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Bradford’s Weekly Newpaper

“Congratulations Class of 2013”

Bradford Journal

VOL. 172 NO. 22 BRADFORD JOURNAL/MINER THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2013 www.bradfordjournal.com Bradford Journal/McKean County Miner/Mount Jewett Echo Phone 814-465-3468

Bradford Dodgers Pixie Softball Team

Bradford Journal Photo Members of Bradford’s Pixie Softball team, the Dodgers, (7-9 years old), wait in the assembly area for the Memorial Day parade to begin, May 27th. They represent Bradford and play other league teams from area towns. (See the photos and video in our photo gallery.)

Easy Performance For This Group Of Gymnasts

$1.00

People Control People

Bradford Journal Photo CSI, Inc., personnel were located at strategic locations around town to help direct and guide traffic during this year’s Memorial Day parade, May 27th. Left to right at Pine Street and Main are Nathan Kline, Steve Cavallaro, and Anthony Cavallaro. While the organization normally gets paid for events, employees volunteered their time to provide the service free in honor of Memorial Day. (See our photo gallery for more photos and videos of the parade.)

INDEX

Bradford Journal Photo Some members of the YMCA Flames Gymnastics Team are seen on their float in the formation area May 27th. The Memorial Day parade will begin shortly and these young gymnasts are excited and ready to go. (See other photos and video in our photo gallery.)

Local News/Weather 2 Comments & Opinions 3 Obituaries 4 Social News 6 Food 8 Comics 13 Classifieds 15 Word Seek/Crossword 16 Bradford Journal P.O. Box, Bradford, PA 16701 www.bradfordjournal.com Phone: 814-465-3468


Page 2 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013

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LOCAL NEWS Save Money on Your Grocery Bills

Cub Scouts Pose With Theme Of Their Float

(StatePoint) With food costs on the rise, people everywhere are looking for ways to reduce grocery bills. Here are tips to help your family save: • Re-evaluate the way you eat: Growing your own food can help you become more self-sufficient. On a quarter acre of land, an average family can produce 85 percent of the food they need and save money in the process. Check out “Maximizing Your Mini Farm: Self-Sufficiency on 1/4 Acre,” by Brett L. Markham to take your garden to the next level. Visit www.markhamfarm.com for more information. • Use coupons: Don’t just trash your supermarket circular. There are tons of savings to be had. • Go vegetarian: Meat prices are trending upward, but vegetables can be grown at home.

Bradford Journal Photo

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Cub Scouts from troop #412 stand for a photo, May 27th before the commencement of the Memorial Day Parade. Pictured also is the American Legion theme for their float “POW-MIA”. Also present for the event were the Boy Scouts in the same troop riding a float in honor of the Vietnam and Korean war fallen soldiers. See our photo gallery for their photo and many others taken during the parade, including some videos.

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THE BRADFORD AREA 5-DAY WEATHER FORECAST

Thursday, May 30: Very warm and mostly sunny today. High of 83°. Thursday Night: Partly cloudy and warm tonight with a low of 60°.

Friday, May 31: Mostly sunny and hot today with a high of 85°. Friday Night: Mostly clear and warm tonight with a low of 62°.

Saturday, June 1: Sunny and hot today with a high of 84°.

Saturday Night: Partly cloudy this evening, becoming mostly cloudy. Warm with a low of 63°.

Sunday, June 2: Mostly cloudy and humid today with a chance of showers and thunderstorms. High of 78°. Sunday Night: Occasional rain and thunderstorms this evening. Cooler with a low of 50°.

Monday, June 3: Cooler today and cloudy with some sun. High of 69°. Monday Night: Cool and partly cloudy tonight with an overnight low of 47°.

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5 ¢ENTS WORTH

by Grant Nichols

“It was a dark and stormy night” Tuesday, May 28th, when we sat down to write this column. The office was quiet, save for the crunch, crunch, crunching sounds coming from the corner where the office dog was chewing his rawhide bone. We were deep in thought about this article- where to begin and where to go from there…The Memorial Day parade was the focus for this week’s photos. We began in one of the formation areas along Davis Street where we found Boy Scouts, gymnasts, Girl Scouts, a T-Ball team and a softball team, among others, all preparing to make the trip down Main Street Bradford. From there we headed to the main parade route where the street was lined with people from Davis to the top of Main. We took pictures of people sitting and standing curbside, various floats as they paraded by (one hundred pictures in all), and many short videos. Our readers should take some time to visit the gallery associated with this issue. There they will find, not only pictures of many of those taking part in the parade, but also videos that show the High School, School Street and Fretz Bands, the Flame gymnasts performing down Main Street, and much more. ……..While our friend, the well known David Newman was volunteering as a special policeman, directing traffic at the corner of Kennedy and Boylston Streets, his dear wife Linda Newman, the former Director of the Bradford Area Public Library, was standing in the shade of PNC Bank enjoying the Memorial Day parade. Following the event we stopped along Main to talk with Linda who, as always, was thoughtful and in good humor. It seems that retirement is treating her well. In fact, her only complaint amongst her many chipper comments was that the parade could have been a little longer……..For those who enjoy cooking in the woods or even in their own back yards, with summer just around the corner, we must recommend Worth Smith at Foster Brook, Bradford. They carry a large selection of items from the Rome Industries outdoor cookware line. They even carry the tri-pod that can be placed over the campfire to serve as a rack for cooking…….Such a hollow man, President Barak Obama still talks from both sides of his mouth regarding the closing of the notorious Guantanamo Prison. Since the beginning of his first term he has stated that he will close the place. Yet, at the same time he allows the lawless secret operatives employed by our government to continue to operate the prison.

It’s A Matter Of Opinion... Guest Columnist “House of Cards” -by Bob Perry Netflix released at one time 13 episodes of House of Cards which is a pleasurable spell-binding depiction of the working of politics in Washington, one, which I urge anyone with interest in politics to view. The main characters are a mercenary Democratic House Majority Whip (played by Kevin Spacey) and his wife (played by Robin Wright) producing excellent acting. The series is an adaptation from a British political thriller which reveals the amorality (lacking moral sensibility - not caring about right or wrong) of politics, which is something we already know. After watching season-1 I am looking forward to season-2 which is in production. A house-ofcards creates a vision that having a card missing or a card not being played right, the house will fall. Today we are witnessing a ‘House of Cards’ in Washington as we watch a series of scandals unfold that may in the end bring down the current administration as well as the House of Representatives and/or the Senate. With political leaders giving testimony to Congress like “I don’t know,” and “I

didn’t know until…”, there is a message that there are all too many things that are not being revealed and who is willing to risk their political career, job or even life if they reveal (playing a card) the truth. In the series, as in real politics, the elixir is power and as we all know “power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely” (numerous authors). Once in office, elected politicians fight tooth and nail to get reelected because they need more of the elixir. (Sort of like rock stars that are always seeking a new ‘high’ by experimenting with mind expanding drugs since they feel a void that cannot be filled). Kevin Spacey plays a ruthless politician who uses his power to get what he wants and does it thru subversion and leaking seeds of information to the press (via a news reporter he gains the confidence and loyalty of (in and out of bed). And do you think it doesn’t happen today? Guess again! As Earl Pitts always said “Wake up America”. No surprise that the favorability of Congress (both Houses) is somewhere between 12 and 15 %). What the series shows in particular is that we the people do not really know the people that represent us and more so do not know the political games that go on continuously. Stay tuned and watch the events happening in Washington to find out ‘who you can trust’. Without any doubt, the unfolding events will have a pronounced effect on the elections in 2014.

Wear Matching Shirts Ladies Auxiliary Float

Bradford Journal Photo

Bradford Journal Photo

Chris Tingley and his son Owen Tingley 3 sit curbside a few minutes before the Memorial Day parade down Main began, May 27th. Notice their matching Old Navy patriotic t-shirts. (See photos and videos in our photo gallery.)

American Legion Post #108 float carrying Ladies Auxiliary and Miss Poppy 2013, Kali O’Neil heads down Main Street, May 27th during the Memorial Day parade. (See our photo gallery for more photos and videos of the parade.)


Page 4 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013

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OBITUARIES Shirley Reynolds Shirley A. Reynolds, a loving wife, mother and grandmother, 74, of 805 South Kendall Ave., Bradford, passed away Friday (May 17, 2013) at the Bradford Regional Medical Center, surrounded by her loving family. Born Oct. 19, 1938, in Bradford, she was a daughter of the late Lidia Cramer Smith and Robert N. Moore. On March 9, 1961, in Bradford, she married Larry R.

Reynolds, who survives her. She was a wonderful homemaker. Surviving in addition to her husband are four daughters, Shirley Bunce, Betty Kelley, Tammy Slaugenhaupt and Cindy Lupold; four sons, David Reynolds, Richard Reynolds, Rob Reynolds and Mike Reynolds; 22 grandchildren; 29 great-grandchildren; three sisters, Phyllis Llewellyn, Ethel Mae Raab and Sue Ewing; two brothers, Robert

Moore, and Steve Wood; and several nieces and nephews. Burial was in McKean Memorial Park Cemetery.

Maxine Keane Maxine H. Keane, 93, of 2 South Ave., Bradford, passed away Monday (May 20, 2013) at the Bradford Manor. Born July 6, 1919, in Bradford, she was a daughter of Emanuel and Mary Marsh Ketchner. She was the wife of Jack Keane,

who died 1975. Surviving are two sons, Peter D. Mooney of Bradford, and John R. Keane of Smyrna, Ga.; a daughter-inlaw, Mary Ann Sivak of Kane; seven grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Willow Dale Cemetery.

Jamie Papinchak Jamie Richard Papinchak, 38, of 45 Walker Ave., Bradford, went to

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be with the Lord on Tuesday (May 21, 2013) in Elkins, W.Va. Born Feb. 19, 1975, in Windber, he was a son of Richard Stephen and Diana Lynn Ott Papinchak of Windber, who survive. On Nov. 1, 1998, in the Emanuel Lutheran Church, he married Rebecca L. Zawacki Papinchak, who survives. He was employed by Skelly & Loy Inc. as an archeologist. In addition to his wife and parents, he is survived by three daughters, Lillian Katrina Papinchak, Violet Elizabeth

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Copy And Advertising Deadlines Persons interested in submitting materials for news releases in the Bradford Journal should submit their copy to the Bradford Journal office, no later than 5 p.m. on Saturdays. Advertisements should be submitted by 5 p.m. on Mondays.

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Papinchak and Penelope Jean Papinchak, all at home; two sisters, Krista (Vincent Grattan) Papinchak and Sara (Joshua Rearick) Papinchak; a brother, David (Melinda Kime Papinchak) Papinchak; a paternal grandmother, Ann Papinchak; a maternal grandmother, Ann Ott; his in-laws, Jim and Nancy Zawacki of Bradford; a brotherin-law, Brian (Jennifer) Zawacki; a sister-in-law, Katrina (Christopher) Winsor; and several nieces and nephews. Burial was in St. Bernard Cemetery.

USPS-062-740 Postmaster: Send address changes to: Bradford Journal P.O. Box 17 Bradford, PA 16701-0017 Phone: 814-465-3468 Copy Deadline: Noon Saturday Published every Thursday at 69 Garlock Hollow. Bradford, PA 16701, Except for the third Thursday in the month of June. Subscription In Advance (By U.S. Mail) Yearly/$50.00 Within County Yearly/$68.00 Outside County Internet Color Version $15.00 yearly Email Color Version $26.00 yearly

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BUSINESS & PERSONAL FINANCES

Avoiding Hidden Flight, Hotel Fees The last few years have been tough economically for many people. Unemployment fears combined with plunging home, stock and retirement account values caused many to forgo big vacations – even though stressful times are when we most need to recharge our batteries. But with the economy turning around, many families are cautiously dipping their toes in the travel pool once again. Hotel occupancy rates have risen in many areas and airports are as crowded as ever. Airlines and hotels are notorious for tacking extra charges onto their bills. Here are a few to watch out for: • A few airlines allow one free checked bag (Southwest still allows two), but most charge up to $25 for the first checked bag each way, and even more for additional pieces. Plus, most now tack on hefty fees for overweight and over-sized checked and carry-on luggage, so measure and weigh your luggage carefully. • Expect to pay extra for things like changing flights, extra leg room, priority

Waiting For Parade

-by Jason Alderman boarding, unaccompanied minors, pets, Wi-Fi access and food. Some airlines even charge extra to speak to a live person or to buy your ticket at the airport counter or by phone. • Airfarewatchdog.com, Travelnerd. com and Kayak offer great fee comparison charts for various airlines; but always double-check the airline’s own posted rules before booking your flight. • Some hotels charge extra if you check in before a certain time. Ask whether they’ll store your luggage for free until check-in so you can begin sightseeing unencumbered. • Many hotels charge a hefty penalty if you don’t cancel a reservation 24 to 72 hours beforehand and some also charge an early-departure fee – sometimes the equivalent of one night’s lodging. Read the hotel’s cancellation policy before booking, especially if you’re looking at a discounted, non-refundable rate. • Minibars often have electronic sensors that trigger a charge if you simply move the contents. Also, water or snacks sitting on the dresser may appear to be complimentary, but double-check before consuming. • Hotel parking in major cities can cost up to $50 a day, and many have mandatory valet parking, which means adding a tip on top of that. Research nearby municipal parking lots beforehand, or check the city’s tourism bureau for hotels offer-

ing parking promotions. Sometimes using public transportation and taxis is cheaper overall than paying for parking. • Some hotels and resorts automatically add housekeeping or spa gratuities to your bill, so ask first before leaving your own tip – unless of course the service was terrific. • Most hotels charge exorbitant amounts for local and long-distance calls made from room phones, so use your cellphone. • Resorts often charge extra for services they offer – such as gym access or daily newspaper delivery – even if you don’t use them. Find out the policy ahead of time and scrutinize your bill for unused services. • Ask to see your bill the night before you check out, so you can review it carefully for overcharges. • If you’re traveling abroad, be aware that using your cellphone can be mighty expensive. Research your carrier’s international calling plan and ask whether your phone is compatible with foreign networks. You may need to rent an international cellphone, or buy or rent an unlocked phone and international SIM card. If your budget’s in good shape and you’re getting wanderlust, maybe it’s time to venture out into the world again. Just be cautious about how hidden expenses can add up.

Turned Out For Another Exciting Parade

Bradford Journal Photo John Knapp and his son Takota 3 wait along Main Street, Bradford, for the Memorial Day parade to begin, May 27th. Takota is waiting for the big trucks. (See more photos and videos in our photo gallery.)

Bradford Journal Photo Left to right, Ebony Ford 8, Chloe Ford 10, and Jorganna Ford 5 sit with their grandmother, Katrina Hallman, along Main Street Bradford, waiting for the Memorial Day parade to begin, May 27th. The day, while a little cool, was bright and sunny, and the children were waiting excitedly to see their friends marching, to catch a little candy, and to see the marching bands. (See more photos and videos in our photo gallery.)


Page 6 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013

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AREA SOCIAL NEWS Bradford Area Calendar of Events: MAY 2013: MAY 30: Knitting Club 1-3pm Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. Whether you are an expert knitter or have never picked up a set of needles, this informal club is for you. Meets weekly in the Carnegie Room. For more information, call the Bradford Area Public Library at 814-362-6527 MAY 30 & JUNE 6: Basic Digital Photography 5:30-8:30pm Community Education Council of Elk and Cameron Counties, St. Marys, PA. Learn about framing, composition, and creativity in taking pictures. Cost: $75. For more information or to register, contact the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford, 814-362-5078 or contined@pitt.edu. MAY 31: Preschool Story Hour 10:30-11:30am Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. Includes story, craft, snack, and social interaction. Geared toward preK children, accommodates infants and toddlers. For more information, contact Bradford Area Public Library at 814-362-6527

Events are free and open to the public. Sponsored by Mental Health Association in Cattaraugus County, Peer Networking Group, Rays of Hope, and STARS. For information, call 814-362-7464. JUNE 2: 2nd Annual Miles for Smiles 5K Run/2 Mile Walk/Kids Fun Run 9am UPB Gymnasium, 300 Campus Drive, Bradford, PA. Registration fee: $15. Kids Fun Run free to all children 14 and under. Proceeds benefit McKean County Special Olympics and American Cancer Society. For more information, visit facebook. com/milesforsmiles or milesforsmilesrun. weebly.com

Amidst The Crowds

JUNE 2013: JUNE1: Bradford Area Town-Wide Garage Sale 9am-? Sponsored by the Downtown Bradford Business District Authority. To register, go to Tin Ceiling Gift Shoppe, 51 Main Street, Bradford, PA. Kings Park: Stories from an American Mental Institution 10am Father Leo Gallina Social Center, 95 East Corydon Street, Bradford, PA. Filmmaker Lucy Winer will be speaking locally at two separate presentations.

Bradford TOPS #16

-article submitted Leader Vickie Johnson conducted the Thursday afternoon, May 23rd meeting of TOPS Pa. #16 at the First Presbyterian Church. There were 28 weigh-ins with a loss of 12 1/2 pounds. There was no loser of the week. Loser in waiting and officer of the week is Silvana Reed. At the business meeting Silvana Reed, Jean Miller and Sue DellaValle reported on the the workshop they attended with Mary Mullane, the new area coordinator for Tops. They also met the TOPS State Queen, Sandy Homer . Bev Hannon’s quote of the week was: “Flowers are like human beings, they thrive on a little kindness.” Sue DellaVelle gave the helpful hint: “To remove skins of almonds easily, soak them in hot water for 15 to 20 minutes. The fashion tip was given by Jean Miller: “A blazer is the fastest way to add polish to an outfit. A soft color will add jazz.” Pat Wester gave a program on good and bad snacks. She reported on why we snack and ways to eliminate unneeded snacks. If you are hungry between meals have an intelligent snack. Examples are: carrots or frozen grapes. The meeting was closed with a prayer.

Friends And Family Bradford Journal Photo Emma Whyte 3 and her 20-mos.-old brother Garrett Whyte wait along Main Street, amidst the crowds, for the Memorial Day parade to begin, May 27th. They could see lots of people along Main Street, and they both knew something big was about to happen. They were excited. (See photos and videos in our photo gallery.)

BIRTHS

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Daughter, May 17, to Allison and James Mericle, Eldred, PA. Son, May 23, to Sarah and Stephen Belt, Bradford, PA. Son, May 23, to Sarah and Stephan Belt, Bradford, PA. Daughter, May 23, to Nichole and Chris Magee, Bradford, PA. Son, May 24, to Kara Britton, Bradford, PA

Bradford Journal Photo Joe Gleason squats down to be in a photo with his son A.J. Gleason 7 on the left, and his son’s friend Gabe Wyant 7. They were along Main Street, enjoying a bright sunny day, May 27th, waiting for the Memorial Day parade to begin. A.J. and Gabe were there to see friends in the parade and maybe catch a little candy. (See more photos and videos in our photo gallery.)


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Bean & Vegetable Salad and Beef & Horseradish Wraps FAMILY FEATURES

Beef & Horseradish Wraps

Baby Beets & Olives

arm weather is welcome for a variety of reasons, but for many of us it signals the season for dining al fresco. Whether stepping out back onto a porch or patio, or planning a picnic at the beach or park, the food is the star. These recipes showcase exciting flavors and easy preparation. One way to liven up outdoor menus is with unexpected ingredients, such as pickled beets. They add flavor, color and nutrition to a variety of dishes. Aunt Nellie’s line of pickled beets tastes homemade — only the peeling and pickling are done for you. Just open the jar and you’re on your way to fabulous appetizers, main dish wraps and, even, dessert. For a colorful vegetable side, a can of READ 3 or 4 Bean Salad is the perfect base. Just add fresh vegetables cut into thin strips and toss with a quick dressing. Dine al fresco — cheers to fresh air and fabulous food. For more delicious recipes made with Aunt Nellie’s products, visit www.AuntNellies.com. Additional ideas for READ salads can be found at www.ReadSalads.com.

Makes 4 servings Preparation Time: 30 minutes 1 jar (16 ounces) Aunt Nellie’s Sliced Pickled Beets 1/2 cup shredded carrots 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish 1/2 cup spreadable cheese (such as goat cheese or herb/garlic soft cheese) 2 large soft flour tortillas (about 10to 12-inch diameter) 10 green onions (green part only) 10 thin slices deli roast beef Drain beets; chop. Discard beet liquid. In medium bowl, combine beets, carrots and horseradish. Spread 1/4 cup cheese evenly over each tortilla, leaving 1-inch border. Arrange 5 green onions (do not chop) on each; press lightly into cheese. Place 5 slices beef on each tortilla covering green onions, then sprinkle beet mixture evenly over beef. Roll up in parallel direction of the green onions. Wrap each roll tightly in plastic wrap. Refrigerate up to 4 hours. To serve, remove plastic wrap; cut each tortilla into 2 pieces.

Makes 6 servings Preparation Time: 15 minutes 1 16-ounce jar Aunt Nellie’s Whole Baby Pickled Beets, drained 3/4 cup assorted pitted olives 1 to 2 tablespoons orange zest 1 clove garlic, minced 1/2 teaspoon cracked black pepper Combine all ingredients in medium bowl. Serve at room temperature or chilled

W

Baby Beets & Olives

Herbed Eggplant & Beet Dip Makes 8 servings (approx. 1/4 cup each) Preparation Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes 1 jar (16 ounces) Aunt Nellie’s Sliced Pickled Beets, drained 2 tablespoons olive or canola oil 1 medium eggplant (about 1 pound), cut into 1-inch pieces 1 cup chopped onion 3 cloves garlic, sliced Salt Coarse ground black pepper 1/2 cup plain nonfat yogurt (Greek or traditional), optional 1/4 cup thinly sliced fresh basil 1 to 2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves Pita chips, fresh vegetables Coarsely chop beets. In large nonstick skillet heat oil over medium heat until hot. Add eggplant, onion and garlic; cook 15 minutes or until vegetables are tender, stirring frequently. Add water, 1 tablespoon at a time, if mixture seems too dry or begins to stick. Salt and pepper, as desired. Place eggplant mixture in bowl of food processor; process until mixture is chopped and combined. Measure out 1/2 cup chopped beets; set aside. Add remaining chopped beets to eggplant mixture. Process until dip is desired consistency. Transfer dip to serving bowl. Stir in yogurt, if desired. Stir in herbs and reserved 1/2 cup chopped beets just before serving. Serve with pita chips and vegetables for dipping. If not served immediately, cover and refrigerate up to 6 hours. Allow to stand about 15 minutes before serving if chilled.

Herbed Eggplant & Beet Dip

Bean & Vegetable Salad Makes 4 servings Preparation Time: 30 minutes 1 can (15 ounces) READ 3 or 4 Bean Salad 2 cups vegetables, cut into thin strips* 1/4 cup very thinly sliced red onion, optional Cracked black pepper Chopped parsley, optional Dressing: 2 tablespoons reserved bean salad liquid 1 tablespoon apple cider or wine vinegar 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 large clove garlic, minced Drain bean salad; reserve 2 tablespoons liquid. For dressing, combine reserved bean salad liquid, vinegar, oil and garlic. Whisk until combined. In large bowl, toss together drained bean salad, vegetables and onion, if desired. Toss with dressing. Season with black pepper and stir in chopped parsley, if desired. Serve at room temperature or chilled. *Cut vegetables into thin strips about 2 x 1/4 inch. Vegetables can be one or a combination of: carrot, celery, bell pepper, cucumber, zucchini, yellow squash, or other favorite vegetable.

Smoked Salmon & Beet Wraps Makes 4 servings Preparation Time: 30 minutes 1 jar (16 ounces) Aunt Nellie’s Sliced Pickled Beets 2 tablespoons finely chopped red onion 1 to 2 tablespoons capers 1 to 2 teaspoons lemon zest 1/2 cup spreadable chive cream cheese 2 large soft flour tortillas (10- to 12-inch diameter) 8 slices smoked salmon 1/2 cup baby spinach leaves Drain beets; chop. Discard beet liquid. In medium bowl, combine beets, onion, capers and lemon zest. Spread 1/4 cup cream cheese evenly over each tortilla, leaving 1-inch border. Place 4 salmon slices over cream cheese; press lightly. Top each with spinach. Sprinkle beet mixture evenly over spinach. Roll up. Wrap each roll tightly in plastic wrap. Refrigerate up to 4 hours. To serve, remove plastic wrap; cut each tortilla into 2 pieces.

Spicy Beet, Fruit & Nut Bars Makes 28 bars Preparation Time: 25 minutes Bake Time: 20 minutes 1 jar (15.5 ounces) Aunt Nellie’s Harvard Beets 1 package (15.25 ounces) spice cake mix 1 cup packed light brown sugar 1/4 cup canola or vegetable oil 1 large egg 1 cup dried mixed fruits, chopped if necessary 1/2 cup chopped walnuts, pecans or almonds (or a combination), toasted Confectioners’ sugar Preheat oven to 350°F. Drain beets. Puree beets in food processor or blender until smooth; set aside. Line 15 x 10 x 1-inch baking pan with aluminum foil. Spray lightly with nonstick cooking spray. Place cake mix in large bowl. Add pureed beets, brown sugar, oil and egg. Beat on low speed of electric mixer 2 minutes or until completely combined, scraping bowl as necessary. Stir in fruits and nuts. Spread dough evenly in prepared pan. Bake 20 minutes or until pick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool completely. Sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar. Cut into bars. Spicy Beet, Fruit & Nut Bars


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013 Page 9

It’s Time - Let Them Spread Their Wings Another school year has gone by and graduation day is here. By the time your child becomes a senior, you’ve had a fair amount of experience with letting go. You might even believe that you’re adequately prepared for your teen to leave home. You know you’re a sensible, rational adult who’s done a better than average job of parenting. So maybe you can handle the grief of letting go. You have much to be prod of; you’ve raised an independent child who can think for themselves. You’ve been supportive and enthusiastic as they make their plans to leave home. Maybe they’ll get a job, gent an apartment, join the service, or travel through Europe. Whatever your teen’s dream is, you’ve both shared in it. You’ve known from the very first day you became a parent that your child would be leaving you, venturing out on their own. This is the main teenage theme, your teen’s struggle for independence and

your struggle to keep them close and protected. You know you’re supposed to let go. This has been your goal to launch a happy, confident and productive individual into society. This letting-go tuggle-of-war starts around twelve, and depending on how hard you’re holding on, pulling, and dragging, it keeps escalating until you give in and finally let go. In the end, your child will win, as they should. Although at times you may feel like you’ve lost, friends of mine with older children reassure me that the kids won’t leave and desert you forever. Letting go takes courage, for both of you. More and more, you feel sadness as you realize just how quickly your child has grown up. Parenting never stops, it just changes directions and intensity, and these after-highschool years begin another chapter. No, I wouldn’t’ want to relive the physically exhausting “zombie tired” toddler years. And I really enjoy having a child that can carry on an intelligent conversation and is

fun to spend time with. You’ll have a lot of self doubts. Have I taught them what they need to know to live independently? Will they use the common sense they have? Will they make good decisions regarding friends and their future? Will they trust the wrong person? Will they still value my opinion? I’m reminded of a favorite column written by Erma Bombeck. She tells a story which equates launching children to flying a kite.There are many attempts until the kite gets launched into the sky; several times the kite will nose-dive and need retrieved from a precarious situation. Finally, the kite catches the wind just right, and you continue to let out more an more string, launching the kite high into the sky. Now it’s time for you to let out more string and launch your “kite” high into the sky!

WE SALUTE Bradford Area High School Class of 2013 Graduates HAPPINESS AND SUCCESS TO YOU All of your friends will be going their separate ways. Whole new worlds will be opening up for you, full of fascinating and sobering discoveries. But your paths will cross from time to time, bringing back all of the warm and funny memories. As you choose your individual roads to travel, we want to wish you all the happiness and success in the world!

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Page 10 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013

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Scouts Enjoy Parades For Many Reasons

More Than Ready

Bradford Journal Photo In the assembly area, before the Memorial Day parade, May 27th, Girl Scout Daisies and Brownies from troop #23090 wait for the show to begin. They tell us the like the parade because they receive a lot of attention, get to be with friends, and, because, Shhh, they appropriate some of the candy that they throw to the kids along the parade route to themselves, before things get started. (See the photos and videos in our photo gallery.)

Bradford Journal Photo Robbie Schwind 7, and Danny Schwind 4 are watching for the trucks and the candy. The Memorial Day parade was about to begin, May 27th, and they were more than ready. (See more photos and videos in our photo gallery.)


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013 Page 11

ON THE HEALTHY SIDE A Look At Supplements And Age-Related Eye Disease (NAPSI)—There could be good news for many people who take vitamins and other nutritional supplements to help protect their health. A new study from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) helps clarify which are most effective and safe for treating age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common eye disease among people age 50 and over. The Problem AMD breaks down cells in the back of the eye that provide sharp central vision, necessary for reading, driving and recognizing faces. Advanced AMD can lead to significant vision loss and is a leading cause of blindness in the United States. About 2 million Americans have advanced AMD; another 8 million are at risk. Smoking is a major risk factor. The Good News Fortunately, the National Eye Institute’s (NEI) Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) found that a combination of vitamins C and E, beta-carotene and the minerals zinc and copper-called the AREDS formulation-can help reduce the risk of advanced AMD by 25 percent. The Latest News In a follow-up study, AREDS2, the researchers discovered that adding omega-3 fatty acids didn’t really help; neither did adding lutein and zeaxanthin. Lutein and zeaxanthin together, however, proved to be a safe and effective substitute for betacarotene, which has been linked to lung cancer risk in smokers. Doctors’ Advice Study findings show a link between beta-carotene use and lung cancer risk not only for smokers but even for former smokers. “Adding lutein and zeaxanthin in place of beta-carotene could improve the AREDS formulation for both smokers and nonsmokers,” said lead investigator Emily Chew, M.D. “Millions of older Americans take nutritional supplements to protect their sight without clear guidance regarding benefit and risk,” said NEI director Paul A. Sieving, M.D., Ph.D. Many risk factors contribute to AMD, including age, genetics and diet. People over 60 should get a dilated eye exam at least once a year and consult an eye care professional before using AREDS supplements. Learn More: For further information, visit www.nei.nih.gov/areds2

AICR HealthTalk

-by Karen Collins, MS, RD, CDN American Institute for Cancer Research Q:Does someone with high blood triglycerides need to eat less fat? A: Triglycerides are fat, but excess triglycerides in the blood usually come from over-production within the body, not from food itself. Experts now say that high blood triglycerides are a sign of heart disease risk and also of an environment within the body likely to promote risk of diabetes and even some cancers. For people who are overweight, weight loss is usually the key to reducing triglyceride production. Losing even 10 pounds is often enough to make a difference, but it has to be kept off. If you are overweight, eating less fat will help if that strategy reduces your overall calories and leads to weight loss. But sometimes, too much carbohydrate (especially as sweets, soft drinks, large portions of juice and refined grains) is what’s behind excess weight and over-production of triglycerides. Too little physical activity is often another part of the problem. Moderate walking 30 to 60 minutes a day can substantially lower blood triglycerides for many people through its effects on body hormones. Too much alcohol can raise triglycerides, so while moderate use may be safe for some people, others may need to avoid alcohol. Genetic disorders, as well as certain diseases and drugs, can also cause high blood triglycerides. People with extreme elevations in blood triglycerides, which is relatively uncommon, may need a very low-fat diet. But for most people with high triglycerides, weight loss, daily moderate exercise and a balanced plant-focused eating pattern are the keys. A registered dietitian can help you sort out the problems and solutions. Ask your physician for a referral, or find one in your area using the website of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (www.eatright.org). Q: Can a person get enough vitamin A from milk, fortified cereal and other sources without eating dark green and orange vegetables? A: You could get all the vitamin A you need without vegetables at all. But carotenoid compounds – beta-carotene, alpha-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin – found in dark green and orange vegetables are important for more than making vitamin A in the body. These vegetables have antioxidant compounds that can protect our cells from highly reactive “free radicals” that could damage cells and lead to cancer, heart disease and other health problems. In addition, dark green vegetables are a major source of folate, a B vitamin with many health-protective functions. Dark green and orange vegetables are one part of what you need for good health: these and other vegetables and fruits provide nutrients Americans need more of like potassium, a mineral that can help control blood pressure. They also supply a host of phytochemicals. Phytochemicals are natural compounds found in plant foods that seem to block several steps in cancer development. Regardless of where else you get vitamin A, aim for at least five servings every day of a variety of vegetables and fruits, and then add more for additional health and weight control benefits.

Youngsters Excited About Being In Parade

Bradford Journal Photo These five and six-year-old children are some of the members of the Tigers T-Ball team. They are in the formation area, waiting for the Memorial Day parade to begin, May 27th. They can hardly contain their excitement. (See the photos and video in our photo gallery.)


Page 12 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013

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Natural, Quality Ingredients Make the Meal FAMILY FEATURES

he best meals offer loads of fresh flavor and are best served with a side of originality. Let your pantry serve as your starting point for creating memorable meals the family will love.

T

Proper Pantry Practices Before letting those creative culinary juices flow, take inventory of your pantry. If you find items that are too old, that have never been touched, or that you hardly ever use — get rid of them. Look closely at the ingredient list to decide which items to keep. Get rid of items filled with corn syrup and artificial sweeteners and colors. Foods with fewer ingredients and pronounceable words tend to be more natural or “whole.” Made from four ingredients, Kikkoman’s Soy Sauce is brewed naturally, using a traditional process that goes back hundreds of years. Other “keepers” include honey, canned beans, whole grain pastas or rice, raw nuts and olive oil. Once your pantry is in order, you can incorporate these healthy staples into meals using the freshest vegetables, poultry, fish and beef. By keeping your pantry stocked with the most wholesome ingredients, you can be sure you are giving the very best to your family. For additional recipes and information, visit www.kikkomanUSA.com.

Savory Chicken Brine Servings: 6 1 chicken (5 to 6 pounds) 1 gallon cold water 1 tablespoon dried sage 1 tablespoon dried celery seed 1/2 tablespoon dried thyme 3/4 cup kosher salt 3/4 cup sugar 3/4 cup Kikkoman Soy Sauce 2 tablespoons of seasoned salt Remove giblets from chicken cavity, rinse chicken inside and out. In large stock pot or container, mix water, sage, celery seed, thyme, salt, sugar and soy sauce to create brine. Stir well until sugar and salt are dissolved. Place chicken in brine, cover and refrigerate at least 4 hours or overnight. Preheat oven to 400ºF. Remove chicken from brine and rinse well inside and out. Sprinkle with 2 tablespoons of seasoned salt. Bake chicken at 400ºF for 45 minutes.

Brining 101 What exactly is brining? Much like a marinade, meat and poultry is soaked in flavorful liquid, such as an all-purpose seasoning like Kikkoman Soy Sauce. This adds a tremendous amount of flavor and also breaks down proteins, thus, tenderizing the meat or poultry. The only real rule to brining is that the meat must be kept cold throughout the entire process. Use a large container, cooler or brining bag that can fit into a refrigerator because the protein and brine solution has to be kept below 40 degrees at all times.

Greek Pasta Salad Servings: 6 Sun-Dried Tomato Salad Dressing: 3/4 cup sun-dried tomatoes, drained or rehydrate if dry 2/3 cup olive oil 1/4 cup fresh basil, chopped 2 tablespoons capers 3 cloves garlic 3 tablespoons Kikkoman Rice Vinegar Salad: 1/4 cup Kikkoman Thai Style Chili Sauce 4 cups rotini pasta, cooked 1/2 cup cucumber, peeled and seeded 1 cup cherry tomatoes 1 cup green bell pepper strips 1 4-ounce package feta cheese, crumbled 1 3.8-ounce can black olives, sliced and drained 3/4 cup chopped green onions 1/2 tablespoon chopped dill weed For dressing, whisk together sun-dried tomatoes, olive oil, basil, capers, garlic and rice vinegar. Set aside. For salad, whisk together 1 cup salad dressing and chili sauce, set aside. In large bowl, combine pasta and remaining ingredients, tossing to combine. Serve with salad dressing.

Classic Fried Rice Spaghetti and Meatballs Servings: 8 1 pound spaghetti 1 1/4 pounds ground beef 2 eggs, beaten 1 cup Kikkoman Panko Bread Crumbs 1 tablespoon Kikkoman Soy Sauce 1 cup Parmesan cheese, grated and divided 4 cloves garlic, minced and divided 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 small onion, finely diced 2 28-ounce cans crushed tomatoes 1 tablespoon dried oregano

Cook spaghetti according to package directions, rinse and drain. Combine ground beef, eggs, panko, soy sauce, 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese and 2 cloves of garlic in large bowl; shape into 1 1/2-inch sized meatballs. Bake meatballs at 350°F on ungreased cookie sheet for 10 to 12 minutes. Meanwhile, heat deep skillet, add oil, 1 clove garlic and onions and sauté for about 5 minutes until onions are soft. Add tomatoes and remaining garlic, cheese and oregano; simmer for at least 20 minutes.

Servings: 6 6 strips bacon, cut into 1/2-inch pieces 1 egg, beaten 8 green onions and tops, sliced 4 cups cold, cooked rice 1 tablespoon garlic, minced 3 tablespoons Kikkoman Soy Sauce Cook bacon in large skillet over medium heat until crisp. Move bacon to side of pan; add egg and scramble. Move egg over and add green onions to the skillet; sauté for a minute. Stir in rice, add garlic and soy sauce. Toss until mixture is well blended and heated through.


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013 Page 13

THAT’S ENTERTAINMENT! May 14: Jacob Not Rated May 21: Last Stand R Parker R Side Effects

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VIDEO SELECTIONS Last Kind Words PG-13 Once Upon a Time in Brooklyn R Robin Hood: Ghosts of Sherwood Not Rated Common Man PG-13 Donovan’s Echo R Struck By Lightning Not Rated Apartment 4E PG-13 USS Seaviper Not Rated Stalked at 17 Not Rated Dark Frontier R Adventures of Bailey: A Night in Cowtown Not Rated Captain America Collector’s Edition PG-13 H.P. Lovecraft’s Cool Air

PG-13 Dark Circles R Ecstasy Not Rated Inflicted Not Rated This Girl Is Badass Not Rated Open Road Not Rated Love Sick Love R LEGO Batman: The Movie Not Rated 23rd Psalm: Redemption Not Rated May 28: Dark Skies PG-13 Numbers Station R Dead Mine Not Rated AE-Apocalypse Earth Not Rated Generation Um... R

Haunting at Silver Falls Not Rated Battle Earth Not Rated Attack of the Jurassic Shark Not Rated Baby Mama’s Club R Bubble Guppies: Sunny Days! Not Rated Nailbiter R Re-Generator

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Page 14 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013

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CHRONOLOGICAL LISTINGS Engagements, Marriages, Births & Deaths

ENGAGEMENTS:

(None) MARRIAGES: (None) BIRTHS: MAY 17, 2013: Daughter, to Allison and James Mericle, Eldred, PA. MAY 18, 2013: Son, to Jessica and Douglas Carnahan, Johnsonburg, PA. Daughter, to Elizabeth Smith and Lloyd Hundley, Olean, NY. Son, to Racheal Webb, Portville, NY. MAY 21, 2013: Daughter, to Audrah John and James Porter, Salamanca, NY. Son, to Amani Var-

gas, Salamanca, NY. MAY 22, 2013: Son, to Amanda Wagner and Michael Hulbert, Olean, NY. Son, to Jonnie and Timothy Geiger, Shinglehouse, PA. Son, to Audrey and Jesse Watson, Olean, NY. Son, to Jamie Lowrey and Justin Harris, Olean, NY. MAY 23, 2013: Son, to Sarah and Stephen Belt, Bradford, PA. Daughter, to Katelyn Jufer and Brent Kreamer, Olean, NY. Son, to Sarah and Stephan Belt, Bradford, PA. Daughter, to Nichole and Chris Magee, Bradford, PA. MAY 24, 2013: Son, to Kara Britton, Bradford, PA.

Legion Post #108 Truck And Cargo

Bradford Journal Photo The Post #108 American Legion truck, carrying Pete O’Donohoe, Claire Butler, and others, moves down Main Street, Bradford, May 27th, during this year’s edition of the Memorial Day parade. Go to the photo gallery associated with this issue to see more photos of the same, including videos of parade action.

Daughter, to Emily Berry, Salamanca, DEATHS: and Daniel Cham- NY berlain, Olean, NY. MAY 17, 2013: Son, to Jessica ANDERSON, Harold M. - 78, of YOUR WEEKLY HOROSCOPE Kane, PA. MAY 30 - JUNE 5, 2013 PAGE, Lawrence G. - 87, of CoudARIES - (Mar. 21 - Apr. 19) This week, you needn’t concern yourself with a belief that you’re unable to defend ersport, PA. your corner properly.Your position is extremely strong. REYNOLDS, TAURUS - (Apr. 20 - May 20) Shirley A. Moore If you’re willing to show understanding toward a certain person, it will be recipro- - 74, of Bradford, cated. PA. GEMINI - (May 21 - June 20) It’s time to decide what you want and are prepared to do where a certain relation- MAY 19, 2013: BISHOP, Francis L. ship is concerned. CANCER - (June 21 - July 22) - 81, of Frederick, Your frustration with waiting for a response won’t last as long as you believe. formerly of BradLEO - (July 23, - Aug. 22) ford, PA. Once done, a decision about moving forward can - and will - be made easily. MAY 20, 2013: VIRGO - (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22) The coming week or so will do much to reassure you that something is finally mov- KEANE, Maxine H. Ketchner - 93, of ing forward. Bradford, PA. LIBRA - (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22) There is a strong element of cloudiness in the current climate. Don’t let it put you TRUBIC, Marguein a weaker position. rite McKenna - 87, SCORPIO - (Oct. 23, - Nov. 21) Kane, PA. The coming week is likely to bring an end to some form of negotiation in your COCHRAN, Myrworld and the sky suggests strongly for many Scorpions that this will relate to fitle Fuller - 103, of nances or earnings. SAGITTARIUS - (Nov. 22 - Dec. 20) Whether it is your heart or reputation you’re concerned about protecting, you know time has come to see progress in an almost stale situation. CAPRICORN - (Dec. 21 - Jan. 19) Information that comes to light this week is likely to give plenty of food for thought. AQUARIUS - (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18) Romantic and financial opportunities await if you’re willing to dare to do something different now. PISCES - (Feb. 19 - Mar. 20) Coming developments will highlight how uniquely talented you are.You can provide precisely what someone wants - and they’re unlikely to take no for an answer!

Katy, TX, formerly of Kane, PA. MAY 21, 2013: PA P I N C H A K , Jamie R. - 38, of Bradford, PA. MAY 22, 2013: SMITH, Helen E. Shonts - 82, of Cyclone, PA. PETERSON, Alice S. Silvis - 92, of Mt. Jewett, PA. MAY 23, 2013: PETERSON, Chester F. - 85, of Kane, PA. HIGGINBOTHAM, Robert D. 33, of Kane, PA. NELSON, Clyde III - 33, of Kane, PA. MAY 24, 2013: TOMPKINS, Willard W. Jr. - 80, of Port Allegany, PA.


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013 Page 15

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Page 16 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013

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JUST PASSING TIME THEME: “School’s Out” ACROSS: 1. Enthusiastic approval 6. Network with an eye 9. Train track 13. Beamed or glowed 14. Atilla, e.g. 15. “Beats me!” 16. Shinbone 17. Tropical American cuckoo 18. America’s singing choices 19. *”School’s Out” singer 21. *”Diary of a Wimpy Kid: ___ ____” 23. Endorsement 24. Harper and Bruce, e.g. 25. A cool ___, as in money 28. South American Indian people 30. Raja’s money, pl. 35. *Essay’s main ____ 37. *Truant officers 39. *Done at the mirror before prom 40. Organization formed in 1949 41. Bone-chilling 43. Picked up by

one of senses 44. Expels from community 46. Actresses Ryan and Tilly 47. Of higher order or level 48. 1/100th of a ruble 50. Like nay-sayers 52. Gas type 53. Sir Francis Drake’s “Golden ____” 55. Approximated landing time 57. Individual 61. *Final assessments 64. Santa Anna’s siege site 65. Sarcastic 67. User ID + password 69. Letter’s end 70. Canal locale 71. About to explode 72. Field worker 73. Caustic chemical 74.Yielded

6. Blacken 7. Dog holder 8. Like a snicker 9. Paul of “This Is 40” 10. Dwarf buffalo 11. Inwardly 12. *Summer learning ____ 15. Excavates 20. Derive 22. “___ the land of the free ...” 24. Helen Keller did this 25. Capital of Belarus 26. “Potato State” 27. Reduce pressure 29. *Read in English class 31. *Formal affair 32. Downy duck 33. Be theatrical 34. Wheel stopper 36. Blue-ribbon 38. *Done to a yearbook 42. Poly- follower 45. *For underachievers in summer 49. Kith partner 51. Right-leaning DOWN: character 54. Handrail post 1. PST plus three 56. Love intensely 2. All the rage (Crossword Solution on page 15) 3. One of Los Lo- 57. *Colorful accessory to cap and 59. Magician, in the 61. Swirling vortex 66. Bit of sunshine bos olden days 62. Exclamation of 68. Flanders of “The 4. Opposite of cat- gown 60. Arab ruler Simpsons” surprise, archaic 58. Assortment ion 63. Surfer’s stop 5. Kitchen whistler

WORD SEEK


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013 Page 17

Don’t Like Pressure? Your Tires Do (NAPSI)—Investing a little time and effort to make sure your tires are road worthy can pay dividends when it comes to safety. Experts say the first step is to make sure your tires are properly inflated. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, underinflated tires contribute to more than 600 fatalities and 33,000 injuries each year. Simply checking your tire pressure can help you stay safe during your next trip. To get the most from your tires this summer, here are some maintenance tips from the world’s largest tire and wheel retailer-Discount Tire: • Get Pressure Right—Low tire pressure can decrease fuel economy. Tires may lose up to one pound per square inch per month. The specific inflation pressure number can be found on the vehicle placard located on the driver’s side doorpost, glove box door, fuel door or in the owner’s manual. Custom tires and wheels may change standard air pressure requirements, so if you customize, have a pro check them out before you go. • Don’t Overload Vehicle—Overloading decreases fuel economy due to increased wind drag and cargo weight. Handling, control and braking are also negatively impacted. • Rotate Before You Go—Regular rotation helps achieve uniform tire wear and improves road performance. Tires rotated every 6,000 to 8,000 miles have longer life and help to maximize your tire investment. • Straighten Up—Proper wheel alignment provides safe, predictable vehicle control and helps tires wear evenly and last longer. • Bald Isn’t Beautiful—Lack of tread affects the tire’s ability to grip the road. Make sure tires don’t have uneven wear, high or low spots or unusually smooth areas that can decrease traction and increase the risk of road accidents. A Five-Minute Fix Checking tire pressure and tread is easy and can pay dividends when it comes to fuel economy and handling. Don’t go by appearances. Use a tire gauge to check since a tire can be 50 percent underinflated but still not appear flat. Make it a habit to check tire pressure every month and always before a long trip. Use the vehicle manufacturer’s recommended tire pressure. Additionally, check tire tread depth by using the “penny test.” Insert Abe Lincoln’s head upside down into the tread. If you see his entire head, it’s time to replace the tire. To learn more about tire safety, visit www.discounttire.com

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Page 18 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013

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It’s Time - Let Them Spread Their Wings Another school year has gone by and graduation day is here. By the time your child becomes a senior, you’ve had a fair amount of experience with letting go. You might even believe that you’re adequately prepared for your teen to leave home. You know you’re a sensible, rational adult who’s done a better than average job of parenting. So maybe you can handle the grief of letting go. You have much to be prod of; you’ve raised an independent child who can think for themselves. You’ve been supportive and enthusiastic as they make their plans to leave home. Maybe they’ll get a job, gent an apartment, join the service, or travel through Europe. Whatever your teen’s dream is, you’ve both shared in it. You’ve known from the very first day you became a parent that your child would be leaving you, venturing out on their own. This is the main teenage theme, your teen’s struggle for independence and

your struggle to keep them close and protected. You know you’re supposed to let go. This has been your goal to launch a happy, confident and productive individual into society. This letting-go tuggle-of-war starts around twelve, and depending on how hard you’re holding on, pulling, and dragging, it keeps escalating until you give in and finally let go. In the end, your child will win, as they should. Although at times you may feel like you’ve lost, friends of mine with older children reassure me that the kids won’t leave and desert you forever. Letting go takes courage, for both of you. More and more, you feel sadness as you realize just how quickly your child has grown up. Parenting never stops, it just changes directions and intensity, and these after-highschool years begin another chapter. No, I wouldn’t’ want to relive the physically exhausting “zombie tired” toddler years. And I really enjoy having a child that can carry on an intelligent conversation and is

fun to spend time with. You’ll have a lot of self doubts. Have I taught them what they need to know to live independently? Will they use the common sense they have? Will they make good decisions regarding friends and their future? Will they trust the wrong person? Will they still value my opinion? I’m reminded of a favorite column written by Erma Bombeck. She tells a story which equates launching children to flying a kite.There are many attempts until the kite gets launched into the sky; several times the kite will nose-dive and need retrieved from a precarious situation. Finally, the kite catches the wind just right, and you continue to let out more an more string, launching the kite high into the sky. Now it’s time for you to let out more string and launch your “kite” high into the sky!

WE SALUTE Bradford Area High School Class of 2013 Graduates HAPPINESS AND SUCCESS TO YOU All of your friends will be going their separate ways. Whole new worlds will be opening up for you, full of fascinating and sobering discoveries. But your paths will cross from time to time, bringing back all of the warm and funny memories. As you choose your individual roads to travel, we want to wish you all the happiness and success in the world!

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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013 Page 19

Tips On Entertaining Kids (NAPSI)—When vacation time comes and kids have more free time, there could be good news for parents searching for interesting and unique activities. Lance Burton, world-renowned magician and magic adviser on “Oz the Great and Powerful,” recommends practicing magic as a fun option for engaging kids at home. Magic has been enjoyed by many as a compelling hobby over the years—even by some celebrities including Neil Patrick Harris, Jason Alexander and Johnny Carson. Burton notes, “While the vast majority of kids who take up magic as a hobby are not going to become professional magicians, magic is great for helping kids develop many different life skills while having fun. Mastering the tricks helps them develop self- esteem, strengthen mental focus and enhance physical coordination. Magic is also a great way to interact with people and gain new friends. Kids can learn cool tricks to share with their peers and at the same time gain confidence for future life experiences.” Burton recalls that he had so much fun and success teaching magic to James Franco, who stars as a great magician in “Oz the Great and Powerful,” that he started thinking about how he could create some simple tips for parents to encourage their kids to try magic at an early age. He suggests: • Help arouse the young magicians’ curiosity: The gift of a magic set is what got many magicians started. Watching a movie such as “Oz the Great and Powerful” on Blu-ray™ or DVD at

home can also inspire. Other films with magical appeal include “Bedknobs and Broomsticks,” “The Chronicles of Narnia,” “The Sword in the Stone” and “Mary Poppins.” • Take a trip to the library: A very simple way to start learning about magic is by visiting the library. Look for books for beginners. • Search online: Another inexpensive way to begin is to sit together at the computer and search through the array of basic tricks that include easy step-by-step directions. • Start with simple tricks: Begin with simple tricks that do not require difficult sleight of hand or expensive props. For card tricks, Burton recommends using a miniature deck that is made specifically for kids. • Practice, practice, practice: Devote some time to helping your children practice. Encourage them to keep trying even if success isn’t immediate. • Provide an audience: Once your child has mastered a few tricks, provide the opportunity for him or her to proudly show off some newfound skills. Set up a magic show for the whole family or friends. You’ll also be helping to encourage your child and to build confidence. Burton notes, “The No. 1 fear among adults is fear of public speaking. If a child learns to perform magic for an audience, he/she is much more likely to also feel comfortable speaking in public, whether on stage or in the boardroom.” • Find others who like magic: Visit magic shows and shops. Look for a nearby magic club. The International Brotherhood of Magicians has chapters

in many communities. • Have fun: Remember, the primary objective is to provide youngsters with a challenging, engaging way to have fun. Keeping it simple makes it easy to have fun doing magic. Learn More: For further information about the movie, you can visit www. disney.go.com/thewizard. For more information on Lance Burton, visit www. lanceburton.com

Keeping Pets Safe In Hurricane Season (NAPSI)—Warmer weather means more than the start of vacation season. It’s also when extreme weather—such as tornadoes and hurricanes—is more likely to occur. Experts say it’s important to remember that extreme weather can pose a danger to pets as well as people and property. At the ASPCA (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals), director of Disaster Response, Dr. Dick Green, says preparation is key. “Don’t wait until it’s too late,” says Dr. Green. “Have a plan in advance, so you can save time and get yourself and your pets to safety.” Here are some tips from the ASPCA: • Always bring pets indoors at the first sign of a storm or disaster. • Make sure all pets wear collars with up-to-date identification. The AS-

Best BBQ Around! PCA also recommends microchipping as a more permanent form of ID. • Get a rescue alert sticker and display it so rescuers will know that pets are inside your home. • Include your pet in evacuation plans. If it’s not safe for you to stay, it’s not safe for your pet. • Make sure you keep pet emergency supplies and critical information in your emergency preparedness kit. Include your pet’s medical records, water, pet food and pet first-aid supplies. To learn more, visit www.aspca.org

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Page 20 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013

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FAMILY FEATURES

hopping for some dads is easy — neckties, gift cards or golf balls are sure to bring a smile to his face. Others want something a lot more creative and unexpected. This year, get your favorite father a gift that creates special memories. Take him fishing, host a family barbecue featuring his favorite grilled fare or let him rock out with his favorite guitarist. No matter what type of dad you have, here are a few great

S

gift ideas sure to make this Father’s Day one to remember.

Wine, Wisdom and Rock Experience Catch Some Memories with Dad A rod and reel, some bait, a cooler of snacks and sandwiches, fishing licenses and his favorite fishing buddy; all these together make for a perfect Father’s Day gift. Spoil dad with a day on the open water with no distractions. He’ll be glad you opted for tackle instead of the tie. For more details on how to purchase fishing licenses, supplies you will need, where the fish are biting, and how to hook ’em, visit takemefishing.org.

Wow dad with a once-in-a-lifetime gift: The “Wine, Wisdom and Rock Experience” at the Louis M. Martini Winery, presented by Rock ’n’ Roll Fantasy Camp, Aug. 16 to 18. This unbelievable weekend will blend classic rock with classic cabernet in one of Napa Valley’s most historic wineries. Dad will taste world class cabernet with Michael Martini, third-generation master winemaker, and jam with classic rock guitarist Joe Satriani and other rock legends. For more information, visit http://rockcamp.com/napa-valley.php or www.Facebook.com/LouisMartiniWinery. California Table Wine, © 2013 Louis M. Martini Winery, St. Helena, CA. All rights reserved.

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Gifts that Sizzle For the man who has everything, give dad the gift that brings the whole family together. With the grilled goodness of Omaha Steaks’ Favorite Gift package, he’ll have everything he needs for an incredible feast — from extra tender Filet Mignons to bold, beefy Top Sirloins and savory sides. Not only will he love the incredible fare, he’ll also love the extra family time. Remember, a well-fed dad is a happy dad. For information, visit www.omahasteaks.com.

Grill Up Some Good Times An icy beverage, the sun beating down and the smoky smell of a sizzling cut of meat — these are a few of dad’s favorite things. If dad is a novice to the grill, open up a new culinary world to him this Father’s Day with the gift of a new grill. Is he already a seasoned master of the flame? Think about upgrading his old rig for one that’s shiny and new. It’s a gift dad will enjoy using all year long.


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013 Page 21

Giving a Voice to the Cystic Fibrosis Adult Community (NAPSI)—If Ali Christensen Wilde had been born in the 1950s, it would have been unimaginable that she could dream of going to college and marry her high school sweetheart. But the 23year old with cystic fibrosis has just done that—and so much more. The newlywed is now living in Provo, UT with her husband Chase, and is pursuing her undergraduate degree while singing and speaking out about living with cystic fibrosis as an adult. CF is a life-shortening genetic disease that affects about 30,000 children and adults in the United States. In the 1950s, most children with CF did not live long enough to attend elementary school. By 2011, the median life expectancy for people with CF was in the upper mid 30s. The disease primarily impacts the lungs and digestive system, making it hard to breathe and to digest food. More specifically, CF impacts the way salt and water move in and out of the body’s cells, causing the body to produce unusually thick, sticky mucus that clogs the lungs and leads to lifethreatening lung infections. One of the things Ali loves is to sing with her younger sister, 16-year old Christina, who also has CF. While their first performance was a sad occasion— the funeral of their older sister April who had also battled CF for years—it unleashed a passion that would lead

them to sing as finalists on NBC’s America’s Got Talent in 2010. Last year, the sisters released a song, “Something About Me,” to share their message that challenges, like CF, do not define them or hold them back from pursuing their goals. The song and behind-the-scenes video are available for free on www.cfvoice.com, a website and online community for people of all ages living with CF, supported by Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation. CF therapy may require up to 20 medications to be used every day with an average daily treatment burden of approximately 2 hours. Today, there are more treatment options than ever to manage the incurable disease. In the last year alone, several medications to manage cystic fibrosis have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Ali is grateful for the support she’s had and the encouragement she’s received. “Our mom and dad are great supporters,” she notes. “They want us to be healthy, they want us to succeed, but my favorite part is they didn’t raise us like they had sick children. They believed in us and wanted us to do anything that we wanted to do.” For Chase, the transition from boyfriend to husband has also included learning more about CF and the treatments needed to keep Ali healthy. As

the life expectancy continues to increase, more young adults with CF are navigating independent living, relationships and career. Ali continues to inspire as she enters this new phase of her life. “There is someone out there for everyone. As long as we’re doing our best to take care of ourselves, we will find someone who wants to learn with us and who wants to love us for who we are.”

A Better Breakfast Starts With Vegetables (NAPSI)—Here’s a delicious idea: Enjoy vegetables for breakfast. Eating a balanced breakfast with lean protein, healthy carbs and a small dose of healthy fat can be a great way to start the day. Vegetables such as onions help you increase your intake of dietary fiber and other important nutrients with layers of flavor. Use these easy ideas to start your day with a nutritional boost. • Add chopped onions, tomatoes and either spinach or kale to omelets. • Combine hash browns or other breakfast potatoes with cooked vegetables and tofu. • Sauté mushrooms, onions and bell peppers and add to scrambled eggs. • Use up last night’s leftover salad and top with a poached egg. • Spread a thin layer of onion-flavored cream cheese on lightly toasted wholegrain bread. Add sliced tomatoes and sweet onions, avocado and fresh, baby spinach leaves. • Try this tasty onion quiche from the National Onion Association. A lighter version of the classic, this dish is easy to prep ahead and reheat in the morning to take to work or school. SWEET ‘N’ SAVORY ONION QUICHE Makes 6 to 8 servings

bine sugar and flour with seasonings. Add slightly beaten eggs and milk to flour mixture. Put sautéed onion, ham and cheese in a pie shell; pour milk and egg mixture over onions. Bake for 35 minutes or until custard sets and top is golden brown. Serve warm. • Wrap up a morning’s nutrition with a breakfast burrito: Fill a whole wheat or sprouted wheat tortilla with sautéed onions, scrambled eggs, tomatoes and cilantro. Top with plain yogurt and a fresh salsa like this one: 5 cups yellow onion, thinly sliced 1 tablespoon olive oil ½ cup Canadian bacon, diced 1 cup nonfat Swiss cheese, grated 1 tablespoon sugar 1 tablespoon flour 1 teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper ½ teaspoon black pepper ¼ teaspoon nutmeg 2 eggs, 1 egg white, slightly beaten ¼ cup 2% milk 1 9-inch pie shell, unbaked Rosemary and sautéed red onion for garnish Directions: Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Sauté onions in olive oil until tender and translucent. Add Canadian bacon and grated cheese. In a separate bowl, com-

ONION-PEACH SALSA Makes 6 servings ½ cup chopped yellow onion 2 cups chopped fresh ripe or thawed frozen peaches, drained 3 tablespoons chopped cilantro leaves 2 tablespoons chopped jalapeño pepper Salt Fresh lime juice Combine ingredients in medium bowl, adding salt and lime juice to taste; cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. Makes 6 servings. Tip: Yellow onions are the best, allpurpose choice for both raw and cooked dishes. For more great tips and recipes using onions, visit: www.onions-usa.org/recipes


Page 22 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013

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Helping Children Live And Learn (NAPSI)—In surprising ways, American youngsters and their parents are helping children half a world away stay in school. What Can Be Done Countless impoverished girls in Africa don’t have the means to purchase sanitary pads, causing them to miss up to five days of school each month. The absence creates insurmountable gaps in their education and risks to their health. Enter Huru International, founded in 2008 by Lorna Macleod, which manufactures reusable sanitary pads. For $25, American children and, in fact, anyone can send an African child a “Huru Kit” with the reusable pads and HIV/AIDS prevention information. The kits are given out through schools, with the assistance of a network of local partner organizations through support from Johnson & Johnson, the Elton John AIDS Foundation, and Micato Safaris, among others. When the Huru Kits are distributed, the students participate in an educational seminar that delivers engaging and interactive health and empowerment messaging to at-risk girls. The kits from Huru (which means “freedom” in Swahili) have helped more than 100,000 girls stay in school, and the organization is working to ensure that girls everywhere have the means to complete their education and safeguard their health. Huru has employed hundreds of adults and sponsored many community events that provide thousands of people with HIV testing, cancer screening and

family-planning services. Why To Do It UNICEF and the World Bank cite keeping girls in school as the best way to protect them from chronic poverty and getting infected with the HIV virus. It has long been recognized that “education is likely to determine a person’s vulnerability to HIV infection,” according to UNICEF, and that most of the gains made through prevention initiatives have occurred among the educated. This makes keeping girls in school especially important, as it is one of the most direct and effective means of reducing their vulnerability to HIV infection and ensuring that they develop the life skills they need to lead healthy,

prosperous lives. What The Experts Say Explains Macleod, “Education is the most cost-effective means of preventing new HIV infections. Just one additional year of schooling can prevent 60 infant deaths, three maternal deaths and 500 unwanted pregnancies.” The Global Campaign for Education states that “Ensuring that all children complete primary school will prevent 700,000 HIV infections each year.” Where To Learn More You can find out more about Huru International at (212) 340- 7115, www.HuruInternational.org and info@HuruInternational

Old-Fashioned Photo Fun Is New Again (NAPSI)—Face it: Photo booths have once again become all the rage for teenagers and young adults. These entertaining spaces are found in more places than ever, including restaurants, bars, movie theaters and malls, as well as the old standbys, arcades and amusement parks. They are even showing up at special events and weddings. An Old Idea, New To The Young For many young people, it’s the novelty of a printed photo that’s the real charm. For most older Americans, a printed photo is something they’ve lived with most of their lives. They hang on the wall, sit on the desk, and hold a special place in people’s wallets. Today’s younger generation, however, isn’t so familiar with a tangible print. Some just don’t have the patience required to download and print out a photo. Another reason for the increasing popularity of the photo booth may be that that’s where people can get spontaneously goofy, romantic or serious,

whether individuals, couples or a group of friends crammed in together. Photo Sharing The Modern Way In a further twist, at some photo booths you can now combine hard copy with digital photography. Face Place Photo Booths can even link your snapshot experience to your social media pages, with an instant upload of the photo strip, directly through the photo booth. You can get 2x3 multiphoto strips or full-size 4x6 photos and share photos directly from the photo booths by e-mail, Facebook or Twitter. Why It Works An integral part of the photo booth fun are Mitsubishi Electric’s dye-sublimation high-speed printers. They create a high-quality print everyone can enjoy in under six seconds, and they can be in either color or the traditional black and white. They also print in different sizes with a unique roll-type mechanism that ensures jam-free reliability, which

is required for demanding photo booth applications. Learn More: You can find further facts about this trend and other electronic innovations at www.mevsa.com, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ MitsubishiPhotoimaging and on Twitter at twitter.com/MitsubishiPhoto


Page 23 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 30, 2013

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To Save the Bears, We Need to Save the Forests American Forests Endangered Western Forests Initiative

(NAPSI)—Josh Westerhold, 36, is a grizzly bear hunter. His weapon is a camera. And over the years, he’s shot grizzlies by the dozens. Despite growing up in Cody, Wyo., Josh did not catch grizzly fever until his college days during hikes and mountain trips with friends. It was then that he learned how and where to find the threatened bears by talking with hunting outfitters, U.S. Forest Service members and fish and game experts. The key piece of advice was to go where the bears go for food. In the Mountain West, this meant at or above the timberline, as grizzlies feed on seeds from whitebark pines growing there. Whitebark pine seeds are essential for many birds and animals. For bears, they are a rich, preferred food source that provide a high calorie content — more calories per pound than chocolate — that is vital for hibernation. In bumper crop seasons for whitebark cones, they can dominate the food habits of bears for the entire next year. In bad years for whitebark pine, according to Josh, you can fairly accurately predict the increased number of incidents of grizzly and human interactions, as the bears travel down the mountains for food. With this knowledge, Josh began finding grizzlies — lots of them — and took to photography to illustrate these amazing sights. “I kept telling people about all the stuff I was seeing, and I realized I needed to document it. I was witnessing things like 35 grizzlies in one place - males, females and cubs all together. Because of the abundant food source, they’re pretty tolerant of each other. It is very unusual.” But things are changing in the West, including in the iconic Greater Yellowstone Area, Josh says. “Over the course of the last decade, I’ve seen the progressive deterioration of the forest. Not just the whitebark pine, but the whole upper canopy, right at the timberline. In certain drainages, more trees are dead than alive.” What Josh is seeing, according to Dr. Bob Keane, American Forests Science Advisory Board member and U.S. Forest Service research ecologist, is the combined impact of mountain pine beetles, white pine blister rust and excessive past fire suppression. “We are seeing an urgent situation in the process of turning catastrophic,” says Dr. Keane. “In the last decade of warmer summers and winters, the decline of this critical ecosystem has greatly accelerated in all parts of whitebark pine’s range.” It is estimated that 41.7 million acres of pine forests in more than 10 states are dying due to abnormally large mountain pine beetle outbreaks. These affected forests contain the headwaters of some of America’s most prominent rivers, which serve as major water resources for more than 33 million people in 16 states, including cities like Los Angeles. The whitebark pine is a keystone species critical to the health of these at-risk,

high-elevation ecosystems. The American Forests Endangered Western Forests initiative is a collaborative program designed to find solutions to and address these threats. Funded in part by a U.S. Forest Service grant, the initiative has created a partnership between American Forests, federal agencies, local communities and other nonprofits to protect and restore forest ecosystems in the West devastated by these threats. The initial phase of the initiative is focused on the Greater Yellowstone Area by planting 100,000 naturally disease-resistant whitebark pines and protecting another 10,000 with pheromone patches. The program is supporting researchers and scientists testing the best techniques for rehabilitation; managers implementing these restoration actions on the ground; and the public learning about these forests, their threats and the level of damage. The organization has a track record of success in these areas and has planted 125,000 whitebark pines since 2010. “We are at a critical point in ensuring

the future of these beloved forests,” says Dr. Keane. “With new research and management techniques, we hope to restore whitebark pine across most of its range and, in turn, create resilient landscapes that can weather future climate change, but time is of the essence.” And not just for the forests, but for the species that make their homes there. The Greater Yellowstone Area is home to approximately half of the threatened grizzlies found in the lower 48 states. “I love grizzlies because they are what make the wilderness wild, but they’re a threatened species,” says Josh. “The survival of the bears is an indicator of the health of the environment and how we’ve taken care of the forests.” To learn more about the American Forests Endangered Western Forests initiative, visit the website www.americanforests.org/EWF or call 202-737-1944. Please support the work of this initiative and help save our western forests. Your contribution can make a critical difference.

Bradford Journal Issue May 30, 2013  

Fifth Issue May 2013

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