began to focus on restoring the neglected lagoon. In 2002, FOCL helped to secure $200,000 in funding from the State Coastal Conservancy for a Restoration and Feasibility Study. Funding was received in 2006 to convert an abandoned snack shack into the Wetlands and Marine Science Education Center (WAMSEC), kicking off FOCL’s educational programs.

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The lagoon has been listed on California’s 303(d) list of impaired water bodies due to elevated levels of heavy metals and other contaminants including indicator bacteria. However, significant and important restoration efforts have been completed to remove and treat contaminants, restore native ecosystems and better manage storm water flows. These efforts have improved water quality resulting in the lagoon being removed from Heal the Bay’s list of the Top 10 most polluted beaches in California.

1893 map overlaid with street map.

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FOCL has been instrumental in several landscape restoration efforts at the lagoon including the removal of invasive plant species and establishment of native plants along the eastern bank of the northern arm, grassland median and parking lot renovations, trail improvements, creation of a 600’ long bioswale along the northern border of the western arm, and re-vegetation of intertidal and upland portions of the lagoon.

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The Colorado Lagoon was once a thriving coastal water body — used both by humans and wildlife. Generations of Long Beach residents enjoyed recreational and leisure activities such as swimming, model boat building and sailing, fishing and picnicking; its long history includes many fond childhood memories for Long Beach area residents. However, for decades the lagoon has suffered from deteriorating health due in part to the unrestricted flow of contaminants through its eleven storm drains. These conditions created a situation that only worsened as the surrounding population increased dramatically during the 20th century.


HISTORY

A

Model boat building

Model boat sailing at Colorado Lagoon

Beach volleyball

Children learning to swim

4

INTRODUCTION

Cafe at the lagoon


FUTURE OF COLORADO LAGOON

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he previous pages describe the history of Colorado Lagoon, which was an important destination in our community until it was degraded to the point that people stopped coming. To restore Colorado Lagoon, FOCL has been collaborating with the City of Long Beach for over a decade. Significant progress has been made in cleaning up past, and preventing future, pollution of the lagoon. Toxic urban runoff that previously flowed into the lagoon is now diverted and treated by the sewer system. Equally important, more than 80,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment have been removed from the lagoon. The final step in the structural restoration is to re-open the original tidal connection between Alamitos Bay and the lagoon as depicted in the map on the following page. All of these efforts are necessary to make the lagoon safe for people, flora and fauna. This vision document focuses on restoring native habitat, which will not only beautify and create a home for marine life, but will also naturally clean contaminants from the water, helping to keep it safe for future generations. In the following pages, the vision for the Colorado Lagoon habitat and landscape restoration is presented through renderings and diagrams. Depicted are a wildlife reserve in the Western Arm, trails with educational kiosks, the extension of the bridge that crosses the lagoon and native plants that will adorn the banks, planted by community members. The purpose and principles adopted by FOCL to guide the creation of this habitat restoration and landscape vision are listed below.

Purpose of the Vision Document • • • • • •

Communicate FOCL’s mission, vision, and goals to the public Align FOCL, the City, and the community’s expectations of the lagoon’s habitat restoration designs Communicate lagoon history and current status Convey FOCL’s accomplishments Guidance for the specifics of restoration plans (i.e. landscape aesthetics) Fundraising tool

Guiding Principles • • • • • • • • • • • •

5

Provide clean, safe water that invites recreation in harmony with nature Cultivate a serene environment fostering enjoyment, renewal and reconnection with nature for people of all ages Utilize native marine and upland plants to promote sustainable wildlife habitation Engage and educate the community and visitors about our interdependence with wetlands, the oceans, and nature Incorporate neighborhood views and safety needs along with general public access Balance the need for irrigation to maintain green coverage during the summer with the needs for low-maintenance Employ water conservation practices that minimize runoff and erosion Provide tree canopy and benches for resting, viewing and educational areas Use porous materials and/or recycled paving materials instead of impervious paving materials for trails that are ADA accessible Use sustainable energy sources when possible (i.e. solar power for irrigation valves) Use of recycled materials for fencing, benches, signage, etc., must be considered to further our mission of sustainable development Utilize educational signage elements that engage and inspire the public with minimal intrusiveness on the natural environment


Aerial photo, circa 1921, of the original waterway connecting Colorado Lagoon with Marine Stadium (looking north).

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FUTURE VISION

B


V I S I O N O F WAT E R WAY R E C O N N E C T I N G C O LO R A D O L A G O O N W I T H A L A M I T O S B AY

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Colorado Lagoon reconnected to the ocean through Alamitos Bay as envisioned by FOCL. 7


C R O S S S E C T I O N O F R E S T O R E D WAT E R WAY

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FUTURE VISION

KEY PLAN


COMMUNITY “NEST”

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KEY PLAN

CONCEPTUAL IMAGE OF “COMMUNITY NEST” AT LOOKOUT POINT

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WESTERN ARM

VIEW OF FUTURE WESTERN ARM RESERVE AT PARK AVENUE

KEY PLAN

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FUTURE VISION

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BRIDGE EXTENSION

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VIEW FROM BRIDGE TOWARD FUTURE TRAILS ALONG THE NORTHERN PORTION OF THE LAGOON KEY PLAN

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NORTHERN ARM

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VIEW OF FUTURE TRAIL AND RESTORED HABITAT ALONG THE NORTHERN ARM 12

FUTURE VISION

KEY PLAN


SEVENTH TEE

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LAGOON VIEW FROM “LITTLE REC’S” FAMOUS SEVENTH TEE

KEY PLAN

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PARK AND APPIAN

FUTURE VISION

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VIEW OF FUTURE WESTERN ARM RESERVE AT CORNER OF PARK AND APPIAN KEY PLAN

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OVERVIEW

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photo credit: Jennifer Zell

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ducation has been occurring for centuries, if not millennia at the Colorado Lagoon. As part of the historic Los Cerritos Wetlands, which once encompassed over 2,400 acres, the Colorado Lagoon was undoubtedly a place of exploration and learning for local native peoples, the Tongva. In more recent times, Long Beach residents have been utilizing the lagoon as a place for recreation and leisure. The primary goal of FOCL is to educate the community, and FOCL believes that education should be fun. By utilizing its natural resources, fun learning experiences can be enjoyed by all who visit the lagoon.


PROGRAMS

C

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OCL initiated educational programs in January of 2006 concurrent with the opening of the Wetlands and Marine Science Education Center (WAMSEC). Since its opening, WAMSEC has functioned as a hub for learning and community involvement at the Colorado Lagoon. All events and classes offered through FOCL’s education program are free to the community, open to the general public and school classes of all levels and disciplines. The educational programs enjoy ongoing success and include four distinct components. They include instruction, events, service-learning, and the Innovators program. Each component is unique with different objectives, but overlapping goals. The Colorado Lagoon is an incredibly dynamic site with the ability to host multiple educational events.

Education Goals Provide free, place-based nature education Host regularly scheduled after school and weekend WAMSEC hours Engage local public, private, and charter schools, after-school programs, colleges and universities Host estuary exploration events on the second Saturday of each month Provide opportunities for professional development through our Innovators program Host four EcoEvents each year 16

E D U C AT I O N

One of FOCL’s goals and the best way for our community to value the lagoon is to be involved with its restoration. This is why we created the Colorado Lagoon Champions Curriculum. The Champions Curriculum is a way for the community to take the lead on improving this vital urban wetland. We have developed a plan for high school and university students to obtain service learning hours while working to restore the lagoon. Volunteer beach clean-up and weeding events are held weekly, while naturalist tours are conducted on site, bimonthly. The Colorado Lagoon Champions Curriculum is our community based servicelearning restoration program. We learn by doing and what we’re doing is taking care of our environment. This service and education program includes activities such as weed removal, trash cleanups, and planting of native species. The Champions Curriculum is designed for students who need to complete volunteer hours, but it’s open to anybody willing to help restore the Colorado Lagoon. Events are led by qualified restoration ecologists who give students insight into what it takes to maintain healthy urban habitats.


SITE CONTEXT

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he Colorado Lagoon is an 18 acre tidal water body connected to Alamitos Bay and the Pacific Ocean through an underground concrete box culvert to Marine Stadium (approximately 33 acres with future open waterway connection). Originally part of the larger San Gabriel River Delta, commonly known as the Los Cerritos Wetlands, the lagoon is located in the City of Long Beach, approximately 20 miles south of downtown Los Angeles. The lagoon is an urban coastal salt marsh water body, which has withstood decades of development pressures. Regionally the lagoon is located between the heavily channelized waterways of the Los Angeles and San Gabriel Rivers. Following the coast to the south and east are other surviving portions of Los Cerritos Wetlands and Anaheim Bay National Wildlife Refuge. North and west of the lagoon are the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. Most of Long Beach parks and open spaces are located in south and east Long Beach. These areas provide recreation and leisure easily accessible to nearby residents, but require transportation connections to visitors coming from all parts of Long Beach. Currently, Long Beach Transit provides a connection from the lagoon to downtown areas along 4th Street and a north/south connection along Ximeno Avenue. Regional bikeways are fragmented and are nearby, but do not directly connect to Colorado Lagoon.

photo credit: Dave Pirazzi

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VICINITY MAP D H BLV BEAC LONG

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photo credits this page: Mike Dees and Jennifer Zell

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H A B I TAT R E S TO R AT I O N

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abitat restoration is another essential element to restoring and sustaining the health, safety and beauty of Colorado Lagoon. Seagrass ecosystems, made up of intertidal and subtidal plants, are as rich in diversity and productivity as rain forests and equally as important to sustaining a healthy world. At Colorado Lagoon FOCL is leading community-based restoration to renew vital intertidal and upland habitat. Additionally, FOCL is currently pursuing funding to restore the open tidal connection between the lagoon and Alamitos Bay. This will restore subtidal habitat, in particular eelgrass beds, which serve as a nursery for two-thirds of the fish in the oceans and a foundational food source for multiple marine and wildlife species.

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A N A LYS I S

photo credit: Mike Dees

Enthusiastic community groups and volunteers, from scouting groups to university students, are currently coming out to restore native upland and intertidal habitat in the western arm of the lagoon. Guided by experts, volunteers have placed thousands of plants into the western arm of the lagoon bounded on two sides by Colorado Street and Park Avenue. FOCL’s hope is the community will plant, watch, protect and enjoy the fruits of their labor for years to come. FOCL’s vision is for the western arm to become an ecological reserve providing a safe haven for marine related wildlife and providing viewing enjoyment for the public to reconnect with nature.

photo credit: Mike Dees

With help from the community, FOCL has completed planting native habitat along the eastern bank of Colorado Lagoon. The project included removal of invasive plants followed by replanting with native upland and intertidal species. This area is visible along the Champions Trail and sets an example of a successful and attractive community-based restoration project. In addition to the Champions Trail, the grassland median located along E. Colorado Street, establishes a native grassland zone in what was formally asphalt paving.


C I R C U L AT I O N

E T

he Colorado Lagoon is an important park within the Long Beach park system. It lies between Recreation Park to the north, and Marina Vista Park to the south and east. Colorado Lagoon, Marine Stadium, and Alamitos Bay are valuable open space resources for the citizens of Long Beach and surrounding areas. These waterways are desirable areas for passive and active recreational uses. The Circulation Map (next page) indicates important connection points for multi-modal travel to the lagoon as well as nearby destinations and routes. By enhancing connectivity for visitors, the recreational value of the lagoon will be increased.

The waterways of Colorado Lagoon, Marine Stadium and Alamitos Bay interrupt the orthogonal grid of development within Long Beach. As a result, navigation within this area is fragmented and disorienting. Bikeway and pedestrian improvements within this corridor will greatly improve pedestrian and bicycle safety and connectivity. The construction of the waterway provides the opportunity of increased open space connectivity. Along with reconnecting tidal waters of the lagoon to surrounding natural systems, it is important to establish connectivity from and to the lagoon, with the rich natural and cultural destinations of the coastal area.

ADA accessible routes Enhance connectivity Create a variety of user experiences Balance protection and access

Sidewalks, trails, and crossings are used by children traveling to nearby Wilson High School, Will Rogers Middle School, and Lowell Elementary School.

Landscape improvements along Appian Way, between Will Rogers Mini Park and the Long Beach Greenbelt, will enhance the aesthetic continuity of passing through an important natural open space corridor.

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photo credits this page: Jennifer Zell

It is recommended, where feasible, that a continuous and fully integrated ADA accessible route be linked to all destinations throughout the lagoon. A local example of a beach crossing is the at-grade wood boardwalk at Shoreline Aquatic Park. Stable and permeable trail materials are preferable including decomposed granite or crushed oyster shells.


C I R C U L AT I O N M A P

CONNECTION TO RECREATION PARK, WILSON HIGH SCHOOL, AND BIKE PATHS

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PEDESTRIAN PATH (EXISTING) CONNECTION TO TRANSIT ROUTE RUNNING EAST/WEST ALONG 4TH STREET. POTENTIAL CONNECTION TO LONG BEACH GREENBELT

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PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION LINKING COLORADO LAGOON TO WATERWAY

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CONNECTION TO MARINE STADIUM RESERVE AND BIKEWAY CONNECTION TO 2ND STREET AND CALIFORNIA COASTAL TRAIL

CONNECTION TO PEDESTRIAN PATH AT MARINE STADIUM

CONNECTION TO JACK DUNSTER MARINE BIOLOGICAL RESERVE

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A N A LYS I S

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DIRECTIONAL SIGNAGE FOR PROPOSED GREENBELT

PEDESTRIAN PATH (EXISTING)

INTERPRETIVE ELEMENTS FOR BIOSWALE

INTERPRETIVE ELEMENTS FOR NATIVE HABITATS

INTERPRETIVE ELEMENTS FOR MARINE AND FOULING ORGANISMS

INTERPRETIVE ELEMENTS FOR BIRDS AND RESERVE

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I N T E R P R E TAT I O N

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E photo credit: Eric Zahn

s an urban wetland, the lagoon’s context provides unique interpretive opportunities and increased visibility. Interpretive elements will focus on telling the story of the cultural and natural history of the place. The placement and content of interpretation will dovetail with visitors’ interest and programmed educational activities. Careful consideration should be taken that interpretive signage not detract from the experience of the lagoon by adding visual clutter. Interpretive themes will include the evolution and restoration of the lagoon, observation of resident and migratory bird species, marine and fouling organisms, marine ecology, wetlands restoration, watershed and stormwater management, and historic activities. Interpretive signage for the lagoon is conceived as a three part system: two-dimensional information communication including kiosks and panels, two-dimensional graphic communication including trail identification and directional signage, and connection to digital resources. The bulk of information will be concentrated at attractive kiosks or panels in areas of high visibility. Signs in natural areas or along trails will be subtle in appearance and carefully integrated into the site. Links to digital resources will eventually be provided on all informational signage such as maps, audio interviews with naturalists or historians, and sample bird songs. Allowing for digital links to information accommodates varying levels of curiosity tailored to the specific interests of visitors, without cluttering the natural environment.

Tell story of cultural and natural history Carefully integrate with landscape

Subtidal Channels are important ant habitat for fish at low tide allowing good drainage and flooding in mudflats. Mudflats sound dirty but are great places for invertebirds. What about the big brates to get eatten by shorebirds. over this area? green mats that sometimes cover

Beach Primrose Camissonia cheiranthifolia

California Horn Snail Cerithidea californica

Snowy Egret Egretta thula

Forster’s Tern Sterna forsteri

COLORADO LAGOON

Example of future signage 26

A N A LYS I S

These Southern California rnia plants and animals are influenced by tidess

Dave Pirazzi

Salt Marsh Communities

Mike Dees

Mike Dees

Accommodate varying levels of curiosity


TRAIL CROSS SECTION - NORTHERN BANK

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KEY PLAN

T

rails have the dual purpose of providing visitors with access to the site and protecting habitat areas from potential damage or disruption. Trails will be located in areas that maximize opportunities for high quality wildlife viewing and a variety of user experiences. This urban wetland is unique to the region because of its proximity to densely populated areas. Accessible pedestrian trails will accommodate a variety of user abilities. Naturalist-led walking tours are a part of FOCL’s education program and trails will be designed to intersect with the range of habitats that exist on the site. Trails will be constructed of stabilized decomposed granite or crushed stone.

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TRAIL CROSS SECTION - WOOD BRIDGE

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DESIGN GUIDELINES

KEY PLAN


TRAIL CROSS SEC TION - PARK AVENUE

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KEY PLAN

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T R A I L C R O S S S E C T I O N - A P I A N WAY

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30

DESIGN GUIDELINES

KEY PLAN


SITE FURNISHINGS GUIDELINES

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ite furnishings will have an impact on the visual quality of Colorado Lagoon. The design and style choices made regarding these elements communicate a viewpoint and are expressive of held values. Safety, durability, and comfort must be a top priority. Recycled and locally sourced materials will be considered to further sustainable project objectives. Each bench will accommodate a customized donor plaque and dissuade vagrancy. The City of Long Beach does not have a required standard bench. However, the bench commonly used by the City in public parks is included as an option. There are numerous material and style options that are suitable for use at the lagoon. Outlined on the following pages are two style options including standard issue and modern. These styles have various price, material and manufacturer considerations. The site furnishings will be an intuitive reminder that Colorado Lagoon is a special place.

photo credit: Jennifer Zell

STANDARD ISSUE - BENCH

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QUICK CRETE PALM BENCH

Cost:

$896.00 for Quick Crete Palm bench

Materials:

Cast concrete

Installation:

The weight is 1,918 lbs. for the Palm bench and will require additional equipment to install. A reinforced concrete apron and footing must be built to receive anchor bolts.

Maintenance:

A standard gloss sealer will be applied to make surfaces resistant to paint graffiti. No need to add skateboard deterrents if adjacent trails are nonskatable materials such as decomposed granite.

Sustainability:

Gen2 product should be specified, which have a 80% recycled content. The benches are manufactured in the Southern California area, which reduces transportation impact.

Customization:

These benches can have a donor plaque attached and can have a customized color and sandblast finish for an additional cost.

Analysis:

Benches are a standard and expected choice for City of Long Beach public parks. The unit cost is low but the installed cost may be higher depending on the equipment needed and site accessibility. Gen2 product would meet the RMC recycled materials requirements.


BENCHES

photo credit: Maglin

Cost:

$1,390 for Maglin MLB1200 Ipe wood bench. $1,895.00 for High Density Paper Composite (HDPC).

Materials:

All MLB 1200 series benches have solid cast aluminum supports. Wood seat/back slats or HDPC are options.

Installation:

Benches weigh 135 lbs. each and are 70 inches in length. Benches can be freestanding or surface mounted, but it is recommended benches are mounted onto a base and bolted down. Either a concrete apron can be poured or a footing surrounded by D.G. can be installed for a more natural look.

Maintenance:

Graffiti can be removed from (HDPC) with solvents or sanded off. Both the wood and HDPC materials can be sanded. Ipe wood slats are finished with penetrating sealers and should be allowed to naturally weather to silver. No additional stains or varnish should be applied.

Sustainability:

HDPC is 100% FSC certified post consumer recycled paper. Wood and aluminum are 100% recyclable and Maglin uses 95% recycled aluminum material for the frame.

Customization:

The MLB1200 bench has an optional center deterrent strap and both can be personalized with a donor plaque for an additional cost.

Analysis:

The HDPC bench with aluminum support has the most recycled material content of the bench options. The MLB1200 Ipe wood benches are the preferred option because they are durable, attractive, and help to reinforce the image of the Colorado Lagoon as a special place. The MLB1200 bench is more costly than the concrete bench, but the MLB1200 is lightweight and can be installed without expensive equipment.

photo credit: Maglin

MLB1200W BENCH

Plaques can be pre-installed on the bench for an additional cost of $220-$250. An area in the back slat is routered and the plaque is bolted in. Material choices are Corian, aluminum or bronze. 32

SITE FURNISHINGS

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MODERN BENCH


T R A S H A N D R E C YC L E R E C E P TAC L E S

F Sustainability:

The Quick Crete Gen2 product has 80% recycled content. Wood and metal are 100% recyclable and all tubular and sheet steel contains recycled content. The Maglin E-coat system contains no heavy metals, has low VOC’s and no hazardous air pollutants.

Customization:

The Quick Crete Palm trash receptacle can be customized and the BigBelly solar powered trash compactor can have a plastic sleeve added to accommodate posters.

Analysis:

The MLWR400 trash receptacle is ideal for low-traffic locations such as along trails, while the BigBelly with recycling units could be utilized in high-traffic areas. Trash and recycle receptacles should be placed in close proximity, but not adjacent to benches; within 50 feet of all trail heads and parking areas to encourage proper waste disposal.

photo credit: Jennifer Zell

Big Belly solar trash compactors and recycling units are useful in areas that do not have frequent trash collection or in locations where events are held that generate high volumes of trash. The product comes with a software service that provides alerts when the container is full.

B I G B E L LY S O L A R T R A S H CO M PA C TO R WITH RECYCLING UNITS Cost:

$611.00 for Quick Crete Palm waste receptacle. $1,375.00 for Maglin MLWR400W trash receptacle with steel tube frame and Ipe slats and 20 gallon plastic liner and metal lid.

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Cast concrete, steel tube and wood slats, or galvanized sheet steel and plastic.

Installation:

The Quick Crete Palm waste receptacle weighs 1,017 lbs. and should be set on reinforced concrete apron. The MLWR400 weighs 127 lbs. and should be bolted to concrete base. The BigBelly weighs 170 pounds and is set on a concrete base. The unit is self-powered and requires no wiring.

Maintenance:

Graffiti can be removed from wood parts with solvents or sanded off. Metals are powder coated for outdoor and salt-spray durability.

CUSTOMIZED QUICK CRETE PALM TRASH R E C E P TAC L E

photo credit: Maglin

Materials:

photo credit: Jennifer Zell

$4,080.00 for BigBelly solar powered trash compactor; with recycle unit, add $2,640.00 each.

MLWR400W TR ASH R E C E P TAC L E


FENCING

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F

urrently, there are seven different types of fencing materials at the lagoon including wood sand, black metal picket, white vinyl rail, galvanized chain link, PVC coated chain link, split rail, and post and rope. While the impact of the disparate materials appears haphazard, the different types of fencing serve different purposes and relate to adjacent uses. Fencing guidelines for the Colorado Lagoon will reinforce the functional needs and aesthetic priorities of the lagoon. Fencing should be minimal, aesthetically pleasing, unobtrusive, and used to delineate and protect sensitive habitat.

photo credit: Jennifer Zell

NATURAL MATERIALS Split rail, wood sand, and post and rope are made with materials that are attractive, weather nicely, and are easy to replace and repair. Split rail is used nearby at the golf course. The materials reinforce a desirable restoration aesthetic at the Lagoon, but have limited function as a barrier. Wood sand fencing is semi-transparent, captures trash, and prevents beach erosion.

SPLIT RAIL ALONG E 6TH STREET

CHAIN LINK Split rail fencing defines a boundary while the metal picket fence creates a barrier, which is required for steep drops adjacent to a walkway. The sand fence delineates a zone and provides plants with protection from erosion.

METAL PICKET The black powder coated metal picket fencing is used nearby at Marine Stadium and borders the sidewalks along Park Avenue and Appian Way. This fence provides a solid pedestrian barrier for sensitive habitat areas.

SITE FURNISHINGS

photo credit: Jennifer Zell

Both PVC coated and galvanized 6’ fencing border the lagoon. Chain link fencing delineates the boundaries of the golf course and acts as a barrier to entry. Chain link is used where the lagoon borders Alamitos Heights Park and is combined with dense vegetation to create a visual and physical barrier to the lagoon. This barrier also obscures the entrance to the Champions Trail.

M E TA L P I C K E T VINYL RAIL

photo credit: Jennifer Zell

This fence is seen throughout Long Beach on open lots and is used along the Greenbelt right-of-way where it intersects at Park and Appian. White vinyl rail is used at the lagoon east of the Model Boat Shop and continues to the west of Alamitos Heights Park. This material is favored by municipalities because of the reasonable cost and low maintenance requirements. However, the fence is a simulation of painted three or four board fences found outlining private ranches and estates. The historical use and synthetic material make the vinyl fence a poor choice for the lagoon.

WOOD SAND FENCE

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35 photo credits this page: Tidal Influence and Courtesy of the Port of Long Beach


HOW YOU CAN HELP FOCL’s Landscape Vision lays out our passion, specifically the guiding principles and ambitious plans for the transformation of the lagoon from a recovering ecosystem to a beautiful, safe and flourishing marine habitat and recreational area. Taking action now to plant native species, construct trails, and restore the open waterway to Alamitos Bay will establish a safer, better future for ourselves and the plants and animals that share the Colorado Lagoon ecosystem.

As such, consider this document your personal invitation to come down to the lagoon and join the fun. We encourage you to stop by the WAMSEC and find out about the incredible sea creatures living right here, participate in a lagoon clean-up or community planting event, join a nature walk to learn more about flora/fauna living in your neighborhood, and get involved in any of the myriad ways that Friends of Colorado Lagoon is making a difference. Indeed it is an exciting time at the lagoon, the future is bright, and it becomes even more so with your participation. Bring your passion and join us—we look forward to welcoming you, your family and friends to the Colorado Lagoon very soon!

Get involved, learn more, and stay informed. Go to www.coloradolagoon.org 36

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Restoration is an ongoing process, and implementing FOCL’s Landscape Vision requires the dedication of resources to priorities and projects with long-term benefits. This document is designed to guide the way to a fully restored lagoon, but it will take the long-term commitment of the community—you!—to make this vision a reality.

FOCL Landscape Vision 8.13  
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