Page 1

Oct/Nov 2009

Treating Cancer

Enchanting with Compassion Evenings Out

Random Acts of Kindness

Scott & Faye Medley 2009 Medical Issue


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48TU3PBE 4UFtJonesville, FLFlorida 32669 HOME Living In the Heart of

Dedicated To Bringing Smiles To Our Community

14


table

On the Cover

of contents

22

72 The Doctor Is In

Right after Dr. Scott Medley’s name, the title reads: Medical Director, North Florida Regional Medical Center, but if you look at the stethoscope that hangs around his neck, you might wonder if he is an administrator or a doctor.

Community Impact Story

Community Spotlights

28

72

62 Building with Trust is the Bullard Way 64

John Spence Knows His Stuff

66 Gainesville Chamber Earns 5-Star Accreditation 68

John Isaac’s Clothing: Eliminating the stress from getting dressed

70

Going Paperless with CAMPUS USA Credit Union

Medical Community Spotlights

Around The Home

42

Building green by Using Energy Effectively

46 What’s Going on With Cabinets and Countertops 48

Landscape Calendar: Fall Gardening

A Taste of Home

52

Enchanting Evenings Out

LivingInTheHeartOfFlorida.com

52

DEPARTMENTS

22 Treating Cancer with Compassion

Business

48

HOME Living

In the Heart of Florida

15


table

of contents

78

DEPARTMENTS HOME Living

100

Lifestyle

Charities

78

Fashion Corner: Who says charity work can’t be fashionable?

100 Prematurity Awareness Month

Travel Corner: Geaux to Baton Rouge

101 Noche de Gala

82

16

96

Health And Fitness

86

Preventing the Fall for Seniors

Community

88

UFPA & SHANDS AIM Together for Healing

90

Rocky Voglio - Newberry Backyard Bar-B-Q Awarded Florida Main Street Business of the Year by Secretary of State Browning

92

Cleaning for a Reason

94

Random Acts of Kindness

Sports & Recreation

96

One-on-One with Coach Shyatt

98

Amanda Butler is Taking the Gators to Bold New Levels

In the Heart of Florida

101 Gainesville Gone Nashville

Calendar

102 Ghouls, Goblins and Giving 104 Community Calendar Around Town

106 Where We’ve Been Editorial Cartoon

109 Jake’s Corner Get To Know

110 Jan Patterson

LivingInTheHeartOfFlorida.com


The Flats, not your average apartments

Quartz Counter Tops Stainless Steel Appliances Wood Floors Solid Wood Doors Dining, Shopping & Entertainment

The Flats at Tioga Town Center are not trying to be different. They just are. Sure, The Flats have quartz counter tops, stainless steel appliances, wood floors, and all the modern conveniences of Tioga Town Center at a remarkable value. But rather than bore you with paragraphs of fancy lingo, come see for yourself why The Flats are much more than your average apartment.

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HOME Living In the Heart of Florida

From the Publisher

Publisher: Scott Costello Creative Director: Brad Palmer

How do you define success? following definition:

Editor: David Greenberg

• Success means knowing I do the right things for the right reasons. • Success means not compromising integrity.  • Success means I share with those who need my help.  • Success means I give my time to my family.  • Success means providing value to others.  • Success means living up to my commitments.  • Success means building a community – not a network.  • Success means looking in the mirror and liking what you see. 

Assistant Editors: Molly Bruce Victoria Phillips Advertising Sales Director: Sarah Sander Public Relations Director: Faith Reaves Public Relations/Event Planning: Emily Davis Emily Merwin Katy Davis Lauren Aitchison Lauren Gispanski

I agree with all of these. I also think success is defined by surrounding yourself with people who bring out the best in you. If you look at the masthead to your left, I think you will see the secret to our success at HOME. We have a team in place that is passionate, dedicated, driven, and has integrity. Not everyone on the team gets the recognition, but each is integral to the success of our company. Featured on our cover this month is a man who believes strongly in surrounding himself with quality people. Dr. Scott Medley came to Gainesville to start his career after finishing school. He started Gainesville Family Physicians and, before he departed, made it the community’s largest medical family practice. Today, he is the medical director of North Florida Regional Medical Center. And with his community activity, he is the epitome of the Heart of Florida – he has earned his living here and has given back. With this being our medical issue, we use our Community Impact story to demonstrate the camaraderie between two great hospitals in their effort to treat cancer. With Shands and NFRMC, we have one of the best teaching and community hospitals. We also feature 10 individuals in the community

Staff Writers: Aggie Haney Ashley McCredie Jessica Lipscomb Katie Gillen Mary Manchess Sara Brubaker Sara Horn Stephanie Thomas Contributing Writers: Jon George Jacklyne Ramos Contributing Photographers: Mario’s Photography Photography 35 Editorial Cartoonist: Jake Fuller E-News Brief: Anja Majcen

Advantage Publishing, Inc. 4140 NW 37th PL Suite D Gainesville FL 32606 (352) 372-5854 in Gainesville (352) 368-1707 in Ocala LivingInTheHeartOfFlorida.com

I recently read the

who make a difference when it comes to medical treatment in the Heart of Florida. I am grateful to NFRMC for sponsoring our Medical Community Spotlights. Another medical story of interest deals with a leading problem for our older residents – avoiding that first fall and the resulting problems that will change their lives. In this issue, A Taste of HOME takes us on an Enchanting Evening Out. Be forewarned, if you weren’t hungry before reading this article, you will be soon after! In Around the Home, Jon George’s Landscape Calendar prepares us for Fall planting, our series with David Melville, the owner of David Melville Contracting Services, Inc., focuses on energy efficiency, and we look at what’s new with countertops and cabinets. Among our features in Business are stories on builder Barry Bullard, speaker and trainer John Spence, John Isaac’s Clothing and the Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce receiving 5-star accreditation. In Lifestyle, our Fashion Corner focuses on some of the fine clothing and accessories that will be featured at the Children’s Home Society Gainesville Auxiliary Inspiring Lives Fashion Show. Sports & Recreation prepares us for the upcoming Gator men’s and women’s basketball seasons. Community brings us stories about Random Acts of Kindness, AIM together (a program that brings together performing arts and health care) and Cleaning for a Reason, a program designed to help women dealing with cancer by local cleaning services coming to your home and helping out. We applaud A Personal Elf and Mini Maid for making life a little easier for people with cancer. Our December/January issue is our Charity issue. To reserve space, contact us today.

Scott

Scott Costello scott@advantagepublishinginc.com

HOME™: Living in the Heart of Florida reserves the right to refuse advertisements for any reason. Acceptance of advertising does not mean or imply the services or product is endorsed or recommended by HOME™: Living in the Heart of Florida. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by an information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from Advantage Publishing, Inc. Although every precaution is taken to ensure accuracy of published materials, Advantage Publishing cannot be held responsible for opinions expressed or facts supplied by its authors. Manuscripts, artwork, photography, inquiries and submitted materials are welcome. Visit us online: www.LivingInTheHeartOfFlorida.com

LivingInTheHeartOfFlorida.com

HOME Living

In the Heart of Florida

19


y a s L S uxury H o h W

as To Be Big?

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The CyberKnifeÂŽ is painless for patients. But tumors should be afraid, very afraid.

The Cancer Center at North Florida Regional Medical Center is one of the few facilities anywhere with the CyberKnifeÂŽ Robotic Radiosurgery System. This incredible non-invasive technology is a gigantic leap forward from traditional radiation treatments. What used to require up to 45 radiation treatments now takes only one to five. It is also a painless, bloodless alternative to surgery. In addition, we offer the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy that delivers a precise 3-D radiation dose while sparing healthy tissue. Cutting-edge technology delivered to you with old-fashioned hospitality â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that is our unique approach. Because to us, everything

revolves around you.

To learn about cancer treatment, or for a physician referral, call Consult-a-NurseÂŽ 24/7 at 1-800-611-6913. X X X O G S N D D B O D F S D P N  t       / F X C F S S Z  3 E  ( B J O F T W J M M F  ' -


COMMUNITY IMPACT STORY

Treating Cancer By David Greenberg

with Compassion

photography by Brad Palmer

T

Dr. Patricia Shearer sits in her office with Jason Mlot, who was treated for his cancer at Shands, and now is a representative of the Cancer Survivor Program there.

here may be no word more difficult for patients to hear from their doctors than cancer, and the data suggests at some point each and every one of us will have a family member or friend dealing with this disease. Cancer consists of a group of diseases that occur when there is uncontrolled growth of cells in the body that can intrude on adjacent tissue or spread to other locations. Malignant cancers are different from benign, which do not spread or grow. Most cancers result in tumors, but one of the leading exceptions to that is leukemia. If you have to deal with cancer, the Heart of Florida may be one of the better places in the United States for care and treatment. That’s primarily because of Shands at UF and North Florida Regional Medical Center (NFRMC). With its staff of doctors affiliated with the University of Florida College of Medicine, Shands is a leading medical research institute, and with many of its doctors trained at UF, NFRMC is a top-notch community hospital. Shands is consistently ranked among the leaders in non-profit medical institutions, and NFRMC achieves similar rankings on the for-profit side. The level of care provided by the two hospitals and private practices associated with them result in excellent medical care in this community, whether it is for cancer or something else. And now both institutions have stepped up with new and significant commitments to cancer care – the Shands at the University of Florida Cancer Hospital and The Cancer Center at North Florida Regional Medical Center. The new outpatient cancer center at NFRMC, which opened in July, includes some of the newest, state-of-the-art technology in cancer care, including the CyberKnife® Center and RapidArc™.

Phase one of the center is dedicated to radiation oncology. The next step will be medical oncology. Scheduled to open in November, the cancer hospital at Shands will offer a full range of cancer-related services, operating rooms, an intensive care unit and a critical care center. All patient rooms will be private and will include features to make a patient’s stay as comfortable as possible. Also at both hospitals, there are many other services and departments dedicated to the treatment of cancer and to maintaining a high quality of life after successful treatment. But it isn’t enough to have great facilities. From the doctors, to the nurses, to the technicians, when it comes to treating cancer there has to be a dedication to achieving success that may go far beyond that which occurs in almost any other medical field. It also takes a cooperative atmosphere. Doctors at Shands and NFRMC regularly consult with each other about patients and treatment when it comes to cancer care. The level of care is what brought Jason Mlot to Gainesville when he discovered he had a rare form of sarcoma cancer at the age of 16. Because of his age, Mlot is not the traditional cancer patient. He falls into what is called the young-adult group of cancer patients, said Dr. Patricia Shearer, the director of the Cancer Survivor Program at the UF Shands Cancer Center. Among other things, the center focuses on dealing with issues beyond the initial treatment. “With 64 percent of adults and 80 percent of children expected to be cured, there are long-term issues to deal with,” Shearer said. “There are two broad categories to deal with in regard to that – lateeffect medical issues and psycho-social late effects.” Younger patients may experience medical complications with growth and development and vital organ damage. In terms of the psycho-social factors, doctors often deal with quality-of-life issues, fatigue, anxiety, depression and chronic pain, she said.

Children's Miracle Network, KTK, The Sky and Shands all work together to raise money for patients. 22

HOME Living

In the Heart of Florida

LivingInTheHeartOfFlorida.com


COMMUNITY IMPACT STORY

DeWayne Yates, a 37-yearold Trenton resident, was diagnosed in August with acute myeloid leukemia. He is seen here with his wife, Marsha, and a multitude of get-well items.

LivingInTheHeartOfFlorida.com

HOME Living

In the Heart of Florida

23


COMMUNITY IMPACT STORY

Dr. Mark Perman talks to Floyd Crews about his treatment at The Cancer Center at North Florida Regional Medical Center.

That is where Mlot is today. Before his cancer was discovered, Mlot had visions of being a pilot, but he says that will likely never occur now because of his cancer. Mlot, now 24 and a student at UF studying computerized GIS mapping, has come a long way from the days when he first discovered the disease. “As far as the cancer goes, I am in remission,” he said. “I was having pain in my back for seven months. At first, doctors thought it was nerves compressing my pelvis. They finally discovered I had a 15-centimeter tumor. I quickly went from flying lessons to just hoping to be able to walk again.” Mlot came to Shands from Lake Worth because he knew he could get the level of care he needed. “I was going to be treated here, and I wanted to be as close to my doctors as possible,” he said. “I needed seven rounds of chemo and six weeks of radiation two times a day. I went from 125 pounds to 70 pounds.” Doctors were unable to remove Mlot’s tumor because it had become entangled in his nerves, but it continues to shrink because of his treatment, he said. Now Mlot comes in for annual tests which include blood work, an echocardiogram and an EKG. “He had a lot of chemotherapy,” said Shearer. “The tests enable us to measure the effects on his bone marrow and kidneys. In addition to bone marrow and kidney issues, we have to be looking for respiratory and heart damage and infertility issues. Also, he has obviously had to change careers.” Besides changing his career, Mlot has become a representative of the success of the survivor program, where he met his girlfriend, Erica Reyes, also a survivor. He does a lot of cancer-advocacy work, including involvement in an online cancer-survivor network.

Dr. Joseph Simone is the director of the Shands Cancer Center, where Mlot was treated. He is recognized as an international leader in cancer care, research and education. Simone says part of what makes the level of care here so good is the differences between the two hospitals. “Different hospitals have different strengths,” he said. “The university has strength because it combines research and care. Community hospitals may do some clinical trial research, but little or no basic research. But they are often more accessible, which is a significant factor for cancer patients. A lot of our community-care doctors trained here at UF, and they are outstanding doctors. “Any time you have a cancer-research institution it has a tendency to raise the level of care for all,” he continued. “People train there, and then they join a practice in the community. Communities that do not have academic facilities close by don’t have that. For us, the best way to describe it is like there is a halo effect.” Like Mlot, Floyd Crews is thankful for the level of cancer care in Gainesville. Crews is retired from a career with the state of Florida that included work in the prisons system, Florida Highway Patrol and the Division of Forestry. He goes to the cancer center at NFRMC for outpatient services with RapidArc™. His treatment includes a CAT scan first to determine where the tissue is that needs to be treated. “We can deliver radiation in about half the time, and we can decrease the amount of radiation delivered to nearby sensitive normal tissues with RapidArc™,” said Dr. Mark Perman, a member of the radiation oncology staff at the center.”As a result, the treatments are faster and we are able to worry less about the amount of radiation hitting structures that are outside the target.” For Crews, there are even more benefits of being treated in Gainesville. He lives 71 miles away and would have to commute if it were not for the American Cancer Society’s Winn Dixie Hope Lodge, which offers a temporary home for people being treated on an outpatient basis at any of the Gainesville-based cancer treatment centers. “My care here at North Florida has been terrific,” said Crews. “But my ability to stay at the Hope Lodge has been important as well.” Dr. Cherylle Hayes is the medical director of radiation oncology at the Cancer Center at North Florida Regional Medical

The lobby at the recently opened NFRMC Cancer Center is spacious and comforting.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT STORY

The helicopter pad atop the new Shands at the University of Florida Cancer Hospital.

Center. Hayes sees cancer treatment in North Central Florida as community based. “I look at this center as evolutionary,” she said. “As the community changes we respond to those changes. Yes, it is a radiation center with all the traditional trappings. Our plan is to develop a passport system, where people can travel through treatment. We also considered the community because cancer treatment has to include quality-of-life issues, and that encompasses the entire community.” Hayes is also impressed with the community effort between NFRMC and Shands when it comes to patient care and treatment. “I work with people at Shands all the time,” she said. “I love that accessibility. In other places the relationship between hospitals can be more adversarial. I never see that here. It is all about doing the best we can for our patients.” Another cancer patient who is grateful for the level of care locally is DeWayne Yates. The 37-year-old Trenton resident is the chief executive officer of a group of family medical and dental centers west of Gainesville. He was diagnosed in August with acute myeloid leukemia, the most common form of the disease seen in adults. He made the decision to be treated at NFRMC on an inpatient basis, only after talking to the doctors and staff, which includes Gwen Carriere, a nurse who is the cancer program coordinator. The program consists of 43-inpatient beds and 10 outpatient infusion chairs on the fifth floor of the hospital. “I knew I had other options, but I was comfortable with the oncologist here and with Gwen,” said Yates. Last month, Yates was being prepared for a bone-marrow transplant at Shands and was transferred there. His chances of making it into remission were 50 to 60 percent. The cancer program at NFRMC goes far beyond what happens on the fifth floor, said Carriere. “We do a great deal of community education for prevention and early detection,” she said. “We have five staff members at the

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hospital who are certified in the Triple Touch II™ self-breast examination. They fan out in the community to give hour-long self breast exam instruction regularly.” The hospital also focuses on groups at a high risk, but not always in a position to seek treatment – the homeless. It works with the Alachua County Coalition for the Homeless and Hungry to make sure women receive free or low-cost mammograms and pap smears, Carriere said. Many private practices are associated with one of the hospitals. That is the case with Gainesville Hematology Oncology Associates, which is associated with NFRMC. That group consists of five full-time medical oncologists, four nurse practitioners and an active clinical research office, said Dr. Lucio Gordan, a hematologist/oncologist. “We not only see patients every day, but we also do quite a bit of clinical research,” he said. “We see a vast majority of all cancer types, and we have a strong relationship with UF and other research centers around the country. We work really well with UF as far as collaboration and patient flow.” Simone believes the addition of the Shands at the University of Florida Cancer Hospital and the Cancer Center at North Florida Regional Medical Center can only make already great cancer care here even better. “Cancer care is very important in this community,” he said. “We have a lot of retirees, and we all know the frequency of cancer is much higher in older people. Every time NFRMC pushes ahead, it stimulates us to push ahead. When we push ahead, they are paying attention too. That give and take is a very good thing for the community. Things can only improve.”

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Shortly before turning the new hospital over to Shands, members of the Skansa crew that built it stand before it with members of the Shands team.

In the Heart of Florida

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Hope has a new home.

In the battle against cancer, nothing is more powerful than the human spirit. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s with that belief that we have combined the skills and experience of a multidisciplinary team of University of Florida physicians, researchers and healthcare professionals with a brand new 500,000 square foot, state-of-the-art facility. Scheduled to open its doors in November 2009, Shands Cancer Hospital at the University of Florida will lead the way in cancer care for thousands of patients from Florida and around the globe. Through such care, hope will ďŹ nd a home here.

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MEDICAL COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT

Minutes Matter Certified Primary Stroke Center

Our Primary Stroke Center is recognized by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. We are committed to rapid-response treatment that delivers the greatest chance of recovery. While stroke remains the third leading cause of death, most strokes are preventable, and many are treatable. When stroke happens, minutes really do matter. At North Florida Regional Medical Center, so do you.

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Dr. Doug Adel D.D.S. Dentist

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ith care, skill, concern and compassion, Dr. Doug Adel has been providing state-of-the-art dental services in the city of Alachua for 20 years. Adel first opened his practice in January 1990, but he knew years earlier that dentistry was his passion. “I wanted to work in a profession where I would be able to blend science and art, and have the ability to help people,” he said. “Becoming a dentist was the perfect career choice for me. Dental technology and equipment is constantly changing, which provides new and improved ways for me to treat our patients and produce that perfect smile.” In this coming year, Adel will be celebrating his 20th anniversary of practicing dentistry, and wants to take the time to thank his patients for the trust they have always shown in him. “It is the philosophy of our office to treat all patients like members of our family, and to provide quality dentistry for each individual patient,” he said. Graduating with an undergraduate degree in Chemistry from the University of Florida, and earning his dental degree from Emory University in Atlanta, Adel’s philosophy is that a beautiful smile is one of a person’s greatest assets. It is a reflection of happiness and good health. Being a family and cosmetic dentist allows Adel to be involved with all aspects of dentistry for all ages. A lot of emphasis is placed on patient education, and this starts at an early age. He encourages parents to bring their three- and four-year- old children to watch them have their teeth cleaned. The child watches, asks questions, and then wants his turn to get his teeth cleaned. Adel takes that philosophy as step further by visiting Irby Elementary School with his wife, Lisa, to promote good dental hygiene. “First graders have an interactive dental presentation, and the second graders get a dental health review and receive two-minute toothbrush timers as a reminder to continue to take care of their teeth,” said Lisa. “We take it a step further by screening the kindergartners, so they become used to what the dentist is looking for.” Whether the patient is an adult or a child, Adel believes that it is critical for him to stay up-to-date on all the latest techniques and equipment. He was one of the first dentists in Alachua County to utilize the dental Wand, a computer-controlled local anesthetic device, providing extra patient comfort, which takes the place of the anesthetic injections. He also uses the CEREC 3D system, which offers one-visit, precision ceramic tooth restoration instead of the normal two to three visits. The new restorations are natural-looking, compatible with tissue in the mouth, anti-abrasive and plaque resistant. One of the most rewarding cosmetic procedures for Adel is designing and placing porcelain veneers to help patients create a beautiful and natural smile. “Every smile is as unique as every person is unique,” he said. “Any shape, size, and color is possible, and the results speak for themselves. It is truly a life-changing investment.”

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By Victoria Phillips photography by Brad Palmer

Adel recognizes that it takes time and effort to stay ahead of the changes in the dental industry. He has undergone advanced training in cosmetic dentistry at the Nash Institute for Dental Learning in Charlotte, N.C. This post graduate training program focuses on the latest techniques, technology and materials in conventional, esthetic and cosmetic dentistry, and is accredited by the Academy of General Dentistry. That dedication to his profession is also seen outside of work. Family, faith, and being a good steward in the community is what is important to him. Married for 22 years, he and Lisa stayed quite busy raising their three sons. Josh, is a junior at UF; Jeremy a freshmen at Fordham University in New York, where he is on a baseball scholarship; and Joseph is a junior in high school. Adel has sponsored youth teams, band programs, cheerleading programs, and has coached youth teams in flag football, soccer, basketball and baseball. He is involved with his church and is a Partner in Education with the Alachua County School Board. So whether it is work, community or family, Adel has certainly touched many lives in a positive way.

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Stroke Center

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Dr. Altschuler D.M.D. Periodontic and Implant Center

Dr. Gary Altschuler doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to look for a hobby because he has his work. Altschuler, a periodontist who specializes in the treatment of gum disease and places dental implants to replace missing teeth and to help hold dentures in place, is the owner of Altschuler Periodontic and Implant Center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love what I do,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very fortunate, my occupation is my hobby.â&#x20AC;? Part of the reason he loves what he does is that he is able to perform procedures that make people more comfortable, improve health, and also have a cosmetic benefit, his wife, Anita, said. But the other reason is the cool tools he gets to use â&#x20AC;&#x201C; digital imaging, lasers, 3-D modeling software and computer-guided surgery.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have few gadgets at home,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have them all here, and I get to work with them every day. I really enjoy this technology, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great to be able to use this state-of-the-art equipment.â&#x20AC;? Anita describes him as someone who loves to see how things work. Putting the technology together with the patient care is what motivates Altschuler to come to work every day feeling good about what he does. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Interacting with patients, spending time taking care of their gums and helping them have healthier, well-maintained teeth are things in which I take pride,â&#x20AC;? he said. At the Altschuler Periodontic and Implant Center, which he describes as a technology-driven, progressive office, Altschuler routinely performs gum grafts, bone grafts, gum surgery and dental implants. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the many things I like to do is cosmetic gum grafting,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very rewarding because patients can see a big difference in their smiles.â&#x20AC;? One of the other unique aspects of the office is time. Appointments are purposely scheduled in a way to allow Altschuler to spend as much time as he needs with every patient. That also means there is less waiting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Patients say they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have enough time to read the magazines before they are called in,â&#x20AC;? he said. While working on his undergraduate degree in Microbiology from the University of Florida, Altschuler volunteered at the VA Hospital. He met some oral surgeons who suggested that he volunteer in the dental clinic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I started assisting and working in the lab there and realized this is where I belong,â&#x20AC;? Altschuler said. Today, Altschuler balances his professional work with community activity â&#x20AC;&#x201C; some related to dentistry â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and his family. In addition to volunteering at the ACORN Dental Clinic in Brooker, he is actively involved with the Florida Dental Association and the Alachua County Dental Association, where he was president in 2003. He is also the past-program chairman and organizer of the continuing education program for the Florida Dental Association. In the last year he was inducted into the American College of Dentistry, a prestigious honor only a small percentage of dentists in the country receive, and in four years he will be the president of the Florida Association of Periodontists. Anita says there is much more to her husband than work. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He definitely has a fun side. He has an excellent sense of humor,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the things that has kept us together for more than 30 years.â&#x20AC;? The couple, who met in 1978, and their daughter Amelia, 5, enjoy boating, the beach and relaxing together. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He really does care about what he does,â&#x20AC;? Anita said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to him to be able to make a difference, and help people have a better quality of life â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which he does on a daily basis.â&#x20AC;?

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Dr. Paivi Samant D.D.S. Cosmetic and Restorative

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ost people don’t come in here like this.” That was Cindy Deaton’s thought when Dr. Paivi Samant first walked into Deaton’s classroom at the University of Tennessee, Memphis, years ago. “I was so impressed by her training; it was out of the norm,” Deaton said. Now Samant is the leader of the cosmetic and restorative dentistry practice, the Samant Group, located in Gainesville next to Thornebrook Village. Samant views her work as not just dentistry, but as an art form. She strives to create the best functioning and most beautiful smile possible for each of her patients. To give optimal function and appearance, The Samant Dental Group offers many restorative and aesthetic procedures. The cosmetic dentistry procedures include whitening, bonded restorations, all ceramic crowns and veneers. Their prosthetic dentistry treatment options to replace missing teeth include partial and complete dentures, as well as implant supported restorations. The group also provides treatment to help sleep apnea (snoring) and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. Having only the best interest for her patients, Samant teams up with other dental specialists in town to produce the best results for the patient’s problems. “We take time to take care of our patients,” Samant said. “One person cannot do it all. Great dentistry is an art, as well as a multidisciplinary science .” Besides her skill level and true passion for dentistry, Samant is successful because of her people skills. “She connects and communicates well with people,” Deaton said. She uses these skills to help patients decide on the best treatment for them, to interact with other professionals in dentistry and medicine, and to teach. Samant’s journey to dentistry started with a M.A degree in speech and language pathology at the University of Helsinki, Finland in 1987. She attended the University of Tennessee to obtain her DDS degree and specialize in Prosthodontics. Samant taught at UT before moving to Gainesville and starting her practice. She has found Gainesville to be a nurturing environment both professionally and personally. Through her years as a dentist, Samant has joined the American College of Prosthodontics, the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, the American Dental Association and the American Association of Dental Sleep Medicine and American Association of Women Dentist and Florida Dental Association. She has also excelled at research in the field of dental biofilm chemistry. Already having many accomplishments, Samant’s next goal is to develop a niche in dental sleep medicine to offer

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By Ashley McCredie photography by Brad Palmer

dental appliance treatment options to help patients with sleep apnea. She would also like to set up a Gainesville chapter of the American Association of Women Dentists. Wherever life leads Samant, one thing is for sure, she has already helped many people smile proudly.

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Stroke Center

When stroke happens, minutes really do matter. At North Florida Regional Medical Center, so do you.

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Dr. Cherylle Hayes M.D. Radiation Oncology

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or Dr. Cherylle Hayes, treating cancer is a quality-of-life issue, and she should know. Not because she is the medical director of radiation oncology at the Cancer Center at North Florida Regional Medical Center, but because cancer has touched her life. Hayes, a Fort Lauderdale native, came to Gainesville in 1996 to become part of the radiation oncology faculty at the University of Florida College of Medicine. Hayesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sister, Deborah, was practicing law in Long Beach, Calif., and after her pregnancy was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer almost six years ago. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obviously, her life changed completely,â&#x20AC;? said Hayes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But her diagnosis changed my life completely as well. After leaving the university and joining North Florida, I was able to focus more on quality-of-life issues for patients. I believe strongly that this is a critical factor when it comes to care for a cancer patient, and in Gainesville that quality of life part of care extends out to the community.â&#x20AC;? While still at Shands at UF, Hayes began developing a lymphedema program. Lymphedema is the buildup of lymph fluid in the tissues just under the skin. The buildup causes swelling, tightness and discomfort in the affected limb. In cancer patients, the damage is usually due to surgery or radiation therapy. The program developed by Hayes, with Gainesville Health and Fitness Center and ReQuest Physical Therapy, includes physical therapy and exercise and is part of a cancer-recovery program she helped to develop with the fitness center. Gainesville Health and Fitness Center owner Joe Cirulli works with doctors and their cancer patients in the community, but says there is something special about Hayes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know doctors are dedicated, but she is at the next level of dedication,â&#x20AC;? said Cirulli. She is so dedicated to what she does that I have to tell her to take better care of herself. She is so driven to create the greatest possible outcome. I have all the respect in the world for her.â&#x20AC;? Hayes said that it was quality-of-life issues that got her involved with Cirulli. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We looked at fatigue because that is common in a cancer patient (for multiple reasons) and can be so debilitating. After developing an appropriate

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By David Greenberg photography by Brad Palmer exercise program, many patients are able to maintain their daily activities and even jobs,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes, when there are side effects or complications from conventional treatment, there are other options beyond changing someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drugs. We are looking at complementary ways to exploit conventional treatment and care, not necessarily alternatives. My premise became how you optimize cancer survivorship and the quality of life.â&#x20AC;? Hayesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; work has touched so many lives in Gainesville. As a result, some of the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most well-known people are there for her when she needs something as part of this community effort to treat cancer patients. Storm Roberts is one of those people who wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say no to her, and offers high praise for what she has done and what she is now doing at North Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new cancer center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know her professionally and personally, and she is world class,â&#x20AC;? said Roberts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we were going to carve a medical Mount Rushmore in Gainesville, we would have to include her likeness." "What she has put together at the cancer center puts us up so high in medical care.â&#x20AC;? Hayes is so committed to cancer care that even her husband, local developer Gary Schneider, gets into the act. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s involved in several aspects of this center,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always here doing something for us.â&#x20AC;? Ken Block, of Sister Hazel, described Hayes as a surrogate sister. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have known her for years,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I met her when she treated my dadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prostate cancer. She was more than a doctor, and she is now like a daughter to my parents. I have an enormous amount of respect for her as a doctor. She looks at the science and also sees the human side. Cherylle treats the whole person. I would do anything for her, and I know she would do anything for me. Her heart is the size of Texas. It is not often you find someone with all those qualities.â&#x20AC;? This outpouring of support for a doctor stems from Hayesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; insistence that quality of life is part of any cancer treatment. Regarding quality of life, Hayesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sister is doing just fine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She looks the best she ever has,â&#x20AC;? said Hayes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She keeps her disease and daily activities in check, and that is what everyone has to do to maintain their quality of life.â&#x20AC;?

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Dr. Peter R. Nelson M.D. Vascular Surgery

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hile they may not get the same attention as patients with heart or arterial problems, for those who suffer from them, venous diseases can have a strong impact on quality of life, and at least one doctor in Gainesville is trying to do something about it. Dr. Peter R. Nelson, an assistant professor in vascular surgery at the University of Florida College of Medicine, has been specializing in diseases associated with the veins for the past five years in Gainesville. At first blush people might assume that the problem is limited to varicose veins, but there are many other problems that can arise with venous diseases. Veins are designed to return blood back to the heart, and valves in leg veins keep the blood flowing in the right direction. Leaky valves, or reflux, allow blood to flow backwards in the veins and back into the legs, leading to the development of varicose veins, leg swelling and more serious problems. Blood clots, or blockages in the veins, can worsen this leg swelling and pain and can lead to discoloration and thinning of the skin, and ultimately ulcers that can be difficult to heal. “Venous diseases are two-to-five-times more common than the heart or arterial diseases that we hear so much about,” said Nelson. “But they clearly do not get the same level of attention. The more advanced venous problems also result in higher healthcare costs. Nationally, there is a push from the Surgeon General’s office to take a more aggressive stance with venous diseases,” Nelson said. Locally, that push has translated itself into the UF Comprehensive Vein Center. The center offers a variety of services from the traditional – conventional open surgical vein ligation and stripping – to the most up-to-date treatment available – comprehensive duplex ultrasound diagnostic imaging and minimally invasive surgical approaches such as radiofrequency ablation. “People are often told ‘they are just varicose veins’, when it could be something more serious,” said Nelson. “There is generally an underlying problem behind varicose veins. With our new ultrasound techniques, we can diagnose these problems quickly and accurately. Also with radiofrequency ablation, we can replace the traditional treatment called vein stripping with something just as effective, but far less invasive.” Nancy Peterson, who was a critical-care nurse for 22 years and a hospital administrator for 10 more in South Florida, found herself becoming fatigued and getting leg cramps. “I stood on my feet all those years,” she said. “I play golf, tennis and do other activities. I talked to my internist, and he told me about Dr. Nelson. I found him to be very professional and a kind man.” Peterson’s treatment included the radiofrequency ablation, and she said she felt better instantly. “It was a miracle,” she said. “For me as a patient, the procedure was simple. I was able to resume all my normal activities within two days.”

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But for Peterson, with her background in the medical field, the doctor was as important as the procedure. “Dr. Nelson has high standards, but more important than that, he has a great ability to make you feel like you are his only patient,” she said. “He knows who you are. He took the time to explain things, and he was very easy to talk to. He never seemed to be in a hurry, and that is remarkable in today’s society.” That same professional manner is also on exhibit with those who come to the center’s free screenings. “We have held four free vein screenings so far on Saturdays,” said Nelson. “Many people in Gainesville suffer from varicose veins and assume nothing can be or needs to be done, but that’s not always the case. We have seen about 150 people during these free Saturday screenings over the last 15 months. They receive an initial visit and ultrasound screening, and for the ones who have significant findings, we suggest they make an appointment at the UF Vein Center for a more in-depth exam. Overall, people seem to be very appreciative.” Nelson said he likes the fact that people appreciate those efforts, especially in this community, which he and his family have come to love. “We moved here from Massachusetts when the position at UF became available,” he said. “We knew people here, so the transition was relatively easy.” Nelson’s wife, Janice, is currently the president of UF’s Medical Guild, and is busy preparing for its 50th anniversary. An older son, Max, is a freshman at Buchholz High School this year, and younger son, PJ just started kindergarten at Chiles Elementary School. “We all really enjoy the community,” he said. “We’re certainly glad we made the move.”

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Stroke Center

When stroke happens, minutes really do matter. At North Florida Regional Medical Center, so do you.

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Dr. Jeffrey Rose M.D.

By Katie Gillen photography by Brad Palmer

Radiation Oncology

D

r. Jeffrey Rose can be found almost every day performing surgeries â&#x20AC;&#x201C; certainly a challenging occupation. But now, Rose and his wife, Cindy, are getting ready for a new challenge. The couple is adopting five siblings from Brazil. Cindy called the adoption process a long road and challenging, but the two are really excited and looking forward to having a family. It takes someone with compassion and a desire to help others to make the kind of family commitment Rose is making â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the same kind of compassion someone would want in a surgeon. Rose is part of a team of seven doctors that perform surgeries on a weekly basis. Each day, Rose operates on three to four patients, and once a week he must be on call at the emergency room. The surgeries can be anything from a cancer surgery scheduled in advance or an emergency operation that Rose must fit into his already hectic schedule. He first got involved in medicine during his undergraduate studies at the University of Florida. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While I was a third year Physics major, my professor told me I need to improve in math or applied science. I started doing research (applied science) and tagged along with a doctor as he went to clinics and met with patients. From there I fell in love with medicine,â&#x20AC;? said Rose. After completing his undergraduate degree, he went on to attend UF medical school, completing his residency at Shands. When Rose was not in school or studying, he was working and volunteering. Rose took on a variety of jobs ranging from a battery factory worker to a balloon shop employee. Aside from work, he volunteered at the Gainesville Community Playhouse. While volunteering at the Brown Derby theater, Rose met his wife, Cindy. The two have been married for 17 years. When asked about meeting the children from Brazil Rose said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been to Brazil, but I have seen the children in pictures and in video.â&#x20AC;? Though Rose has yet to travel to Brazil, he has been to parts of South America and Korea. Rose went to Korea when he was on active service for the United States Air Force. His service was one of the requirements that needed to be completed in order for Rose to receive a military scholarship for his education at UF. He later served at an air force base in Colorado, and did a six-month tour as a surgeon in Iraq. With his surgical skills, Rose has been able to serve his community as well as country. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jeff is a very conscientious and concerned about his patients, and he holds very high standards with his work,â&#x20AC;? said Cindy Rose.

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Linda Murphy Home Health Care

By David Greenberg photography by Brad Palmer

W

hen Linda Murphy accepted the position of director of professional services for Caretenders of Gainesville three years ago, a small homecare agency serving approximately 50 patients, she never envisioned that she would be expanding to four offices covering 15 counties with more than 100 employees. “I knew during my home health clinical rotation in nursing school that providing care and education in the home setting was the best way to effect well being,” said Murphy. A graduate of the University of Florida and former emergency room nurse at Shands at UF, Murphy says her dream and passion is lived out everyday in the homecare setting, “We change patients and caregivers' lives for the better on a daily basis,” she said. “How many people get to say that at the end of the day?” As a survivor of breast cancer, a former professional cyclist and a mother of three, Murphy appears to defy all odds. “At the age of 35, my dog discovered a large lump in my chest,” she said. “After a year of chemotherapy, surgery, more chemotherapy and radiation, I consider myself so fortunate to understand what a gift life and family truly are. I have never regretted the experience, and view it as a blessing. It was a personal health challenge that I feel gives me a different perspective to caring for others.” Seven years later and with her cancer in remission, Murphy is now the executive director for Caretenders and Apex Homecare of Keystone, bringing healthcare expertise into the home – the ideal setting to promote healing, comfort and support to those facing challenges of aging. Deborah Hill, who has managed the therapy staff at Caretenders since November 2008, said Murphy’s vision for the agency consistently puts patient care first, before the bottom line. “She’s an effective and visionary leader. She sees things that others don’t see. If we point out obstacles in the way of something we want to accomplish, she always looks past them,” Hill said. “Our goal and mission is senior advocacy. We want to assist patients and families to age in place,” said Murphy. “There is no other place in the healthcare arena where you can make the difference in a family’s life like you can in homecare. We peel the onion to discover the best way to effect change and wellness through education and intervention.” Hill said Murphy holds high expectations for herself and her agencies. She estimated Murphy grew Caretenders of Gainesville 850 percent in the three years she has been the director. “She’s an outrageously clinically strong expert as a nurse, and she always sees the end result. She doesn’t buckle, she’s not bound by rules, and she constantly pushes the envelope,” Hill said. Murphy lives just south of Gainesville on a small horse farm with her husband of 23 years, Chris, sons, Sean, 17, Jake, 16 and Aidan, age 2, who Murphy referred to as their surprise. “My boys think they are the only children in the world with farm chores,” she said. “My hope is that we have helped instill a farmer’s work ethic and desire to change the world for a better place.”

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Stroke Center

When stroke happens, minutes really do matter. At North Florida Regional Medical Center, so do you.

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Dr. Anne Rottmann M.D. Neurology

By David Greenberg photography by Brad Palmer

Dr. Anne Rottmann is passionate about what she does â&#x20AC;&#x201C; whether that is creating a stroke center at North Florida Regional Medical Center or playing her oboe or English horn. Rottmann, a neurologist at Southeastern Neurology (SIMED), is also the director of the stroke center at NFRMC, which is certified by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). Started this June, the very existence of the center raises the level of care for stroke patients. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We can diagnose and treat better,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from the ambulance crew to the hospitalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s maintenance staff has had some level of training. At the very least, they can recognize the signs of a stroke when they see it, and notify the right people. Beyond that, our efforts include education for all the doctors in our referral area and the community in general. Having the center means the level of care for stroke victims is vastly improved. It saves lives.â&#x20AC;? Saving lives is something that has been part of Rottmann since she started her career as a general practitioner in 1981. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over time, your depth of knowledge grows along with your professional activity,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But you have to balance that against family. All of a sudden you turn around, and your kids are grown and out of the house.â&#x20AC;? The changes at home created opportunities for Rottmann to explore new professional avenues at SIMED and the hospital. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Today, in addition to everything else, I can mentor young doctors,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is a wonderful experience to help other neurologists grow.â&#x20AC;? But there is much more to Rottmann than simply being a neurologist and director of the stroke center. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a musician. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I play the oboe and the English horn,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I find it enjoyable, relaxing and therapeutic. Music soothes the soul. It is my creative side.â&#x20AC;? Her friend and colleague, Dr. Steven Reid, a neurosurgeon at SIMED, says it helps make her a superior doctor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have known her since we were both residents,â&#x20AC;? Reid said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I consider her one of the most caring and intellectually deep physicians I know. She has an interest in philosophy, and her curiosity covers a much broader range than medicine and neurology. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bit of a renaissance woman. She has explored and mastered many more dimensions in life than just medicine, and that makes her a better physician and human being.â&#x20AC;? As far as her musical interests go, Rottmann does more than just play the instruments. She performs with the Gainesville Pops and the Gainesville Community Band, and once a year she attends a music convention with the Association of Community Bands. Her first husband passed away in 1994, and now she gets to enjoy the musical part of her life with her second husband, Richard Hord. He was director of the Gainesville Community Band for 27 years, and he plays in Gainesville Pops. â&#x20AC;&#x153;His family and ours were friends,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some time after my first husband passed away, we started dating. Now we have a blended family with four adult children.â&#x20AC;? Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a mutual family interest in skiing, and that entails a once-a-year trip to a winter climate to enjoy that activity. By living life to the fullest, this physician has a better understanding of how to treat life, and that makes her a better doctor.

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Drs. Robert Ruano D.C. & Deborah Hudson D.C. Chiropractic

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hey are a modern medicine duo, wielding the latest advancements in chiropractic-rehab technology to give their patients comfortable, effective relief from pain. Founders of Innovative Back Solutions, Drs. Robert Ruano and Deborah Hudson use cutting-edge breakthroughs in non-surgical treatments to give patients relief from back and neck pain. Their practice offers “spinal care for the 21st century,” providing alternatives to the traditional popping and cracking of manual chiropractic adjustments. Patients are often fearful of manual adjustments, Ruano said, but treatments like muscle stimulation, dry hydrotherapy, spinal decompression and adjustments using the Pro-Adjuster help patients feel comfortable, calm and safe because they are low-pressure and specific to the problem areas. Ruano and Hudson treat patients with back and neck injuries from serious trauma to chronic pain. Disc injuries are the most common complaint, he said, and to treat them, he uses state-ofthe-art equipment like the Pro-Adjuster and the DRX9000. “These new technologies place objective finding with a subjective complaint,” said Hudson. The Pro-Adjuster gives doctors the ability to use computer technology to detect problem areas and treat them with a highspeed yet gentle impulse to restore spinal motion. These impulses relieve pressure on the nervous system. Spinal decompression is an intensive six-week treatment discrehabilitation process designed to relieve pressure and is possible because of a machine called the DRX9000. “It targets and treats specific discs in the spine,” Ruano said. Ruano grew up in Pittsburgh, and studied computer network design at West Virginia University. While working with computers in Atlanta, he made friends with some chiropractic students whose work intrigued him. Desiring a more active career, he went back to school, and received his doctorate from Life Chiropractic College. Shortly after opening a private chiropractic practice in High Springs in 1998, he heard of new technology that was helping to heal patients safely and painlessly. He was skeptical, so he began a year-long investigation, researching the different techniques and systems. After visiting clinics that practiced these non-surgical techniques, he was convinced. In 2006, he sold his practice and started Innovative Back Solutions in Gainesville. Not long after, Ruano was joined by Hudson, who was a friend and colleague. She had graduate from the University of Florida, operated Gator Family Chiropractic, and has been treating patients for the last 10 years. She had been using the ProAdjuster, and was seeing tremendous results. Apart from treating patients, Ruano and Hudson are avid Gators fans. Framed news stories from the football team’s victories and photos of Tim Tebow and Chris Leak adorn the walls of their office. On a bookshelf behind Ruano’s desk are photos of him with his wife, Marla, and his two sons Aydan, 3, and Hayes, 2 months old.

LivingInTheHeartOfFlorida.com

By Sara Horn photography by Brad Palmer

For fun, he plays soccer with Aydan and Hayes, and he loves taking them to Gators sports events. On most days at 6 a.m., Ruano and Hudson are at Gainesville Health and Fitness Center. Staying in good health isn’t just something they tell their patients to do. “We practice what we preach,” Ruano said. For both of them, the most rewarding part of their job is to share in their patients’ success stories. “It’s life changing for them, and it’s great to see that transformation,” she said. “That’s why I do the job.” She loves practicing chiropractic because it gets to the root of a problem and addresses the conditions without drugs or unwanted surgery, while providing lasting relieve for the patient. “Our technology is the most advanced and safest,” said Ruano. It’s not just about alleviating pain, but also getting patients back to the things they enjoy doing, said Hudson. Kevin Hackett is one patient who has experienced that transformation. Years of golfing and skiing took their toll, when he injured his back in 2008. The injury worsened into a herniated disc one day at breakfast. “I sneezed twice and hit the floor,” Hackett said. The pain was so unbearable he couldn’t walk. He started the spinal decompression procedure, felt relief after three weeks of treatment, and by the end could do everything he did before he was hurt. "You couldn't ask for anybody better." Hackett said. "Their concern for patients is No. 1."

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Stroke Center

When stroke happens, minutes really do matter. At North Florida Regional Medical Center, so do you.

Sponsored By

352-333-4000

MEDICAL COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT

.EWBERRY2OADÂ&#x201E;'AINESVILLE &, WWW.&2-#COM For more information about stroke and the physicians who provide care at NFRMC, call Consult-a-NurseÂŽ at 1-800-611-6913

Dr. John W. Tyrone M.D. Cosmetic and Plastic Surgery

O

n any given day, Dr. John W. Tyrone can perform the most complex of cosmetic surgical procedures, and then he goes home, where he never stops working with his hands. Surgically those procedures include breast lifts, brachioplasty, face/neck lifts, rhinoplasty, chin augmentations and brow lifts. At home, it might be fixing a computer, building a house on the Suwannee River or repairing a car. Even with all that, he still has time to help 9-year-old daughter, Katie, with her math homework, something he had to do a lot of to get where he is today. He received his bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in economics from the University of Florida, and medical degree from the University of South Florida. Tyrone stood out during his residency by gaining recognition as Intern of the Year, Residency Advisor and Chief Resident. Following that, his plastic surgery training was at Emory University where he learned from some of the leading plastic surgeons in the country. Tyrone knew early on he had an interest in plastic surgery because of its ability to boost peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s confidence and allow them to feel better about their bodies. One of the things Tyrone likes about plastic surgery is that each surgery is a little different, and he appreciates that each procedure can provide a patient with satisfaction. Out of all the procedures he performs, Tyrone said he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a specific favorite because each is a little different, and he appreciates that each procedure can provide a patient with satisfaction. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one profession in medicine where you can make a positive impact on patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives and improve their self confidence,â&#x20AC;? he said. Cheryl remembers a patient who wrote a letter to Tyrone thanking him for making her dreams come true â&#x20AC;&#x201C; something the patient never thought was within her reach.â&#x20AC;&#x153;That is what touches him the most,â&#x20AC;? Cheryl said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He loves helping people. I think he loves the feeling it gives him when he hears somebodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life has changed.â&#x20AC;? Doing what is best for the patient is a rule by which he lives. When someone comes into the office for a consultation, he makes sure they are there for the right reasons and not trying to â&#x20AC;&#x153;take the easy way out.â&#x20AC;? Patients who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t should either find another surgeon or not do anything, he said. When he isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in the office, Tyroneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family takes center stage. Katie, along with his other daughter, Cami, 6, keep him entertained and constantly on the move. Many weekends the family can be found boating on the Suwannee River, their getaway from the hustle and bustle. One of the reasons Tyrone opened a practice in Gainesville was because of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quality schools and familyfriendly atmosphere. The other important reason? Why the Gators, of course.

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By Victoria Phillips photography by Brad Palmer

Tyrone and his wife enjoy going to Gator football games together. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We look forward to the start of every season. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our time togetherâ&#x20AC;?, Cheryl said. While during the day, Tyrone may be performing surgery that will change peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives, at the end of that day he is just like every other father and husband, Cheryl said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a down-to-earth person who likes what he does,â&#x20AC;? she said.

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(right) The HVAC system

AROUND THE HOME

Building Green By David Greenberg Photography by Brad Palmer

42

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and insulation are critical factors in green building.

by Using Energy Effectively Editor’s Note: This is the third in a continuing series on green building. In the next issue, we will look at building a green exterior.

any builders will say that building green and building energy efficient is synonymous, but while they are not really the same, it is almost impossible to build a green home without paying careful consideration to energy efficiency. No aspect of the home will lead to that green identity more than an energy-efficient HVAC system. That’s because heating and, in Florida, air conditioning will have a greater impact on energy use than any other feature in the home. David Melville, the owner of David Melville Contracting Services, Inc. (DMCS), consulted a mechanical engineer before determining the HVAC system for the 3,300-square-foot, two-story home he built in Brytan, the mixed-use, traditional neighborhood being developed on Archer Road in southwest Alachua County by Brice Business Group. The home will be Gainesville’s first LEED Platinum-certified home. LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification is offered by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). Platinum is the highest of four levels of green certification in USGBC’s program. The others are certified, silver and gold. “Green homes are generally tight and energy efficient,” said Melville. “That means fresh air does not seep in through the windows, doors and walls. But fresh air is a factor in green certification, so you have to include an HVAC system that brings in fresh air.” However, that creates a new problem, according to Melville. “As we say in Florida, it is not the heat, it is the humidity,” he said. “I needed a unit that was going to bring in fresh air, but essentially dehumidify it.” Melville’s mechanical engineer recommended a two-ton system from NuTone. The unit comes with a true variablespeed compressor and has what he described as an effective SEER rating of 26, although it is rated at 24. “This unit can cycle at 164 different speeds, and the typical unit has four to eight speeds,” said Melville. “It is always on. It can go down to next to nothing, but still be cycling air. But at that level it will be drawing virtually no amps, so it is not impacting the energy bill.” The system pre-cools the fresh air it is bringing in before introducing it into the HVAC system itself. It also dehumidifies that air. “Florida summer air is 90 percent humidity,” said Melville. “It dehumidifies that air to between 35 and 50 percent before bringing it into the house. That means the cooling unit does not have to work as hard.”

In the Heart of Florida

Melville also says with a unit like this with all its different speeds, it is better to leave the thermostat set and never touch it again. “Since the unit will draw so little electricity, it is better to keep it running,” he said. “Since a green house is built so tight, there is a real danger of mold and mildew if you don’t keep air circulating.” Like everything else in a home he is building, Melville balances the additional costs against the benefit. “Even though this HVAC system costs more, I include it in the mix,” he said. “With everything we are doing in this home, I anticipate that the homeowner will begin to see the payback within three to four years. That may be a little longer than normal, but this is the tightest home I ever built.” For an effective HVAC system to be even more effective, insulation is a key factor. In his home, Melville used a soy-based spray foam which seals up any gaps. “You don’t have to worry about not getting good spread,” he said. “One of the remarkable things about this particular spray foam is that when used in the attic, the temperature will never be more than three to five degrees more than the rest of the house. We all know how hot it can be when you go up into an attic in Florida – especially in the summer. That’s not the case here.” If air conditioning and insulation play the biggest roles in a home’s utility bill, hot water is right behind them. In this home, Melville opted for an on-demand, gas, tankless system from Noritz. “A lot of homeowners want to be able to turn on the tap in the master bathroom, which may be on the other side of the home, and expect hot water immediately,” he said. “As a result, they may shy away from tankless, or actually get a second unit.” Instead, Melville has added a unit that goes under the sink farthest from the water heater. “In this case, it is the second upstairs bath,” he said. “I also added two motion detectors, one for each upstairs bath. When the motion detector senses someone entering either of those bathrooms, it activates the water heater. In about 15 seconds, there is hot water. The unit and the two motion detectors add about $500 to the cost of the home, and that’s instead of adding a second water heater.” It is all about finding a balance, said Melville. “At the end of the day, my responsibility as a builder is to build a home that I would want to live in,” he said. “I want a green home, and there are ways to do that with reasonable cost and without sacrifice.” To learn more about David Melville Contracting Services, Inc., go online to www.dmcs-inc.com or call (863) 521-1217. To learn more about the Brytan community, go online to www.brytan.com.

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AROUND THE HOME

Cabinets and Countertops By Molly Bruce (left) photo courtesy Street of Dreams Photography. The medium born looks great paired with light and dark marble, as this kitchen demonstrates.

A

lack of trends in the market means plenty of options – and that is a good thing if you’re interested in new cabinets and countertops. “The market seems to be all over the place right now,” said Chris Buffington, owner of Town and Country Cabinets and Production Partners, the manufacturing division, since 1996. Contemporary, clean-cut lines and bold colors are selling. Manmade, green products are popular. And the basic, old-fashioned wood finishes aren’t going out of style anytime soon, according to numerous cabinet and countertop retailers in the area. “There are several styles and designs for the kitchen to choose from,” said Debbie Busby, owner of Busby Cabinets for 33 years. And what about those green products? They have been the focus of many retailers and the theme of the Southeastern Building Conference (SEBC) 31st Annual Building Show this year. Busby said she and her company tries to be as green as possible, as a charter member of the Good Earthkeeping community issued by GRU. However, Buffington compared buying green products to buying organic vegetables that cost more. “There’s a lot of buzz about green, but I don’t know that there’s much substance,” he said. He said he cares about trying green products, but he was skeptical about whether they are worth the upfront costs or not. Unlike other home products, like HVAC systems and water heaters, there is no way for a homeowner to recoup any additional costs through energy savings. It is simply a matter of someone’s individual philosophy.

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In the Heart of Florida

The SEBC show, held recently at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, had more than 200 visiting companies which showcased many green products. Paul Thompson, CEO and executive vice president of the Florida Home Builders Association, which hosted SEBC, said green and affordability were the main themes this year. “Homes are becoming smaller, greener and more sustainable,” he said. The United States contributes to global warming more than any other large country, according to the Environmental Defense Fund, a national nonprofit organization. Some remodelers and builders are dedicating their businesses to changing this though, whether the products cost a little more or not. Indigo, North Central Florida’s green home supply store, provides only “sustainable, nontoxic and recycled building materials” according to its Web site. Owner Liberty Phoenix, who opened the store two years ago, gets most of her products locally, and she works with local installers, architects and builders. Though her store is new, “it’s been really well-received and growing rapidly,” Phoenix said. “One of our top sellers is Concrete Countertops.I think this is primarily because we have a custom countertop maker that sources everything locally, uses over 80% recycled content and has zero waste,” she said. Because the concrete is casted specifically to look like granite, stone, or marble, which are nonrenewable products, you’re not being compromised on beauty, she said. Customers tend to choose dark colors with light aggregates to achieve this look, she said. Shells, glass and aluminum shavings are all used to help attain the desired effect. Phoenix warned that many so-called green products aren’t really all that healthy for the environment or the home. Solvents and formaldehyde (which is now outlawed), she said, are just two examples of hazards

to watch out for. Also, she said many companies claim that bamboo is a sustainable wood because it is stronger and grows quickly. But, she said, many companies harvest the bamboo before it has reached its maturity, which takes about five years, which means it is not as strong and therefore not as durable. Phoenix recommended Crystal Cabinetry’s Green Quest Line for cabinetry. GreenQuest is a new frameless, environmentally-friendly cabinet line that offers a multitude of options to design healthy and sustainable custom cabinetry. “They’re the greenest you can get,” she said. Though she sells green products, Phoenix said the natural-wood look is in. Things like wood veneers are great because customers get the look without sacrificing the trees. On the other side, Busby said everything she sells is stone, wood or custom glass countertops. However, Busby, too, uses all products for quality and durability. “We try to be as green as possible,” she said. She said she has noticed that clean-line cabinets, which follow the contemporary style, have been more popular lately. Her husband, Jack Busby, who owns Busby Cabinets with her, won honorable mention in the National Kitchen and Bath Association Competition for a bathroom display, so the couple must be doing something right. Buffington said he has noticed a new trend in cabinets – frameless. “Frameless gives full access to the cabinet,” he said. While traditional cabinets have a ledge that closes in the cabinet, frameless, or European-style, cabinets avoid this problem. “We’re doing a lot of it,” he said. Another trend he’s been selling a lot of is whitepainted wood. “That’s what’s popular right now,” he said. However, younger buyers tend to like darker colors with modern fixtures like mixed-metal and high-gloss. Bright accent colors like red, blue and lime green have also sold well lately. Because homeowners are remodeling more than they are rebuilding right now, according to both Buffington and Thompson, builders are customizing cabinets and countertops to exactly what the customers want. Buffington explained that this makes cabinets and countertops more customizable, whether they are green or not. “There’s a wide variety of products available right now. The sky is the limit.”

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AROUND THE HOME

For all your local cabinet and countertop needs, check out these businesses: Bailey Industries Inc. 352-787-4894, www.baileyind.com Bradco Supply Corporation Inc. 352-336-5372, www.bradcosupply.com Busby Cabinets 386-462-2709, www.busbycabinets.com Cabinetry By Design 352-333-7774, www.constructionwork.com Carson's Cabinetry 352-373-8292 DCI Countertops 352-794-5460 D.R. Nickelson & Company Inc. 386-755-6565 Florida Kitchens 386-758-0099, www.flkitchens.com Gainesville Kitchens 352-505-3138 Indigo Green Store 352-378-2285, www.indigogreenstore.com International Stone Source 352-481-3777, www.internantionalstonesource.com Ivan Solbach Company Inc. 352-262-1838, www.ivansolbach.com Jackson Stoneworks 352-372-6600, www.jacksonstoneworks.com Kitchen Art & Design Inc. 352-331-9889, www.kitchen-art-design.com Marble Today Inc. 386-326-6580 Mica Works Cabinetry Inc. 352-336-1707, www. Micaworks.com Superior Millwork Company 904-355-5676 Town and Country Cabinets & Production Partners 352-454-4833 The Axiom Kitchen Company 386-623-4137 Woodscapes Interiors Inc. 352-367-8456, www.woodscapesinteriors.com Wynne Industries 352-472-4239

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AROUND THE HOME

Landscape Calendar

(left - potted plant) Spruce up the patio with colors of Autumn burgundy Fountain Grass, Cornelius Agave, Croton, yellow Shrimp Plant and Creeping Jenny.

Fall Gardening By Jon George

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emperatures have changed enough for my family to relax and enjoy meals on the back porch again. We counted seven different species of butterflies feeding on various flowers and a hummingbird or two buzzing around a late blooming Chaste tree. The plants think spring has come again and are putting on quite a show before first frost. Fortunately, North Central Florida does not become cold enough to halt year ‘round gardening and this is a great time of year to get trees, shrubs and perennials planted with little transplant stress.

Tuscan Sun is the name of this beautiful floribunda rose we trialed in one of our client’s gardens. Apricot to orange best describes the color which we paired with bright green Abelia ‘Kaleidoscope’ and ‘Lime Zinger’ elephant ears. The coppery color intensifies with cooler weather and the blooms should make a good cut flower for the Thanksgiving table. Tuscan Sun also has a light honey fragrance.

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AROUND THE HOME

A well designed landscape with layers of height and texture will add value to your home. With the right selection and placement of plant material, you can have low maintenance color in your garden all year.

www.TheCottageGardener.com

(352)333-9661 serving Alachua Co. since 1995 Design Consultations â&#x20AC;˘ Planting â&#x20AC;˘ Continuing Garden Care HOME

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AROUND THE HOME

Landscape Calendar

Occasionally I stumble across a plant so noteworthy that I have it specially grown for our designs. One such treasure we call antique white Yarrow, pictured here in a client’s garden in Alachua. This old heritage strain of Achillea attracts butterflies both as a nectar food and host plant for caterpillars. Don’t be fooled by its delicate lacy white blooms. This is one tough plant. I must give credit to Miss Hunt of Jonesville for sharing this plant. It is one passed down from friends and relatives for more than a century. We designed this butterfly and hummingbird garden in southwest Gainesville especially for children but the adults enjoy it as well. A pea gravel path lined with brick leads down through a wrought iron trellis with benches. Inspiration came from my oldest daughter when she suggested I create a place to sit and have conversation in our own garden. This little garden retreat will soon be a shady place to talk and play as the ‘Tangerine Beauty’ Cross vine covers the trellis and provides a canopy overhead. Agapanthus Blue Heaven has created quite a stir this year being the first ever re-blooming Lily of the Nile. I have always loved agapanthus with its evergreen leaves and blue “lollipops” perched atop long stems. Blue Heaven produces a true blue flower head with waves of flowers if fed heavily with bulb booster. Fall is the best time to get agapanthus established for the next year’s spring bloom.

Jon George is the owner of Cottage Gardens Inc., a Gainesville based landscape design and installation firm. He has been gardening in North Central Florida for more than thirty years. You may contact his staff at www.TheCottageGardener.com or at cottagegardensinc@yahoo.com.

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TE NE CH W NO LO GY !

The Altschuler Periodontic and Implant Center

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Enchanting Evenings Out

E

mbers of Gainesville holds the same reputation Ritz-Carlton carries with hotels – heavenly cuisine, attentive service and luxurious facilities. For starters, the Prime Filet Mignon Flatbread appetizer offers thin strips of blackened filet mignon grilled on a flatbread alongside caramelized onions, sundried tomatoes and mushrooms finished with a balsamic vinegar reduction sauce. This flatbread is thick enough so the appetizer is easy to eat, but it is thin enough so it does not inhibit you from savoring every flavor in this dish. If you prefer a salad as a starter, there is the Fire Grilled Caesar, organic romaine hearts lightly smoked on the wood-burning grill and drizzled with homemade Caesar dressing. Accompanied by a Parmesan cracker, this salad is entirely unique. The hearts are smoked perfectly to capture the flavor of the grill, but it is not executed in a way that wilts or takes away from the hearts’ crisp nature. To experience both succulent seafood and steaks, try the Surf and Turf, which features a 6-ounce prime filet and Red King Crab. Executive Chef Briton Dumas shells all the crabs and cooks each steak to order. Served with your choice of two side dishes, this exquisite meal remains fit for the gods. Each bite just melts in your mouth, warms your heart and soothes your soul. And the side of lemon butter comes in its own porcelain dish sitting in a holder below which a tea candle is lit. Just when you thought this dining experience couldn’t be any more divine, the dessert arrives. The Banana Foster Cheesecake has a white Oreo crust, topped with fresh bananas, and glazed with a cinnamon, rum and brown sugar sauce. Finished with a dollop of fresh whipped cream and side of fried spaghetti coated in cinnamon and sugar, this dessert may seem fit for two but will certainly be devoured by one.

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by Lauren Gispanski photography by Brad Palmer

Mastering the craft of fine dining, the Embers staff is impeccably trained, a characteristic uncommon to a new restaurant that sets Embers apart. Polite, knowledgeable and extremely friendly, the Embers staff members treat every customer as if they are serving the guest in their own home, a philosophy Embers president Ryan Todd ensures is put into practice with each service. Aside from the amiable people, the décor and ambiance establish this restaurant as one of Gainesville’s premiere steakhouses. Romantic lighting, dark wood and fresh linens create the intimate, upscale experience unfamiliar to Gainesville. The brown leather chairs and exclusive black napkins artfully placed in ornate napkin rings make you feel as if you are on cloud nine. Every detail down to the cloth towels in the restrooms provides a sense of luxury to your dining experience. Unlike comparable restaurants in larger cities, Embers does not charge extra for a lavish dining experience. Although the only USDA Prime Cut steakhouse that serves the finest top 2 percent of quality steak, Embers' prices remain comparable to any chain steakhouse. Appetizers range from $8 to $14, and entrées average $12 to $39. Depending upon the cut, steaks vary from $24 to $46. And if you’d like to come in for a nightcap and dessert, Embers also offers champagne and dessert for two. Or if you’d like to see what Chef Dumas can really do, reserve the chef’s table and treat yourself to an exclusive multi-course meal each paired with a wine selected by Todd, who is also a certified sommelier. With so many amazing aspects to this new restaurant, be sure to check it out and remember this – there is no other place in town offering such incredibly warm service and delectable dishes.

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Embers Gainesville

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Emiliano’s A Gainesville

by Lauren Gispanski

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photography by Brad Palmer

In the Heart of Florida

s you walk toward this fine eatery located just east of Main Street and South First Avenue, the savory aromas and contagiously fun atmosphere lure you into the most comfortable and flavorful dining experience downtown Gainesville has to offer. Family owned and operated for 25 years, Emiliano’s Café lays claim to being the first Gainesville restaurant to offer tapas, a wide variety of appetizers in Spanish cuisine. Scallops marinated in limejuice and seasoned with cilantro, red onion, peppers and garlic, the Ceviche de Vieras remains one of the traditional cold tapas on the café’s menu. If you’re looking to heat things up, Emiliano’s Café also has Tapas Calientes, or hot tapas, such as the Alcachofas Rellenas and Crab-Stuffed Portobello. Spinach- and ricottastuffed artichoke hearts topped with a creamy béchamel sauce, the Alcachofas Rellenas is one of the most popular Tapas Calientes. In close second, the Crab-Stuffed Portobello features baked baby Portobello mushrooms with a crab stuffing and queso blanco topping served over a calabaza-jalapeño cream sauce. Unique to Emiliano’s Café, the creamy sauces accompanying the tapas add a velvety richness to the dishes and bring a finishing touch for which each one of your 10,000 taste buds will be more than thankful. Of course, the menu contains signature soups such as the Gazpacho, a chilled tomato soup with onions, peppers, garlic, cucumbers and cilantro. Emiliano’s Café offers classic entrées as well to accommodate the less adventurous palates with the Ropa Vieja and Paella Emiliano’s. An authentic Cuban dish, Ropa Vieja is pulled flank steak in a red wine and tomato sauce served with green peppers and onions topped with fried capers. This dish also comes with a side of black beans, white or Spanish rice and amarillos, sweet fried plantains.

Served in a large shallow steel platter, Paella Emiliano’s features chicken and fresh fish cooked in rice and Spanish seasonings with sautéed shrimp, asparagus and artichoke hearts. Mussels and clams line the dish, creating the only barrier between you and an explosively flavorful entrée. Maintaining its 25-year reign as Gainesville’s premiere tapas and mojitos hot spot, Emiliano’s Café continues to satiate the appetites of its vast clientele with new additions to the already diverse menu. Fried island conch served with a cilantro tartar sauce, Conch Fritters is a new tapa on the menu. Fried so the conch is perfectly crisp rather than overdone and greasy, these bite-sized pieces sure will go quickly. Quite possibly the most popular new item remains the NY Strip. A char-grilled 12-ounce New York strip steak topped with a Stilton bleu cheese and habanero sauce served alongside mashed potatoes and grilled asparagus, this meat and potato entrée goes above and beyond its rather plain reputation. To finish any meal, dessert is essential, and at Emiliano’s Café, the Tembleque is unbelievable. Thick, creamy coconut pudding topped with a layer of dark chocolate ganache, Tembleque manages to not only clear your palate but also leave behind a bit of sweetness. Served in a classy martini glass, you’ll definitely feel like you’re in heaven when you devour this delightful dessert. If you’d rather finish your meal with something from the bar, mojitos are this restaurant’s signature. With eight varieties from which to choose, the Pomegranate Mojito combines the flavor of sweet pomegranate with sour lime and cool mint for a more than refreshing taste. Depending on what you desire, the prices vary. Tapas range from $4 to $12, and entrées average from $15 to $20. So when you’re craving one-of-a-kind pan-Latin cuisine, know a night at Emiliano’s is a night of great food for everyone!

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www.emilianoscafe.com

25 years in the heart of Gainesville

Crazy 8’s Lunch Express

“eight choices, eight minutes, eight dollars”

352-375-7381 downtown at 7 SE 1st Ave, Gainesville Live Jazz - Mon &Wed 6:30 -10: 00 p.m. Sunday Brunch - 10: 00 a.m. - 4: 00 p.m.


Amelia’s F Gainesville

by Lauren Gispanski

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photography by Brad Palmer

In the Heart of Florida

eaturing traditional northern Italian cuisine alongside its chef’s own culinary creations, Amelia’s offers a wide variety, transforming the traditional Italian restaurant stereotype. Located in the downtown Sun Center behind the Hippodrome Theatre, this restaurant can bring a little taste of Italy to everyone. A classic Italian appetizer remains Bruschetta, and Amelia’s recipe focuses on its fresh, juicy tomatoes. With every bite, the diced tomatoes that you can’t stuff into your mouth will fall from the thick slice of baguette onto the appetizer plate below. And after the baguette is gone, you will eat the leftover tomatoes with either a fork or your fingers because the olive oil, basil, and light layer of Parmesan with which the Bruschetta is made make this recipe simply irresistible. If chilled tomatoes aren’t up your alley, try the Crostini NY, a spinach, artichoke and Parmesan cream dip served with garlic crostinis, thin toasted slices of Italian bread drizzled with olive oil and seasoned with garlic. Of course there is

also the Cioppino, an Italian seafood stew of mussels, calamari rings and tentacles, salmon, and tomatoes cooked in a seafood broth. For a truly Italian seafood experience, look no further than the Florida Grouper Posilipo, a seared egg-battered grouper with Cedar Key clams, spinach, garlic and a light marinara sauce. The breading created by the egg batter is not heavy but instead mirrors that of a chicken Parmesan, capturing the heart of Italian cuisine. Amelia’s knows how to end any great meal, and that is with a divine dessert. Although offering everything from cheesecake and chocolate tortes to tiramisu and cannolis, the Creme Caramel Flan tops the list and is far too tasty to share regardless of its generous size. The prices at Amelia’s are comparable to the prices at any other chain Italian restaurant, but unlike those more familiar names, Amelia’s provides a more personal and flavorful experience. So remember to keep Amelia’s in mind the next time you’re craving Italian.

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Mark's Prime Steakhouse Gainesville

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he intimidating entrance, darkened tavernlike décor and polished wait staff insinuate ultimate exclusivity, but Mark’s Prime Steakhouse is actually not the culmination of conceit its exterior suggests. Sandwiched between 101 Downtown and Dragonfly, the steakhouse is typically savored by those celebrating special occasions or enjoying the happy hour specials. The Bacon Wrapped Scallops show you the sweet side of the sea. The mango salsa with which the scallops are topped accents the crispy bacon and hint of Chipotle honey sauce without overpowering the natural and delicate scallop flavor. The Original Bleu salad and Sliced Tomato & Fresh Mozzarella are also great cocktail pairs or meal starters, but Mark’s prides itself in the Filet

O

Ti Amo! - Gainesville

ffering oxtail, quail and escargot, Ti Amo! of downtown Gainesville puts a sophisticated spin on small-plate dining. Its Mediterranean dishes may seem exotic, yet many of the ingredients were purchased from organic farmers at the area’s farmer’s market, instilling a local flavor to all the dishes. Unique to Ti Amo!, the menu features a variety of gourmet dishes available in both small and large portions. A well-known favorite nearly everyone orders, the Braised Oxtail will satisfy both curiosities and appetites. First seared to enhance its natural flavors, the oxtail is then cooked slowly until ready to serve with gnocchi, grana padana cheese, pine nuts and a drizzle of rosemary oil. If you’d rather stick to a Mediterranean staple, the Local Organic Tomato & Gorgonzola Salad

101 Downtown - Gainesville

101

Downtown turned a new leaf in Gainesville nightlife. Unlike other hot spots, this one transforms from a restaurant offering international fusion cuisine into an active martini bar at night. Much like the airy, Miami-chic atmosphere, the appetizers are fresh and fulfilling. The 2nd Ave. Chicken Quesadilla features char-grilled chicken, caramelized onions, peppers and melted cheese in a flour tortilla. Dip this crispy creation into the homemade hot red chili sauce for an explosion of flavor. There are two items on the 101 Downtown menu that you will not find anywhere else – the Brazilian Bourbon Coffee Strip and Filet 101. Marinated for 48 hours in Knob Creek Bourbon, soy sauce, pineapple juice and brown sugar, the 15-ounce New York strip steak features a Brazilian Bourbon coffee bean rub

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Mignon. So tender the steak melts in your mouth, Mark’s believes its Oscar option is what makes the steaks so unique. But do not worry if you’re not a steak-eater, Mark’s has other entrées that will do more than just the trick. The Grouper Santa Fe brings back the mango salsa patrons love to this fresh black grouper dish. Finished with lumps of white crab meat sautéed in cilantro-lime butter, the grouper refreshes taste buds with its citrus flavors. The Chocolate Paradise dessert is a Mark’s original and infamous favorite. The Oreo Kahlua crust filled with a rich chocolate mousse is finished with hazelnut cream, raspberry and toasted almonds. This decadent dessert has incredible substance and must be shared or saved for later. With appetizers and salads averaging $10, sides and desserts pricing $7, and entrées varying from $20 to $50, Mark’s Prime Steakhouse remains a place to eat, drink and be merry. would be a safe bet. Slices of juicy red tomatoes with crumbles of gorgonzola cheese are served alongside a side salad of mixed greens and balsamic vinaigrette dressing. Finished with a slice of starfruit and some pickled onions, this salad will please your eyes and your taste buds. For those seeking something from the sea, try the Grilled Cobia topped with a homemade red pepper sauce and served over shrimp polenta with a side of zucchini, squash, mushrooms and onions. The creamy polenta mixed with the red pepper sauce really complements the fish and adds that sweet and spicy flavor everyone craves. Ti Amo!’s prices can accommodate everyone. The small plates range from $4 to $10, and the large plates average $15 to $20. Its bar is full, and the wine list is long. So know this about Ti Amo! – this tasty “new age Mediterranean” is here to stay. that will leave a delicately bitter flavor in your mouth you will never forget. On the other hand, the filet covered in a rosemary-port demi-glace and finished with tobacco onions tossed in Cajun spices will satiate those carnivores who have a bit of a sweet tooth. Both steaks are so tender, a steak knife is superfluous. The only way to finish a 101 Downtown meal is with either a decedent dessert or a dessert martini. The Molten Chocolate Volcano and Mint Chocolate Chip martini are both exquisite choices that cater to those looking for a rich sweet or nightcap. The prices are fair with appetizers at $10, entrées around $20, and cocktails and desserts about $5 to $10 a piece. As the night approaches in 101 Downtown, the music begins to play, the liquor continues to pour and the patrons start to party. Whrn it comes to 101 Downtown – it’s more than a look, it’s a flavor, and it’s known to fill quickly. HOME Living

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Mario’s Wine Bar & European Bistro by Lauren Gispanski

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photography by Brad Palmer

tep into Mario’s Wine Bar & European Bistro and you will experience just what everyone needs as the chaos that accompanies the holiday season approaches: comfort. With its simply divine soups, salads, Paninis and exclusive Spanish wine, this bistro is about to take Gainesville by storm. Located in Thornebrook Village off Northwest 43rd Street, the restaurant’s red and orange faux-finished walls, cherry wood tables and chairs, and quaint décor parallel the warmth and fulfillment patrons receive from the signature dishes. The bistro’s Bisque and Bruschetta offer your taste buds a warm and cold starter dish, respectively. While filled with a classic sweet and creamy flavor, this Bisque also has a kick of jalapeño that transforms the staple soup into a contemporary course. Thick slices of baguette topped with diced tomatoes tossed in a balsamic glaze seasoned with garlic and oregano and finished with a sprinkle of mozzarella cheese make this bistro’s Bruschetta the best this side of Italy.

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Gainesville

Served with your choice of homemade dressings, the Sevilla Salad features a crisp blend of field greens, cucumbers, red onions and tomatoes topped with goat cheese and roasted red peppers. If you prefer sandwiches to salads, don’t worry because there are six Paninis from which to choose. The Mario Panini remains a favorite as it is loaded with barbecue pork tenderloin and sautéed onions. Finally, the bistro’s chef, John, creates daily entrée specials featuring various meats and fish. When paired with a Portuguese white wine like Verdelho, the Pan-Seared Wahoo is a true delight seared in garlic butter and served with seasoned rice and roasted tomatoes. Prices are more than reasonable as no entrée exceeds $20, and the wine list varies from $12 to $150 bottles to fit all tastes and budgets. So when you’re looking for a bite to eat and a glass of great wine, look no further than Mario’s Wine Bar & European Bistro.

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TommyWilliamsHomes.com Call Us (352) 333-9395

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O!O Tapas & Tinis' Gainesville

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by Lauren Gispanski

!O Tapas & Tinis’ in the Haile Market Square is famous for its never-ending martini list. With more than 100 martinis, it will take even a martini maverick weeks to taste them all. But do not be fooled, the dishes are just as delicious as the drinks. Tailoring the menu to not only patron requests but also changing seasons, O!O Tapas & Tinis’ executive chefs have crafted a fall menu featuring exquisite cuisine such as the Gorgonzola Filet. Sitting on a bed of white wine and asparagus risotto, the perfectly cooked filet is topped with a red wine reduction sauce, grilled asparagus and chunks of blackened Gorgonzola. For something rather heavenly, try the Bourbon Pork Chop served with Gouda mashed potatoes and Knob Creek apples. The bourbon-candied apples paired with the tender pork chop create a meal of sweet substance. O!O Tapas & Tinis’ also serves sensational seafood dishes on its new fall menu. The Macadamia Encrusted Mahi-Mahi is served with a spinach risotto and mixed vegetables. The champagne butter sauce and edible orchid dress up this dish while adding an herbal sweetness to the fish. The new Grilled Salmon is also a phenomenal fall menu item. Served with a horseradish Dijon sauce, this rosemary-grilled salmon is perfectly moist and pairs nicely with the Ruby martini. The sweetest seafood addition, by far, is the Coconut Infused Lobster Tail. Served with sautéed romaine, capers and grape tomatoes then garnished with an edible orchid, this lobster delicacy is glazed with a coconut reduction. You won’t be able put down your fork as you delve into this dish. The coconut is not overpowering but instead replaces any need for the traditional melted butter. Finally, the new Rotini Primavera is a white wine pasta entrée full of zucchini, squash, fresh tomato, yellow and green peppers, and onion. This pasta packs quite the kick, and unlike other vegetarian-friendly entrées, this dish will satisfy taste buds and appetites. O!O Tapas & Tinis’ offers $5 martini nights and competitively priced appetizers and entrées averaging $10 and $20, respectively. O!O Tapas & Tinis’ also features gluten-free menu items. So while located near the swankiest neighborhoods in Gainesville, remember this about O!O Tapas & Tinis’ – reasonable prices for copacetic cooking and cocktails means it’s time to give O!O a try.

photography by Brad Palmer


NEW MENU MORE CHOICES LOTS TO LOVE

Mediterranean Turkey Ciabatta

New salads, new burgers, new sandwiches, and so much more. Stop in for a Mediterranean Turkey or Tuscan Chicken Ciabatta. How about a Garden Harvest Salad, Bistro Burger, or Chicken Caprese Sandwich. All your old favorites, so many new choices, so much more to love about your favorite deli!

Butler Plaza ll 3410 SW Archer Road (352) 244-0973

New Fall Menu

102 D

iffere

Mon-Fri 11:30 am - 2:30 pm Sun Lunch 12:00 - 5:00 pm Dinner 7 Days 5:00-10:00 pm

Call For Reservations

101 SE Second Place #118

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352-371-2323

Gainesville - Downtoan Sun Center

nt M

artin

is

352-331-6620

2725 SW 91st St.- Suite 100 Gainesville, Florida, 32608

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BUSINESS FOCUS

Three key members of the team at Barry Bullard Homes are (from left): project manager Mark Farris, Bullard and superintendent Robert Harmeier. Photograph by Brad Palmer.

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Building with Trust W

hen building a home, emotions run wild, expectations are high and excellence is demanded. These are the thoughts that consume soon-to-be homeowners. But contrary to popular belief, perfection doesn’t start with the home, but with the right builder. “We were thrilled at the thought of building a home,” said Minde Reinhart, who lives in a Barry Bullard home, “but we didn’t know what to expect or where to start. We had heard from every person we talked to about how stressful it could be. It almost made us too intimidated to even start the process. The only thing we knew for sure was that we needed to find a builder we could trust. With Barry and his staff we found that we could count on all of them – from the subcontractors, to the field staff, to the office people.” Because of that trust, and the expertise of Barry Bullard Homes, the Reinharts had a great experience – something on which Bullard prides himself. Known as one of the leading home-building companies in Alachua County, Barry Bullard Homes has built a reputation of consistent customer satisfaction among its clients by insisting that maintaining trust is the key to the business. Barry Bullard, founder of Barry Bullard Homes, graduated from the University of Florida in 1978, where he studied building construction. After an 18-month stint with his father’s development company he started his business in Gainesville. “I thought I could make a living in the building business, but until I struck out on my own I did not know how much I would love building homes,” he said. Bullard built his business by surrounding himself with a great team of employees, subcontractors and vendors. “Every employee, subcontractor and vendor has an important role, opinion and task, and they are why we are successful,” he said. A lot of responsibility goes to his project manager Mark Farris and superintendent Robert Harmeier. “They are hard-working and loyal members of the team who always get the job done,” Bullard said. Farris and Harmeier are responsible for the day to day scheduling and supervision of the work in the field. They are on each job daily, communicating with the homeowner, field personnel and vendors. The team at Barry Bullard Homes makes every effort to establish a relationship based on trust and respect. “It is important to build an atmosphere of trust,” said Bullard. “We try to be realistic about costs, schedules and the building process. Our goal is to have the homeowner happy in the end. It’s all about expectations. We want to meet or beat the homeowner’s expectations. If we do that, we have a happy homeowner” Bullard has an extensive portfolio of house plans for clients to choose from or he can assist in custom designing a client’s dream home. “We build a variety of sizes and architectural styles,” said Bullard. “We are really known as a custom, high-end builder, but we are competitively priced. We work hard to give our customers good value, no matter what the budget is.”

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is the Bullard Way

The local market has evolved over the last several years, in part By Jacklyne Ramos because people have a lot more access to information about the latest building materials and products. “Homebuyers have much higher expectations,” said Bullard. “They are looking for more attention to detail and finish, and more than that, they are very interested in energy efficiency and green building techniques.” For Bullard, it is all about understanding the different interests of his homebuyers. photograph by Johnston Photography “While some clients have a clear vision of what they want, other clients aren’t sure where to start,” he said. “It is important for us to help them through that process. Our job is to be there for them. We try to focus on individualized homes to offer a more personalized level of service.” Another change that has occurred for homebuyers is how long they will stay in a home. Until the last few years, people would often view homes as an investment – buying a home and turning it around a few years later at a profit. But realizing the market doesn’t always work that way, they are thinking about their home as a longer-term commitment. That often changes what they want in their home, said Bullard. Barry Bullard Homes has experienced an increase in requests for remodeling and additions in recent years. For some homeowners, remodeling makes more sense than constructing a new home. “We enjoy the unique challenges that remodels sometime present” Bullard said. “We have the right people on staff to answer that challenge.” It takes a great deal of time and effort to be a successful custom builder, yet Bullard manages to balance that with community activity and a strong family life. Bullard and his wife, Susanne, were the co-chairs of last year’s Noche de Gala fundraising benefit for the Sebastian Ferrero Foundation. He is also the chair of the local Gateway Bank board of directors, and serves on the bank’s Ocala fiduciary board. He has two daughters attending UF, Lauren, 21 and Allie, 19 and young sons, Wil, 7, and Sam. 5, both at Oak Hall. “We spend a lot of time participating in and watching sports, Whether inside or especially with the boys,” he said. “They love the beach, and last out, Bullard homes year, we took them snow skiing for the first time.” Balancing family, community and work has made Bullard are always a work of a respected name in the community, and the trust that his art. Photograph by homebuyers have in him and his company has made Barry Bullard Brad Palmer. Homes as successful as it is respected. To learn more about the work done by Barry Bullard Homes, go online to www.barrybullardhomes.com or call (352) 331-7162.

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Knows his Stuff John Spence S

by Molly Bruce uccessful professional speaker, employee trainer, consultant and author, John Spence, wears many different hats. Not bad photography by for someone who was kicked out of the University of Miami Brad Palmer his second semester.

(opposite page) John Spence, and his wife, Sheila

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“I did not take college seriously the first time,” Spence said. At the age of 20, he moved from his hometown, Miami, to Gainesville to try the University of Florida. When the receptionist behind the counter laughed at his transcripts, he knew it was time to change his ways. “That was a huge wake-up call,” Spence said. He caught his lucky break when Santa Fe College (formerly Santa Fe Community College) let him in on academic probation. His economics professor, Roger Strickland, whom he remains good friends with today, is whom he credits with teaching him three critical things that have stuck with him since – you become what you focus on and who you hang out with, you need to read the books and you need to ask for help. “He was the one who helped me understand. For some crazy reason, I listened to him,” Spence said. He applied these strategies to college, and he applies them to business today. Spence graduated from UF in 1989 with a degree in Public Relations and was immediately offered a job byWinthrop Rockefeller to work for his Billfish Foundation, a nonprofit organization that works to preserve billfish around the world. He didn’t apply or send a resume – he simply sent a letter stating his skills. Two years later, Rockefeller made Spence CEO of the company. After learning about the business world through the eyes of the experts at the Billfish Foundation, Spence went on to an international training and development company where he gave his first employee training session. Though he never had any desire to speak, corporations started requesting Spence to speak to their employees. “I learned by being there and doing it,” he said. With all of this and more on his resume, Spence is more than qualified to share his business knowledge with the world. That’s why he wrote his newest book, “Awesomely Simple.” The book strives to help businesses streamline and simplify while applying successful business patterns that Spence has noticed in his extensive readings (about 100 business books per year). Spence holds books in high esteem. “I never thought I was someone smart enough to be an author,” he said. He self-published his first book, “Excellence by Design: Leadership,” in 2001, and it has sold 25,000 copies with no marketing or advertising. All copies have been sold solely to companies he has personally worked with. Jossey-Bass is publishing “Awesomely Simple.” The company asked for it within 3 months, so Spence actually spoke into a program called Dragon NaturallySpeaking, which transcribed it for him, instead of typing it the old-fashioned way. It took him 17 eight-hour days to complete the 188-page, six-chapter book. “This is the perfect book to read to learn how to run your business better,” Spence said.

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The six chapters focus on the six strategies Spence advises companies to employ to run their business better: having a clear vision, hiring the best people, utilizing excellent communication, creating a culture of urgency, using disciplined execution and having an extreme customer focus. Spence employs these tactics in his own two companies, John Spence, LLC and Flycaster & Company, a branding and design company that handles mostly marine clients like Edgewater and Albermarle Boats. Spence, a big outdoorsman, tailors his businesses to fit his interests whenever he can. “I try to make my vocation my vacation,” he said. Spence’s wife of five years, Sheila, is a partner in both businesses. Since Spence travels so often for work, mostly from the Gainesville Regional Airport (the TSA people know him by name), Sheila, who is originally from Colorado but grew up in Ocala, travels with him when she can. She said she likes to go if the destination is fun and interesting, and she can get some work done. The couple met in 1999 at a Heritage Club Board of Directors new member mixer. At the time, Sheila owned a consulting firm, Coordinates Services. The couple eloped to Crested Butte, Co., which is the wildflower capitol of Sheila’s home state, to get married in 2004. Both love the outdoors. “It was beautiful,” Sheila said. “The day we got married, we were fly-fishing by noon.” Though the couple could live anywhere in the world with their companies, they choose to live in Gainesville. Spence said he enjoys the “big city amenities without traffic and hustle and bustle” as well as the small-town atmosphere. “This is one of the few places left where you can do business on a handshake,” Spence said. As long as he has his iPhone on him, Spence can do his work from anywhere in the world. “People rarely realize we’re doing fortune-500 work out of a little office in Alachua,” Spence joked. The couple does a lot of entertaining at their home, and their garden was recently written about for possible publication in Southern Living or Better Homes and Gardens. The Spences also like to cook a lot. Spence said the only TV he watches on a regular basis is the cooking network. Though he is known for his business expertise, Spence also coaches employers and employees on personal issues, like conflict resolution and happiness. “Most people aren’t taught that,” he said. Despite his success, Spence said that money does not drive him. Sheila joked that he loves his job so much that he would do it for free. “That’s why I have to do the pricing,” she said. Spence’s new books teaches business owners how to streamline their companies to maximize efficiency and, in the long term, profit. But to him, success is not measured in money and power. “My version of success is when your self-concept and core powers are in sync with your everyday life,” Spence said. That’s how John Spence is most successful.

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Gainesville Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Brent Christensen and Board Chair Joe Cirulli accept the 5-star accreditation from Debbie Carrothers, the southeastern regional manager of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

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Gainesvil e Chamber T

o win an accreditation of any sort is no small feat. Winning a 5-star accreditation requires near-perfection. The Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce became perfect on June 16. “When the U. S. Chamber of Commerce evaluates you as a program, they evaluate everything,” said Brent Christensen, chamber president and CEO. “To get 5-stars they don’t find any weaknesses, and I can tell you that it takes an all out team effort.” Of the 6,943 chambers in the United States, the Gainesville Chamber is one of 283 that have been accredited by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, one of only 26 in the state of Florida that are accredited and one of only six in Florida with 5-star accreditation. By achieving 5-star status, the chamber is also in the top 1 percent of all chambers in the U.S. “While accreditation in itself is a great achievement, Gainesville’s obtaining 5-star accreditation status signifies the best of the best,” said Raymond Toole, vice president of the Institute for Organization Management and executive director of political affairs and federation relations at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Gainesville Chamber Board Chair Joe Cirulli, of Gainesville Health and Fitness Center, said that this recognition is a result of the staff’s hard work. “It’s a long process,” he said. “Tremendous kudos has to go to the staff. I wasn’t there through the entire process, but it was massive task. When you look at this chamber and all the projects it is involved in for its members and the business community, it is nice to see the recognition it is now getting. I get the opportunity to see this group work and plan for the future.” Applying for accreditation is voluntary, and it takes place every five years. The Gainesville chamber took six months to put together its application. “It enables you as you’re going along to do a self-evaluation and see some of the areas the chamber may need improvement,” he said. To receive accreditation, a chamber must meet certain standards in their governance, government affairs and technology. They are graded upon the effectiveness of the organization and community impact. Five years ago, when it applied, the chamber received a 4-star award. Afterward, it began to explore new areas, thinking innovatively about how it could change for the better. Christensen said the U.S. chamber was impressed with its pioneering ideas, one of which pertained to the benefits of having high-quality employees. The chamber has partnered with the Alachua/Bradford Workforce Board to provide services to area businesses under the name FloridaWorks. It is a unique partnership that impressed accreditors. “Businesses are only as good as the employees they have working with them,” Christensen said. “By making sure our

businesses are finding the caliber employees they need we are strengthening their business in that way as well.” The chamber also manages the city’s high-tech incubator, the Gainesville Technology Enterprise Center. The facility helps entrepreneurs take their ideas from the idea stage, into planning and then to market. The next accreditation is still five years away, but Christensen is already thinking of things to improve and ways to keep up the five stars – which he views as a “Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval” of sorts. “Your members get that assurance that they’re investment is a good one,” he said. At the chamber’s annual meeting in January, the new strategic plan for the next five years will be presented. In planning these next few years, Christensen said the chamber hopes to remain at the forefront of innovation in the Gainesville community. “Winning an accreditation takes a chamber that’s on the cutting edge,” he said. “That’s what we are.”

By Victoria Phillips

More Flights, More Jets

More Low Fares! ...Delta Air Lines initiates two more daily flights from Gainesville!

Worldwide Connections Delta Air Lines and US Airways Express Register for weekly GNV “Low Fare Alerts” visit:

www.flygainesville.com GNV Airport Feb. 2009.indd 1

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Earns 5-Star Accreditation

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2/20/2009 2:25:38 PM

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John Mitchell (top right), of John Isaac's Clothing, dresses all these men and many others for success. Seated (at left) are Jeff Ference and (at right) Franklin Lentz, Jr. Standing next to Mitchell is Dr. Jamie Berk and to his left is Rick Staab.

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Eliminating the stress from getting dressed By Jessica Lipscomb photography by Brad Palmer LivingInTheHeartOfFlorida.com


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Gentlemen, imagine a world where frustrating trips to the mall looking for clothing don’t exist. Better yet, ladies, picture not having to be the one making those trips so that your boyfriend or husband will actually have something to wear. Thanks to John Isaac’s Clothing, that world now exists right here in Gainesville. Former businessman turned clothing concierge, John Mitchell founded John Isaac’s Clothing to fulfill a lifelong dream. Named for his father, John and grandfather, Isaac, Mitchell was looking for a way to fill a passion for his business, and this translates into top-quality service for his clients. His company provides the men of Gainesville everything ranging from catalog to full-custom, and includes suits, tuxedos, dress shirts, casual shits from Southern Tide, khakis, shoes and ties. He understands that both time and money are precious in today’s economy, and he structures his business in such a way as to honor both. “I aim to make the process of buying clothing more pleasant and less complicated,” said Mitchell. “I meet my clients wherever they need me to. That may be their home or even place of work.” Those meetings are where Mitchell uses his expertise to make the process a breeze for his clients. In addition to purchasing clothing, John Isaac’s customers can also commission him to do anything from tailoring existing clothing to a complete

Clothing From Casual to Fully Custom Tailored We bring the showroom to you. John Mitchell - Owner (352) 225-3577 phone (352) 262-7920 cell JohnIsaacsClothing.com

An antidote for fashion apathy closet clean-up and reorganization. For those purchasing for someone else he also has personalized gift certificates. There is even a picture-book option, which Mitchell creates to provide a choice of pre-coordinated outfits to wear. “You can feel comfortable telling him what you want to accomplish with your wardrobe,” said Rick Staab, founder of Tyler’s Hope. “I have known John for years, and he has a real knack for getting you into newer looks that are still within your own personal style.” It is just that comfort level that has enabled John Isaac’s to grow so much in the last year. “Despite the tough economy, people still need clothing and still need to look professional,” said Mitchell. It is the goal of his company to make that process easy and affordable. He is also personally involved in every aspect of the process – from fittings, ordering goods to delivering the final product (yes, he delivers). Mitchell’s main goal is that his customers not only look great, but feel great. “He has an eye for things that I just don’t,” said Jeff Ference, owner of Ference Insurance Agency. “He’s so hands on, you don’t have to lift a finger if you don’t want to. It’s awesome.” Mitchell helps Ference keep his wardrobe organized and in top working order to help avoid the pesky mall trips that Ference dreads. When asked what he enjoys most about his business, Mitchell said, “It is definitely the feedback from my clients.” He explains that his new customers quickly find out that people notice not only how good they look, but that they are also more confident. Mitchell explains that he often gets calls from his customers’ wives or girlfriends thanking him. “They tell me he hasn’t looked this good in years,” said Mitchell. Whether you are wearing jeans and a T-shirt or a tuxedo, the key is in the clothes properly fitting not only your body, but your lifestyle as well, he said. “Clothing may not be a priority to some, but it is a necessity,” said Mitchell. “Why not feel your best?”

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BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

Going Paperless with

CAMPUS USA Credit Union I

t feels good to go green. Plus, it can put more cash in your pocket. Because a credit union is owned by its members, cutting costs in small ways, such as going paperless, comes back to the members of the credit union in the form of better rates and lower fees. In times like these, every little bit helps. At CAMPUS USA Credit Union, we’ve made sure the process is simple and easy. Benefits of going paperless

When you switch from mailed paper statements to online statements, you’re protecting: • • • •

Natural resources (paper for statements & envelopes) Air (factories that make paper and trucks that deliver mail pollute) Time (the several days it takes for mail delivery) Your identity (your mailbox and trash are two of the most common sources for identity theft)

The advantages are even greater when you elect to set up your paychecks and other items on direct deposit: • •

Your funds are deposited immediately You skip the traffic and time to visit a branch or seek out an ATM

Options for greener finances It may take you a little time to feel comfortable with online statements, and that’s OK. Start with one account. As your confidence grows, switch more. Follow these simple steps to make the switch. 1. Enroll in online access – giving you control over your accounts anywhere with Internet access 2. Request direct deposit – for paychecks, federal and state payments (including income tax refunds), and any investment dividends 3. Switch to e-statements – for all your financial accounts and bills 4. Set up automatic transfers to other accounts – retirement fund, college fund, holiday account, and vacation account 5. Set up automatic payments – car payments, rent or mortgage, utilities, and phone 6. Pay bills online – credit card, subscriptions, medical and taxes At CAMPUS USA Credit Union, we want what’s best for our members. When you become a member of CAMPUS USA Credit Union and sign up for e-Statements, you become eligible for our CAMPUS Free Checking Account. Call us at 335-9090 and press 5 to get started today.

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Gainesville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Hunterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Summerfield 17950 US Hwy. 441 Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd.


COVER STORY

The Doctor Is In By David Greenberg

R

ight after Dr. Scott Medley’s name, the title reads: Medical Director, North Florida Regional Medical Center, but if you look at the stethoscope that hangs around his neck, you might wonder if he is an administrator or a doctor. Medley says he is both, and he made that clear to the people at North Florida when he accepted the medical director position on May 4. “When I took the position, I made it clear that I was still a practicing physician,” he said. “I do that for two reasons. First, it is what I do, and I don’t want to stop. Second, it certainly helps my credibility with the staff when they arrive in the morning, and they see me admitting patients in the emergency room. I can’t be accused of just being an administrator. I have a bias about that. I don’t believe that you can fully understand the system if you are not practicing in it. By being involved this way, I understand the needs.” Medley could have gone anywhere to start his medical career back in 1979. He and his wife, Faye, chose Gainesville, in part for the opportunity to work at Shands at UF, and the couple has never looked back. That is certainly good news for this community. “We have no reason to be anywhere else,” Medley said. “Both as a community and a medical community, I can’t think of a better place. As a community, we have anything you could want – the right mix of culture in a great university town that is still small enough for you to know a lot of people.”

Photography by Brad Palmer

As it is for many people, Medley’s initial contact with the community was as a doctor on the staff at the University of Florida College of Medicine. Two years later he left to start Gainesville Family Physicians, and by the time he left that practice 20 years later, it had become a community institution. Medley left Gainesville Family Physicians to return to UF to teach and develop a hospitalist program at Shands at AGH. Hospitalists are physicians who work primarily in hospitals and have no outside practice. Seven years later, Medley was approached by North Florida Regional Medical Center (NFRMC), where he has served on the board of trustees for 12 years, to become that hospital’s medical director. He accepted that position and with Shands at AGH closing – there may not be a better person to assume that role. “His record and dedication to patient care speaks for itself,” said NFRMC President and CEO Ward Boston. “Scott has great insight into how to make improvements and how to practice medicine. That is critical at this time. We are very pleased with the overall leadership he provides, not just on patient care issues but also his high involvement in community affairs.” Medley believes that his experience at Shands and North Florida enables him to understand and effectively deal with the changes that are about to take place. “Shands at UF has a significant role in education and research, as well as having

NFRMC Medical Director Dr. Scott Medley stands outside the hospital on Newberry Road.

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Scott and Faye love to spend time together, as they are doing here outside their Gainesville home.

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excellent patient care,” said Medley. “While we do research and education – especially in areas like nursing and physical therapy – our primary mission is patient care. We are basically a patientcare institution.” “As a community, we have to deal with change and what that means,” he continued. “Many of the private doctors from AGH will be moving over here. Shands is a wonderful hospital, but it is a different culture. Those private doctors are used to a communityhospital environment. That’s what we have here.” While some people in the community see the relationship between North Florida and Shands as competitive, Medley, with his unique perspective, views it as complementary. “We have superlative health care,” he said. “As a medical community, we are blessed with two great institutions. Shands is a great referral center for us, and when there are things we don’t do, we are happy to refer patients to Shands at UF. I, for one, am glad they are here.” As medical director, Medley has a lot to oversee. NFRMC is a 325-bed, full-service medical and surgical acute-care facility. It provides comprehensive heart care, cancer care, women’s health, senior care and orthopedic/neurosurgery and spine services. The hospital has more than 405 physicians on staff in 40 different specialties. The Women’s Center and recently opened Cancer Center are shining examples of the hospital’s dedication to meeting the needs of its patients and the community. The Women’s Center offers maternity services, surgery facilities, physician offices and a diagnostic center. The outpatient Cancer Center is one piece in the hospital’s effort to treat this disease. Medley also points out that as a private institution, North Florida is the second largest taxpayer in Alachua County – behind the Oaks Mall, and it is one of the largest employers. “I see my role as helping all those people provide medical care to their patients,” said Medley. However, that may be an oversimplification. A medical director serves different functions in different hospitals, said Medley. “The institution really decides what the role is,” he said. “Technically, it is a medical/administrative practitioner. I try to coordinate the activities of our medical staff. I spend a lot of time on quality improvement, help coordinate the activities of 20 day-time and four night-time hospitalists, and I help out with public relations. I am also now very involved in trying to increase hospital efficiencies as we prepare to take care of an increasing patient load.” None of that includes the time he still spends being a doctor. Medley estimates that all his activity usually means it is about an 11-hour day. However, none of that is unusual for the man who grew up in Kentucky. He attended medical school at the University of Kentucky, where he met Faye. He served as a doctor in the military during the Vietnam War. “Doctors were being drafted and sent to the front lines, so I joined up,” he said. He returned to Kentucky as a nerve-gas doctor, before going to Tripler Army Medical Center in Hawaii for his residency. While he was in Hawaii, Faye, who was a nurse, visited several times, and during one of those visits – 34 years ago – they got married. “Besides us, there were only four other people there,” he said. After leaving the army in 1977, Medley joined the faculty of the Medical University of South Carolina, before coming to Gainesville in 1979.

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While Medley is in a high-profile position today, it is his time at Gainesville Family Physicians that defines him as a member of the local medical community. He was the managing partner of the practice, which started with two doctors, two nurses and a receptionist. When he left in 2001, the practice had 10 doctors, five nurse practitioners, four offices, 64 employees and 40,000 patients. “I loved it, but it drove me nuts,” he said. As if that wasn’t enough, that was really the period in which Medley became involved in the community. One of the most unusual aspects of that involvement was his tie to the Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce, where he ultimately served as chair in 1997. “It goes without saying that the medical community is a major part of our business community,” said chamber CEO and President Brent Christensen. “Scott understands that, and he embraces it. He is a true representative of the medical profession in our community. While most doctors will just practice medicine, which can take a significant amount of time and effort, Scott is involved because he understands the vital role the medical community plays in our economy. It is certainly a rarity to have a doctor serve as the chair of the chamber. Scott did, and he did it well, and today he is still involved with us to this day.” While his involvement in the chamber took a great deal of Medley’s time, he has also served as president of the Florida Academy of Family Physicians (which named him Florida Family Physician of the Year in 1992), on the board of Mercantile Bank and as president of the Alachua County Medical Society. He was awarded the Gainesville Sun Community Service Award in 1997. Taking on extra duty at the medical society, Medley has, for the last 11 years, served as editor of the organization’s magazine, House Calls. “I have known Dr. Medley a little more than two years,” said Alachua County Medical Society Executive Vice President Sally Lawrence. “When I took the job, he indicated that it was about time for him to step down as editor. I begged him to keep doing it. He agreed to stay for a while. He is a wonderful editor. People love his column because he is so funny. He is also very smart. We plan what special topics we want to cover and which doctors we will ask to write for the magazine. He proofs everything before we send it to the printer.” HOME Living

Medley is unique in hospital administration because he still works with patients. Here he is discussing a patient's medical needs with Jana Reid of the cardiology department.

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Medley riding his bike on the sandy beaches of St. Augustine, an activity that he engages in while visiting his picturesque beach get-a-way that overlooks the Atlantic Ocean on one side and the Intracoastal Waterway on the opposite side.

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While Medley loves staying involved in the magazine, Lawrence suggested she may be buying him off to get him to stay. “I bribe him with a batch of chocolate chip cookies every issue,” she said, “and I never cook.” Lawrence agrees with Christensen’s perception that Medley is not your typical physician. “He is unusual because as busy as he is, he is very involved in the community and the business community,” she said. “The fact that he is so knowledgeable about what goes on here really helps. And in my role, I see his ties with both North Florida and Shands as very beneficial. He can really be a bridge between the two facilities.” For her part, Faye Medley, who has taught nursing at UF for 20 years, is not surprised at anything her husband does, and is thrilled that they made their life together in the Heart of Florida. “We loved Gainesville from the beginning and always knew we would stay here, even after a short time,” she said. “This community has all the things you would want to raise a family.” The Medleys have done that. Daughter, Katy, 28, and son, Evan, 31, both graduated from Gainesville High School. After serving in the Peace Corps, Evan now works in historic preservation in Laramie, Wyo. Katy is the managing director of a performing arts center in Santa Fe, N.M. Scott and Faye Medley vacation in Colorado Springs in order to see both of them. In addition to what he described as a “modest home” in Gainesville, the couple has a second home in St. Augustine, where the view from the front overlooks the Intracoastal Waterway and the one in the back is of the Atlantic Ocean. “I am not at all surprised at Scott’s career moves and community involvement,” said Faye. “It’s the way he likes to operate. He talked about slowing down after leaving Gainesville Family Physicians, but I knew he wasn’t ready. I don’t think he would be happy not doing a lot, and if he’s not happy, I’m not happy. I’ve gotten used to it. He always seems to manage to juggle everything, and do it all well.” That is good news for the Heart of Florida. Fortunately for this community, when it comes to Scott Medley, the doctor is always in.

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LIFESTYLE

by Emily Davis photography by Brad Palmer

Fashion

Corner Missy looks dazzling in a black dress from Cache. Gold and black accessories add a touch of sparkle.

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LIFESTYLE

Susan stays casual with a white T-shirt from Alternative Apparel paired with a fringe scarf, all from etc…boutique.

Who says charity work can’t be fashionable? The Children’s Home Society Gainesville Auxiliary is doing their part to put the fun and fulfillment back into charity by connecting fashion with a cause. The organization will hold its annual “Inspiring Lives Fashion Show” on Nov. 5 at the Carrabba’s Italian Grill in Gainesville from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.   Top retailers in the Gainesville community have generously provided clothing for this event in order to help this amazing group of women with their fight to end child abuse and neglect.   As one of the oldest and largest children’s advocacy agencies in the state, the Children’s Home Society of

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(above) These ladies keep it cool downtown with clothes from Dahlia.

Going from day to night is easy in this black and white combo from Banana Republic.

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In the Heart of Florida

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LIFESTYLE

Looking classy with a touch of flair is easy with this outfit from Vela.

Stay prepared for any type of weather in this outfit from Cache.

(above) Reggie looks stunning in this Banana Republic dress topped off with a light cardigan.

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Florida has placed more than 30,000 children in adoptive homes since 1902. Â As a part of this cause, event attendees will enjoy a fine

In the Heart of Florida

meal while being dazzled by a personal fashion show. Additionally, each guest will be given an opportunity to win a variety of valuable items donated by local businesses.

Tickets are available by calling by calling Ellen Boczarski at (352) 334-0955. Tickets are $30 in advance and $35 at the door. Sellout is expected, so make your reservations early.

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LIFESTYLE

(above) Laura is striking in etc...boutique.

(left) Look fun yet sophisticated in this dress from Vela.

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T C r o a r v n e e l r

GEAUX to By Molly Bruce

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ust like its gumbo, Baton Rouge is a hodgepodge of fun. The people are friendly, the food is rich and delicious and the atmosphere is proud and contagious. “We don’t change. We stick to our culture,” said Whitney Breaux, a communications specialist with the Baton Rouge Convention and Visitor’s Bureau. A Creole who was born and raised in Baton Rouge and recently graduated from Louisiana State University, Breaux can be considered an expert. During my stay in Baton Rouge, I learned more history than I ever did from any history class. I met people who remembered my name the next day. “Nice to meet you, Miss Molly,” they’d say. I also ate more food than I care to admit. “We live to eat, we don’t eat to live,” as Breaux explained. If you choose to make the easy eight hour drive to Baton Rouge for the UF vs. LSU game in October, or if you choose to take a weekend jaunt to this unusual city, make sure you truly take in the culture. Talk to some people. They’ll be more than happy to swap stories with you over a glass of Abita, a local brew. Try some crawfish, because you haven’t lived until you’ve eaten the tasty creatures (and you’re not a true Louisianan unless you suck the “juice” – or the brain). And visit LSU’s campus because, diehard Gators fan or not, it is something to be seen. THE RESTAURANTS If you’re hunkering for some down-home, finger-lickin’ good food, look no further than Boutin’s (pronounced “Boo-tan’s”). Lynn Boutin, the owner, was born in Lafayette, La., the heart of Cajun country. As he explained it, Cajuns ended up in the swampland nobody wanted, and it turned out to be a goldmine. His restaurant serves gumbos, sausages, crawfish in every way imaginable and even gator. “This is what Cajuns like to eat when they go out,” Boutin said. Cajuns, he explained, would come together for meals as a community. Maybe someone remembered the beef and maybe not. Gumbos, therefore, are a collection of whatever everyone had to offer. The sharing mentality extended long after Cajuns moved into Baton Rouge. Boutin offered to take pictures for customers and chatted with regulars all night. When asked if he’d open another location, he replied, “If you can have one great restaurant, that’s all you really need.” Live Cajun bands six nights a week and a swamp full of turtles to feed in the back delights grandparents and grandchildren alike. Boutin’s is a family restaurant at its best. Boutin, one of 11 children, is there every day. His son, Brandon, is there sometimes, too. Boutin has been in the restaurant business for 25 years, and Boutin’s has been around for nine years now. Needless to say, he knows his way around the business. “People want two things from a restaurant – consistency and a to-go box,” he explained in his Cajun accent. For a more refined dining experience, add Mansur’s on the Boulevard to your list. Anna Paquin and Stephen Moyer of HBO’s original series “True Blood” dined there while filming, and the mayor makes it there twice a month. “We enjoy a real regular clientele,” said Shane Smith, general manager for the past 15 years. Soft piano music, played by the talented Miss Jo Garner, intimate lighting and an extensive wine list and a certified sommelier, Rodney Willis, Jr., make Mansur’s a romantic, quiet dining atmosphere. Entrees like Duck Mansur, Cedar Roasted

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Redfish and Mardi Gras Crab add to the fine dining experience. Mansur’s enjoys friendly competition with Juban’s, another local fine-dining restaurant. Amazingly enough, it truly is friendly. The restaurants even help each other out with supplies. “If I can’t get any coffee, I can call them, and they’ll say, ‘Come on over,’ ” Smith said. If you’re craving a midnight snack, check out Louie’s Café near campus. Actually, you can check it out way past midnight. The tiny restaurant, decorated with signs that say “Be Nice Or Leave,” is open 24 hours a day. Famous for its hit-the-spot-no-matter-what-time-it-is hash browns and pancakes, Louie’s is a staple to the LSU community. We sat next to some of the LSU football team’s training staff on a busy Saturday morning. “The cool thing about Louie’s is that you see people from all walks of life,” Breaux said. A few miles down the road from Louie’s is Sammy’s Grill, a huge sports bar and family restaurant. Appetizers like fried cheese and gator with remoulaude sauce and every kind of po’boy you can imagine make Sammy’s a favorite among all, especially after a football game. Another LSU staple, The Chimes, is located directly next to campus. It can best be explained as the LSU version of the Swamp Restaurant. Those faithful to Chimes can try to Go Around the World. It involves drinking 64 beers from 20 countries at the rate of five beers per night. Those who complete the challenge win a T-shirt and get

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(opposite page) A staircase in the old State Capital Building (below) The new State Capitol Building looms in the distance in this downtown Baton Rouge skyline.

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Known for their Cajun wonders, the people of Baton Rouge love shrimp, crawfish and, of course, gumbo.

their name on a plaque. One loyal customer, Theo, has completed the Around the World challenge more than 70 times. While there on a Sunday evening, we ran into Shane Smith, the manager of Mansur’s, and a bartender from Schlittz and Giggles, a downtown pizza restaurant we had wandered into the day before. Both were more than happy to sit with us and introduce us to their friends. When asked why people from Baton Rouge were so friendly, Todd Bruno, a law professor at LSU who sat with us, replied, “It’s because we drink so much.” One thing all Baton Rouge restaurants have in common is a certain Cajun seasoning called Tony Chachere’s, better known simply as Tony’s. A mysterious and delicious blend of Louisiana spices, it tastes good on absolutely everything, from eggs to crawfish to poultry and more. No matter what kind of dining experience you have, request some Tony’s to perfect every dish. THE ATTRACTIONS Crooked politics (especially the infamous Huey Long), the biggest state school and tradition give Baton Rouge more culture than a city should be allowed. Attractions like the old and new state capitol buildings, BREC’s Baton Rouge Zoo and the Louisiana Art and Science Museum make this city worth visiting over and over again. The new state capitol building is the tallest in the country, at 34 stories. It’s where Huey Long, Louisiana’s most notorious governor, was shot in 1935, and the bullet hole is still easily visible in a marble column. The old state capitol is smaller and contains even more history. The castle-like building holds the entire story of Louisiana’s history (its own major at LSU), and the stained glass ceiling and winding staircase add to its beauty. History buff or not, it is a sight to see. Across the street from Boutin’s restaurant, Perkin’s Rowe is a must-see. It’s an outdoor shopping center with original boutiques and favorites like White House/Black Market. Restaurants, bars and an old-fashioned cinema complete the charm of this cozy mall-alternative. Located near Perkin’s Rowe and Boutin’s, the Hyatt Place is a comfy and coiffed hotel choice. It’s near the highway and close

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enough to downtown Baton Rouge and LSU’s campus to make it an ideal stay for the LSU vs. UF game and any other weekend. Managers Robert Lopez and Al Schof make guests feel right at home, greeting them as they walk in the door. Another good hotel choice, the Sheraton, is in the heart of the downtown area, within walking distance of attractions like both state capitol buildings, the Art and Science Museum and Third Avenue, a strip of bars and restaurants. It also has a floating casino attached for guests who are feeling lucky. The night before the big game, the Sheraton is hosting a Gator Tailgating event. Started by Mike and Tamara Herchel and Rusty Thompson because of the last LSU game, www.gatortailgating. com provides a place for Gators to tailgate peacefully together. The night before the big game, the Sheraton hosted a Gator Tailgating event. Started by Mike and Tamara Herchel and Rusty and Crystal Thompson because of the last LSU game, www.gatortailgating. com provides a place for Gators to tailgate peacefully together. Rusty Thompson said he and some friends traveled to Baton Rouge in 2007 to tailgate for the game, and they were surrounded by Tigers fans the whole time. While they were friendly, he would prefer to be surrounded by friend not foe. A cash bar, Cajun buffet as well as a country band from Gainesville, Bryce Carlisle and the Rattlesnake Daddies, performed at the event. Gator Tailgating also had blocks of rooms and RV spaces rented for Gator fans to use. Gators fans to the core (“I was brought home from the hospital in orange and blue,” Thompson said), the Herchels and the Thompsons are doing Gators fans everywhere a favor by providing a coordinated place to come together. Look for them on the corner of Gale Lemerand Drive and Museum Road next home game or check out the Web site, www.gatortailgating.com, for the next road trip. THE SCHOOL A large lake, plenty of Oak and Magnolia trees and a live tiger make LSU a very interesting campus. The French influence is prominent- T-shirts, banners and memorabilia read, “Geaux Tigers,” never “Go.” Like other parts of the city, Huey Long added to the history of LSU’s campus. Its stadium currently holds about 92,000 fans, largely due to Long’s efforts. He wanted to make the stadium the biggest in the state, so he built student dorms into the stadium to obtain enough funding. Needless to say, studying was impossible every home game, and the dorms are no longer occupied. Across from the stadium, you may notice a 475-pound cat pacing around his large enclosure, splashing in the water and eyeing any pets someone may be brave enough to bring close by. Mike VI, LSU’s live tiger and official mascot, dines on food in the shape of opponents on game days (yes, there will be a Gator-shaped piece of meat in there on Oct. 10) and provides an exotic touch to the campus. Rumor has it that Mike IV got loose on campus in the 1980s, but he was so used to humans that no harm was done. Full of tradition and culture, Baton Rouge is a city that deserves a visit. The Laissez-faire attitude, French and Cajun influences and intentional isolation from the rest of the country make it unique and fun. Whether you go for the football game or a vacation, take in Baton Rouge. Everyone comes together for common causes. “It’s all about the gumbo,” many Baton Rougians said. But Whitney Breaux may have said it best: “It’s Baton Rouge. It’s one big party at the end of the day.”

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HEALTH & FITNESS

Preventing the Fall for Seniors

by David Greenberg & Katy Davis photography by Brad Palmer

T Ben Greenberg is one of the many residents at The Village retirement community who participate in Wii Bowling to stay active.

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he statistics are staggering. Every 18 seconds an older person is in some emergency room in the United States because they have fallen. Even more startling is that for those who are more than 75, one-third will die within a year of that first serious fall. Those statistics are imbedded in the mind of Dr. Alan Goldblatt, an internist specializing in geriatrics, who serves as the medical director of North Florida Regional Medical Center’s Senior Healthcare Center at Crown Pointe. “While many people are at risk for falling, it is clear the risk and consequences rise with advancing age,” said Goldblatt. “And as people become more frail, there is a much greater likelihood of a hip fracture.” The worst scenarios may occur when that older person encounters medical or treatment as a result of that fall, he said. “More often than not, they will need direct emergency services,” said Goldblatt. “That also means Surgical, orthopedic and rehabilitation services. That process is the last thing an older person needs, and it can seriously derail their future plans.” The direct cost of this care is estimated to be $20 billion a year. That number is expected to rise within the decade to $54 billion, as baby boomers get older. The unfortunate thing, said Goldblatt, is that many of those falls didn’t need to happen. “When people reach a certain age, they start to believe they don’t need or don’t want physical activity anymore,” he said. “Just the opposite is true. They need a carefully balanced program of physical strengthening and improvement in balance and flexibility as part of an overall plan to prevent falls.” There are many aspects of this plan, including education, exercise and environmental modification, he said. Goldblatt and other doctors are studying the type of physical activity in which a senior should be involved. Every person is different. A plan for activity should be created in conjunction with a doctor and physical therapist.

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HEALTH & FITNESS

“I encourage most of my frail patients to bring in an occupational therapist to examine their home,” he said. “Old age should be fun, but it also can be made a little safer. An occupational therapist will help determine safe paths through the home. That beautiful throw rug may be just the thing that will throw an older person to the floor. More people fall in their home than in any other location.” Jocelyn Holt is the owner of Comfort Keepers, a company which provides caregivers to go into homes to insure safety, prepare meals, assist with bathing and transportation and offer companionship. While Comfort Keepers does not necessarily perform home-safety evaluations, Holt, as a registered occupational therapist, knows how important they are. “Occupational therapists are trained to see things family members don’t always see as unsafe,” she said. “We can make suggestions on how to make a home safer and prevent that fall, with the ultimate goal of allowing that person to remain in their home for a long time.” As far as physical activity, Goldblatt says there are a wide variety of things in which older people can participate. Among the more popular are dance, Pilates, golf, tennis yoga and Tai Chi. “We are embarking on specific diagnostic studies that can direct people to a prescription for care,” he said. “Along with home care and specific exercise programs, there are other factors – like polypharmacy – the use of multiple medicines to be considered. The primary physician must be aware of all the medications being taken by a patient. Polypharmacy is a major cause of falls.” Of all the physical activities in which seniors can participate, Goldblatt’s favorite may be Tai Chi – an ancient Chinese selfdefense mechanism that reduces stress, increases flexibility and improves muscle strength and definition. “Tai Chi or yoga should be a requirement for seniors across the country,” said Goldblatt. Tai Chi is one of many physical activities offered at The North Florida Retirement Village, a retirement community in northwest Gainesville. Ernest Paul Campbell comes to The Village two days a week to offer Tai Chi. He has been studying Tai Chi for 20 years and teaching for the last 10. “Balance, coordination and flexibility are all important,” he said. “I think it is a relaxing hour for the participants. I have to present things more slowly and carefully. As people get older, they get out of the habit of learning new things. But learning this new type of movement improves balance and hand-eye coordination.” Elaine Brown, The Village’s activities director says that many of the other offerings are popular as well. “In addition to Tai Chi, we have Bocce Ball, yoga, balance classm tennis, golf, a fitness center, a dance club and classes and Wii Bowling,” she said. “Everyone finds what works for them.” Annetta Mitchell, 87, loves the Wii Bowling, which has become popular all over the country. Her high game so far is 264. “I found this on a cruise ship two years ago, and it is great exercise for me,” she said. “It definitely helps me with balance. I haven’t fallen, and I don’t want to. I have had two knee replacements. I don’t want to fall on these knees.” While seniors living in a retirement community can find these activities more readily, others have to be more imaginative. John Pastore, 83, has found a way. “Exercising and staying healthy are two things that are definitely important to me,” Pastore said. “In 2006, I started taking ballroom lessons at Maria Alvarez Imperial Ballroom Studio here in Gainesville. Dancing is an enjoyable way to stay in shape.”

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Many gyms now offer ballroom dancing in group lessons as a workout, and ballroom dancing studios have seen a rise in interest. But these aren’t the only places jumping on the ballroom bandwagon. Community centers and senior living centers are also offering ballroom dancing. “After I started taking professional lessons, I learned that the Thelma Boltin Center in downtown Gainesville has dances,” Pastore said. “I started going, and now I love it. There is always a huge turnout.” Dances at the Thelma Boltin Center include swing, foxtrot, waltz, tango, cha cha, rumba and many others. The night of dancing even includes a live band called the Bluenotes. Pastore knows that old age is inevitable, but he has one motto by which he swears. “I have always believed that old age can’t catch up to you, if you keep moving,” Pastore said. Mary Sessums, who also lives at The Village, believes that as well. She uses Pilates to keep on feeling lively. In addition to a weekly session at EnCore Pilates, she works out three times a week at Gainesville Health and Fitness Center and at home. “I have a back issue,” she said. “In order for me to be walking around, this is necessary. Other modalities were not as useful as what I am doing now. It is not just exercise. It is a way of life. People have told me that I stand better and am walking better, and that is important to me.” EnCore Pilates owner and physical therapist, Shannon Nicolette, suggests that Pilates is useful for anyone at any age, but by its nature, it is a perfect exercise for older people. “Pilates for seniors is a mindbody system of exercises that is basically low to no-impact,” she said. “It allows us to address the special needs of the senior population by placing them in a spinal-supportive environment. While Pilates exercises can incorporate large pieces of equipment, it can also be done in a simple but stable chair. The key to Pilates is quality, not quantity, and a session will usually leave you relaxed, yet with a sense of deep strength. By simultaneously incorporating flexibility and strength exercises for the typically tight and weak muscles of seniors, the effect is a more efficient workout.” For Goldblatt, it all comes back to having a plan that includes education, exercise and environment. “If a senior falls and breaks something, we know how to fix it,” he said. “Unfortunately, we have a lot of practice. The thing is to avoid the problem in the first place.” HOME Living

Dance is one of the many ways that John Pastore stays young.

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COMMUNITY

UFPA & Shands

AIM Together for Healing By Katy Davis photo courtesy UFPA. (right) Los Angelesbased physical dance company, Diavolo, performs for patients in the pediatric infusion room.

Nrityagram Indian Dance Ensemble performs in the hallway of the bone marrow transplant floor at Shands at UF.

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ife on the road for touring artists can be tough – a new city every few days, one hotel room blending into another. However, University of Florida Performing Arts (UFPA) offers visiting artists a unique opportunity to reach into the community in a very special way. AIM Together, a groundbreaking initiative between UFPA and Shands Healthcare, brings performing artists into various health care settings where they interact with patients, families and medical staff. According to UFPA Assistant Director Elizabeth Auer, who has coordinated AIM Together activities since 2004, the program was developed to expand the reach of the arts into atypical communities. “When you think about it, hospitals and health care settings are individual communities who have restricted access to cultural activities. Add the stress and uncertainty for the future, and the arts are a natural fit to reach this population as a healing tool,” said Auer. Artists from around the world have participated in AIM Together. Participants of the program learn as much about themselves as they do about the patients and the stories they have to tell. “It’s a wonderful transition to see the artists walk in as performers, and leave as human beings who have been touched by others. No longer are they judging success by ticket sales, but rather by the act of getting a smile out of one patient,” said Auer. After participating in the program for the first time, Ahn Trio member Angella Ahn said, “You hear all the time about the healing powers of music, but to partake in it firsthand is truly a remarkable experience.” AIM Together reaches all ages and illnesses, from the newest and smallest of babies in the neonatal intensive care unit to those who are facing the end of their lives. The program also adapts to the setting, which has included everything from the main atrium at Shands, to playrooms, hallways, outpatient units and oneon-one bedside interactions. “Patients are always touched that someone would take the time to visit them in the hospital to help ease their pain,” said Auer. “It isn’t until the activities are over that they feel the effects the arts have on their physical ailments.” Just recently, a patient attended an interaction in the bone marrow transplant unit, and was hesitant to attend because she was afraid of having to leave early due to pain. However, after interacting with the artists for 45 minutes, the patient asked to go back to her room “the long way” and walked the floor twice before heading in.

In the Heart of Florida

In addition to working with artists on a short-term basis to introduce them to the concept of Arts in Medicine, UFPA and Shands also train other presenters and artists how to set up similar programs in their home communities. In 2006-07, through funding by a Florida Division of Cultural Affairs Challenge Grant and the National Endowment for the Arts, the program seeded AIM Together partnership-based programs in five Florida cities. Trey McIntyre Project (TMP) spent a week in Gainesville in March 2009, learning the ins and outs of setting up a similar program in their hometown of Boise, Idaho. “Trey McIntyre Project’s experience participating in AIM Together was one of the few opportunities you have as an artist to directly see the change and impact you can have on those around you,” said John Michael Schert, executive director for the dance company. “It was incredibly eye-opening to realize the ability art has to change people’s lives, and how it can be used as an instrument of healing. The wisdom and skills taught to us by AIM Together has made it possible for TMP to now bring this groundbreaking program to our home community and implement it at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center.” Long after the performance is over, and the lights have dimmed, after the artist has climbed back on their tour bus, headed for the next city on their tour, the impact of AIM Together still resonates. For Ahn, participating in the program has allowed her to connect with a very special audience. “As performers, we rely greatly on our audience’s response,” she said. “We try to bring them to a different place; to help them transcend the daily grind in some way. Through AIM Together, we were able to bring our music to people who most need that momentary departure. Many of them were in great pain and lived in a discouraging world, but we were able to give them hope and joy, if only for the length of a concert. There is nothing more rewarding for a performer.”

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COMMUNITY

Rocky Voglio receives his award from Secretary of State Kurt S. Browning .

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Rocky Voglio - Newberry Backyard Bar-B-Q

By Brad Palmer

Awarded Florida Main Street Business of the Year by Secretary of State Browning Rocky Voglio and Newberry's Backyard BarB-Q, along with several additional recipients of honor or merit-award winners were recognized recently for their exceptional accomplishments for Florida Main Street communities. Voglio received the Business of the Year award, the highest honor bestowed at the Florida Main Street 2009 annual conference held in Melbourne on Sept. 17. “I am proud to recognize the activities and accomplishments of this year’s honorees,” said Secretary of State Kurt S. Browning, as he acknowledged each of the winners. “Their sincere commitment to preservation and contributions to their local programs have been critical to the successful revitalization of traditional commercial districts across the state.” The Secretary of State’s 2009 Florida Main Street Awards are based on the recommendations of the ad-hoc Florida Main Street Awards Committee, which convened in June to consider the applications received for 2009. The committee included Joan Jefferson, Florida Main Street Program coordinator; Phillip Wisley, Florida Main Street Program architect; and three local Main Street program managers – Wayne Carter, Eustis Main Street; Robin HusbandsCauchi, Old Palm Harbor Main Street; and Sandi Moore, Leesburg Downtown Partnership. The awards acknowledge local Main Street program accomplishments that advance the preservation and revitalization goals of the Florida Main Street Program. Florida Main Street is a technical assistance program of the Bureau of Historic Preservation, Division of Historical Resources, Florida Department of State. The bureau conducts statewide programs aimed at

identifying, evaluating and preserving Florida's historic resources. Main Street, with its emphasis on preservation, is an effective strategy for achieving these goals in Florida's historic retail districts. Since 1985, the bureau has offered manager training, consultant team visits, design and other technical assistance, as well as the benefit of experience gained by other Florida Main Street programs. Newberry had one of the largest contingents of support at the awards, including State Rep. Debbie Boyd, Mayor and several city council members. Part of the reason there is such great support for Voglio is that he is a hometown hero. A humble individual who seems to give back to the community every chance he gets, not to mention his restaurant is second-to-none. “I would not be in business without the support of all of the great people in our community,” Voglio said. “When we first opened our doors there were many local individuals who loaned me a hand and actually made it possible for me to not only open this restaurant, but to make this business a success. I love to help others, because so many people have done the same for me. This award is an honor, but it wouldn't have happened without the support of all the individuals you see here tonight.” The Newberry Main Street Program contributed information to this article.

Photos of Voglio celebrating at the awards with his friends from Newberry.

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Cleaning for a Reason Ginny Allen (left) and her family were able to focus on her recovery after a recurrence of lymphoma while Mini Maid helped take care of her home.

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Ginny and Bill Allen enjoy time spent together on a cruise. Cleaning for a Reason helped the Allens have one less thing to worry about.

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fter a long day at the office, coming home to a dirty house is slightly irritating. After a long stay at the hospital, coming home to a dirty house is just overwhelming. “When I’m healthy I don’t even want to clean my own house, much less when I’m sick, you know?” said Erica Castano, owner of housekeeping company, A Personal Elf. Hers is one of two local companies that are picking up their mops and brooms as part of Cleaning for a Reason, a national nonprofit that cleans houses free of charge for women who are going through treatment for cancer. Castano’s aunt was diagnosed with cancer years ago, and is today a survivor. The cause has always been close to her heart. “Cancer’s this non-discriminatory disease that just has a horrible impact on these women and their families,” she said. While there are many nonprofits dedicated to cancer research, few have the same scope as Cleaning for a Reason, said Carol Doak, owner of Mini Maid, another company dedicated to the cause. “It’s just such a direct impact,” she said. “We’re not just cleaning a house, we’re affecting a family.” The McDonalds are one of those families. Genne McDonald’s kids were headed into their first week of school when Mini Maid stepped in to tidy up their house. With McDonald unable to clean without risk to her surgical recovery, the team arrived to help her with the things she couldn’t do on her own anymore. “I’m able to relax and recover without looking around and stressing,” McDonald said. “It’s invaluable for people who can normally do it all, and find themselves in a position where they cannot.” That element of relaxation and recovery is something Castano of A Personal Elf values most about the work her company does. Instead of spending time picking up around the house, the women are able to have a few more hours to do what they enjoy.

In the Heart of Florida

By Jessica Lipscomb “The days that they do have energy – that’s like sacred, precious time they should be spending with their family,” she said. After the resurgence of her lymphoma, Ginny Allen was just trying to focus on her chemotherapy and radiation treatments. Understandably, keeping house was not a high priority. “My energy level was just too low to give my house the attention it needed, so Carol and her team from Mini Maid came to the rescue,” Allen said. “I don’t think my house has ever been as clean. And most importantly, they are just wonderful, delightful people.” Both A Personal Elf and Mini Maid would like to see other companies get on board with the foundation in order to be able to reach as many women as possible. Cleaning for a Reason has 487 partners in all 50 states and Canada, but only two partners in the Gainesville area. Being able to serve a wider area of clients is one of her company’s goals with growth, Castano said. Above all, the two companies are proud to be part of an organization that really hits home and has such an immediate impact. “Being a mom, and a working mom, I can’t imagine the burden. If we can give them just a little relief, we are the ones that are blessed,” Doak said. Castano agrees. “To a lot of people, cleaning a house doesn’t seem that important,” she said. “But for anyone who’s sick, it gets to the point where it’s not a luxury, it’s a necessity.” For more information go to www.cleaningforareason.org.

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COMMUNITY

Random Acts of Kindness By Stephanie Thomas

Community members surprised others with random acts of kindness, in a program sponsored by Regions Bank and K Country 93.7 FM.

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aybe it was new school supplies for children, or tooth brushes and toothpaste for the homeless, or just a nice greeting, but whatever it was, many people in Gainesville were the recipients of Random Acts of Kindness on Aug. 13. Regions Bank partnered with K Country 93.7 FM and gifted the community with unexpected donations. “We wanted to do some good in these tough economic times,” said April Sweet, Regions Bank branch manager. Random acts included paying for customers’ lunches at restaurants such as Gator’s Dockside and Bento. Regions brought the event back from its 2007 debut. Regions provided most of the funds for the gifts and received donations from local businesses such as Sports Authority and Kids Only Dental Place. Bank employees pooled together their own donations and contributed 45 sets of school supplies to Partnerships for Strong Families. Multiple teams of employees spread the kindness by passing out cards to recipients saying, “take this card and pay it forward,” Sweet said. Kindness reached the gamut of Gainesville residents – from children to the elderly to the homeless. Patients at Haven Hospice

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received flowers in each room. Volunteers accepted cake and cookies as a thank you for their dedication. The community showed their appreciation for St. Francis House volunteers with movie tickets to enjoy time off. One hundred sets of toothbrushes and toothpaste were donated to the homeless. It’s a necessity that people forget about, Sweet said. A visit to North Florida’s YMCA was a huge hit with the kids with soccer balls, gym bags and goals for the youth facility. “We think this is a great example of local businesses taking time out in spite of economic difficulties in the community,” said John Bunting, CFO of North Central Florida’s YMCA. The children at the center expressed their gratitude by crafting a “Thank You” banner and cried out a cheer for the visitors, Bunting said. “Giving kids the opportunity to learn and grow is an amazing thing,” he said. Random Acts of Kindness not only spread to random recipients, but to K Country listeners as well. Radio talent encouraged citizens to spread their kindness to others in need and submit their stories to the K Country Web site. Three winners of the most moving stories were chosen to receive prizes, including a first prize $100 gift certificate to Mark’s Prime Streakhouse. One story included a 15-year-old girl who donated bread and pastries every day to Mascotte Civic Center. Sweet said Regions received immediate response from the event. Organizations were sending in thank you wishes by the end of the day and more groups are planning to get involved next year.

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SPORTS & RECREATION

One-on-One with Coach Shyatt photos courtesy University Athletic Association

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(above) photo courtesy University Athletic Association. Sophomore Ray Shipman is one of the underclassman who will be asked to play a bigger role this year. (right) photo courtesy University Athletic Association. Associate Head Coach Larry Shyatt

peek into the Gator men’s basketball locker room reveals a high-quality coaching staff and balanced team, according to Larry Shyatt, University of Florida’s associate head coach. Entering his sixth with Florida, the coaching veteran brings more than 30 years of experience. A nice gift to start off the season is a deep front line on the court, he said. Another bonus this season is more stability among class rankings. With senior Dan Werner and juniors such as Chandler Parsons and Alex Tyson on the roster, these players will continue their college journey with the Gators. This is a marked improvement over past seasons with almost no upperclassmen When asked what qualities the coaching staff looks for when recruiting, Shyatt adds competitiveness to the basics of character and academic eligibility. Everyone makes mistakes, but a competitive quality gets the player back in the game. “We hurt when we lose, and we want to win every night just like the fans,” he said. This season marks one of the most competitive schedules for the Gators, starting with non-conference games and moving into the SEC conference. Highlight games against Xavier, Michigan State and Syracuse stand out in the non-conference schedule. Shyatt says the team has just enough upperclassmen to challenge their opponents early. The players plan to march on and play the best they can. “Games like these are far more exciting for the fans,” he said. One challenge the team has to overcome is the loss of top players to professional associations. The traditional backcourt offense provided by former player Nick Calathes left the team weak in the backcourt. Shyatt confides this as a challenge the team plans to overcome and will.

By Stephanie Thomas

“We’re the only school that’s lost eight players to the NBA in four years during the draft in June,” Shyatt said. Throughout any challenges, Shyatt abides by the philosophy of “winning more and losing less,” he said. Behind the court, fans probably wouldn’t expect the team and staff to do a lot of praying. “If people knew what coaches say before, after and during a game, they would be astounded. We aren’t different than anyone else, but everyone’s eyes are trained differently,” he said. While most coaching teams may identify with their successes, Donovan strikes this differently. Shyatt describes Donovan as old-school and says he doesn’t carry any labels of his accomplishments. Despite the notion that college sports has entered the world of entertainment and a multi-million dollar industry, Shyatt knows the original leaders do it for the love of the game. A new assistant coach, Rick Pitino, Jr., son of Louisville head coach Rick Pitino, fits the bill beautifully. “We needed youth, enthusiasm and a good coach, and we got all three.” Shyatt praises, “We needed a shining star.” This coaching staff has a strong backbone, and is prepared to move forward after each game the best they can. Success will come from teamwork and competitiveness, Shyatt said. “Our fans should be really excited about this year’s team,” said Shyatt. “We are ready to start the season and compete for an NCAA berth.”

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SPORTS & RECREATION

Amanda Butl e r is Taking

the Gators to Bold New Levels By Molly Bruce

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photography By Brad Palmer

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SPORTS & RECREATION

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manda Butler knew she wanted to play college basketball in the SEC, but other than that, she didn’t know which school in particular. “All it took was for me to take one official visit to Gainesville,” she said. Butler, 37, played for UF from 1990-1994 while completing her bachelor’s degree in exercise and sport science. She received her master’s in exercise and sport science in 1997 from UF as well. She is now in her third season as head coach at the University of Florida. This season, the Gators, who Butler referred to as “one big family,” has a lot to look forward to. The UF women’s basketball team added two additional SEC games to their schedule and will compete in the Jimmy V. Classic at Rutgers this December, which will be broadcast on ESPN2, to help raise money for cancer research. Before she became the head coach, Butler was the assistant coach for Florida, assistant coach at Austin Peay State University and assistant coach and then head coach at UNC Charlotte. For a player who originally wanted to be a physical therapist, she has had quite the coaching career. “My head coach while I played has been a tremendous impact on my life,” she said. That coach was Coach Carol Ross, who holds the record for most wins in UF women’s basketball history, and she hired Butler as her assistant coach right after graduation. “Being a coach, you have a sense of which players would be a good coach,” Ross said. As a freshman, Butler had confidence on the court, Ross said. While Butler expressed her interest in physical therapy, “It was so clear that her greatness was going to come through coaching,” Ross said. Butler has led the Gators to three postseason appearances so far, and, in this summer, she helped lead the US under-19 women’s team to the world basketball championship and gold medal in Bangkok, Thailand. “It was an honor to represent the country,” Butler said. The woman behind the curtains of Gator women’s athletics, Lynda Tealer, had nothing but enthusiasm for the coach. “Amanda is very intense, passionate, energetic and fun,” Tealer said.

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Tealer has been the senior associate athletic director for six years now, so she has been there since Butler started as coach. No. SPORTS STATION IN NORTH CENTRAL FL “She’s not a sit-on-the-bench-with-herlegs-crossed kind of coach,” Tealer said. Though she is originally from Mt. Juliet, Tenn., Butler enjoys living in Gainesville, especially the festivals, restaurants and growth in the downtown area. “Do I enjoy living in Gainesville? Absolutely,” she said. Mildred’s Big City Food, Relish (“A great Ocala 900am 100.1fm place to get a hamburger,” Gainesville 1230am she said), Wing Zone, Bento and Dragonfly are just some of her favorite places to eat out. During summer, though, Butler said she enjoys grilling and cooking outside with her staff and friends. Catfish LISTEN LIVE ON THE INTERNET@ fries are another way she likes to entertain. www.floridasportstalk.com “I’m kind of a traditional southern girl,” BUS 352.732.2010 FAX 352.629.1614 she said. This southern girl may have been a fan of ESPN RADIO-RESULTS WITH ADULTS the SEC in general, but the Gators have owned her heart since 1990. Coaching at her alma mater has brought her many special moments, she said. She couldn’t pick just one, but defeating espnradio_0209_O.indd 1 1/26/09 1:41:09 PM Tennessee and beating FSU in its own arena were two highlights of the 2008-09 season. She also enjoys the recruiting aspect and loves signing new players. “I know how special it Celebrating 20 years of service in Alachua County was to be a Gator,” she said. Butler enjoys the s0ORCELAIN,AMINATES 6ENEERS relationship she develops AND/NLAYS with her staff and players, s #OMPUTER'ENERATED#ROWNS who she’ll sometimes play INASINGLEAPPOINTMENT pick-up games with. s3MILE-AKEOVERS “The biggest thing we s4-*4HERAPY have in common is being s)MPLANT2ESTORATIONS able to call ourselves a s$IGITAL8 RAYS Gator,” she said. With competition heating up, these Gators will be put to the test this season. Women’s basketball is gets#ROWNSAND"RIDGES ting more and more attens-ETAL&REE&ILLINGS tion, Butler said. “Things s,ASER$ENTISTRY are on a different level than s7HITENING they were 20 years ago, and s-OST)NSURANCESACCEPTED I think that’s great.”

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CHARITIES

Prematurity Awareness Month

photos courtesy University Athletic Association

By Emily Davis

F

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ight. Some babies do it every day. March of Dimes promises to continue the fight this November in their campaign against prematurity This campaign proved invaluable to Elaine Almond when her son, Carter, was born 11 weeks premature at Shands at the University of Florida. When Carter was born, March of Dimes went above and beyond just giving the Almond family literature on prematurity. They provided a family support team who worked, even through the holiday season, to give the Almond’s scrapbooks, lunches and meetings with other families coping with a premature birth. “I talk about it now as a positive experience because at the time I felt supported. It gave me a sense of peace,” said Almond. “The organization has been a tremendous help. It’s something I’ll hold near and dear to my heart for the rest of my days.” And while the March of Dimes fights to provide support to families like the Almonds, it is not an easy battle. What many may not realize is that half of premature births have no known cause. “Some women will have no symptoms, and their doctor will say they have a textbook pregnancy until they go into labor at 26 or 27 weeks,” said Lindsay Krieg, community director at the March of Dimes in Gainesville. According to Krieg, premature birth is defined as one before 37 weeks gestational age. This often causes underdevelopment of a baby’s lungs and brain, resulting in lifelong consequences. Interestingly, the U.S has a higher rate of premature birth than many other developed countries, and that number is on the rise. More than 545,000 babies are born prematurely every year in the US. That is one out of every eight babies born too soon, and too small. Together, March of Dimes volunteers are working to find a cause in order to find a solution. Until that cause is found, March of Dimes continues to provide countless support for families, help for pregnant women, funding for research and work to raise community awareness of prematurity. “The prematurity issue is something people don’t know about unless it happens to you. Prematurity Awareness Month puts the message out there for people to hear and understand,” said Almond. The March of Dimes allows this growing issue to be brought into the spotlight. Join the March of Dimes this November to fight for babies, fight for families and fight prematurity.

(above left) Gator football coach Urban Meyer, and his wife, Shelley, are strong supporters of the March of Dimes and Prematurity Awareness Month.

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CHARITIES

Gainesvil e Gone Nashvil e for Kids By Faith Reaves

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ainesville was ready for the rodeo. The Child Advocacy Center’s first-ever “Gainesville Gone Nashville: Kountry for Kids” was a sold-out success. More than 400 attendees channeled their innercowboy with Texas hold’em, linedancing and a concert with Ryan Gallagher, Nashville’s rising star, on Oct. 3 at the Canterbury Equestrian Showplace. “We surpassed our original goal for both sponsorships and ticket sales,” said Margot Wilder, development chair for the CAC. “We are absolutely overwhelmed by the community’s response to this event and the potential to raise awareness about the Child Advocacy Center’s mission and services. “I have been most surprised by the outpouring of support of the community and the excitement the event has created,” said Sherry Kitchens, president/CEO of the CAC. “The economy has really impacted children’s lives and put stress on families. The community, our sponsors, organizers and volunteers have risen to the occasion and been champions for children in our community. All proceeds will go for operations and services for children and non-offending caregivers, said Kitchens. The CAC is a local chapter of the National Children’s Advocacy Center. The center’s mission, to meet the needs of abused children in the community, is met through the committed team of agencies that work together to coordinate investigations and interventions for each child abuse case. For more information on the Child Advocacy Center and what you can do to help, contact Margot Wilder at (352) 376-9161 or margot@childadvocacycentergainesville.org.

(right) Ryan Gallagher performs one of his songs on stage. (below) Checking out the silent auction items

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Noche de Gala

By Faith Reaves

The red-carpet was rolled out for the second-annual Noche de Gala black-tie fundraiser benefiting the Sebastian Ferrero Foundation

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fter a magical fundraiser and a jaw-dropping donation, the Sebastian Ferrero Foundation is significantly closer to its ultimate goal of building a full-service children’s hospital in Gainesville. The second-annual Noche de Gala took place on Oct. 3 at the spectacular Besilu Collection in Micanopy. The black-tie fundraiser had more than 900 guests in attendance and generated close to $900,000 in contributions, including cash sponsorships, individual ticket sales, in-kind donations, silent auction and the generous dollar for dollar match by founders Horst and Luisa Ferrero. To add to the success of the annual fundraising event, the Foundation received a transformative gift during the planning of Noche de Gala that brought this very important initiative to another level. The foundation received a $5 million dollar gift from Gainesville native Craig Silverstein, son of Drs. Burton and Janet Silverstein. Silverstein was Google’s first employee in 1998 and is now its director of technology. “Growing up the child of two doctors, I understand the important role medical care plays in a community,” said Silverstein. “The more I hear about this project and what it will bring to Gainesville, the more excited I am by it.” Since the inaugural Noche de Gala in 2008, the momentum has continued to build and the Sebastian Ferrero Foundation has marked many significant milestones of progress in less than a year. “With our new executive director, Deborah Peeples, our tremendously successful 2009 Noche de Gala fundraiser coupled with the recent transformative $5 million gift from Craig Silverstein and our partnership with UF&Shands to undertake a needs analysis study, we have gained the leadership, support and resources necessary to continue on this extraordinary path,” said founder Horst Ferrero. The Foundation attributes their success thus far to the hard work and dedication of so many dedicated people, including pediatricians, mothers, fathers, grandparents, community leaders, board members, devoted staff, and literally hundreds of passionate volunteers. “Even the children of our community supported the Foundation by making souvenir Venetian masks for this year’s Gala,” said Ferrero. “The unwavering support of the Gainesville community has been overwhelming, deep and widespread,” said Deborah Peeples, executive director of the Sebastian Ferrero Foundation. “It’s heartwarming how people in our community really understand and care about the health care and special needs of children.” “The Ferreros have been an important catalyst, turning their tragedy into a legacy of love,” she said. “When we succeed, and the hospital is built, the entire community will have partnered in turning a long-time dream into a reality.”

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CALENDAR SPOTLIGHT

Ghouls, Goblins and Giving

There is nothing spooky about a Halloween carnival benefitting a charity. Sun Country Sports Center will be hosting its 21st annual Halloween carnival. All proceeds generated from the event will go to the March of Dimes in Gainesville. This family-friendly, seasonal event will take place on Oct. 25, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Sun Country’s West location, at 333 S.W. 140th Terrace in Jonesville. The event will be sure to have something for everyone. The carnival will boast a wide array of fun-filled Halloween themed activities. Activities will include numerous carnival games, hayrides, train rides, bounce houses, obstacle courses, rock climbing, Kidquest indoor playground, Sun Country’s Gym Bus and two haunted houses. Snow cones and pizza will be provided along with goody bags and prizes for all children attending. Children must be accompanied by an adult and are encouraged to wear costumes.

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In the Heart of Florida

This is the third year all proceeds from the event are being donated to a local charity. Last year $2,500 was donated to the Sebastian Ferrero Foundation. Sun Country employees eagerly anticipate being able to donate yet again. “I look forward to the end result and getting to see how our staff can pull together as a team,” said Jodi Bennett, director of marketing and operations at Sun Country. “We all enjoy working together and want to see how much money we can donate toward the non-profit each year.” All Sun Country employees are certainly joining together to orchestrate such a vast event. Sun Country decided to add an extra hour this year due to high interest and a 15,000square-foot expansion. Last year more than 500 families were in attendance. The carnival entrance fee will be in the form of donations. For children two years old and up the price is $15 in advance or $20 at the door. For children under the age of two it is $8 in advance or $10 at the door. In advance ticket pricing also includes priority entrance the day of the carnival. Children who are not yet walking are free. Tickets can be purchased in advance at either Sun Country location Employees will be volunteering their time to make the event a success. Chain Reaction, a local high school extension of March of Dimes comprised of approximately 30 high school students, will be assisting before and at the event. The mission of March of Dimes is to improve the health of all babies by preventing premature birth, birth defects and infant mortality. The money raised for the charity will be used for research and funding. Proceeds will be split between the local Gainesville chapter and the national charity, said Cherie Sussman, youth development director for the March of Dimes. Volunteers are needed to help set up before the event as well as during the carnival. For those interested, please contact Jodi Bennett at 352-331-8773. For more information about Sun Country, go to www.suncountrysports.com.

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Community Sept. 28 to Oct. 31 Trinity United Methodist Church Pumpkin Patch Sunday to Friday: noon-8 p.m., Saturday: 10 a.m.-8 p.m. at Trinity United Methodist Church http://www.trinitygnv.org/ Oct. 2-3, 9-10, 16-17, 23-24, 30-31 Silver Springs Fright Nights Silver Springs http://www.silversprings.com/events. html Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 Jean Dorney Memorial Wildflower Walks 9 a.m. at Morningside Nature Center http://www.cityofgainesville.org/ Oct. 10-11 BANCF Fall Parade of Homes http://www.bancf.com Oct. 10 Trinity United Methodist Church Fall Festival 4 p.m. at Trinity United Methodist Church http://www.trinitygnv.org/ Oct. 10 High Springs Fall Festival http://www.highsprings.com

Oct. 18 Alachua Harvest Festival Alachua http://alachuabusiness.com

Nov. 6 Oelrich Golf Tournament Haile Plantation Golf and Country Club http://www.rtix.com/golfclassic/

Oct. 15 Log-a-Load for Kids Golf Tournament Chiefland Golf and Country Club For more info call Monica Haynes at 265-7237

Nov. 8 March of Dimes, Gators March for Babies University of Florida http://www.marchofdimes.com/ florida/35915_60512.asp

Oct. 15 Florida Recovery Center Benefit Concert featuring Ken Block and Andrew Copeland of Sister Hazel 7 p.m. at Trinity United Methodist Church http://www.shands.org/

Nov. 14-15 Downtown Festival & Art Show - Gainesville http://www.gvlculturalaffairs.org/

Oct. 24 Trinity Trot 8 a.m. at Trinity United Methodist Church www.TrinityGNV.org Oct. 25 Climb for Cancer Peak-A-Boo Bowling Benefit 2 p.m. at the Splitz Bowling Center http://www.cfc-foundation.org

Oct. 25 Halloween Carnival benefiting March of Dimes 3 p.m. at Sun Country West http://www.suncountrysports.com/ Oct. 28 The Great Pumpkin Harvest 5:30 p.m. at Trinity United Methodist Church http://www.trinitygnv.org/ Oct. 29 RE/MAX Art Auction When: Oct. 29 Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine Institute http://www.shandskids.org/

Nov. 20 Gainesville Chamber Orchestra “Got Beethoven?” Concert 7:30 p.m. University Auditorium http://gcomusic.org/ Nov. 30 Daughtry Supporting Acts: Theory of a Deadman and Cavo 7:30 p.m. - Stephen C. O’Connell Center http://www.oconnellcenter.ufl.edu/ or (352) 392-5500 Dec. 5-6 Craft Festival 2009 10 a.m. - Stephen C. O’Connell Center http://www.oconnellcenter.ufl.edu/ or (352) 392-5500

Oct. 30 Alachua Halloween Scarecrow Row Maine Street - Alachua http://www.alachua.com Oct. 30-Nov. 3 Columbia County Fair Columbia County Fairgrounds http://www.lakecitychamber.com/ Oct. 31-Nov. 1 Micanopy Fall Harvest Festival Micanopy http://www.afn.org/~micafest/ Nov. 3 March of Dimes Signature Chefs Auction Holiday Magic Rountree Moore Toyota Showroom Lake City http://www.springsrus.com/Calendar_ Of_Events.aspx#200911143 Nov. 6 An Evening with The Rat Pack 7 p.m. - Turkey Creek Country Club http://www.facebook.com/event. php?eid=112004232301

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Theater Oct. 14-Nov. 8 Mindgame 7 p.m. at Hippodrome Theatre http://www.thehipp.org/

Nov. 27-Dec. 20 A Tuna Christmas 7 p.m. at Hippodrome Theatre http://www.thehipp.org/

Oct. 25 In the Heights Experience 2 p.m. - Center for the Performing Arts http://performingarts.ufl.edu/ events/2009/in-the-heights/

Nov. 28-Dec. 20 A Christmas Carol 7 p.m. at Hippodrome Theatre http://www.thehipp.org/

Oct. 28 Classic Albums Live: Pink Floyd – The Wall 7:30 p.m. - Center for the Performing Arts http://performingarts.ufl.edu/ events/2009/cal-the-wall/ Nov. 3 The Ten Tenors 7:30 p.m. - Center for the Performing Arts http://performingarts.ufl.edu/ events/2009/the-ten-tenors-2/ Nov. 5-29 Look Homeward, Angel Ocala Civic Theatre http://www.ocalacivictheatre.com Nov. 6 Rani Arbo & daisy mayhem - Pajama Party 7 p.m. - Center for the Performing Arts http://performingarts.ufl.edu/ events/2009/rani-arbo-daisy-mayhem/ Nov. 9-10 Avenue Q 7:30 p.m. - Center for the Performing Arts http://performingarts.ufl.edu/ events/2009/avenue-q/ Nov. 12 Soledad Barrio & Noche Flamenca 7:30 p.m. - Center for the Performing Arts http://performingarts.ufl.edu/ events/2009/noche-flamenca/ Nov. 13 Steel Hammer - Bang on a Can AllStars and Trio Mediaeval 7:30 p.m. - Center for the Performing Arts http://performingarts.ufl.edu/ events/2009/steel-hammer/

Dec. 6 Béla Fleck and The Flecktones The Holiday Tour Featuring Victor Lemonte Wooten, Future Man and Jeff Coffin 3 p.m. at the Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts http://performingarts.ufl.edu/ events/2009/bela-fleck-flecktones/

Sports

For information of Gator sports go online to http://www.gatorzone.com

Nov. 27 Volleyball vs. South Carolina Time: TBA Nov. 28 Football vs. FSU Time: TBA Volleyball vs. Notre Dame Time: TBA Dec. 4-6 Gator Swim Club Holiday Winter Classic http://www.gsoc.com/

An evening with

The Rat Pack

Oct. 9 Soccer vs. Alabama 7 p.m. Oct. 11 Soccer vs. Auburn 1 p.m.

presented by:

Oct. 17 Football vs. Arkansas (Homecoming) Time: TBA

Friday, November 6, 2009

Oct.22 Soccer vs. LSU 7 p.m.

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Oct. 23 Volleyball vs. Arkansas 7 p.m. Oct. 23-25 Gainesville Senior Games http://www.gsoc.com/event-listgainesville-florida-sports.html Oct. 25 Volleyball vs. Ole Miss 1:30 p.m.

Nov. 15 Bruckner Orchestra Linz Dennis Russell Davies, Conductor Renaud Capucon, Violin 2 p.m. - Center for the Performing Arts http://performingarts.ufl.edu/ events/2009/bruckner-orchestra-linz/

Oct. 30 Soccer vs. South Carolina 6 p.m.

Nov. 25 Yamato, The Drummers of Japan 7:30 p.m. - Center for the Performing Arts http://performingarts.ufl.edu/ events/2009/yamato/

Nov. 7 Football vs. Vanderbilt Time: TBA

Nov. 27 Lerner & Loewe’s Camelot Phillips Center for the Performing Arts http://performingarts.ufl.edu/ events/2009/camelot/

Nov. 21 Football vs. FIU Time: TBA

All proceeds benefit the Five Points of Life program. Thousands are waiting for a lifesaving donation of blood, apheresis, marrow, organs, and cord blood. Help us raise awareness, educate and make these lifesaving gifts available in our community.

Nov. 6 Volleyball vs. Georgia 7 p.m.

Nov. 8 Volleyball vs. Auburn 1:30 p.m.

Where: Turkey Creek Country Club 11400 Turkey Creek Boulevard, Alachua, FL Time: 7 p.m. - 11 p.m. Attire: Black tie optional

Sponsored by:

Corporate Tables for 10: $1, 200 Individual Tickets: $100 Sponsorship packages are available.

South

For more info, or to purchase tickets, call Brite Whitaker at (352) 224-1728 or visit www.fivepointsoflife.org.

CommunityBloodCenters

Nov. 13 Volleyball vs. LSU 7 p.m. Rat Pack 11x17 flyer.indd 1

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Ronald McDonald House Ribbon Cutting

Tioga Town Center Festival- photos courtesy Mario's Photography

A Quinn Jones Marker Dedication

Where We've Been AROUND TOWN

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AROUND TOWN

Santa Fe College Center for Emerging Technologies Ribbon Cutting

Where We've Been

Passport To Rio - Photos courtesy Mario Photography

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Ribbon Cutting Ristorante Deneno

108 photo's courtesy of Photography 35

Shands/Children's Miracle Network

photo's courtesy of Mario's Photography

Gainesville Chamber After Hours

photo's courtesy of Photography 35

Junior League Monte Carlo Night

BANCF Silent Auction

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JAKE'S CORNER

Jake’s Corner Jake Fuller appears regularly in Advantage Publishing’s magazines as our featured political cartoonist. Originally from Lakeland, Fuller has been living in Gainesville since 1970. He is married to Laura Fuller, probably well-known to many local business leaders. They have two sons, both attending Santa Fe Community College. His work is internationally syndicated by Artizans.com, and also appears on the websites of Jewish World Review, Irreverent View and AAEC, and in the annual publication “The Best Editorial Cartoons of the Year.”

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GET TO KNOW

Jan Patterson

By Emily Davis

W

hile she may be too humble to admit it, Jan Patterson impacts lives every day. Whether it be through her church, volunteering or through her work at the Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce, she is constantly reaching out and affecting positive change in the community. Most notably, Patterson is the director of Events and Programs as well as director of Leadership Gainesville for the Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce. Leadership Gainesville is a program that helps develop leaders in the community. It educates these potential leaders on the many opportunities and challenges facing our area and enables them to gain access to positions of community leadership in an informed and responsible manner. Leadership Gainesville provides Patterson with an outlet for her work in the community to extend beyond herself. Since she began her position, members have been inspired to bring a positive influence into the area. Some members now deliver produce that would otherwise be wasted to local food banks, some work actively in the education system, some graduates have become more active in the community through charity and volunteer work and some have even been elected to office as city commissioners. Even Patterson herself was affected by an inter-city trip the chamber took to Chattanooga. As a result of this, The Florida Community Design Center was created for which Patterson has been part of the board of directors for the past few years. “You can see her passion for what she is doing. You can tell she loves her job and the city,” said Nora Kilroy director of off campus life at the University of Florida, and recent Leadership Gainesville graduate. “She definitely has a passion for what she does and she does it well.” Patterson uses this fervor to lead by example. Be it with students in Leadership Gainesville or children at a local elementary school, the plight of education is an ongoing theme in her life. From working with her church, Patterson is now actively involved in the Partners in Education program through Alachua County Public Schools. Through her work in this program, Patterson sends weekly tutors to Lake Forest Elementary School to work with students or just provide a little extra needed attention. She also helps collect food and gifts for some of the neediest children around the holiday season as well as providing healthy snacks during FCAT testing. Patterson has carried this dedication to education into her work at the Chamber of Commerce by coordinating an Education Task Force. This project is working toward improving high school graduation rates. In the end, for Patterson, it all comes down to a love for this community. It is a love that is obvious to anyone who is fortunate enough to meet her. “I love this community for several reasons – it’s physical beauty, the Gators and the people. There are so many passionate people working tirelessly to make this an even better place to live and working to improve the quality of life for every citizen,” said Patterson. “I am thankful for the front row seat to witness all that is great about this community my job at the chamber allows me to have.”

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Grab Life

Start Here For Women Thornebrook Village 374-4634

Men & Women 4820 Newberry Road 377-4955 â&#x20AC;˘ Tioga Town Center 692-2180

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