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“Stinkfest”

Saturday - May 4th 11 am - 6 pm

Bradford’s Weekly Newpaper Magazine

Bradford Journal

VOL. 172 NO. 18 BRADFORD JOURNAL/MINER THURSDAY, MAY 2, 2013 www.bradfordjournal.com Bradford Journal/McKean County Miner/Mount Jewett Echo Phone 814-465-3468

Everton After Final Indoor Soccer Game

$1.00

Argentina Gets Control

Bradford Journal Photo The Everton U12 soccer team poses with their coach following their game with Newcastle, April 27th at Fretz Middle School. It was the last day for Bradford Community Bradford Journal Photo Soccer League indoor play for the year. Players are (l-r) James Green 12, Steven KelDuring the final weekend of Bradford lam 12, Logan Dunlap 10, Colton Swanson 12, Peyton Kirk 12, Simon Burleson 11, Community Soccer League under 10 play, and Stephen Tingley 12. Standing behind his team is Coach Pat Swanson. (See videos April 27th, Argentina gains control of the in the photo gallery.) ball during a match with Poland. (See videos in the photo gallery.)

Argentina Players And Coach Following Match

INDEX

Bradford Journal Photo The Argentina U10 team poses for a photo following their last match of the indoor Bradford Community Soccer League season, April 27th at Fretz Middle School. Left to right are Assistant Coach Connor Tingley 16, Destiney Sharp 9, Marissa Buccolini 9, Anastacia Deitz 9, Lauren Baldwin 10, Desarae Luce 9, Jessie Kerr 9, Jade Jimerson 10, Lauren Placer 9, Ryley Cleveland 9, and Maddie Emerson 9. Standing behind her team is coach Aimee Emerson. (See videos in the photo gallery.)

Local News/Weather 2 Comments & Opinions 3 Obituaries 4 Social News 6 Regional News 8 Comics 13 Classifieds 15 Senior Information page 16 Bradford Journal P.O. Box, Bradford, PA 16701 www.bradfordjournal.com Phone: 814-465-3468

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Page 2 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013

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LOCAL NEWS 4-H Club Holds Earth Day Kick-Off

Photo submitted Pictured above (l-r), are the winners of the Public Speaking Contest, they are: Tyler Baldwin, Shelby Baldwin, Ashley Wian, Emily Dibble, John Cradduck, Stephanie McFall Penn State Extension’s McKean County 4-H Club program recently held a Kickoff for the Earth Day at Kinzua Bridge State Park. Holly Dzemian, park educator, showed how the forest is regenerating after the tornado and took the group out

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onto the skywalk. Next, a public speaking contest was held. Tyler Baldwin took first place in the junior division. Stephanie McFall placed first in the senior division, with John Cradduck second, Emily Dibble third, Ashley Wian fourth, and Shelby Baldwin fifth. Following the contest, the youth enjoyed a variety of demonstrations. Natalie Aiello, Extension Educator for Elk and Cameron Counties, showed a collec-

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Photo submitted Pictured above are members of McKean County 4-H on the Kinzua Skywalk overlook area. In the back row, (l-r) are: John Cradduck, Stephanie McFall, Emily Dibble, Ashley Wian, Shelby Baldwin, and Ryan Bailey. In the front row (l-r) are: Sarah Murray, Tyler Baldwin, Zoey Hoffman, Eliana Murray, Caitlyn Munsell, and Celeste Austin tion of macroinvertebrates. Heather McKean and Sherry Dumire, from the McKean County Conservation District, provided activities about recycling and gave each participant a Canadian hemlock. Ashley Larson from the McKean County Dairy Club brought a calf along for an introduction to the dairy industry as well as an invitation to join the club. Don Comes, renowned horticulturalist and 4-H benefactor, led a gardening station where each participant planted flower seeds to take home. Finally, the McKean Teen Leadership Club provided a variety of activities for everyone to enjoy—plaster animal tracks, picture frames, cupcake decorating, hiking, and habitat golf. The public was invited to this event to explore what 4-H has to offer. Newcomers as well as current members enjoyed a beautiful day at Kinzua Bridge State Park.

THE BRADFORD AREA 5-DAY WEATHER FORECAST

Thursday, May 2: Sunny today and pleasant with a high of 69°. Thursday Night: Mostly clear and cool tonight with an overnight low of 43°.

Friday, May 4: Sunny and nice today with a high of 70°. Friday Night: Mostly clear and cool tonight with an overnight low of 42°.

Saturday, May 5:

Sunny today and pleasant with a high of 69°. Saturday Night: Partly cloudy and a little warmer tonight with an overnight low of 45°.

Sunday, May 6: Slightly cooler today and partly sunny this morning, becoming mostly cloudy later. High of 67°. Sunday Night: Clear and cool tonight with a low of 42°.

Monday, May 7: Mostly sunny and cooler today with a high of 63°. Monday Night: Clear and cool tonight with an overnight low of 46°.

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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013 Page 3

5 ¢ENTS WORTH

by Grant Nichols

April 27th was the last day for Bradford Community Soccer League play at Fretz Middle School and we spent much of it photographing the final group of teams that we had missed throughout the season. These included the under 10 teams: Poland, Argentina, and Italy; the under 12 team: Everton; and the under 8 team: Lightning. Naturally we took some shots and videos during the games, along with the team pictures- all of which can be found in this issue or its associated gallery. Our readers are welcome to submit any personal photography taken throughout the season…….As the weather gets better, drivers who happen to travel South Kendall Avenue, Route 46, are advised that local police and state troopers are looking for speeders in the areas of the roadway that intersect with the side roads, Pratt, Garlock, Looker Mountain Trail, and Corwin Lane at the one end; Totten Hollow in the Middle; and Lafferty, Buchannan, and Chelsea at the other……..We happened to meet up with

our friend Diane Sheeley, probably best known in her former capacity as the Executive Director of the Bradford Area Chamber of Commerce. She tells us that she is now, not only a representative for Shaklee® Products, but also a satisfied user. Maybe she’ll contact us and tell us more about her new endeavors……..This Saturday, May 4th, on National Homebrew Day, our readers can find something special going on at 12 Kennedy Street, Bradford. There, the American Homebrewers Association’s Big Brew event will take place from 11AM-3PM at How Ya Brewing, located next to the Cavallaro Paint and Decorating store. They will be cooking a batch of Pointon’s Proper Beer, and they encourage us to bring our favorite food to share, and try some of theirs. They also suggest we taste some of their homebrew and bring some of our own to show-off (or bring our own bottle)…….. The East Bradford Stinkfest event will take place this Saturday, May 4th from 11AM in the morning until 6PM in the afternoon. As in previous years, we can expect great food, libation, and street vendors galore come rain or shine, and we recommend at least a quick visit to the site by those who have not yet experienced this down and dirty good time day of frivolity. A reminder for the event can be found on page 9 of this issue and has been sponsored by the Cavallaro’s “How Ya Brewing, New Keystone, Dexter Service & Collision, Hedlund Glass, Bottorf Embroidery and Screen Printing and Monte’s Restaurant & Lounge. …….

It’s A Matter Of Opinion... Guest Columnist “ Supreme Errors ” -by Bob Perry Without question our federal government has exceeded unchecked the stated limits of authority as defined by the Constitution of the United States. When the Supreme Court took up the case of the Affordable Care Act, it failed to cite Congress for not legislating in a constitutional way, which requires each member of Congress understanding the legislation so as to determine the constitutionality of same. This to me results in Supreme Errors! How is our government ever supposed to do what is right for the country if the legislative process is not overseen by the Judicial Branch? Congressional oversight over itself, including ethics, is like a student being able to grade thier own tests! The other prime question the Court did not obviously consider in reference to the Affordable Care Act is whether or not Congress has the authority to produce such a law. The 10th Amendment of the Constitution states: “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” So the question remains if

health care is a responsibility reserved for the states or not. In my opinion the Court must be proactive by being informed on the legislative process on all legislation and issue perception on failed deliberation and constitutional consideration. Review of passed legislation must be a continual process somehow. In case you have not reviewed the oath of office for the Supreme Court, here is the oath which is a combination of the two oaths commonly used: “I, _________, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will administer justice without respect to persons, and do equal right to the poor and to the rich, and that I will faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent upon me as _________ under the Constitution and laws of the United States; and that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God.” While the Court does not have the authority to create law, it seems to me they need to be declarative as to whether or not any law created by Congress and being challenged is unconstitutional since it falls under the 10th Amendment. Another issue is, of course, the declaration of war that is the specified a responsibility of Congress and has been ignored since World War II.

Lightening After Last Game Of The Season

Bradford Journal Photo The Lightening U8 soccer team poses with their coach following the game with Avalanche, April 27th at Fretz Middle School. This was the end of the indoor soccer play for the Bradford Community Soccer League. Players are (l-r) Maddie Cowburn 8, Shawn Wilt 8, Wyatt Bond 7, Brett Kubeja 8, Nino Aiello 7, and Zachary Perkins 6. Standing behind his team is Coach Travis Cowburn. (See videos in the photo gallery.)


Page 4 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013

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OBITUARIES Marianne Herold Mcnair Marianne Herold McNair, 79, wife of Jerry M. McNair of Jacksonville, FL, died Monday, April 8, 2013. She was the daugher of Mary Downs Herold and Griffith A. Herold of Bradford, PA. She was a graduate of Bradford High School Class of ‘51; Pennsylvania State University, Centennial Class of 1955; and Traphagan School of Fashion Design, New York City. Marianne taught high school home

economics in Point Pleasant Beach, NJ. She traveled for Simplicity Patterns running fashion shows in high schools throughout the country and later worked in their home offices in NYC. She and Jerry owned and operated a fabric shop and sewing school called “And Sew Forth” in Saddle River, NJ. She had been a professional genealogist since moving to Florida 30 some years ago. She is survived by her husband Jerry M. McNair; sister, Dianne Warner

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of Monroe, WA; and brother, John Downs Herold of Ann Arbor, MI; stepdaughters, Sharon Schendel of Fairfield, CT, and Karen Needham of Dallas, TX; grandchildren, Connor and Chase Needham, and Taylor and Ryan Schendel; nieces, Lucia Warner Bacon, Vienna, VA, Lynn Warner, Seattle, WA; and Dr. Rebecca Maki, Hudsonville, MI; nephews, Michael Warner, Portland, OR, and Tim Herold, Bedford, IN; and 7 grandnephews; and 6 grandnieces. No memorial service was held, but a celebration of Marianne’s life will be held at a later date.

Robert Clark Robert J. Clark, 45, of 134 Winter St., Bradford, passed away Saturday (April 20, 2013) at Buffalo (N.Y.) General Hospital.

Born July 19, 1967, in Bradford, he was a son of the late Jacqueline “Suzie” Andress Clark and Leon Jamison. On July 3, 2002, in Punxsutawney, he married Jeannette L. Bowers Clark, who survives. He worked as a floor supervisor at the Seneca Allegany Casino in Salamanca, N.Y. Surviving, in addition to his wife, is one son, Nate Clark of Bradford; one granddaughter; one sister, Colleen S. Swanson of Punxsutawney; two brothers, Andrew A. Clark of Jamestown, N.Y., and Tom M. Clark of Youngsville, N.C.; and several nieces and nephews.

David Nichols David W. Nichols, 61, of 354 West Corydon St., Bradford, died Sunday (April 21, 2013). Born Jan. 1, 1952 in Nashville, Tenn., he was a son of Wil-

liam D. and Bonnie A. Moore Nichols. On June 7, 1991, in the First Presbyterian Church in Bradford, he married Cherri L. Hartburg Nichols. From a young age, he worked for oil and gas companies around the region, including Superior Well Services Inc., Halliburton and Universal Well Services, as a field-hand, operator and in sales. He is survived by his wife, Cherri Nichols of Bradford; a daughter, Amanda Nichols of Bradford; two stepsons, Randy and Jonathan (Kimberly) Komidar, both of Bradford; a stepdaughter, Alicia (Kevin) Leahy of Cherry Hill, N.J.; a sister, Rebecca Skinner of Irvine, Calif.; a brother, W. Geoffrey (Michelle) Nichols of Rock Hill, S.C.; seven step grandchildren; four nieces and a nephew; and sev-

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eral cousins. Burial was at Willow Dale Cemetery, Bradford.

Josephine McCord Josephine A. “Jo” McCord, 92, formerly of 71 Derrick Road, passed away Sunday (April 21, 2013) at the Bradford Ecumenical Home. Jo was the last surviving member of her immediate family. Born June 30, 1920, in Bradford, she was a daughter of Carl P. and Rose M. Deschler Arnold On June 3, 1946, she married Harold L. Johnson, who died Feb. 23, 1966. On March 19, 1973, she married Howard L. McCord, who died in 1985. Surviving are several nieces and nephews. Burial was in Willow Dale Cemetery

USPS-062-740 Postmaster: Send address changes to: Bradford Journal P.O. Box 17 Bradford, PA 16701-0017 Phone: 814-465-3468 Copy Deadline: Noon Saturday Published every Thursday at 69 Garlock Hollow. Bradford, PA 16701, Except for the third Thursday in the month of June. Subscription In Advance (By U.S. Mail) Yearly/$50.00 Within County Yearly/$68.00 Outside County Internet Color Version $15.00 yearly Email Color Version $26.00 yearly

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Grant Nichols Publisher Debi Nichols Editor Don Poleteo Military Correspondant Periodical postage paid at USPS Bradford, PA 16701-9998


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BUSINESS & PERSONAL FINANCES

Should you ‘Freeze’ Your Credit Reports? Although the odds of having your identity stolen remain quite low, anyone who’s ever been had their bank or credit card account compromised knows what a pain it can be to unravel the mess. Sometimes enterprising hackers just need your Social Security number, address and date of birth to start opening new accounts in your name. Many victims don’t realize anything’s wrong until they apply for a new account and find their credit has been trashed; or, they start getting calls from collection agencies regarding unfamiliar accounts. More and more people have begun blocking access to information in their credit reports, even if there hasn’t yet been any fraudulent activity, by instituting a “security freeze.” A credit security freeze is where you instruct the three major credit bureaus to disallow new creditors from viewing your credit report and score. Because most businesses won’t lend without first checking your report, a freeze can deter identity thieves. Before going to the trouble and expense of doing a credit freeze, however, learn how the process works and be aware of several possible inconveniences: First, determine if you really need a credit freeze. If your credit or debit card is lost or stolen, you won’t necessarily be a victim of identity theft, which usually requires additional personal information. Similarly, fraudulent billing charges don’t necessarily indicate identity theft. Verify by reviewing your credit reports. You can order one free report annually from the three major bureaus through the AnnualCreditReport.com; otherwise you’ll pay a small fee. To freeze your credit reports, you must individually contact each credit bureaus: Equifax (www.equifax.com), Experian (www.experian.com) and TransUnion (www.transunion.com). You’ll need to supply your name, address, birth date, Social Security number and other personal information. Filing requirements and fees vary based on your state of residence (commonly $5 to $10). People over age 65 sometimes receive a discount and if you are an identity theft victim, credit freezes are free – although you’ll need to provide supporting paperwork. Once implemented, you’ll receive a unique personal identification number (PIN) from each credit bureau. Store these PINs securely because you’ll need them to temporarily lift a credit freeze and then reinstate it – usually for a fee. All these fees can really add up, so if

-by Jason Alderman you’re planning any action that requires a credit check, you may want to hold off implementing a freeze. It can take up to five business days to process a request for a security freeze or temporarily lift, so plan major purchases or other credit actions carefully. A few additional facts about credit freezes: • Although freezes can help block the creation of new credit accounts, they can’t prevent an identity thief from making charges to existing accounts. • Your current creditors can still access your credit reports, as can collection agencies acting on their behalf. • Government agencies have access

for collecting child support payments or taxes, to investigate Medicaid fraud, or in response to court or administrative orders, subpoenas or search warrants. • You can temporarily lift a credit freeze either for a specific period of time, or for a specific party – say, a potential landlord or employer. • If you lose your PIN, you may request a new one, although there may be a fee. Bottom line: Always monitor your credit reports to spot errors or fraudulent activity. To take security a step further, consider placing a credit freeze on your reports.

Poland Poses After Last Indoor Game

Bradford Journal Photo Poland players and their coach pose following their match with Argentina, April 27th on the last day of Bradford Community Soccer under 10 play at Fretz Middle School. Players are (l-r) Angelina Burgess 10, Chloe Costa 10, Sydney Rodgers 10, Madison Dillaman 9, Lindsay Moore 9, Grace Dalton 10, Mia Huber 10, Regan Johnson 10, and Emma Swanson 8. Coach Pat Swanson stands behind his team. (See videos in the photo gallery.)

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AREA SOCIAL NEWS Bradford Area Calendar of Events: MAY 2013: MAY 2: Prayer in the Square 12noon Veteran’s Square, Bradford, PA 62nd annual observance of the National Day of Prayer. Knitting Club 1-3pm Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. Whether you are an expert knitter or have never picked up a set of needles, this informal club is for you. Meets weekly in the Carnegie Room. MAY 3: Preschool Story Hour 10:30-11:30am Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. Includes story, craft, snack, and social interaction. Geared toward preK children, accommodates infants and toddlers. MAY 4: Electronics Recycling Event 9am-12noon Bradford Recycling Center, High Street, Bradford, PA. Organized by PA CleanWays of McKean County. Free to the public. Anyone with more than a car load of material should pre-register by calling Jim Clark at 814-887-5613, all others no registration required. For questions or more information, contact Jim Clark. Derby Gala: Bradford Area Public Library Endowment Benefit 4:30-8:30pm Pennhills Club, Pennhills Drive, Bradford, PA. Tickets: $50 per person, available at the Bradford Area Public Library. Southern cuisine, hat parades and prizes, Kentucky Derby live, cash prizes, casino night, and more. Remarkable, one-of-a-kind Zippo auction piece. Cash drawing – limited ticket sales – $25 cash raffle ticket. Visit bradfordlibrary.org or call 814-362-6527 to get further information or tickets. MAY 4-5: Kinzua Fly Fishing School

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University of Pittsburgh at Bradford, 300 Campus Drive, Bradford, PA. 20 hours of instruction and supervised practice. Cost: $305 resident, $285 commuter. For more information, contact Steve Skvarka at skvarka@penn.com MAY 5: “Celebrating Gettysburg” 3pm Bromeley Family Theater, Blaisdell Hall, University of Pittsburgh at Bradford, 300 Campus Drive, Bradford, PA Southern Tier Symphony 10th Anniversary Season Finale. $20 for public, all students free. Tickets available at the door. MAY 6: Kids Fun & Fitness 10:30am Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA Fun exercise program for toddlers and preschoolers designed for them to be active and enjoy fitness. For more information, contact Bradford Area Public Library at 814-362-6527. MAY 7: Bradford YMCA Community Awards Breakfast 7:30am University of Pittsburgh at Bradford, 300 Campus Drive, Bradford, PA. Honorees include: Dr. Richard McDowell, Bradford Creative and Performing Arts Center, five area youth, and three volunteer of the year recipients. Reservations may be made at the Bradford Family YMCA. Corporate/patron tables, patron tickets, and individual reservations available. Writing Center 3-5pm Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. To assist students and adults who need guidance with homework or work-related writing. For more information, e-mail marietroskosky@hotmail.com. MAY 8: United Way’s First Chapter Program 10:30am Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington St, Bradford, PA. Birth to 5 year old literacy program designed to promote childhood development through reading, crafts, and play groups. For more information, contact the United Way of the Bradford Area at 814-368-6181. Bereavement Support Group 10:30am Bradford Senior Center, 60 Campus Drive, Bradford, PA. Adults who are grieving the loss of a loved one are invited. These meetings offer positive ways to work through your grief with the support of professional counselors. For information, contact Community Nurses at 814-362-8183. Lunch in the Square 11:30am–1pm Veterans Square, Downtown Bradford. Enjoy menus from various Bradford restaurants, live musical entertainment by the BAHS Choral/Jazz Department, and fun. Open to the public. For more information call or email Colette Roessler at 814-598-3865 or croessler@bradfordpa.org Friends of BAPL Book Club 6:30pm Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. Friends of BAPL Book Club will meet at

Bradford TOPS #16

-article submitted The Thursday, April 25th meeting of Tops Pa #16 was held at the First Presbyterian Church and was opened with the Tops pledge conducted by president Vickie Johnson. The Tops pledge was recited and “Overweight ByeBye” was sung to the tune of “Bye-Bye Blackbird”. There were 30 weigh-ins with a loss of 16 and a half pounds. Loser in waiting is Audrey Gilligan and officers of the week are Vickie Johnson and Silvana Reed. Jeannie Miller told a joke and gave a helpful hint. Red grapes when cut in two and rubbed on your face will give you a healthy glow. A helpful hint from Sue DalleValle was to put cucumber slices on your floor and counter tops to ward off bugs and ants. Bev Hannon gave the inspirational quote for the week. Elaine Harris told us to read labels on soups for salt content and the fat and calories in Tortillas. Forbidden food for the week is cheese. Our area captain, Silvana Reed, talked on the different kinds of scales and how they differ, she also did the program on Body Heart Mind Spirit and Inspiration. Her quote was: “I can and I will reward my self and remember you are loved.” There is a workshop, A Day in May with Mary, on Saturday May 18th in Erie from 10 to 2 any one wishing to attend call Silvana. The meeting was closed with the friendship circle and a prayer.

the library to discuss “Roger Tory Peterson” by author Elizabeth Rosenthal. Free and open to the public. New members always welcome. For information, contact the library at 814-362-6527 MAY 8 & 11: Beginning Canoeing 6-8pm May 8th Marilla Reservoir and 8:30am-12noon May 11th Willow Bay Boat Launch. Learn the basics of canoeing on flat water, canoe safety, proper equipment, proper strokes, etc. Youth 12 and older may register with a parent. $55 includes use of canoe, personal flotation device, and paddle. Class will take place rain or shine. For more information or to register, contact the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford 814-362-5078 or contined@ pitt.edu.

BIRTHS Son, April 23, to Pamela and Noah Christjohn, Bradford, PA. Daughter, April 24, to Megan and Michael Seebaly, Bradford, PA. Son, April 26, to Stephanie and Brett Morrison, Bradford, PA.


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UPB Graduates Largest Ever BRADFORD, PA (04/22/2013)(readMedia)-- The University of Pittsburgh at Bradford graduated its largest class ever on Sunday, April 28. Among those receiving their degrees are the followinglocal students: Jennifer Anderson of Port Allegany, PA, received a BS degree in Athletic Training with a minor in Athletic Coaching. Joshua Anderson of Kane, PA, received a BA degree in Criminal Justice. Matthew Anderson of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Sports Medicine. Colby Austin of Smethport, PA, received a BS degree in Elementary Education. Olivia Austin of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Criminal Justice with a minor in Education (Non-teaching). Cortney Barnett of Port Allegany, PA, received a BA degree in Criminal Justice with a minor in Political Science. Tyler Bizzak of Kane, PA, received a BA degree in Environmental Studies. Nathan Booth of Eldred, PA, received a BS degree in Sport & Recreation Management with minors in Athletic Coaching & Marketing. Jeffrey Bosworth of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Business Management with minors in Economics & Marketing. Kayla Branch of Olean, NY, received a BA degree in Human Relations with a minor in International Business. Brenda Brown of Eldred, PA, received a BS degree in Elementary Education. Daniel Brown of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Criminal Justice. Laurie Brown of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Environmental Studies. Tiara Brown of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Business Management & Sport & Recreation Management with a minor in Athletic Coaching. Nichole Burritt of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Psychology with a minor in Administration of Justice. Brett Butler of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Sport & Recreation Management with a minor in Business. Drew Caldwell of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in History-Political Science. Caitlin Castina of Mt. Jewett, PA, received a BS degree in Entrepreneurship. Andrew Cauley of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in English and Writing. Maxwell Cercone of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in History-Political Science. Kristie Clark of Westline, PA, received a AS degree in Nursing. Shane Close of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in History-Political Science. Samantha Cobb of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Elementary Education. Charlotte Colf of Olean, NY, received a BA degree in Public Relations.

Mandy Colosimo of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Writing with a minor in English. Richard Colosimo of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Broadcast Communications with a minor in Public Relations. Cassidy Corah of Port Allegany, PA, received a BS degree in Chemistry with a minor in History. Matthew Covert of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Hospitality Management. Amanda Davis of Bradford, PA, received a AS degree in Nursing. Douglas Dixon of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Chemistry & Petroleum Technology. Jake Elwell of Olean, NY, received a AS degree in Petroleum Technology. Morgan Emery of Eldred, PA, received a BA degree in English & Social Sciences with minors in Anthropology & Political Science. Brittany Falconi of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Criminal Justice. Kailey Fesenmyer of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Broadcast Communications with a minor in Public Relations. Beth Freer of Eldred, PA, received a BS degree in Elementary Education. Tammy Gardner of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Human Relations with a minor in Counseling Psychology. BriAnne Gleason of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Athletic Training. Filane Godding of Bradford, PA, received a AS degree in Nursing. Brittany Good of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Social Sciences with a minor in Education (Non-teaching). Bobbie Guzan of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Criminal Justice with a minor in Sociology. Angela Hajnos of Kane, PA, received a AA degree in Liberal Studies. William Hannon of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Biology with a minor in Philosophy. Shilah Hassek of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Elementary Education. Nicole Hoffower of Smethport, PA, received a BS degree in Radiological Science. Kristine Jekielek of Kane, PA, received a AS degree in Nursing. Ashley Johnston of Eldred, PA, received a BA degree in Public Relations with a minor in Art. Brittany Keck of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Elementary Education. Blaine Kehler of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Sport & Recreation Management with a minor in Athletic Coaching. Amanda Kleps of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Public Relations with a minor in Political Science. Ashley Kloss of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Elementary Education. John Kohler of Bradford, PA, received a AS degree in Engineering Science. Susan Krainz of Bradford, PA, received a AS degree in Nursing. Nichole Krietemeyer of Mount Jewett, PA, received a BS degree in Elementary Education. Heidi LaChine of Smethport, PA, received a AS degree in Petroleum Technology. Alyssa Lapp of Port Allegany, PA, received a BS degree in Psychology with a minor in Sociology. Meghan Lindquist of Kane, PA, received a BS degree in Sports Medicine. Meagan Little of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Sociology with a minor in Athletic Coaching. James Lombardo of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Hospitality Management. Sheila Lorenzo of Kane, PA, received a BS degree in Elementary Education. Kegan Mahon of Port Allegany, Pa., received a BA degree in English. Rose Manning of Olean, NY, received a BS degree in Health and Physical Education. Lauren Marshall of Lewis Run, PA, received a BA degree in History-Political Science with a minor

in English. Ian McDonough of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Broadcast Communications with a minor in Theatre. Mackenzey McNulty of Lewis Run, PA, received a BA degree in Criminal Justice. Daniel Minich of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Business Management with a minor in Marketing. Ashley Mollander of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Radiological Science. Katelyn Morris of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Public Relations with a minor in Political Science. Doreen Neel of Bradford, PA, received a AS degree in Nursing. Debbra Nelson of Kane, PA, received a BSN degree in Nursing. Allison Patten of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Accounting. Amanda Perkins of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Sociology with a minor in Education (Non-teaching). Richard Persing of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Accounting & Business Management with minors in Economics & Finance. Kara Piganelli of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Elementary Education. Meredith Piganelli of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Criminal Justice. Brianna Price of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Criminal Justice. Shane Roush of Port Allegany, PA, received a BS degree in Business Management & Hospitality Management. Rachel Rybicki of Olean, NY, received a BS degree in Computer Information Sys & Tec. Kyle Schulze of Olean, NY, received a BS degree in Radiological Science. Leslie Shallop of Bradford, PA, received a BSN degree in Nursing. Kevin Shunk of Smethport, PA, received a BS degree in Health and Physical Education. Shannell Simms of Port Allegany, PA, received a BS degree in Sports Medicine. Michelle Sink of Kane, PA, received a BA degree in Social Sciences with a minor in Education (Non-teaching). Christie Smith of Kane, PA, received a AS degree in Nursing. Jenna Spittler of Lewis Run, PA, received a BA degree in Human Relations. Gabrielle Stephens of Westfield, PA, received a BS degree in Psychology with a minor in Sociology. Amanda Stillman of Kane, PA, received a AS degree in Nursing. Jessica Stull of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Business Management with a minor in Marketing. Colin Sullivan of Olean, NY, received a BA degree in Broadcast Communications with a minor in Theater. Daniel Taylor of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Computer Information Sys & Tec. Pamela Terrette of Port Allegany, PA, received a BS degree in Accounting & Business Management. Sarah Tipton of Bradford, PA, received a AS degree in Nursing. Megan Truman of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Sports Medicine with minors in Psychology & Education (Non-teach). Steven Trumbull of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree in Computer Information Systems and Technology. Michael Vadney of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in Broadcast Communications with minors in Speech Communication & Writing. Benjamin Walter of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in History-Political Science. Heather Ward of Bradford, PA, received a AS degree in Nursing. David Ware of Bradford, PA, received a BS degree (Continued on page 14)


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013 Page 9

Welcome To Our Stinkfest!

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Page 10 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013

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Italy Poses Following Hot Game Of Soccer

Bradford Journal Photo Italy poses with the coach following their U10 game with Mexico, April 26th. It was their final Bradford Community Soccer League match of the season. Players are (l-r), Aiden Manning 9, Justin Komidar 9, Spencer Cornelius 9, Calyb Geist 8, Bradley Eschrich 9, and Jonathan Komidar 10. Standing behind his team is Coach Kevin Sambol. (See videos in the photo gallery.)

Lightening Gets Control

Bradford Journal Photo Lightening is about to take possession of the ball during their U8 match with Avalanche, April 27th, at Fretz Middle School. This was the last day of the season for Bradford Community Soccer League indoor soccer. (See videos in the photo gallery.)


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013 Page 11

ON THE HEALTHY SIDE Healthy Summer Survival Guide

(NAPSI)—The warmer months mean social gatherings, travel and an active outdoor lifestyle. Ensure that you take the appropriate steps to stay safe and healthy this summer so you can have fun with confidence. 1. Get outside and rejuvenate your mind and body, but ensure that you give your skin a bit of TLC. Ultraviolet rays can harm your skin even when it’s cold or cloudy, so take the necessary precautions to protect your skin. Choose a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) rating of at least 15 and apply 20 to 30 minutes before going outside. 2. Exercise, also known as Mother Nature’s antidepressant, can have a direct effect on your overall mood and selfconfidence. Physical activity is also at the cornerstone of healthy aging, according to the experts at the National Institute on Aging. Move vigorously: Jog, swim, dance or garden at least 20 minutes a day, at least five days a week. Just remember to stretch your muscles first. Joining a gym can not only be a great way to get fit, it can be a good place to find new friends. Studies show socialization is vital, especially as you grow older. The National Institute on Aging adds that engaging in social and productive activities you enjoy, such as taking an art class or volunteering in the community or with your place of worship, may help maintain your well-being. Studies have also found that people involved in hobbies and other social and leisure pursuits may be less likely to develop some health problems, including dementia. They might even live longer. 3. If you drink alcohol, do so in moderation—especially on hot days. According to the National Institutes of Health, people over 65 should have no more than seven drinks a week and no more than three drinks on any one day. While there are ingredients in red wine that may be good for your health, you can get many of the same benefits from a glass of grape juice. 4. If you are a denture wearer, the idea of dentures dislodging during dinner with friends or a meeting with colleagues can be mortifying. A recent study by Wakefield Research for Fixodent revealed that 72 percent of respondents avoid some type of food because of their dentures. In fact, more than 57 percent of all respondents have ordered “denture safe” food when dining out with company. If your dentures

AICR HealthTalk

-by Karen Collins, MS, RD, CDN American Institute for Cancer Research Q: What exactly is a “plant-based diet”? I get confused about what people are specifically recommending when they talk about this. A: In general, there’s a good chance when you hear the phrase “plant-based diet” it means that the majority of what you eat comes from plant foods – vegetables, fruits, grain products, beans, nuts and seeds. Some people or groups really mean a vegetarian diet (with no meat or poultry), or even a vegan diet (with no animal products at all). A predominantly plant-based diet – whether or not it’s vegetarian – is at the heart of nutrition recommendations to promote overall health and reduce cancer risk. This allows us to get plenty of the plant foods that supply dietary fiber and antioxidant nutrients and phytochemicals, while more easily managing our weight as we fill up on foods that are not very concentrated in calories. If someone chooses to include meat, fish or dairy products, these foods play a supporting, rather than starring, role. Although highly processed foods like chips, crackers and pastries may technically be plant-based, these foods won’t provide the health benefits from whole and minimally processed foods and can lead to eating more calories than you need. So, choose a balanced, predominantly whole-foods, plant-based diet to help you reach and maintain a healthy weight.

Lots Of Soccer Action Struggle For The Ball

Bradford Journal Photo There was lots of action on the court April 27th during the final weekend of Bradford Community Soccer League under 10 play. Poland played a good game against Argentina. (See videos in the photo gallery.) don’t fit well, you should seek the care of a prosthodontist. Additionally, to help with oral hygiene and avoid potentially embarrassing slips, you should consider using a denture adhesive. Fixodent® is one such adhesive that helps seal out food particles and kills odor-causing bacteria for a clean mouth and fresh breath. With Fixodent, you can eat, drink, laugh, and go about your day knowing that your dentures will not only stay in place but give you fullmouth protection. Learn More: For helpful tips and tools on living your life to the fullest, visit the Fixodent Facebook page: www.facebook.com/Fixodent

Bradford Journal Photo During U10 play, April 26th, Italy and Mexico demonstrate that almost anything will do, in an effort to gain control of the ball. This is their final game for Bradford Community Soccer League’s indoor season. (See videos in the photo gallery.)

McCormick General Contracting Commercial & Residential

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Page 12 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013

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JUST PASSING TIME THEME: “Famous Mothers”

ACROSS: 1. Outdoes 6. Mike Tyson famously bit one 9. Strip of wood 13. Capital of Ghana 14. Bearded antelope 15. Putin’s retreat 16. Hiker’s path 17. Automated teller 18. Bother 19. *Old Mother _______ 21. *”Ma” to some “public enemies” 23. Tokyo, formerly 24. After dusk 25. Bachelor’s last words 28. Turn bad 30. Half-way across 35. Hawk or peddle 37. Croaking leaper 39. Not a soul 40. Smoothie bar offering 41. Flower part 43. *Executed mother of Queen Elizabeth I 44. Showing lack of guile 46. Home to China 47. U-____ 48. Anew

50. “The Big ____ Theory” 52. Fleur-de-___ 53. Neat 55. Red Cross supply 57. *She did her good works in Calcutta and beyond 60. *Where Wilma Flintstone lived 64. Done with a court case 65. The last letter 67. Policeman’s club in India 68. Form of theological rationalism 69. Bird-to-be 70. Trojan War epic 71. Gusto 72. Old PC platform 73. Sunrise side, pl. DOWN: 1. English town famous for its hot springs 2. Light brown or beige 3. Healing sign 4. Cherokee or Hopi, e.g. 5. Caesar and Greek, e.g. 6. Archaic expression of surprise 7. Aardvark’s crumb 8. Cuban dance 9. Thin 10. Frequent issue

for a teen 11. God of thunder 12. Cow chow 15. Make dark 20. Abode tops 22. ___ de Triomphe 24. Performs a popin 25. *Ivanka’s Mom 26. Sanka, e.g. 27.Very happy 29. Carbamide 31. Genesis skipper 32. Relating to tone 33. Boredom 34. Olden-day movies 36. Dump 38. *Mother Earth, to Ancient Greeks 42. Dishonored cyclist 45. Put on a pedestal 49. Her counterpart 51.“I swear to ___, I did not ___” 54. In a fog 56. Set of syllables commonly used when humming 57. *California’s Mother of the Forest 58. Knight’s chest plate 59. Pipe problem 60. Solicits or asks desperately

(Crossword Solution on page 15)

61. “____ Day & the Knights” from “Animal House” 62. Type of room

WORD SEEK

online and shape wood 63. *Rose Kennedy 66. “I” problem had nine of them 64. Tool used to cut


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013 Page 13

THAT’S ENTERTAINMENT! Apr. 16: Django Unchained R Haunting in Connecticut 2: Ghosts of Georgia Not Rated Dragon R

VIDEO SELECTIONS

Crazy Enough Not Rated PG Colombian Escapee Connection R R At the Gate of the Crosshairs Ghost Not Rated R Iron Man: Ben 10: Rise of Technovore Destroy All Aliens PG-13 Monster in Paris PG Not Suitable for Children Not Rated Save the Date R State of Emergency Not Rated This Is Our Time Not Rated Apr. 23: Gangster Squad R Haunted House R Promised Land R Impossible PG-13 Pawn

KENNEDY STREET CAFE

R Assassins Run R Cheech and Chong’s Animated Movie! R Thale Not Rated Pegasus vs. Chimera Not Rated Cloned: The Recreator Chronicle Not Rated Cold Prey 2 Not Rated Deep Dark Canyon Not Rated Family Weekend R God’s Country Not Rated Into the Woods Not Rated It’s In the Blood Not Rated K-11 Not Rated Apr. 30: Silver Linings Play-

book R Broken City R Guilt Trip PG-13 Details R Ben Hur Not Rated Delhi Safari PG Koala Kid PG Little Red Wagon PG

My Little Pony: Princess Twilight Sparkle Not Rated Night of the Living Dead: Resurrection R Not Fade Away R Back-up Bride Not Rated Wicked Not Rated

Solution on page 15

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Page 14 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013

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CHRONOLOGICAL LISTINGS Engagements, Marriages, Births & Deaths

ENGAGEMENTS:

MORELLI/ HOFFOWER Connie Morelli of Harrisburg, daughter of Eugene Morelli of Lafayette Township, has announced her engagement to Timothy Hoffower of Smethport, son of Mildred Hoffower of Emporium. A June 29 wedding is planned. MARRIAGES: (None) BIRTHS: APR. 20, 2013: Son, April 20, to Ashley and Christopher Cashimere, Olean, NY. APR. 22, 2013: Son, April 22, to Jake and Rhiannon Lundquist, Olean, NY. Girl, April 22, to

Bryan Hansen and Robyn Kotwicki, Olean, NY. Daughter, April 22, to Tiffany and Andrew Whipple, Olean, NY. APR. 23, 2013: Son, April 23, to Pamela and Noah Christjohn, Bradford, PA. APR. 24, 2013: Daughter, April 24, to Megan and Michael Seebaly, Bradford, PA. Daughter, April 24, to Jera and Joshua Dynda, Olean, NY. Daughter, April 24, to Autumn Palmeri and Kris Arnesen, Olean, NY. Son, April 24, to Anne and Kyle Threehouse, Allegany, NY. APR. 26, 2013: Son, April 26, to Stephanie and

Brett Morrison, Bradford, PA. Daughter, April 26, to Courtney and Justin Hand, Olean, NY. Son, April 26, to Jennifer and Andrew Randolph, Portville, NY. Son, April 26, to Kayla Williams and Nicholas Keech, Allegany, NY. Daughter, April 26, to Paige Papa and Andrew Rozler, Salamanca, NY. DEATHS: APR. 15, 2013: RICHTER, Frederick L. – 66, of Mt. Alton, PA. APR. 17, 2013: FOX, David E. – 70, of Ludlow, PA. APR. 19, 2013: HAFER, Gayle E. Reese – 69, of Coudersport, PA.

SMITH, Dale E. – 70, of Derrick City, PA. APR. 20, 2013: CLARK, ROBERT J. – 45, of Bradford, PA. SOULES, Mary J. Aiken Fitzsimmons – 97, of Eldred, PA. APR. 21, 2013: NICHOLS, David W. – 61, of Bradford, PA. MCCORD, Josephine A. Arnold – 92, of Bradford, PA. PICARELLI, Janet M. Chirillo – 67, of Kane, PA. APR. 22, 2013: BLACK, Emogene H. Baker – 82, of Buffalo, NY, formerly of Bradford, PA. JOHNSON, George A. – 71, of Kane, PA. LARSEN, Dr.

YOUR WEEKLY HOROSCOPE MAY 2 - MAY 8, 2013

ARIES - (Mar. 21 - Apr. 19) A process of change started earlier this month and is picking up pace now. TAURUS - (Apr. 20 - May 20) This pivotal week brings you an opportunity to make a decision, state your intentions and start afresh in a way you’ve wanted for some time. GEMINI - (May 21 - June 20) The coming week should help you formulate some sort of ‘profile-raising’ strategy to ensure those who don’t know of you and what you’re capable of will do so soon! CANCER - (June 21 - July 22) During the coming week, whether you’re willing to accept your mission or not, it’s time to look out for Number One and health and home matters might just be a perfect place to start, too. LEO - (July 23, - Aug. 22) Prepare for a week that could be heavy-going where the need to negotiate with a few people is concerned. VIRGO - (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22) More than one area of your world requires some form of healing process applied. LIBRA - (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22) This week, you might discover you-know-who is more aware of how they respond to you than you thought they were. SCORPIO - (Oct. 23, - Nov. 21) An issue does appear to exist surrounding how much you are giving to a certain person or cause now. SAGITTARIUS - (Nov. 22 - Dec. 20) Don’t dwell upon what you don’t have. You have something very special to hand that can bring about a fantastic change, so use it. CAPRICORN - (Dec. 21 - Jan. 19) Someone is willing for a seemingly platonic relationship to go one step further – or deeper! AQUARIUS - (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18) As the week progresses, a way of replacing chaos with optimism and excitement will present itself. PISCES - (Feb. 19 - Mar. 20) This week, if you want to make progress in a particular area close to your heart, you’ll need to act swiftly but precisely.

Richard J. – 79, of Coudersport, PA. APR. 23, 2013: SMITH, Michelle – 50, of Salamanca, NY. CONNER, Clifford M. Sr. – 75, of Ormsby, PA. APR. 24, 2013: CONFER, Michael L. – 57, of Bradford, PA.

POLUCCI, John J. Sr. – 88, of Bradford, PA. DICKERSON, Mark A. – 81, of Shinglehouse, PA. APR. 25, 2013: ANDERSON, Harry R. – 81, of Kane, PA. APR. 26, 2013: BENNETT, Leonard F. – 77, of Rixford, PA.

The Forecast Is Beautiful: New Yahoo! Weather App For Smartphones (NAPSI)—For most of us, the daily routine of getting the weather is a moment of anticipation, it’s the memory of a great place we’ve traveled to or it’s even a topic of conversation with a total stranger. Weather is so much more than a forecast of reading numbers and charts. The new Yahoo! Weather for your iPhone is a window into the places you care about most. It combines beautiful images from the Flickr community to show you current local conditions, with all the details you want to know about the forecast. With a tilt of your phone, get lost scrolling through photos reflecting the current weather in places that matter to you—kind of like flipping through a stack of postcards from your travels. Yahoo! Weather for your iPhone is launching globally in 30 languages, available for free from the App Store. Send In Your Photos: Have a great weather photo? Share it with the Flickr community to be showcased in Yahoo! Weather for iPhone and Android. For more details on how to submit your photos, check out: www.flickr.com/projectweather.

UPB Grads...

(Continued from page 8) in Applied Mathematics. Samantha Weidner of Smethport, PA, received a AS degree in Nursing. Aaron Weise of Allegany, NY, received a BS degree in Computer Information Sys & Tec. Samuel Williamson of Bradford, PA, received a BA degree in English with a minor in Philosophy. Matthew Wingard of Bradford, PA, received a AS degree in Petroleum Technology. Gui Xie of Smethport, PA, received a BS degree in Accounting. Christopher Zaffino of Kane, PA, received a BA degree in Criminal Justice.

Bradford native and venture capitalist George J. Still Jr. will addressed the graduating class of 2013.


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013 Page 15

JOURNAL CLASSIFIED ADS MISCELLANEOUS:

CARS/VANS/ TRUCKS: 2006 Nissan Pathfinder Boise Stereo, moonroof, 3rd row seating, running boards, window guards, new tires & battery. Call 3662945 or 598-2117 APARTMENTS FOR RENT: 1 Bedroom $750 1st Floor Parking Includes Utilities 814-598-1778 814-558-5404 3 Bedroom lower apt in Bradford., no pets. Please call 1-716-373-3360 Apartments on the Square. Accepting Section 8 Call 814-726-1108 Nice 1BR apt, avail. immediately. Call 716-378-2407

Take Ball Down Court

CROSSWORD SOLUTION

2008 John Deere 5425 loader, $8200, 484-727- 8167, ghessy7@juno. com 2010 Jay Feather 17 C Camper. Exc. Cond. 598-4512 PETS/SUPPLIES: Free to a quiet home: Indoor male tan/white 5 month old kitten. 814-331-6949 FOR SALE: Registered Lilac Rabbits. Male & Female (Adults). Prize winning rabbits in Harrisburg Show. $30.00 each or $50.00 for the pair. Call Sarah at: (814)203-8374, after 3 p.m. days. Anytime weekends.

SUDOKU SOLUTION

Bradford Journal Photo Everton takes the ball down court, during their U12 game with Newcastle, April 26th at Fretz Middle School. This was their last Bradford Community Soccer League indoor soccer game of the season. (See videos in the photo gallery.)

Military News

Need Fresh Cage-free Organic Eggs?

HOMES FOR RENT: 4BR, 1&1/2 BA house for rent. 366-1447

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V-NAILS

HOMES FOR SALE: Apart house for sale. 48 Elm St. Bradford. $18,000 804-556-4328 To settle Estate: 14x80, 3BR, 2BA mobile home for sale. Central air, all appliances, carport, located on rented lot in Port Allegany, Pa. 814-558-4540

Air Force Airman 1st Class Camrin J. Stuckey graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Stuckey is the son of Jeff Stuckey of Church Street, and Christa Brookens of North Main Street, both of Port Allegany. He is a 2011 graduate of Port Allegany High School.

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Page 16 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013

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SENIOR INFORMATION PAGE Five Ways Older Adults Can Be More Active By The National Diabetes Education Program (NAPSI)—As you get older, your risk for health problems, such as type 2 diabetes, increases. You also have a greater chance of getting type 2 diabetes if you have a family history of the disease. But it’s never too late to lower your risk for type 2 diabetes. Research shows that modest weight loss through healthy eating and being active can help to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in people over age 60. If you are overweight, losing 5 to 7 percent of your current body weight can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. If you weigh 200 pounds, this means a weight loss of about 10 to 14 pounds. Talk to your doctor about setting safe weight loss goals and ways to be more active. Getting Started: How to Get Moving Once you set your goals, decide what small steps you will take to get started. For example, you might say, “I will walk for 10 minutes after lunch to be more active each day” until you reach at least 30 minutes a day, five days a week. Be active, move more and sit less to help yourself lose weight or stay at a healthy weight and be more flexible and strong. Ask your health care provider how you can safely start to be more active. Before being active, be sure to warm up to get your body ready. Shrug your shoulders, swing your arms, or march in place for three to five minutes

75 Forman St Bradford, PA 362-4902 Hours: 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. Mon. - Sat. 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sundays

before you begin any activity. Five Ways to Be More Active There are many ways you can get active at little or no cost, such as walking or doing chair exercises. Find an activity you can enjoy so you can stay at it. This will make it easier to stick to your plan and reach your goals. Try these ideas: • Around the House. Things that you do every day can help you be more active. Stand up from a chair and sit down again without using your hands. Rise up and down on your toes while standing and holding on to a stable chair or countertop. When you watch TV, stretch and move around during commercial breaks. You can also walk around the house when you talk on the phone. Follow along with a video for older adults that shows you how to get active. • Around Town. Being more active can also be a great way to meet friends. Join a local walking group. Always walk in safe places such as the mall, museum or a community center. Wear shoes that fit your feet and provide comfort and support. • While Running Errands. Make getting active a part of your regular day. If it is safe, park the car farther away from stores or restaurants. If you take the bus or train-and the area is safe-get off a stop earlier and walk the rest of the way. • With Your Family. Get your family involved to make being active more

fun. Teach the younger people in your life the dances you enjoy. Plan a trip to the local pool and go for a swim together. Moving around in the water is gentle on your joints. • Get Outside. When you can, get active outside. Take care of a garden or wash your car. Enjoy a brisk walk with friends or family around a park, museum or zoo. For more tips to help prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes, download or order the “It’s Not Too Late to Prevent Diabetes. Take Your First Step Today” tip sheet or “Small Steps. Big Rewards. Your Game Plan to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: Information for Patients” booklet from the National Diabetes Education Program at www.YourDiabetesInfo.org or call 1-888-693-NDEP (6337); TTY: 1-866-569-1162. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Diabetes Education Program is jointly sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with the support of more than 200 partner organizations.

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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013 Page 17

Make Healthy Eating A Family Tradition by Chef Nikki Shaw

(NAPSI)—A legacy of healthy eating can be one of the best gifts you give your family. Like traditions, healthy recipes can be passed down from generation to generation. Choose the right ones and you’ll provide great opportunities for your family to live longer, healthier lives. The Network for a Healthy California (Network) offers a number of tips and resources to help take charge of your family’s health. By providing families with healthy recipes, the Network empowers everyone to pass down traditions of health. Try adding a few healthy and tasty recipes to your family’s legacy, starting with the delicious Oven Fried Chicken with Summer Squash from the Network’s Soulful Recipes−Building Healthy Traditions cookbook: Oven Fried Chicken with Summer Squash This recipe adds a healthy twist to a traditional meal by baking instead of Bake for 30 minutes. While the chicken frying chicken. is baking, heat oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Sauté garlic in 1 cup finely crushed cornflakes oil for about 3 minutes. Add zucchini, yellow squash and oregano; continue to ¼ teaspoon salt cook until tender, about 5 to 7 minutes. Serve each piece of chicken with 1 cup ½ teaspoon ground black pepper of zucchini and yellow squash mixture. Makes 6 servings. 1 teaspoon onion powder This recipe is lower in fat because the chicken is baked, not fried. It’s 1 teaspoon garlic powder also lower in both fat and cholesterol because it uses chicken breasts instead ½ cup evaporated skim milk of thighs. Remove the skin before 1 pound chicken breasts, skin removed, cut into 6 pieces Non-stick cooking spray ½ tablespoon vegetable oil 1 clove garlic, finely chopped 2 medium zucchinis, cut into short strips 3 medium yellow squash, cut into short strips 1 teaspoon dried oregano Place an oven rack in the middle of the oven. Preheat oven to 350°F. In a small bowl, combine cornflakes, salt, ground black pepper, onion powder and garlic powder. Place evaporated milk in a separate bowl. Dip chicken pieces in milk and roll in crushed cornflake mixture, lightly coating both sides. Spray a roasting pan with non-stick cooking spray and arrange chicken pieces on the pan in a single layer.

coating the chicken to reduce fat even more. Serve it with a side dish of sautéed squash and zucchini to ensure your family gets closer to the recommended goal of making half their plate fruits and vegetables! Celebrity Chef Nikki Shaw hosts “Today’s Flavor” on Sirius XM and was a contestant on the Food Network’s search for “The Next Food Network Star.” For more information on the Network for a Healthy California, visit www.CaChampionsForChange.net

How Miss America Stays Chic (NAPSI)—You don’t have to be Mallory Hagan to look like Miss America—or, at any rate, to dress like her. He Dresses Miss America Hagan’s favorite designer, Joseph Ribkoff, has a new collection of dresses and coordinated sportswear that features stylish dresses for every occasion, from the boardroom to the garden party, from casual to more formal, with a simple change of accessories. Highlights include wraps draped to shapely perfection, retro-style sheaths and carefree tunics. Even if you don’t travel as much as Miss America, you can enjoy travelsmart coordinated separates in easy-tocare-for fabrications. They’re colorful and comfortable, for the woman on the go. Breezy sheer tops flow over casually cropped and classic trousers, while a selection of lightweight jackets finishes off a look for effortless style. Graphic black and white join brilliant, multicolor graphic and floral prints as well as bright solids of dazzling electric

blue, ambitious orange and provocative pink. The aim of each piece: It fits, it’s figure flattering and it’s fashionable. See The Clothes To view all the current collection, go to www.ribkoff.com To find a nearby store and try them on yourself, call (800) 361-1839


Page 18 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013

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Sell Your Home: For Sale By Owner Gets A Level Playing Field (NAPSI)—In the past, selling your home for sale by owner (FSBO) meant trying to reach buyers on your own by posting a yard sign or running a classified ad. With over 80 percent of buyers using agents to find homes, however, FSBO sellers were locked out of “the club” because they could not get on the agents’ Multiple Listing Service (MLS) or on popular sites like Realtor. com. Without hiring a full-commission agent, FSBO sellers’ chances of being seen by qualified buyers were slim. Now, however, a revolution in online real estate has shifted power into the hands of FSBO sellers and leveled the playing field. There are websites that hook up sellers with agents who offer MLS listings for a low price and without any commission for the “listing agent.” The National Association of Realtors calls this “Minimal Agent Service” and, according to its latest research, flat-fee MLS listings are the fastest-growing segment of the market. “I don’t know how it could be any easier,” says Dale R. of Texas, who sold his home using the flat-fee service at Owners.com. At first he was skeptical, but within 24 hours of listing on the local MLS, he had two competing offers on his home that were over the asking price. His home was sold within three weeks. “All day the phone was ringing...there were 20 cars parked outside.”

Just remember, a seller listing on the MLS for a flat fee is responsible for showing his or her own home and negotiating directly with buyers. The flatfee agent who listed the home on the MLS is only responsible for maintaining the listing. Although listing on the MLS for a flat fee bypasses the listing agent’s commission (typically, 3 percent of the sales price), you will have to offer a commission to buyers’ brokers, which typically ranges from 2 to 3 percent. On the other

hand, if a buyer who isn’t working with an agent wants to buy your home, you are free to sell to that buyer and owe no commission to any agent. Selling “for sale by owner” might not be for everyone but it’s much easier today than it was 10 years ago. At a site such as Owners.com, you can level the playing field and get the same exposure for your property as traditional agentlisted homes. For more advice on how to sell your home or to list your home for sale, visit www.owners.com

Tips On Being Green At Home And Away (NAPSI)—Today, finding ways to be more energy efficient and eco friendly isn’t just good for the environment—it can be good for your home, your family and your bottom line. Here are hints on how: • Reduce, reuse, recycle: Take a look around—a simple mental checklist of reusable, recyclable items can make a

KENNEDY STREET CAFE 11 Kennedy Street- Ph 362-6040

Stop in for some simply

Great Food! Call Us For Catering: 814-362-6040 Let Us Cater Your Party!

world of difference with no more effort than a weekly drop-off. For example, take old books and donate them to a school or library. If you buy eggs in cartons, drop the empties off at an elementary school or after-school center to be used for art projects. If you’re renovating your home or even just planning a few small home improvement projects, remember that just about everything, from old flooring to doorknobs and light fixtures, can be repurposed by a charity if not by you. • Eat and drink your way to a healthier planet: How (and what) you eat can

make a big impact on the environment and the community. Farmers’ markets are often bursting with fresh produce. Supporting one helps preserve the vitality of community agriculture. Buying local means produce is fresher—it hasn’t been shipped from hundreds of miles away. To keep those fruits and veggies fresher longer, you can get a refrigerator with humidity-controlled crispers. Using your refrigerator’s water dispense system and a reusable bottle instead of bottled water can keep up to 300 plastic bottles a year from ending up in landfills. • Let the housework do the saving for you: New home appliances are far more efficient than older models. New washers such as the Energy Star−certified Amana 3.6-cu.-ft., high-efficiency washer use 75 percent less water and 82 percent less energy than those manufactured just a decade ago. If you’ve been considering a new washer or dryer, the good news is it could save you money on your utility bills. • Learn more: You can find additional facts on efficient appliances at www.amana.com


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013 Page 19

Ultimate Peanut Butter Brownies Buddy Valastro FAMILY FEATURES

Y

Ultimate Peanut Butter Brownies

ou might have a favorite cookie or

Prep time: 10 to 15 minutes Bake time: 30 to 40 minutes Yield: 32 brownies 4 ounces semisweet chocolate 1 cup canola or vegetable oil 2 cups sugar 4 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 2 cups M&M’S Peanut Butter Candies, divided Preheat oven to 350°F. Lightly grease a rectangular 13 x 9 x 2-inch pan In 3-quart saucepan, gently combine the semisweet chocolate and oil over very low heat until melted. Remove from heat and allow to cool. In separate bowl, combine sugar, eggs and vanilla extract until blended. Add in chocolate mixture. Slowly sift in remaining dry ingredients and mix until combined. Fold in 1 1/2 cups candies. Spread batter into pan. Sprinkle with remaining 1/2 cup candies and press lightly. Bake until brownies begin to pull away from sides of pan, about 30 to 40 minutes.

brownie recipe — but did you know you could make it even better by

adding a simple, familiar ingredient? With a few expert tips from Buddy Valastro, author and star of TLC’s “Cake Boss,” you can take your sweet treats from good to great in no time. 

Start with Quality Ingredients — When you start with better ingredients, you end up with a better cookie or brownie. Use real butter, high-quality vanilla and great tasting chocolate. Here, Buddy shares some of his favorite recipes that use M&M’S candies to add an extra special touch to family favorites — making them even better.



Chill the Dough — Leaving cookie dough in the refrigerator gives it more body and results in a fuller and better tasting cookie. Plan ahead so you can refrigerate your dough at least one hour — or, even better, overnight.



Keep It Uniform — Use a small ice cream scoop to keep your cookies the same size. This not only helps them look professional, but bake up evenly and consistently.



Amazing M&M’S Cookies Amazing M&M’S Cookies

Pans Matter — Bake cookies on light-colored, non-insulated cookie sheets without sides. Metal pans will cook brownies faster than glass pans, which means cooking times will vary. Start checking your brownies early to test if they’re ready and prevent over baking. You can find more sweet baking tips and recipes at www.facebook.com/mms.

Milk Chocolate Minis Cookies Prep time: 10 to 15 minutes Chill time: 1 hour to overnight Bake time: 7 to 12 minutes Yield: 24 to 30 cookies 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened 3/4 cup firmly packed light brown sugar 1 cup granulated sugar 2 large eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour 1/3 cup cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 3/4 cups M&M’S Milk Chocolate Minis Candies 1 cup chopped walnuts (optional) Preheat oven to 350°F. In large bowl, cream butter and both sugars until well blended. Add eggs and vanilla extract, and mix to combine. In separate bowl, sift flour, cocoa powder, baking soda and salt. Slowly add dry ingredients to butter mixture, and stir until combined. Fold in candies and walnuts, if desired. Chill dough 1 hour, or overnight. Drop dough by rounded tablespoons onto lightly greased tray, about 2 inches apart. Bake for 7 to 9 minutes for chewy cookies, or 10 to 12 minutes for crispy cookies.

Simply Sweet Cannoli

Prep time: 10 to 15 minutes Chill time: 1 hour to overnight Bake time: 8 to 14 minutes Yield: 24 to 30 cookies 1 cup (2 sticks) butter 2/3 cup brown sugar 2/3 cup granulated sugar 1 egg 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract 2 cups flour 1 1/4 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 1 3/4 cups M&M’S Milk Chocolate Candies Preheat oven to 350°F. In large bowl, cream butter and both sugars until well blended. Add egg and vanilla extract, and mix to combine. In separate bowl, sift flour, baking soda and salt together. Slowly add dry ingredients into butter mixture and stir until combined. Fold in candies and chill dough for 1 hour or overnight. Drop dough by rounded tablespoons onto lightly greased tray, about 2 inches apart. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes for chewy cookies, or 12 to 14 minutes for crispy cookies.

Simply Sweet Cannoli Prep time: 20 minutes Yield: 24 1 cup Snickers Bars, finely chopped 1 1/2 cups part skim milk ricotta 1/3 cup sugar 1/2 teaspoon grated orange zest 1 resealable plastic bag 24 mini cannoli shells, unfilled 1/2 cup M&M’S Chocolate Candies Combine chopped candy bars with ricotta, sugar and orange zest. Spoon mixture into resealable bag and snip off a 1/2-inch corner. Fill cannoli shells by squeezing in filling from each end. Decorate both ends with chocolate candies.

Milk Chocolate Minis Cookie


Page 20 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013

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Understanding Your Dog’s Ancestry (NAPSI)—If you’re like most people with a mixed-breed dog, you may sometimes be surprised at certain behaviors and wonder just what breeds make up his ancestry. After all, experts on genetics contend that the dog is, at this point, the most diverse species of mammal. The many breeds recognized today are the result of careful selective breeding for functional attributes deemed beneficial to their human owners including hunting, guarding and herding, and desirable physical characteristics such as skull shape, size, and coat variation. Genetic analyses across closely related breeds have suggested that a given breed represents a distinct genetic unit; consequently, relative genetic similarity within breeds makes the construction of definitive breed signatures a realistic proposition. An Answer Fortunately, whether yours is a designer dog, a purebred or a mutt, the guessing game of just what breed it is can be over, thanks to a convenient 3-in-1, do-it-yourself dog DNA test, owners can now identify breeds that make up a mixed- breed dog; inform the parental ancestry of a “designer” dog; or certify whether a purebred is a purebred. The test kit offers improved accuracy by testing for more than 200 breeds and varieties, covering 100 percent of American Kennel Club registered breeds. Once you’re armed with breed insights, this test can finally answer those nagging questions and may help you take better care of your pets. What The Vet Says Dr. Angela Hughes, DVM, Ph.D., veterinary genetics researcher, explains: “A dog’s ancestry can be influential in surprising ways. Obvious and not-so-obvious physical traits plus behaviors like digging, herding and barking can all come from the various breeds in a dog’s family tree. Once an owner understands a dog’s natural tendencies, it makes it possible to create a tailored training, exercise and nutrition program to fit his one-of-a-kind needs, plus it may help owners work with their veterinarians to be on the lookout for certain diseases they never would have expected.” The state-of-the-art test is based on more than 15 years of extensive research, drawing from the expertise of leading scientists, veterinarians, universities and breed organizations throughout the world. Their development included the analysis of more than 19 million DNA markers from more than 15,000 dogs covering over 200 breeds and varieties. As a result, the tests are the most complete and comprehensive products on the market and are able to detect the breed composition of a dog with unprecedented accuracy. Called

several steps you can take to be a responsible dog owner: • Avoid impulsive decisions when selecting your dog. Get a pet that’s suited to your home and lifestyle. • Keep only the type and number of pets for which you can provide appropriate food, water, shelter, health care and companionship. • Provide appropriate exercise and mental stimulation. • Properly socialize and train your dog. • Make sure your dog gets preventive health care (vaccinations, parasite control, etc.), as well as care for any illnesses or injuries. • Budget for emergencies. • Clean up after your dog. • Make sure your dog is properly identified (tags, microchips, tattoos) and keep the registration up-to-date. • Make alternate arrangements if you can no longer provide care for your dog. • Recognize any decline in your dog’s quality of life and make timely decisions in consultation with a veterinarian. What Else You Can Do For Your Learn More: The test and further Dog facts are available at www.wisdompanThe experts at the American Veteri- el.com nary Medical Foundation say there are Wisdom Panel® 2.0, the test comes from Mars Veterinary, a global leader in pet care and canine genetic breed identification. How It Works All it takes is a simple cheek swab. The kit includes all you need to administer the test at home, and you then mail in the samples in a prepaid package. You can also upload a photo of the dog for inclusion in his or her report. What You Get Within three weeks of receipt of the swab sample, you’ll get an e-mail of an official Ancestry Report revealing the dog’s genetic background, including: • Breed ancestry identification back to great-grandparents for mixed-breed dogs • Breed certification and level of genetic diversity for purebred dogs • Illustration that a dog is a true 50/50 hybrid of two purebred parents for designer dogs • Adult weight range prediction to help make appropriate nutrition and diet choices • Breed insights to help provide a better training program, understand behavior and create an effective care and wellness plan.


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013 Page 21

Welcome To Our Stinkfest!

STINKFEST 2013 Leek Cuisine America’s Native Onion!

Walk Up To

The Ramp & Bite It......... Leek Cuisine At Our Stinky Food Tables During The Stinkfest!

SATURDAY MAY 4 th 11 A.M. - 6 P.M

.

East Main Street area between S. Kendall Avenue and Fisher Ave.

Dexter Service & Collision •Inspections •Collision Work

28 Yrs Exp

•Expert Mechanical Repair 156 W. Wash. St. Bradford

Phone 814-362-3888

Big Brew Event! AT: 11 am to 3 pm

Saturday, May 4th 12 Kennedy St., Bradford, PA 814-362-9565

Personalize Your Clothing!

Bottorf Embroidery & Screen Printing 217 W. Washington Street Bradford, PA 16701

Phone 814-362-0536 www.bottorfembroidery.com

The NEW KEYSTONE 425 E. Main Street 814-362-6650

Stop At Our Stand! Try Our Great Leek Hot Dog Sauce!


Page 22 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013

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FAMILY FEATURES

tarting the day right with a good breakfast helps set the tone for your day. In fact, studies show that kids who eat breakfast have better scores on math, reading and standardized tests; are better able to pay attention; and have fewer absences and incidences of tardiness, compared to breakfast skippers. But is your breakfast the best it can be? Experts recommend 20 to 30 grams of protein at each meal, and while breakfast is typically lower in protein than other meals, it’s a particularly important time to include protein in your diet — to help you get the right start to your day. In fact, when you have your protein can be just as important as how much you have, and research suggests that spreading protein intake throughout the day — rather than just at lunch or dinner — can optimize how your body uses it, and that means making sure you include enough protein at breakfast. A protein-packed breakfast can also help you feel “healthy full” so you stave off mid-morning cravings and can stick to healthier eating throughout the day. Help your whole family start the day right and include protein in your nutritious breakfast. Try these tips to maximize protein in the AM:  Make your morning oatmeal with milk instead of water. Top with almonds for extra protein, too.  Include a glass of milk with your morning meal. An 8-ounce glass of milk has 8 grams of quality protein.  Make your own smoothie and choose your favorite frozen fruit.  Grab a latte, instead of black coffee, and pair it with peanut butter toast and some fruit for a balanced meal.  Whip up a bowl of cottage cheese topped with fruit and honey.  Create a breakfast BLT with a whole grain muffin, lean turkey bacon and lettuce and tomato. Find more ways to give your morning a boost with recipes at www.thebreakfastproject.com.

S

Hearty Oatmeal with Strawberries, Dried Cherries and Almonds Servings: 2 1 3/4 cups low fat or fat free milk 1 cup old-fashioned or quick cooking oats (not instant) 1 teaspoon brown sugar 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 cup sliced strawberries 1/4 cup dried cherries 2 tablespoons toasted sliced almonds Combine milk, oatmeal, brown sugar, and cinnamon in a saucepan; bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring often to prevent boiling over. Cook until thickened; divide between two serving bowls and top with strawberries, cherries, and almonds. Serve immediately. Nutrition: 360 calories; 6 g fat; 0 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 15 g protein; 61 g carbohydrates; 6 g fiber; 0 mg sodium; 300 mg calcium (30% of daily value). Nutrition figures based on using fat free milk.

Apple-Raisin Breakfast Quinoa Servings: 5 1 cup quinoa, rinsed according to package directions 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 cups low fat or fat free milk 1/2 cup water 3 tablespoons brown sugar 1 tart-sweet apple (such as Braeburn), chopped 1/2 cup raisins 1/3 cup chopped toasted walnuts Toast quinoa and cinnamon in a medium saucepan over medium heat, stirring often. Cook until quinoa is golden and cinnamon is fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add milk, water, and brown sugar; bring to a simmer, and cover. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook until liquid is absorbed, 20 to 25 minutes. Fold in chopped apple, raisins, and walnuts and let stand a few minutes, covered, to heat through. Serve with additional milk. Nutrition: 300 calories; 7 g fat; 0.5 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 10 g protein; 53 g carbohydrates; 4 g fiber; 5 mg sodium; 163 mg calcium (16% of daily value). Nutrition figures based on using fat free milk.

Go Green Smoothie Servings: 2 2 cups fresh spinach leaves, lightly packed 1 cup low fat or fat free milk 1/2 cup green grapes 1/2 cup honeydew melon, chopped 1/2 cup ice cubes 1 kiwi fruit, peeled and chopped 2 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon unsweetened almond butter 1 tablespoon lime juice In a blender, combine all ingredients. Cover and blend until smooth. Serve immediately. Nutrition: 240 calories; 5 g fat; 0 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 7 g protein; 45 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 90 mg sodium; 212 mg calcium (20% of daily value). Nutrition figures based on using fat free milk.

Peaches & Cream Smoothie Servings: 2 1 cup low fat or fat free milk 1 cup frozen peach slices 1/2 cup fresh mango 2 tablespoons honey In a blender, combine all ingredients. Cover and blend until smooth. Serve immediately. Nutrition: 162 calories; 0 g fat; 0 g saturated fat; 2 mg cholesterol; 5 g protein; 38 g carbohydrates; 2 g fiber; 53 mg sodium; 163 mg calcium (16% of daily value). Nutrition figures based on using fat free milk.


Page 23 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, May 2, 2013

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Make Your Driving Dollars Go Farther (NAPSI)—From daily commuting to summer road trips, the amount of time we spend driving adds up quickly…and so can travel costs. However, a few good driving habits can help put the brakes on unnecessary spending and get you on the road to savings: • Watch your speed. A faster trip may be less fuel efficient. When traveling at speeds above 50 mph, gas mileage tends to decrease rapidly. • Lose weight in your car. Every extra 100 pounds can reduce fuel efficiency by up to 2 percent, so keep your trunk clear of unnecessary items. • Find gas pumps that pay you back. Some stations, like participating BP stations, allow you to save on future fillups. With the BP Driver Rewards program, for every 20 gallons of BP fuel you purchase, with a minimum of two transactions, you can earn a 5-centsoff-per-gallon reward. It’s free to join. Rewards accumulate automatically and may be redeemed as soon as one hour from being earned-without the wait for monthly statements or additional purchases at other retailers, as many loyalty programs require. Program rewards may be redeemed toward a single fillup (up to 20 gallons), for a period of

90 days following the month in which they were earned, and may not be able to be combined with other offers. To save even more, you can use a BP Visa credit card to pay for your fuel purchases along with the BP Driver Rewards card. Visit www.bpdriverrewards.com for terms and conditions and participating locations. • Avoid idling. When parked, shut off your engine to save fuel. An idling

engine can consume up to a half gallon of fuel per hour. • Inflate for a smoother ride. Keep your tires at the proper pressure to get up to 3.3 percent better gas mileage. • Choose quality gasoline. Fill up with a quality fuel like BP gasoline with Invigorate®, which can help your car get a few more miles per tank when compared to low-detergent gasoline. When used continuously, it helps clean and protect critical engine parts from harmful deposits, so you’ll go a little farther between fill-ups. Results will vary depending on a variety of factors and in tests were more significant in older model vehicles. • Rack up a more efficient ride. Use a removable roof or bicycle rack and install it only when needed. By avoiding the extra bulk, you’ll minimize aerodynamic drag—the air and wind resistance your vehicle must overcome to accelerate and maintain a constant speed. • Cruise cautiously. Use the cruise control on long stretches of highway driving when it’s safe to do so, which can help save fuel by helping your car maintain a steady speed. Driving aggressively by rapid acceleration and braking uses more gas.

To Mom With Love (NAPSI)—Show your love for mom by looking after her health with the gift of heart-smart cooking. Try classic brunch recipes that have a heart-healthy twist, such as those from CanolaInfo’s “Mother’s May the Healthy Way” recipe collection from Ellie Krieger, M.S., R.D., host of the Cooking Channel’s “Healthy Appetite.” To lighten up her recipes, Krieger uses low-fat dairy products, whole grains and canola oil, which has the least saturated fat and most omega-3 fat of all common culinary oils. Here’s a healthier take on Eggs Benedict to warm mom’s heart: Smoked Salmon Eggs Benedict with Creamy Dill Caper Sauce Yield: 4 servings Serving size: 1 piece

whisk yogurt and canola oil until blended. Whisk in lemon juice, then stir in chopped ½ cup nonfat plain yogurt dill, capers and lemon zest. Toast English 1 Tbsp canola oil muffins. Place slice or two of salmon on 1 tsp fresh lemon juice 1 Tbsp chopped fresh dill, plus sprigs for top of each English muffin half. To poach eggs: Fill large, deep skillet about ¾ inch garnish to top with water and bring to boil over 1 Tbsp capers, drained high heat. Add vinegar, then reduce heat to ½ tsp finely grated lemon zest medium-low. Crack egg into small bowl, 2 whole-grain English muffins then gently add it to boiling water. Repeat 3 oz thinly sliced smoked salmon with remaining eggs until all four eggs are 4 medium eggs in skillet. Cook until whites of eggs are 3 Tbsp white wine vinegar set but yolks are still slightly runny, about To make sauce: In medium bowl, 3 minutes. Use slotted spoon to transfer

eggs to paper towel to drain. (Alternatively, cook eggs over easy in nonstick skillet.) Transfer each egg to salmon-topped English muffin half. Pour 2 tablespoons of sauce on top of each muffin and garnish each with sprig of dill. Nutritional Analysis per Serving: Calories: 200, Total Fat: 10 g, Satu- rated Fat: 2 g, Cholesterol: 190 mg, Sodium: 470 mg, Carbohydrates: 16 g, Fiber: 2 g, Protein: 14 g. For more recipes and culinary tips, go to www.CanolaInfo.org


Bradford Journal Issue May 2, 2013