Page 1

Po r t f o l i o

bradley shanks


SPA s, K i n g A b d ul l ah F i nan c i al Di s t r i c t At the geographical center of the King Abdullah Financial District, the Mens and Womens SPAs create a visual portal to the new group of skyscrapers comprising the financial center. The buildings are technically complex: the main structural system is a steel diagrid with significant cantilevers; the perforated titanium facade contains dynamic elements, and the main interior spaces, known as fissure gardens, include vertical gardens by the French botanist and artist Patrick Blanc. Other major design challenges include incorporating infrastructure elements, including a 4-level underground parking garage under the SPAs, two skywalks connecting to neighboring buildings, a monorail station, and the surrounding landscape, all designed by others.

w il l brud e r+pa r t n e r s

/

worksbureau

2 011 -

r i ya d h,

saudi

arabia


steel frame attached to structure above fiberglass panels on unitized frame bearing on foundation

structural V-column LED lights affixed to outside of frame lateral stability connection to columns

steel collar attached to column tube steel frame fiberglass panel / frame assembly

unified system bearing at foundation

LED lights affixed to outside of frame

scale 1:20

0

250mm 500mm

1

A.11 / A.12

exterior column jacket


A.11

pool area

fissure garden

monorail

L2 L1

wet area

public atrium

GF wadi

portico

retail

B1 B2

travelator

B3 B4

0 5 10 scale 1:500

25

A.11

section B


KAFD Portal Spas parcelsA.11/A.12

D25: phase 2, stage II 10 July 2011 plate 99

Raison d’Etre


KAFD Portal Spas parcelsA.11/A.12

D25: phase 2, stage II 10 July 2011 plate 90

Raison d’Etre


Par c e l 2.08, K i n g A b d ul l ah F i nan c i al Di s t r i c t A single building on a parcel, comprising two towers, retail podium, parking garage, and roof gardens. Composed of a five-level office block and a fifteen-level residential tower linked buy a two-level retail podium, the major masses bracket a semicircular public garden at grade, and a podium level roof garden, both sited under a shade canopy that soars overhead. 658,870 sf | 61,211 sm

w il l brud e r+pa r t n e r s

/

worksbureau

2 010 -

r i ya d h,

saudi

arabia


2.0

residential façade The residential tower has been given a strong vertical expression, showing its height and stacking of units with continuous vertical bands of spandrel or vision glass. The prismatic mass of the tower is cut with vertical ‘crevices’ containing inset terraces at four locations of each plate. To protect this glazing several techniques are employed: On the northwest and southwest, limited frit is used. Where frit is used behind the shade screen structure, it gives vertical scale to double-height spaces of duplex units that can benefit from added sun control. The primary sun control system is provided by an outboard perforated aluminum shade system. On other elevations, frit is the means of sun control; it is also the means to spandrelize glazing, and is a key part of the privacy strategy which we have addressed in response to the concerns of RIC. The coloration is envisioned to be a very pale silver-blue pattern on surface 2, with a translucent white frit provided on surface 3 similar to the office block daylight strategy. Where frit occurs at spandrel glass, the back face of the laminated panel will be opacified—either with a very light grey, or silver metallic—to create a vertical, non-gridded visual emphasis.

façade assets 1 civic presence 2 economic façade 3 luxury residence 4 sustainability

elevation

section

plan

EWS-03A RESIDENTIAL TOWER SINGLE HEIGHT CURTAIN WALL (WITH EXTERIOR SHADE SCREEN) PARCEL 2.08

King Abdullah Financial District

facade concept + details 20 july 2010

(1110-2.08-DC-A-2409-Rev00)

40


EWS-02A OFFICE TOWE

facade concept +


2.0

REFER TO "PROJECT MANUAL FOR VOLUME 6 - CLADDING & PERFORMANCE" FOR INFORMATION REGARDING ALL EXTERIOR WALL ASSEMBLIES AND MATERIALS.

EXTERIOR WALL SYSTEMS

T.O. FIN. FLR. (L6)

EWS-01A

TERRA COTTA RAINSCREEN

EWS-01B

PODIUM CURTAIN WALL

EWS-01C

PODIUM L1 GARDEN FACADE GLAZING

EWS-01D

PODIUM FACETTED CURTAIN WALL

EWS-01E

GARAGE LIGHT WELL GLAZING

EWS-01G

PODIUM VESTIBULE GLAZING

EWS-02A

OFFICE TOWER CURTAIN WALL (W/ EXTERIOR SHADE LOUVER)

EWS-02B

OFFICE TOWER OUTWARD SLOPING CURTAIN WALL (W/O EXTERIOR SHADE LOUVER)

3500

EWS-02C

STACKING JOINT

OFFICE TOWER PARAPET CURTAIN WALL

EWS-02D

OFFICE TOWER SKIRT CURTAIN WALL

EWS-02E

OFFICE TOWER OUTWARD SLOPING PARAPET CURTAIN WALL

EWS-03A

RESIDENTIAL TOWER SINGLE HEIGHT CURTAIN WALL (W/ EXTERIOR SHADE SCREEN)

EWS-03B

RESIDENTIAL TOWER DOUBLE HEIGHT CURTAIN WALL (W/ EXTERIOR SHADE SCREEN)

EWS-03C

660.350 T.O. FIN. FLR. (L5)

PODIUM GARDEN ELEVATOR GLAZING

EWS-01F

RESIDENTIAL TOWER SINGLE HEIGHT CURTAIN WALL (W/O EXTERIOR SHADE SCREEN)

EWS-03D

RESIDENTIAL TOWER DOUBLE HEIGHT CURTAIN WALL (W/O EXTERIOR SHADE SCREEN)

EWS-03E

RESIDENTIAL TOWER PARAPET CURTAIN WALL (W/ EXTERIOR SHADE SCREEN)

EWS-03F

RESIDENTIAL TOWER PARAPET CURTAIN WALL (W/O EXTERIOR SHADE SCREEN)

EWS-04A

METAL RAINSCREEN SYSTEM

EWS-05A

STUCCO WALL COVERING

KEYNOTES 1

3500

RECESSED ROLLER SHADE

VISION GLAZING FRIT

ROLLER SHADE CABLE GUIDE ROLLER SHADE TENSION STOP

SPANDREL

STACKING JOINT

ALUMINUM SILL

C3 A5003

GWB

TYP

FINISHED FLOOR SPANDREL 656.850

PTFE / STEEL FRAME PORTE COCHERE SHADE

2

METAL CLAD WALL / FASCIA

3

PLANTER - STONE VENEERED

4

WATER GARDEN - TILE FACED

5

PERFORATED STAINLESS STEEL RP-LINED VENT SHAFT

6

SKYWALK LOCATION - BY OTHERS

7

RESIDENTIAL TOWER SHADE SCREEN

8

OFFICE TOWER SHADE LOUVER

9

PTFE / STEEL FRAME GARDEN SHADE CANOPY

10 PERFORATED METAL GUARDRAIL 11 PERFORATED SIGNAGE VALENCE 12

SKYLIGHT WALLS

13

SKYLIGHT - INTEGRATED WITH FAÇADE

14

GENERATOR EXHUAST

15

SLOPE OF VIEW GARDEN (LANDSCAPE)

16 MECHANICAL LOUVER 17 ROOFTOP MECHANICAL SCREEN 18

NOTE: FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON SHADE SCREEN REFER TO 43/44.

GL TYPICAL GLAZING AT PODIUM 1-1 GL GROUND FLOOR GLAZING AT PODIUM GARDEN 1-2 FACADE

B5

PARTIAL ELEVATION 1:20

0

200

400

B2

800

PARTIAL WALL SECTION 0

1:20

GL GLAZING AT PODIUM W/ BARRIER LOADING 1-3 200

400

GL SPANDREL GLAZING AT PODIUM 1-4

800

GL TYPICAL GARDEN FACADE 1-5 GL SKIRT GLAZING AT PODIUM GARDEN FACADE 1-6

NOTE: ALL MISCELLANEOUS STEEL THAT IS PART OF THE EXTERIOR WALL SYSTEM TO BE SUPPLIED AND INSTALLED BY SUBCONTRACTOR.

GL GLASS BALUSTRADE AT PODIUM GARDEN 1-7 FACADE

150MM CURTAINWALL SYSTEM ALUMINUM SILL 250MM CURTAINWALL SYSTEM

GWB INSULATION

GL ELEVATOR GLAZING 1-8

GWB INSULATION

ALUMINUM SILL

250MM CURTAINWALL SYSTEM

SLAB EDGE

GL GARAGE LIGHT WELL GLAZING 1-9 GL VESTIBULE GLAZING 1-10 GL TYPICAL GLAZING AT OFFICE 2-1 GL SPANDREL GLAZING AT OFFICE 2-2 GL GLAZING AT OFFICE SKIRT 2-3

SPANDREL

GL GLAZING AT OFFICE PARAPET 2-4

FORMED ALUMINUM CLOSURE

VERTICAL MULLION CAP ZERO SIGHTLINE AWNING UNIT

500

GL TYPICAL GLAZING AT RESIDENTIAL 3-1 GL GLAZING AT RESIDENTIAL W/ BARRIER LOADING 3-2

GL GLAZING AT RESIDENTIAL TERRACES 3-4 GL SPANDREL GLAZING AT RESIDENTIAL (A) 3-5 A GL SPANDREL GLAZING AT RESIDENTIAL (B) 3-5 B GL GLAZING AT RESIDENTIAL PARAPET 3-6

A5

PARTIAL PLAN L4 1:20

facade concept + details 20 july 2010 (1110-2.08-DC-A-2409-Rev00)

GL GLAZING AT OFFICE W/ BARRIER LOADING 2-5

GL SLOPED GLAZING AT RESIDENTIAL 3-3

NOTE: ASSUME ONE OPERABLE UNIT PER 33 SQUARE METERS OF EWS-03C

47

SILVER METAL COLUMN JACKET

GLAZING TYPES

0

200

400

800

A2

PARTIAL PLAN L3 1:20

0

200

400

800

EWS-03C RESIDENTIAL TOWER SINGLE HEIGHT CURTAIN WALL (WITHOUT EXTERIOR SHADE SCREEN) *refer to A4004

PARCEL 2.08

King Abdullah Financial District


3.0

60-150mm W. x 60mm DP. x 1800-3000mm H. DETAIL CONNECTION 1/2 SCALE TERRA COTTA FIXINGS

axonometric assembly diagram

EWS-01A TERRA COTTA RAINSCREEN PARCEL 2.08

King Abdullah Financial District

facade concept + details 20 july 2010

(1110-2.08-DC-A-2409-Rev00)

54


Summe r S t r e e t r amp/s t ai r A design for a new connector between an overpass and a sidewalk in the developing Fan Pier area of South Boston. The ramp/stair would allow users of the convention center complex easier access to proposed hotels and the waterfront.

u t i l e , i n c .

m a r c h 2008

boston,

massachusetts


N


N


C amb r i d g e Pub l i c L i b r ar y An addition to the main city library, built in 1888. The project consists of a new 75,000 square foot building, the preservation of the existing historic library structure, and new below-grade parking. The new building features a double-skin curtain wall faรงade, and is expected to be LEED certified.

w i l l i a m r a w n a s s o c i at e s

j a n u a r y 2006

cambridge,

massachusetts


N


N


Gr e e n Val l e y Re s i d e n c e The project is the addition to and renovation of an existing two-story, wood-frame modernist home that was originally built in 1968. This project is an alternative to the raze-and-build-new scenario typically exercised in this community. The addition is grafted onto the top of the existing house to preserve as much of the existing building as programmatically possible, to conserve on the amount of new materials used, and to limit the interaction with the existing landscape. All materials used for the project are durable, recyclable, and in most instances, renewable.

w i e d e r s pa hn a r c hi t e c t ur e

s u m m e r 2008

armonk

,

new

york


21’-0”

STAIR & DOUBLE -HEIGHT SPACE

458 SF = 3A

120 SF = 3B 21’-10”

UPPER LEVEL UPPER LEVEL EXISTING: Existing:

New: NEW:

1113 SF = 3C 5’-0”

24’-0”

53’-0”

00 SF SF

1691SF SF 1691

Total: 1691SF SF TOTAL: 1691

4’-0”

17’-8”

4’-10”

17’-4”

85 SF = 2F

UPPER LEVEL 3A = 458 SF 3B = 120 SF 3C = 1113 SF TOTAL = 1691 SF

39’-0”

UP

NEW: New:

Porch: TOTAL: Total:

24 254 SF SF

820 SF SF 2550 2550 SF

4’-4” 5’-6” 7’-6”

EXISTING: 1476 Existing: 1476 SF SF

STAIR

648 SF = 2G

820 SF = 2H

36’-8”

6’-6” 48 SF = 2B

MIDDLE MID LEVELLEVEL

166 SF = 2E 41’-6”

28’-6”

494 SF = 2A

MID LEVEL 2A = 494 SF 2B = 48 SF 2C = 120 SF 2D = 169 SF 2E = 166 SF 2F = 85 SF 2G = 648 SF 2H = 820 SF TOTAL = 2550 SF

120 SF = 2C 21’-10” 169 SF = 2D 39’-0”

3’-10”

34’-4”

EXISTING: 1308 SF Existing: 1308 SF

New: NEW: "

Total: TOTAL:

146 SF 146 SF 1454 SF 1454 SF EXISTING HOUSE

38’-1”

38’-1”

LOWER LEVEL LOWER LEVEL

146 SF = 1A

1308 SF = 1B

LOWER LEVEL 1A = 146 SF 2B = 1308 SF TOTAL = 1454 SF


LIVING ROOM DOUBLE-HEIGHT SPACE

ADDITION OF UPPER LEVEL

NEW CONFIGURATION


NORTH ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION


WEST ELEVATION

Facade Materials The volume of the existing house will be sheathed in zinc siding. The added bar at the upper level will be sheathed in cedar with horizontal battens one foot on center. These battens will create a repetitive shadow line to reduce the apparent mass of the bar. Both the zinc and the cedar will patina over time to a natural gray. The existing cedar siding will be preserved and used to sheath the underside of the cantilevers. There will be just three different sizes of windows for economy and efficiency in construction.

EAST ELEVATION


LIVING ROOM

ENTRY

DINING ROOM

GARAGE


DINING ROOM

GARAGE

Systems The construction will be wood frame with both engineered lumber and a modicum of steel members. A forty-percent soybased spray-foam insulation will be used throughout the house for its thermal performance and ability to minimize air infiltration. Natural light is maximized in the social spaces to be occupied during the daytime. Convection of warm air through the two double-height spaces will provide strong natural ventilation. When the windows are closed, a radiant heating and radiant cooling system will use a geothermal energy source. Fresh air will then be introduced into the house through an air exchanger to captivate the interior energy but expel the stale air.

BALCONY LIVING ROOM

ENTRY

PLAYROOM

KITCHEN


MIT Gr a d ua t e Re s i d e n c e Hal l Tentatively named NW35, the 275,000 square foot complex will include 520 beds in a series of connected buildings that are three to five stories tall and are situated around two courtyards. In addition to the private and public spaces in the buildings, the area surrounding the complex will be landscaped with spaces to create greenscape along Albany Street. The courtyards will create a singular community and will serve as private outdoor gardens for the graduate residents. The project included four security gates, each one unique. All had to allow 24-hour card access to residents, and two gates were required to be accessible to fire trucks. The configuration and location of the entry points determined the configuration of each gate. Construction began in October 2006, and was completed in 2008. The project budget was $104 Million.

w i l l i a m r a w n a s s o c i at e s

f e b r u a r y 2007

cambridge,

massachusetts


N


Har b o r Is l an d s Par k Pa v i l i o n This project won 3rd Place in the open design competition. Jurors praised it as an “excellent proposal that would mediate well between the outdoors and the indoors�. The pavilion is a glass box holding two glowing volumes, which, like lanterns, attract and guide visitors. Transparent exterior walls slide away to reveal the services and information to the passerby. The glowing interior volumes float like islands inside the space. Their surfaces are digital screens displaying images and information about the park, harbor and islands. As visitors flow around the volumes, they become oriented to their environment – a new pedestrian space connected to the oceanfront.

i n d e p e n d e n t c o m p e t i t i o n e n t r y

a p r i l 2005

boston,

massachusetts


The place occupied by the pavilion, created by the dismantling of an iconic elevated highway, is a space of transformation and reorientation. The building unfolds, transforming with the seasons to accommodate the swells of warm weather crowds. The west faรงade, 12 foot high glass panels, slide parallel to the greenway, allowing unhindered flow through the length of the pavilion. Information counters mounted on tracks in the floor slide west towards the park. As warm weather arrives and the greenway blooms, the pavilion grows, expanding to the needs of its visitors. The wing-like structure with its unfolding walls, maximizes the covered volume and allows the perimeter to be floor-to-ceiling glass. The glowing internal volumes are thus externally visible from every angle, beckoning the park user.

ATLANTIC AVENUE

STATE STREET

PAVILION

N


INTERIOR VOLUMES

ZONES CAFE STORAGE UTILITY

CARTS SEATING AREA

OPEN PLAN

N

EXHIBITS SHOP

INFO / TICKETS

The diagrams suggest one variation on configuring interior volumes. Such spaces may be necessary to contain certain functions (utilities, secure storage, cart storage or prep kitchen). The configuration assures flexibility in moving, scaling, or eliminating these volumes.


The pavilion is opened and expanded to varying degrees as weather and need permit. The primary entrance becomes the western side of the structure; the glass walls fully retract and stack against an external structure sited on the north side. These glass panels temporarily create a buffer zone between the path and the outdoor seating area. The north and south walls are composed of folding glass panels, allowing the pavilion to open to the city even further. Information desks and sales counters slide out of the building on recessed floor tracks, This allows visitors to walk around and approach the information counter at both sides. During these times staff can be increased to cater to the larger visitor traffic. Outdoor seating can also spread out onto the main path under the awning, creating a distinctly public seating area apart from the main area to the north.


ATL ANTIC

AV ENUE

WATER VIEW

WATER VIEW

OUTDOOR SEATING AREA

GLASS WALL OPEN

ROOF OVERHANG

N


Ro t c h Tr a v e l l i n g S c h o l ar s h i p This project is the winning entry for the second stage of the 2003 Rotch Travelling Scholarship. The competition format was a ten-day charrette, followed by an individual presentation to a jury of eight. The first prize, awarded annually, is a $35,000 fellowship granted for eight months of travel abroad.

i n d e p e n d e n t c o m p e t i t i o n e n t r y

m a r c h 2003

boston,

massachusetts


A supermarket is typically a simple box, a temporary repository of food – the place between the farm and the home. For various cultural and economic reasons, this building type has become a simple volume, formulaic in its dimensions, and artificially lit. As consumers, we expect to find the food clean and well organized, and in a sterile environment. The project aims to bring the source of food into the city, not just the product itself. Shoppers are more aware of the origins of the food they are buying. The proposal is in many ways the opposite of the supermarket, or the inverted supermarket – daylight is welcomed in, shopping occurs inside and outside the building, and on different levels. Produce is neither clean nor sterile – in some instances the food is actually still growing inside the building. Food is understood more as an organic process, and less as a commodity.


The project interacts with the park space, pushing and pulling its boundaries and distorting the notion of building/park. The trees that line the new boulevards zigzag across the park, in effect borrowing part of the open space and claiming it as market space. Thus the space of the Market footprint doubles, creating an open plaza for vending and festivals. Diagrammatically, the green space taken from the park is like a green carpet, which slides up and over the building – the park claims the building as park space in return.

S ection CC

S ection BB

1 16"

1 16"

= 1'-0"

= 1'-0"


C

B

LEVEL 4

A

Outdoor Seating

Restaurant

A

O ces Kitchen

B

C C

B

LEVEL 3

A

Community Center Art Exhibition A

Pre-function area

Art & Community Center Storage Art Exhibition

B

C C

B

LEVEL 2

A

Upper Level Market

Cafe A

Bakery / Cafe

B

C

C

B

GROUND LEVEL

A

Lower Level Market

A

Loading

B

C


The primary building material is plant material. On the ground floor, it is the produce for sale in the stalls. Above the first level, it is the plants that produce flowers, herbs, and berries for harvest and sale. This building material changes color and texture seasonally, and animates the facades on a daily basis. The east façade contains the element of vertical landscape – rows of large window boxes stacked above the second level. These boxes function both as planters for flowers, herbs and bushes, and as a screen for eastern light. Vendors use the planters to grow a variety of produce and flowers, which can be harvested in the presence of customers. The yearround growing of plants becomes a living billboard, directly advertising the building as a Market.


Ho u s i n g i n Na t i o nal Par k s The project addresses the issues of housing for federal employees and volunteers in National Parks. This issue, in its current form, has been debated in the press and in government since at least 1990. Plans have been proposed to build new employee communities at such other parks as Grand Canyon National Park. This issue is very much related to that of transportation and overcrowding in the National Parks. This project aims to design suitable housing on suitable sites in some of the most important public lands in the United States.

t h e s i s p r o j e c t

s p r i n g 2000

canyonlands

n at i o n a l

park

,

u ta h


Canyonlands National Park in Utah was selected as a case study site, although the project is designed to be adaptable to other parks in the region. Canyonlands is a vast area of wilderness in southeastern Utah, centered around the confluence of the Green and Colorado rivers. The 530 square miles of the park contain canyons, arches, spires buttes and other rock formations. The sheer canyons divide the park into three distinct sections, which are unconnected by road. The three separate park headquarters are thus isolated from each other by several hours of driving, on roads that are at times impassible. The Canyonlands area was designated a National Park in 1964; before this much of the terrain was unvisited due to inaccessibility.


N


Employee housing in most parks is outdated and in need of replacement. Limited budgets have resulted in the construction of wood-framed modular housing, assembled on site and placed on a buried foundation. However, such construction is ill suited to the environmental extremes of the desert southwest: temperatures exceed 100o F (38o C) in summer and can drop below 0o F (-20o C) in winter; precipitation amounts to only 7 inches per annum; and due to the elevation (6000 ft/1800 m), daily temperature fluctuations are high. Besides exploring what to build, this project is also concerned with how to build - to develop a housing prototype that is suitable for important public lands. Historically, park headquarters and employee housing were designed to blend with the landscape and mimic ancient buildings. The current housing model in several parks is suburban enclaves tucked away from visitor’s sight. This project is concerned with how the buildings interact with the surroundings, and the issue of permanence. Permanent marks on the land are identified and treated minimally: gravel roads, concrete foundation piles, effluent beds. These are the elements that are placed before the arrival of the unit, and are the same elements that remain after it is removed. The unit itself is non-permanent; like most buildings it will be removed or replaced within 30 years. Like ancient ruins, what remains is evidence of the beliefs and values of a culture.


Each unit is constructed of 4” x 4” welded steel sections. This cross-sectional shape is repeated to create five bays, each 9’-0” on center. The resulting ‘cage’ rests on two 12” steel ‘C’ channels, which provide lateral stability, and the reinforcement required when moving the unit. The enclosure consists of glazing units and stressed-skin insulating panels. All enclosure panels are modular and interchangeable. During transportation, the glazed panels are protected inside the unit, and later assembled.


The dimensions of the unit are based on highway size restrictions, so that the folded-up unit can be delivered by a semi-trailer. Being federal buildings, the units are universally accessible to the handicapped. The length and position of the southern awning is determined by seasonal sun angles. N

Each unit is designed to function as independent living quarters for one or two people. Units are mass produced off-site and delivered to the site by truck. Once placed on the site, the unit unfolds its decks and awnings, and is wired to a photovoltaic solar panel. All utilities, including a water storage tank, are built into the unit.


tic e Sum

x ino qu

72째

째E 52

So ls int er 32 째W

tice Sols mer


The sectional shape of the unit allows it to be coupled with one or more units to provide more space. The slope of the roofs and the integral gutter allow for the clerestory windows to remain operable. In such a situation, the new unit would need no additional enclosure panels; the panels of the existing north facade are moved to the same facade of the new unit, and the new unit needs no south facade.


G ar ag e

wa k efiel d,

A detached residential garage for the maintenance and storage of three vehicles. The owner, a car enthusiast, requires the ability to drive cars through the building and elevate them on a mechanical lift. The sloped roof provides space for a future second level to be used by the client as a space for musical instruction.

wi e d e r s pa hn

architecture

s u m m e r 2008

massachusetts


Budgeted for $75,000, the building is composed of standard elements. Walls and roof are composed of a structurally insulated panel system (SIPS). The exterior cladding is cement board panels.


De s i g n i n g Q u e e n s Pl a z a

queens,

This proposal was awarded Third Place out of 191 entries in the Queens Plaza Design Ideas Competition, sponsored by the Van Alen Institute. The site is a major intersection of New York City transit; the area is dominated by cars, buses, above and below ground subway stations, parking lots and a future railroad station. The competition brief states: The dense layers of transportation infrastructure including boulevards, bridges, and elevated trains are a living diagram of the early 20th-century city and its promise that traffic and prosperity go hand in hand, evidenced by the impressive building stock from that era. Yet today, Queens Plaza has the potential for a new identity from the scale of the median to the scale of the plaza. This project is published in Landscape Architecture magazine, March 2002, and Competitions magazine, Fall 2002.

independent competition entry

(w i t h

ly n n i . h s u )

o c t o b e r 2 0 01

new

york


The project recognizes an opportunity to enrich the experience of Queens Plaza by capitalizing upon the magnitude of the transportation structures that uniquely define the character of the space. A new pedestrian infrastructure and landscape are integrated into the existing urban systems. Queens Plaza is transformed into a distinct gateway and destination by re/surfacing landscape. The existing elevated steel structure becomes the framework for vertical green landscape, filtering light, air, sound, mist; interspersed digital billboards animate the space under the structure. Wood surfaces fold and lift over the JFK commuter triangle and adjacent roads, providing a softer surface for pedestrians Major intersections are surfaced with raised granulated rubber paving to create designated, accessible crossings for pedestrians, while also serving as traffic regulators. The under utilized stretch of rails in Sunnyside Yards is reclaimed and becomes recreational space and wetlands; this greenway links to other transit networks and public spaces.

Raised granulated rubber surface (at pedestrian crossings)

Grass Panels (attached to elevated subway track - south facing)

-slows vehicular traffic -green layer -acoustic absorbtion -biofilter


existing buildings

elevated structure

living panels

Vine Panels (attached to elevated subway track - north facing)

Raised Wood Planks (over JFK commuter triangle)

Wetland Greenway (at existing derelict section of railyard)

-pedestrian plaza bridging traffic -light filter

-recreation -link to greenway

-biofilter

-biofiltration -extends to medians -illuminated underside of deck

-link to future LIRR station

pedestrian sur faces


O c e anár i o d e L i s b o a The Oceanário de Lisboa opened in 1998 as the centerpiece of Expo ‘98. The expansion was commissioned in December 2000, with the purpose of adding a changing exhibit gallery and increasing attendance. The 7,500 square meter (80,000 square feet) building is comprised of three levels and joins the existing support building via an enclosed bridge.

c h e r m ay e f f s o l l o g u b & p o o l e , i n c .

2000 -2002

lisbon,

portugal


S ection AA

S ection BB

E ast E levation

West E lev ation


The program of the building guides the form: a large opaque box (changing exhibit gallery, auditorium) floats above a transparent volume (shops, concessions, entry lobby, curatorial space). In the middle of the building sits a 600,000 liter (158,000 gallon) saltwater tank. The focal point of the expansion, the tank contains a living coral reef, viewed from both the changing exhibit gallery and the auditorium. A canopy creates covered outdoor space south of the building for dining and events. The enclosure material folds down on the south wall, providing wind protection and a surface for evening film projection. The canopy structure continues over half of the building, covering coral propagation areas on the roof. It also becomes the glass enclosure for the coral tank, allowing daylight for coral growth. Studies of how best to direct maximum sunlight into the coral tank were undertaken. The concept of a large vertical reflector plane was abandoned in favor of pivoting mirrored panels within the roof enclosure.


Ph y s i c s L ab o r a t o r y & Da t a C e n t e r The existing structure was built as the Cambridge Electron Accelerator in the 1950’s. The high bay is a 30 foot high volume partially underground, an arc segment sitting above the circular tunnel. While the tunnel itself was dismantled in various stages, the high bay remains. The university sought to take advantage of the under used structure to house a new data center. This server room, to be used for storage and processing of scientific data, was planned to occupy half of the volume; the remaining half would be assigned as laboratories for the department of Large Particle Physics and Cosmology (LPPC). A high-bay annex is currently used for the storage of Mayan artifacts owned by the Peabody Museum.

u t i l e , i n c .

april

-

d e c e m b e r 2007

cambridge,

massachusetts


R GO

UM

ST

E

US

HA

UM

ST

LPPC PATHS

E

US

HA

ET

R GO

RE

ST

ET

GENERAL PATHS

NCIS

FRA

UE

VEN

A CIS

RE

ST

SERVICE PATH

N FRA

M

M

NUE

AVE

OXFORD STREET

ET

RE

M

M

HAMMOND STREET

OXFORD STREET

ET

RE

HAMMOND STREET

PEABODY PATH


OX

ET

ND STRE

HAMMO

FO

RD

N LA ORT BO HW RA ES TO T RIE S

STREET

REET

M ST

EU MUS

ROCKE FELL HALL ER N LA ORT BO HW RA ES TO T RIE S

OE GREEN B HOUSE M LABORCZ ATORY

MUSE COMPAUM OF RA BIOLOG TIVE Y

AVENUE

CO N HA ANT LL

UNIVER HERBA SITY RIA

ANDOV

ER HAL

FARLOW

BIOLO LABOR GICAL ATORIE

S

VANSE

RG

L

FRANCIS

FO R OX

EN GIN LA SCIE EERIN BO NC G RA E TO RY

GORTHAM

DS

TR

EET

60


KEY 1980 SF LPPC ROOMS 860 SF LPPC CIRCULATION/USE 190 SF BUILDING SERVICES 1450 SF BUILDING CIRCULATION

LO

BB

Y.

STO

R.

GEN ER PRO AL DR F. S Y TUB LAB BS

OFFI

CE

. ERV

ICE

LAB OPTICS LASERS

OFFIC

S

W

FF EO

OFFIC

OFFICE OFFICE

E OFFIC E

HEN KITC TING MEE

5570 SF FLOOR PLATE AREA

J

M

HIGH BAY

PEABODY STORAGE

KEY 2830 SF LPPC ROOMS

ST O

RA

GE

710 SF LPPC CIRCULATION/USE 140 SF BUILDING SERVICES

ELE LAB S CT U RO PPO NIC RT SS HO P

320 SF BUILDING CIRCULATION

.

CH

ME OFFI

CE

CONF. KITCH EN

TEST LAB

OFFICE

TEST

LAB

5470 SF FLOOR PLATE AREA

ST

OR

AG

E

CORRIDOR

HIGH BAY

KEY 7400 SF LPPC ROOMS GE

RA

TO

LS

RA

NE

GE DATA

TEL/

OFFICE

WE SH LD OP

38350 SF FLOOR PLATE AREA

C

HIGH BAY

CH

.

CLEA

N RO

PEABOD

550 SF BUILDING CIRCULATION 350 SF PEABODY ROOMS 27600 SF HIGH BAY AREA

BM

GAS ROOM ME

MACHINE SHOP

16800 SF LPPC CIRCULATION/USE 1350 SF BUILDING SERVICES

Y STORAG

E

OM

CASTING PEABODY CAST ROOM STORAGE

ELECTRIC


LPPC

NORTHWEST LABORATORIES

HPRC HIGH BAY

UNASSIGNED NORTHWEST LABORATORIES

COMMON CORRIDOR BUILDING

COMMON CORRIDOR

UNA S 1,33 SIGNED 5 SF

BUILDING

CHILLED WATER PUMPS 275 SF

MACHINE SHOP 4,150 SF

CLEAN ROOM 730 SF

OMS

RESTRO

HEATING PLANT 610 SF

HIGH BAY SF 5,000 SF) (6,150

IC ELECTR ROOM SF 1,080

TRASH 155 SF

G DOCK LOADIN 5 SF 1,09

TORIES LABORA0 SF 3.35

IGNED UNASS 340 SF

UNASSIGNED

SIGNED UNAS 0 SF 61

UPS ROOM SF 1,685

S OOM

260

R EST SFR

PEABODY

Y BATTER ROOM SF 1,485

HT

Y PEABODOM CAST ROSF 1,490

SKYLIG

AHU

HT

SKYLIG

AHU

D WATER CHILLE TANKS 900 SF

D SIGNE UNAS 500 SF

RAGE C. STO R. MIS PP. STO 200 SF FIRE SU 315 SF

AHU

ILLERS RE CH

FUTU

CHILLERS

AHU

PEABOD

Y ANNE

X

SHARED OFFICES 150 SF EACH

LPPC

NORTHWEST LABORATORIES

HPRC HIGH BAY

CE

MAIN LOBBY

CO LL AB 1,2ORA 00 TIV SF E SP A AD M IN O IS 65 FFICTRA 0 E TIV SF E

OFFICES SMALL EACH 75 SF

SOC NOC/ SF 635

UNASSIGNED WAR ROOM 255 SF

OM NE RO MACHI 0 SF 6,47

PEABODY AHU AHU

IQUE FOR UN (AREA CHINES INT MA FOOTPR SF) 1,580

HT

SKYLIG

AHU

HT

SKYLIG

TORIES LABORA0 SF 2,74

MTG 565 SF

AHU SIGNED UNAS 0 SF 1,69

SHIELD 230 SF

PEAB

BUILDING

E OFFIC 84 SF K AREA Y BREA 5 SF CURIT 48 Y/SE ENTR 265 SF ING STAG SF 420

VIDEO 270 SF

LOBBY 445 SF

REST

HIGH BAY SF 5,000

NORTHWEST LABORATORIES

COMMON CORRIDOR

S ROOM

ONICS ELECTR0 SF 96

FUTU

CHILLERS

D SIGNE UNAS 320 SF

ODY AN

NEX

AHU

ILLERS RE CH

GY EXISTING BIOLO ATOR EMERGENCY GENER

AHU

GREENH

OUSE


UNASSIGNED

UNASSIGNED

LABORATORY

SMALL OFFICE

SHARED OFFICE

HIGH BAY

PEABODY

LPPC HIGH BAY

UNASSIGNED

LABORATORY

MACHINE SHOP

COMMON CORRIDOR UNASSIGNED PEABODY

UNASSIGNED

ELECTRONICS

LABORATORY

SHARED OFFICE

SMALL OFFICE

HIGH BAY

LPPC

PEABODY

HIGH BAY UNASSIGNED

LABORATORY

MACHINE SHOP

COMMON CORRIDOR UNASSIGNED PEABODY

RESTROOMS

UNASSIGNED

MACHINE ROOM

ENTRY/ SECURITY

STAGING

CORRIDOR

RESTROOMS

LPPC HPRC UNASSIGNED

UPS ROOM

RESTROOMS

MACHINE SHOP

COMMON CORRIDOR UNASSIGNED BUILDING


Far me r s’ Mar k e t De s i g n C o mp e t i t i o n The competition site is a small vacant lot in the historic Highland Square district in the West Highland neighborhood of Denver. The narrow site measures 25 x 126 feet, with existing buildings on two sides. The program called for ideas for creating a viable public space, and to expand the historical notion of the farmers’ market.

i n d e p e n d e n t c o m p e t i t i o n e n t r y

a p r i l 2009

denver,

colorado


TREES TREES

BOX BEAM / BOX BEAM/ PLANTER PLANTER LIGHT PANEL LIGHT PANEL

ELEVATOR ELEVATOR

PROJECTION PROJECTION STORAGE/ STORAGE/ RESTROOM/ RESTROOM/ OFFICE OFFICE STRUCTURE STRUCTURE

MARKET STALL MARKET STALL CONFIGURATION CONFIGURATION

.A M . .W O

B K O E

R

O T

S


SHADE ROOF SHADE WEST SIDE BOOKS

DN

TREES

Colorado Blue Spruce trees are planted above, creating a new type of green roof: one that is green year-round, and visible to all.

BOX BEAM / PLANTER

(OPEN TO BELOW)

SECOND LEVEL COMMUNITY ROOM

LIGHT PANEL

The ground floor remains open and flexible, allowing for myriad uses. The upper level contains an enclosed space for gatherings, which overlooks the main floor.

OFFICE

MARKET STALL CONFIGURATION

STORAGE WC

EMERGENCY EXIT

M.A.W.

. .W

.A E

R

O T

S

K

O

O

B

COMMUNITY ROOM M.A.W.

5

10

20

WEST SIDE BOOKS

30

50 N

UP

STRUCTURE

N

0

STORAGE/ RESTROOM/ OFFICE

M

JULIAN STREET

WEST SIDE BOOKS

PROJECTION

MAIN FLOOR - STREET LEVEL OPEN AIR

WEST 32ND AVENUE

M.A.W.

WEST 32ND AVENUE

ALLEY

ELEVATOR

A green-tinted glass shell wraps around the upper level, enclosing the community room and creating the front facade: a large translucent screen for the projection of singage & images.


Hi p h o p A r c h i v e Located in the W.E.B. DuBois Institute of African + AfricanAmerican Research at Harvard University, the Hiphop Archive is a center for scholarship and research. The interior renovation of a historic building on the Harvard campus called for public spaces, private offices, and the storage and display of music and artifacts.

u t i l e , i n c .

j a n u a r y - m a r c h 2008

cambridge,

massachusetts


N


Mo n e y c o n e y C o t t ag e This project is the renovation of a stone cottage and outbuildings dating from the mid 1800’s. Vacant since the 1970’s, the structure was in disrepair. The modern addition contains a kitchen, bathroom and boiler room. It is built onto the back of the cottage, occupying the exact volume of a previous lean-to structure which was dilapidated.

i n d e p e n d e n t p r o j e c t

2002-

sixtowns,

county

d e r r y,

northern

ireland


1800

1850

1860

1870

1880

1900

1920

1880

1970

2003


LOFT

BED

BED OLD KITCHEN

ATTIC

PARLOUR


ROOF PLAN

LOFT LEVEL

LOFT

KITCHEN

GROUND LEVEL

BED

BED

ATTIC

BATH

OLD KITCHEN

PARLOUR

LAUNDRY

OIL


T h e A r mo r y - Sp e n c e r Gr e e n A new housing development located on Spencer Avenue at the site of the old Armory building. Spencer Green is composed of 48 rental apartments for low- and moderateincome residents. The site also includes off-street parking and community programming spaces.

u t i l e , i n c .

m a r c h - a p r i l 2008

chelsea

,

massachusetts


SPENCER AVENUE

VERNON STREET

N ELEANOR STREET


LEVEL 3 BR 2

BR 1

BR 2

BR 1

BR 2

BR 2

BR 1

BR 2

DN

DN

HALL HALL

WC

WC

HALL

WC

WC

LEVEL 2

BR 1

UP

WC

HALL

HALL

DN

DN

DN

BR 2

HALL

WC

WC

WC

DN

BR 1

DN

DN

HALL

BR 2

BR 1

UP

BR 1

BR 2

UP

BR 1

UP

BR 2 LIVING

LIVING

REF.

DW

DW

DW

LIVING DW

LIVING

REF.

REF.

DN

REF.

HALL

DN DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

LIVING

LIVING

WC DN

DN

LIVING

LIVING

BR 1

UP

BR 1

UP

REF. DW

UP

UP

UP

BR 1

BR 2

BR 2

BR 1

LIVING

OFFICE

WC

REF.

WC

LIVING

LIVING

WC WC WC

DW

LIVING BR 2

BR 3

BR 3 BR 3

UP

UP

UP

UP

UP

DW

DW

DW

WC

UP

REF. DW

REF.

LAUNDRY

REF.

LEVEL 1

UP

REF. DW

REF.

UP

REF. DW

UP


Te n n e s s e e Aq uar i um Ocean Journey is a free-standing expansion to the original 1991 River Journey aquarium building. The main 500,000-gallon Gulf of Mexico coral reef exhibit is supported by three changing exhibit galleries and a butterfly habitat. At a cost of $22 million, the 60,000 square foot addition opened in April 2005.

c h e r m ay e f f s o l l o g u b & p o o l e , i n c .

2002-2003

c h at ta n o o g a

,

tennessee


Pe n t ag o n Me mo r i al C o mp e t i t i o n This project was a registered entry for the first stage of the Pentagon Memorial competition. The brief asked participants to “ identify a preliminary artistic concept for a memorial to the victims of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on the Pentagon�. The site was a two acre parcel of land west of the western facade of the Pentagon, directly facing the site of impact. A 165 foot buffer zone from the building was retained for security. Flight #77 passed over the site before hitting the building.

independent competition entry

(w i t h

ly n n i . h s u )

s e p t e m b e r 2002

wa shing t on,

d.c.


B

The memorial provides a sequence of experiences shaped by spaces for remembrance, contemplation, and collective gathering. Visitors move through a dense growth of trees into a long narrow space defined by two massive walls. The journey is introverted and quiet. Solid, unyielding, and sculpted from polished metal, the two walls reflect the sky and frame the airspace above and Pentagon ahead. The space speaks of a sudden instant in time. A significant remnant of the tragedy, a blackened piece of limestone placed on the Pentagon at the impact site, becomes the focus of this space.

A


B

A

The memorial provides a sequence of experiences shaped by spaces for remembrance, contemplation, and collective gathering. Visitors move through a dense growth of trees into a long narrow space defined by two massive walls. The journey is introverted and quiet. Solid, unyielding, and sculpted from polished metal, the two walls reflect the sky and frame the airspace above and Pentagon ahead. The space speaks of a sudden instant in time. A significant remnant of the tragedy, a blackened piece of limestone placed on the Pentagon at the impact site, becomes the focus of this space.

A

B

A pool of water from under the passage walls leads the visitor to an expansive open space, defined by delicate cast glass walls to the west and the solid walls of the Pentagon to the east. The glass shimmers with changing light, reflected from the water and surrounding landscape. The raw ground is exposed as loose gravel, transitioning to soft grass. Trees from the grove reach into the memorial space to provide shade.

AA

The luminous presence of the memorial extends to Arlington National Cemetery and beyond. The glass walls are translucent - the shapes of moving people within are seen in the day from the roadway, and the entire wall is lit from within at night. The wall contains 184 voids; these empty spaces, bound together in a luminous structure, look beyond the space of the memorial.

BB


A pool of water from under the passage walls leads the visitor to an expansive open space, defined by delicate cast glass walls to the west and the solid walls of the Pentagon to the east. The glass shimmers with changing light, reflected from the water and surrounding landscape. The raw ground is exposed as loose gravel, transitioning to soft grass. Trees from the grove reach into the memorial space to provide shade. The luminous presence of the memorial extends to Arlington National Cemetery and beyond. The glass walls are translucent; the shapes of moving people within are seen in the day from the roadway, and the entire wall is lit from within at night. The wall contains 184 voids; these empty spaces, bound together in a luminous structure, look beyond the space of the memorial.


Dr a w i n g s

19 9 3 -


Bradley Shanks - portfolio  

Architectural portfolio of work by Bradley Shanks.

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