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Bradford’s Weekly Newpaper Magazine

Bradford Journal

VOL. 172 NO. 13 BRADFORD JOURNAL/MINER THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013 www.bradfordjournal.com $1.00 Bradford Journal/McKean County Miner/Mount Jewett Echo Phone 814-465-3468

Sharks Bradford Community Soccer Team

Get The Ball Moving

Bradford Journal Photo

Bradford Journal Photo Under 6 Falcons and Bobcats soccer playThe Sharks under 6 soccer team poses for us, March 23rd following their game with the Hawks in the Fretz Middle School gymnasium. Left to right are Coach Casey Bucher, Camryn Hewitt 5, Destani Herbstritt 4, Mick Davis 6, Lilly Lasher 5, Cameron Bucher 5, and Coach Michelle Bucher. (See the videos in our photo gallery.)

ers try to get the ball moving, March 23 during Bradford Community Soccer play, at Fretz Middle School. (See the videos in our photo gallery.)

The Dragons Pose After Tough Game

INDEX

Bradford Journal Photo Coach Tim Charnisky stands behind his under 6 team, the Dragons, after a tough game with the Hornets during Bradford Community Soccer play, March 23rd, at Fretz Middle School. Players are (l-r) Matthew Galbraith 5, Gabriel Tate 6, Lance Myers 6, Isaiah Charnisky 4, Haile Jackson 6, Ethan Brien 4, and Mackysenzy Baker 5. (See the videos in our photo gallery.)

Local News/Weather 2 Comments & Opinions 3 Obituaries 4 Social News 6 Easter Shopping Buys 8 Comics 13 Classifieds 15 Word Seek/Crossword 16 Bradford Journal P.O. Box, Bradford, PA 16701 www.bradfordjournal.com Phone: 814-465-3468

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LOCAL NEWS Local Youth Learn Civic Engagement At 4-H Capital Days

Bartley, Bill Kleiner, interim associate Calvin, Director of Penn State Extension director for Penn State Extension, Maria and associate dean of the College of AgriJo Noble, Pennsylvania Dairy Princess, cultural Sciences, and Dr. Barbara Christ, Carol Schurman, 4-H extension educator interim dean of the College of Agricultur(Smethport, Pa). –49 4-H'ers from 25 in Indiana County, Sen. Elder Vogel Jr. of al Sciences. counties across the state met in Harrisburg Pennsylvania's 46th District, Dr. Dennis recently for the 49th annual Pennsylvania 4-H Capital Days, an annual citizenship awareness and civic engagement event held by Pennsylvania 4-H. Attending from McKean County was Stephanie McFall, who is on the State 4-H Council directly involved with planning the event. Capital Days is an experiential citizenship program designed to engage 4-H'ers in the political process and lead them to a better understanding of their roles as citizens of Pennsylvania. Youth learn about governmental issues and the political process; learn how to advocate and speak out about issues that affect them, their families and their communities; and gain valuable leadership and citizenship skills. “Citizenship in a national 4-H mission mandate, and civic engagement is a core 4-H value,” said Christy Bartley, Penn State Extension 4-H program leader. “Programs like this one prepare our youth to be active, engaged citizens in their communities.” Delegates participated in workshops on parliamentary procedure, party roles and affiliations, advocacy, etiquette and community service. They also learned how to Bradford Journal Photo read and debate a bill and participated in a mock legislative session. Each year, bills Following Bradford Community Soccer play at Fretz Middle School, March 23rd, the that are currently under debate in the Gen- under 6 Hawks team members pose with their coaches. Players are (l-r) Aiden Abbott eral Assembly are chosen, and this year 5, Hayden Cobb 5, Nicholas Kriz 5, Bryttan Smith 5, Kadence Martin 6, Kyla Brady 5, and Ethan Lundgren 5. On the left is Coach Casey Abbott, and on the right is Coach the bill addressed texting while driving. Delegates toured the Capitol and had Rob Lundgren. (See the videos in our photo gallery.) their photograph taken on the Rotunda steps. State Secretary of Agriculture George Greig and state Rep. Scott Conklin addressed the group prior to the tour. The 4-H'ers also hosted a legislative breakfast, where they had the opportunity to talk with their legislators one-on-one and tell their 4-H stories. In addition, three speakers told their own stories during the breakfast. Additional speakers included Christy

Under 6 Hawks Soccer Team Poses For Us

THE BRADFORD AREA 5-DAY WEATHER FORECAST

Thursday, Mar. 28: Chance of snow showers this morning, then becoming cloudy. High of 36°. Thursday Night: Mostly cloudy tonight. Low of 24°.

Friday, Mar. 29: Mostly cloudy today with a chance of rain or snow showers. High of 38°. Friday Night: Mostly cloudy tonight with a chance of rain or snow showers. Low of 25°.

Saturday, Mar. 30: Partly sunny and warmer today with a high of 41°. Saturday Night: Partly cloudy early then becoming mostly clear overnight. Low of 26°.

Sunday, Mar. 31: Partly sunny and warmer today with a high of 46°. Sunday Night: Rain tonight, becoming icy late. Overnight low of 29°.

Monday, Apr. 1: Mix of snow, ice, and rain this morning followed by rain in the afternoon. High of 38°. Monday Night: Evening snow flurries with a low of 22°.

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5 ¢ENTS WORTH

by Grant Nichols

Last Saturday, during Bradford Community Soccer Club action at Fretz Middle School, we followed three more soccer matches- this time with the under 6 group children: Sharks vs. Hawks, Dragons vs. Hornets and Falcons vs. Bobcats. While we missed the fourth “under 6 team”, Lizards vs. Bulldogs game, the plan is to pick them up over the following weeks. Our readers should note that we took a couple of pictures during each of the games that show action on the court along with team photos taken after the matches. We also took an approximately three minute video movie during each of the matches that can be seen in the photo gallery associated with this issue. For soccer enthusiasts who may be watching as our weekly game coverage progresses, we should also mention that there will be no games played during school Spring vacation and therefore no soccer photos in our next issue……..Should renters and home owners around town be looking for new places to live! During a recent council meeting the Office of Economic and Community Development (O.E.C.D.) announced their intention to raze homes built before the 1950’s that had not been well maintained and that were in various states of disrepair. A concerned local citizen called us with the following question: “By whose standards will a home be considered grist for the wrecking ball”……..

These days, a good deal of space across all forms of literature is devoted to the condition of the minds of older people. And while much of it concerns the lessoning of cognitive abilities and emotional instabilities in our older folk, it would do us all well to consider the source- the marketing departments of the medical and pharmaceutical industries, and research institutions in need of grant money for highly publicized health issues. For medical diagnosis and treatment to become a product for this industry, there must be a perception by society that a discreet particular disease exists and deserves attention. In the old days the golden years entailed forgetfulness, momentary confusion, or lapses of memory (Where are my keys, where’s my coat, where’s my car, and where am I heading). Today it seems we are all doomed to dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and everything in between. From our point of view, the young people pointing to the shortcomings of their elders, the ones who are forever looking for their cell phones, cell phone adaptors, wallets, and their heads in general, should be getting a little more attention for symptoms that have similar, but age specific characteristics.

It’s A Matter Of Opinion... Guest Columnist “Term Limits ” -by Bob Perry Our forefathers never envisioned congress as it has turned out. Had they known that life expectancy would more than double and some people wanting to control everything, term limits would have been created along with a different formulae for age qualifications for aspirants. Left to their own devices, members of Congress will never create term limits for the House and/or the Senate. Just what is reasonable for term limits is debatable, but that which we have now is not acceptable. Our forefathers envisioned that representatives would convene for a period to make needed law limited to that which is defined by the Constitution and return home to earn a living. Today representatives seek a continuous position which provides them with income and benefits for life. There is NO question that Congress has been violating the Constitution by making law in numerous areas that was defined to be that business reserved for the states. As I have argued numerous times, Congress is failing in their deliberations to consider the constitutionality of legislation and the president has failed as well by

signing passed legislation into law without the same consideration. I think that some reasonable length of terms could be reached for both the House and Senate which prevents anyone from realizing living their life in Washington. As for the House, a limit of 3 consecutive and a lifetime limit of 6 terms might be considered. As for the Senate, a limit of 3 consecutive and a lifetime limit of 5 terms might be considered. Clearly, whenever possible as in the gun control controversy, the members of Congress who have seniority reach up on the shelf and pull down all the plans they have assembled over time and do their very best to create legislation they insist will solve the issue at hand. Rarely works! For example, Senator Ted Kennedy, who served 47 years in the House (8 terms), worked trying to pass universal health care seemingly forever until he dies at the age of 77. The Affordable Act includes a fair amount of what he had on the shelf. Is that working? The ongoing gun control legislation started out as an effort to reduce the carnage in shootings like the one that happened in Newtown, MA., but congress pulled all they had on the shelf and pressed for passing gun restrictions that have nothing to do with stopping shootings. Without term limits we face gridlock in Washington with a lot of ranking representatives playing politics using seniority and committee chairmanships to allow and disallow their favorite ideas to live or die. We do need term limits to create more opportunity to make it to elected office as well as living out the vision of our forefathers.

Hornets Pose After Saturday Soccer Match

Bradford Journal Photo The Hornets under 6 Bradford Community Soccer team poses for a photo after their game with the Dragons, March 23rd at Fretz Middle School. Players (l-r) are Ethan Rochna 6, Miley Swanson 4, Aiden Yeager 6, Cameron Pysher 5, and Trenton Johnson 5. Standing behind their team are Coach Pat Swanson on the left, and Coach Wes Lohrman on the right. (See the Videos in our photo gallery.)


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OBITUARIES Bennett Friedman, 89, long-time lawyer, dies Local attorney Bennett B. Friedman, 89, passed away on Sunday (March 17, 2013). He was born June 30, 1923. Prior to becoming ill, Mr. Friedman had been practicing law in Bradford for more than 50 years. He attended the University of Michigan and later transferred to and graduated from Harvard University. His education was interrupted by World War II when he enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1943 and was discharged on Feb. 10, 1946, after serving in the

7th Army as an interpreter for the questioning of Reichsmarshall Hermann Goering after the fall of Germany. Following his discharge from the U.S. Army, he attended and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1949. He was admitted to the Pennsylvania Bar on Nov. 14, 1949, to the Federal District Court, Western District of Pennsylvania, on Feb. 12, 1951, to the U.S. Supreme Court on Oct. 20, 1958, and to the New York Bar on Feb. 19, 1996. He was also legal counsel for the new Bradford Area Public Library and the upgrading of

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runways at Bradford Area Regional Airport. Mr. Friedman was also a president of the Bradford School Board on which he served from 1964 to 1973. He served on the Selective Service board for 15 years. He is survived by a niece, Nancy Stein Elman of Pittsburgh. Burial was in Willow Dale Cemetery.

Peggy Kelly Peggy Z. Kelly, 84, of 234 Constitution Ave., Bradford, passed away Sunday (March 17, 2013) at Bradford Regional Medical Center. Born June 5, 1928, in Bradford, she was a daughter of Frank J. and Mae F. Beckwith Zenner. On Sept. 27, 1947, in St. Bernard Church, she married Francis B. Kelly, who died on June 21, 2009. She had been

employed as a customer service representative for more than 30 years and retired from Penn Bank. She is survived by a daughter, Bonnie K. Kelly of Bradford; a son, Bernard F. Kelly of Midwest City, Okla.; one granddaughter; and several nieces and nephews. Burial was in St. Bernard Cemetery.

Gerald Kohler Gerald D. “Jerry” Kohler, 69, of 2 Bushnell St., passed away Saturday (March 16, 2013) surrounded by his loving family at Select Specialty Hospital in Erie. Born March 28, 1943, in Bradford, he was a son of the late Gerald S. Kohler and Helen Layfield Onuffer. He was formerly married to Nancy Holden Kohler, who survives. Jerry was employed at Werzalit

of America for many years and later as a route driver for DHL. Burial was in McKean Memorial Park, Lafayette.

Helen Arick Helen L. Arick, 86, loving mother and grandmother, of 193 Constitution Ave., Bradford, passed away Sunday (March 17, 2013) at Bradford Regional Medical Center surrounded by her loving family. Born Dec. 31, 1926, in F r a n k l i n v i l l e , N.Y., she was a daughter of the late Edward L. and Iva Ehman Boyer. On Feb. 1, 1947, in St. Bernard Rectory, she married Thomas E. Arick, who died on March 3, 2009. Mrs. Arik had been a clerk for Olson’s Department Store and a bookkeeper for Greer & Aleci Jewelry Store and at South Penn Oil Co. During World

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War II, she worked in the office at Dresser Manufacturing. She had been employed for many years at Airco Speer, from where she retired. Surviving are two daughters, Colleen (Pat) Scrivo of Derrick City and Kimberly (Dave) Soble of Bradford; two sons, Scott (Janice) Arick of New Kensington and Shane (Martha) Arick of Panama City Beach, Fla.; 10 grandchildren: three grandsons, Bryan Scrivo, Bradford Arick and Matthew Musolino; and eight granddaughters, Ashley Scrivo, Corinne Soble, Erica Soble, Danielle Soble, Nicole Arick, Christine Arick, Amanda Arick and Lindsey Arick; one brother, Donald Boyer Sr. of Rew; and several nieces and nephews. Burial will be in St. Bernard Cemetery. USPS-062-740 Postmaster: Send address changes to: Bradford Journal P.O. Box 17 Bradford, PA 16701-0017 Phone: 814-465-3468 Copy Deadline: Noon Saturday Published every Thursday at 69 Garlock Hollow. Bradford, PA 16701, Except for the third Thursday in the month of June. Subscription In Advance (By U.S. Mail) Yearly/$50.00 Within County Yearly/$68.00 Outside County Internet Color Version $15.00 yearly Email Color Version $26.00 yearly

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Grant Nichols Publisher Debi Nichols Editor Don Poleteo Military Correspondant Periodical postage paid at USPS Bradford, PA 16701-9998


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BUSINESS & PERSONAL FINANCES

Maximize Your Disabled Child’s Government Aid -by Jason Alderman Parents of special needs children have enough on their plates just tending to the health, educational and emotional needs of their kids – not to mention often having to cope with drastically lowered income because of reduced work hours or having to pay someone else for childcare. So it’s not surprising that many of these parents haven’t had time to hatch a long-term financial plan in case their kids need care after they’re not around. Fortunately, many government programs and community resources are available to help relieve the financial burden of parenting special needs children. But eligibility criteria are complicated and the application process time-consuming. Plus, if you’re not careful, you or well-meaning relatives could inadvertently disqualify your kids for future benefits by not structuring their inheritances correctly. Here’s a brief overview of key government assistance programs: The Social Security Administration provides two types of disability coverage: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Income (SSDI). Rules and eligibility requirements differ between the two programs – and benefits differ for children and adults. In a nutshell, SSI is a needs-based, cash-assistance program for disabled people of any age in low-income families with limited resources. Children qualify for SSI benefits if they meet certain strict criteria outlined in SSA Publication 0511000 (www.ssa.gov/pubs/11000.html). SSDI is a separate program funded by payroll deductions (part of FICA). Although children sometimes receive SSDI payments if their parents are disabled, their eligibility is based on their parents’ disability status, not on their own. However, after turning 22, already disabled children may qualify for SSDI on their own if at least one parent qualifies for Social Security benefits. Eligibility rules and definitions for SSI and SSDI are complex. To see if your child qualifies, call Social Security at 1-800772-1213, or search the Disability and SSI tabs at www.ssa.gov. One particularly helpful resource is “Benefits for Children with Disabilities,” SSA Publication No. 05-10026. Many families inadvertently jeopardize their disabled child’s eligibility for government-provided benefits by opening accounts in the child’s name or designating them as beneficiaries. Unfortunately, federal law dictates that recipients of SSI, Medicaid and many state assistance programs will be disqualified if they have resources worth over $2,000. So, if Uncle

Jerry leaves your daughter $10,000 in his will, she could lose her benefits. One good alternative is to create a special needs trust, whose assets can be used by its trustee to manage the finances and personal effects of a disabled person. Trusts are governed by state laws and should only be drafted by an attorney familiar with this area of law. Some parents name the trust as beneficiary of life insurance policies to ensure a source of funding if they die before their child. (Stay current on your premiums.) Other possible funding sources include

cash, stocks and other investments, retirement plan death benefits, home sale proceeds and inheritances from other relatives and friends. Just make sure that the trust –not the child – is named beneficiary. Preparing a special needs trust can be expensive – possibly several thousand dollars, depending on your situation. But weigh that against the prospect of your child losing out on a lifetime of government-provided benefits because of an accidental inheritance – speaking of which, be sure to let any well-meaning relatives or friends know about the trust.

Lots Of Little Bobcat Soccer Players

Bradford Journal Photo The Bobcats under 6 Bradford Community Soccer team poses for us at Fretz Middle School, March 23rd after their game with the Falcons. Players from left to right are Cooper McGee 5, Enzo Aiello 5, Raelin Meacham 6, Keira McGee 6, Margaret Graffius 6, Garett Moore 5, Jacob Abers 5, Andrew Giordano 5, and Tayton Ludwig 5. Coach Brian McGee stands behind his team. (See the videos in our photo gallery.)

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AREA SOCIAL NEWS Bradford Area Calendar of Events:

Bradford Community Soccer Falcons Pose

MARCH 2013: MAR. 28 - APR. 2: Spring Break No School Bradford Area School District MAR. 29: 50’s Night 6-10pm Myers Steakhouse & Inn, 460 Wildwood Avenue, Salamanca, NY 14779. For more information, contact Myers Steakhouse & Inn at 716-9453153.

APRIL 2013: APR. 1-2: Spring Break No School Bradford Area School District

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Bradford Community Soccer under 6 Falcons team poses March 23rd, after their game with the Bobcats at Fretz Middle School. Players are (l-r) Madison Rimer 5, Hunter Hile 5, Joseph Cary 6, Caliana Windsor 6, Rylan Manning 6, Grace Close 6, and Rowan Kriner 6. On the left is Coach Steve Kriner, and on the right is Coach Chris Manning. (See the videos in our photo gallery.)

BIRTHS

Bradford TOPS #16

Daughter, March 16, to Jackie Krouse and Frederick Angell II, Bradford, PA. Son, March 18, to Francesca and Ryan Keck, Port Allegany, PA. Son, March 18, to Michelle Fillhart, Bradford, PA. Son, March 21, to Natasha Skaggs, Bradford, PA. Son, March 21, to Valerie Weaver, Bradford, PA.

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-article submitted The weekly meeting of Top’s #16 was held Thursday,March 21st at The First Presbyterian Church. The meeting was called to order by Leader Vickie Johnson with 34 members weighing with a loss of 37 1/4 . Best Loser and Officer of the Week was Vickie Johnson. Best Loser in Waiting were Betty Austin, Martha Williams, Vickie Johnson, Pat Foote & Jamie Larson. The inspiration was given by Bev Hannon:“Give yourself another chance at something, you deserve it”. This week’s Household Hint was: “For marshmallows that are stuck together take confections sugar or corn starch and coat them to unstick them. To prevent them sticking together store in refrigerator in an air tight plastic bag or container. The Fashion Tipgiven by Sue Della Valle. was: “For a zipper that sticks, take a clear lip gloss and rub on the teeth to lubricant the metal so it moves easier” The healthy tips were given by Elaine Harris. The program was given by Dan Minich from the YMCA and he talked about all the Y has to offer for everyone and Seniors. The meeting was adjourned with the Friendship circle and the Top’s Prayer.

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Tips For Soothing A Fussy Baby (NAPSI)—The next time a crying baby practically has you in tears, don’t despair. First, remember, all babies cryit’s how they communicate. Next, realize that constant crying may be colic, and a visit to the pediatrician may be in order. Finally, consider these tried-andtrue ways to soothe an infant. What To Do • Bath time. A warm bath helps many babies to calm down. • Music soothes. Playing soft music or singing lullabies can help. • Move it. Sometimes a brief excursion and some fresh air will do the trick. • Talk the talk. Talk to your baby in a soothing voice, carrying her from room to room. Point out the decorations. Show her the baby in the mirror. • Go for a drive. Some babies find the car so soothing that it’s the only place they’ll fall asleep. Gas may be expensive but your peace of mind is probably worth a drive around the block. • Turn on a fan or noise machine. The white noise effect is similar to a pregnant belly and could calm your little one down. • It’s a wrap. Swaddle your baby up in a light blanket with her arms across her chest. Swaddled babies often sleep longer and more soundly. • Check the thermostat. Your baby

could be too hot or too cold. • Make it swing time. Babies love the soft, soothing motions of infant swings, and these are often the best way to get your baby to stop crying and go to sleep. To help, Graco has reinvented the swing with a new gliding motion, inspired by the gentle back and forth that moms use while comforting baby in their nursery glider rocker. Every baby is unique, so parents can customize the vibration, swing speed and melodies with optional plug-in, plus they have a five-point harness for peace of mind that their baby is secure. Graco’s Glider family of swings offers parents several options from which

to choose—from a lightweight petite version up to a 2-in-1 high-end elite, and several versions in between. The full-size Glider swings boast ingenious frame designs that use 40 percent less space than other leading full-size swings, giving parents more space. All are lightweight and portable, with a roomy seat combined with plush body for support and three recline positions. So the next time a crying baby is getting the best of you, remember these simple tips—and some great new products—and you’ll be well on your way to enjoying a blissful sound for new moms and dads: the quiet of a happy baby. Where To Learn More: You can find additional information about gliders online at: www.gracobaby.com/gliders


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Common Myths Of Organ Donation:

There is a severe organ shortage in this country. Despite continuing efforts at public education, misconceptions and inaccuracies about donation persist. It’s a tragedy if even one person decides against donation because they don’t know the truth. Following is a list of the most common myths along with the actual facts: Myth: If emergency room doctors know you’re an organ donor, they won’t work as hard to save you. Fact: If you are sick or injured and admitted to the hospital, the number one priority is to save your life. Organ donation can only be considered after brain death has been declared by a physician. Many states have adopted legislation allowing individuals to legally designate their wish to be a donor should brain death occur, although in many states Organ Procurement Organizations also require consent from the donor’s family. Myth: When you’re waiting for a transplant, your financial or celebrity status is as important as your medical status. Fact: When you are on the transplant waiting list for a donor organ, what really counts is the severity of your illness, time spent waiting, blood type, and other important medical information. Myth: Having “organ donor” noted on your driver’s license or carrying a donor card is all you have to do to become a donor. Fact: While a signed donor card and a driver’s license with an “organ donor” designation are legal documents, organ and tissue donation is usually discussed with family members prior to the donation. To ensure that your family understands your wishes, it is important that you tell your family about your decision to donate LIFE. Myth: Only hearts, livers, and kidneys can be transplanted. Fact: Needed organs include the heart, kidneys, pancreas, lungs, liver and intestines. Tissue that can be donated include the eyes, skin, bone, heart valves and tendons. Myth: Your history of medical illness means your organs or tissues are unfit for donation. Fact: At the time of death, the appropriate medical professionals will review your medical and social histories to determine whether or not you can be a donor. With recent advances in transplantation, many more people than ever before can be donors. It’s best to tell your family your wishes and sign up to be an organ and tissue donor on your driver’s license or an official donor document. Myth: You are too old to be a donor. Fact: People of all ages and medical histories should consider themselves potential donors. Your medical condition at the time of death will determine what organs and tissue can be donated. Myth: If you agree to donate your organs, your family will be charged for the costs. Fact: There is no cost to the donor’s family or estate for organ and tissue donation. Funeral costs remain the responsibility of the family. Myth: Organ donation disfigures the body and changes the way it looks in a casket. Fact: Donated organs are removed surgically, in a routine operation similar to gallbladder or appendix removal. Donation does not change the appearance of the body for the funeral service. Myth: Your religion prohibits organ donation. Fact: All major organized religions approve of organ and tissue donation and consider it an act of charity. Myth: There is real danger of being heavily drugged, then waking to find you have had one kidney (or both) removed for a black market transplant. Fact: This tale has been widely circulated over the Internet. There is absolutely no evidence of such activity ever occurring in the U.S. While the tale may sound credible, it has no basis in the reality of organ transplantation. Many people who hear the myth probably dismiss it, but it is possible that some believe it and decide against organ donation out of needless fear.

Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, March 28, 2013 Page 9

April Is National Donate Life Month At this moment, between 30,000 and 40,000 Americans are suffering from kidney disease so serious that the only remedy would be a transplanted kidney. Yet fewer than one-third of those patients will receive a transplant. Most people ignore patients in need of a transplant. Those potential donors simply refuse to consider donating a kidney even though all they would have to do is sign a card declaring their willingness to become an organ donor in the event of their death. Cards are available at the National Kidney Foundation at (800) 622-9010. Physicians match kidney-disease patients with available organs according to blood and tissue type. Anyone who signs a card should be sure to inform his or her family, because doctors will need their consent at the time of the donation. Healthy donors can donate a kidney while they are alive if a relative or friend is in need. In fact, transplants involving healthy donors have the highest rate of success. Unfortunately, of the more than 36,000 people needing transplants, only 11,099 actually received them- because of the acute shortage of donors. As a result, many patients died. The problem has been worsening in past decades as statistics show. In 1988, a total of 739 patients died awaiting a kidney transplant, and 750 died the next year. The death toll continued to rise through 1996 from 917 deaths in 1990 to approximately 1900 deaths in 1996. In many cases, kidney transplantation is the best treatment option. When transplanted kidneys come from healthy donors, operations are successful more than 70 percent of the time, and recovering patients can look forward to a near-normal life span.

THIS MESSAGE BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FOLLOWING BUSINESSES:

Organ Transplantation & Donation Facts:

*People of all ages and medical histories should consider themselves potential donors. Your medical condition at the time of death will determine what organs and tissue can be donated. *On average, 110 people are added to the nation’s organ transplant waiting list each day--one every 13 minutes. *Organs and tissues that can be donated include: heart, kidneys, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, corneas, skin, tendons, bone, and heart valves. *On average, 70 people receive transplants every day from either a living or deceased donor. *There is no national registry of organ donors. Even if you have indicated your wishes on your drivers’ license or a donor card, be sure you have told your family as they will be consulted before donation can take place. *More than 87,000 people are on the nation’s organ transplant waiting list. Almost 700 of them are 5 years old or younger. *All major religions approve of organ and tissue donation and consider donation the greatest gift. *On average, 18 patients die every day while awaiting an organ, simply because the organ they needed did not become available in time. *An open-casket funeral is possible for organ and tissue donors. Related Internet Sites Coalition on Donation www.donatelife.net National Marrow Donor Program www.marrow.org

American Red Cross (blood and tissue donation) www.redcross.org The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network Operated by UNOS under contract with HRSA. www.optn.org U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Web site for Organ Donation www.organdonor.gov


Page 10 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, March 28, 2013

Dragons Move Ball

Bradford Journal Photo The Dragons under 6 soccer team takes ball down court during their Bradford Community Soccer match against the Hornets. The game was held March 23rd at Fretz Middle School. (See the Videos in our photo gallery.)

Fighting For The Ball

Bradford Journal Photo Dragons and Hornets under 6 soccer teams kick away, trying to take control of the ball, March 23 during Bradford Community Soccer play at Fretz Middle School. (See the Videos in our photo gallery.)

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Racing For The Ball

Bradford Journal Photo During Bradford Community Soccer Club play, March 23rd, members of the under 6, Sharks and Hawks teams race to the ball. Club matches are held every Saturday in the Fretz Middle School gymnasium. (See the videos in our photo gallery.)


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, March 28, 2013 Page 11

ON THE HEALTHY SIDE Get Your Nutrition Advice From The Experts (NAPSI)—Here’s food for thought: All registered dietitians (RDs) are nutritionists—but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. It’s an important distinction that can matter a great deal to your health. That’s one reason that, to strengthen the link between the science of dietetics and the overall wellness aspects of nutrition, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the Commission on Dietetic Registration gave all registered dietitians a chance to use a new credential, “registered dietitian nutritionist” (RDN). This new credential helps directly convey the nutrition aspects of the training and expertise of RDs to consumers. Registered dietitians and registered dietitian nutritionists must meet stringent academic and professional requirements, including earning at least a bachelor’s degree, completing a supervised practice program and passing a registration examination. RDs and RDNs must also complete continuing professional education requirements to maintain registration. More than half of all RDs and RDNs have also earned master’s degrees or higher. They translate nutrition science into practical and applicable ways for people to bring nutritious foods into their daily lives and give people the tools to make realistic eating behavior changes. RDs’ and RDNs’ expertise in nutrition and health is more extensive than that of any other health profession and has been recognized as such by Congress as well as federal health agencies like the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Registered Dietitians Help Your Health Numerous scientific studies found that medical nutrition therapy provided by a registered dietitian can lower health costs, decrease hospital stays and improve health. Medical nutrition therapy provided by an RD includes: • A review of what you eat and your eating habits • A thorough review of your nutritional health • A personalized nutrition treatment plan. You can ask your doctor if a referral for medical nutrition therapy provided by an RD or RDN is right for you. Learn More: For more information about what RDs and RDNs can do for you, and to find a registered dietitian or registered dietitian nutritionist nearby, visit www.eatright.org

AICR HealthTalk

-by Karen Collins, MS, RD, CDN American Institute for Cancer Research

Q: Do recommendations to avoid processed meat in order to help prevent cancer refer to ground turkey, chicken and beef? A: Although grinding meat or poultry is a form of processing, the link between processed meat and colorectal cancer does not refer to fresh meat ground up for burgers or casseroles. The types of processed meat that studies convincingly link to colorectal cancer risk include meat and poultry that is smoked, salted, cured or contains added preservatives (such as nitrites). Processed meat refers to choices such as bacon, sausage, ham, hot dogs and bologna. In addition to its link to colon cancer, processed meat is often high in sodium, increasing risk of high blood pressure, and it is also linked to risk of type 2 diabetes. You don’t need to be as cautious with fresh ground meat. However, fresh red meat – which refers to beef, lamb and pork – whether it is solid (like a steak or roast) or ground (like meatloaf or hamburger) is linked to colorectal cancer risk when consumed in amounts beyond 18 ounces per week. You don’t want to exceed that amount, even getting the extra lean version, because red meat’s heme iron content is what seems to pose the risk. If you’re eating ground meat beyond 18 ounces per week, switch some or all of it to lean (7% fat or less) ground turkey or ground chicken. If you’d like further information about red and processed meat, you might like to check this free brochure from the American Institute for Cancer Research: The Facts About Red and Processed Meat.

More Than Lip Service

(NAPSI)—Star athlete and Olympic gold medal winner Misty May-Treanor has some advice for the 80 million Americans who develop cold sores: “Don’t tough it out, knock it out.” “I’ve gotten cold sores for as long as I can remember, and have been using Abreva for about that long. I like it because it gets the job done fast. I try to use it as soon as I feel the first tingle of a cold sore.” Abreva, the number one pharmacist recommended over-the-counter cold sore treatment, speeds healing like a prescription but without one. It penetrates deep to the root of cold sores and helps block the spread of the virus to healthy cells. “Other ‘look-alike’ cold sore treatments claim to heal cold sores as fast as Abreva and may even imitate the packaging, but Abreva is the only over-the-counter medication approved by the FDA that is proven to shorten healing time and duration of a cold sore,” said Pam Marquess, Pharm.D, pharmacist, pharmacy chain owner. Marquess says common triggers of cold sores include fatigue, stress, cold weather, ultraviolet (UV) rays, hormonal changes, trauma to your mouth or lips, and a fever, a cold or the flu.

Bob Cats On The Ball

Bradford Journal Photo During regular Bradford Community Soccer play at Fretz Middle School, March 23rd, the Bobcats are on the ball. They were playing the Falcons. (See the videos in our photo gallery.)


Page 12 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, March 28, 2013

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FAMILY FEATURES

athering the entire family around the table for meals or snack time is a great way to stay connected and enjoy time together. You can keep that family time fun by mixing up the menu and preparing quick and tasty meals together. Here are some easy ways to bring smiles to the table every day:  Make breakfast together. Whether it’s PB & J French Toast on a weekend morning or topping everyone’s favorite cereal with fruit before school, there are plenty of delicious ways for the entire family to rise and smile. And working together to put some breakfast magic on the table makes it even more special. Kids can spread peanut butter and jelly, wash fruit, set the table or help pour milk and juice.  Serve something unexpected. Use familiar ingredients in unexpected ways. These recipes, for example, take Honey Bunches of Oats Greek Honey Crunch cereal out of the bowl and into some tasty treats like Creamy Orange-Vanilla Squares or Rainforest Chewy Bars. Made with whole grains, and two unique granolas with real Greek yogurt, it adds a crispy, tangy element the entire family will love. Cereal can also be used in meatloaf and casseroles, and as breading on baked chicken fingers or mozzarella sticks.  Get creative with snack time. Change up the usual snacks for something different. Chocolate-dipped frozen bananas, yogurt parfaits, or these Caramel Balls are all kid-friendly snacks that little hands can help make. You can find more smile-worthy recipes at www.honeybunchesofoats.com.

G

PB & J French Toast

Creamy Orange-Vanilla Squares

Total Time: 25 minutes Makes: 4 servings 8 slices whole wheat, white or cinnamon raisin bread 1/4 cup peanut butter 3 tablespoons strawberry jam 2 eggs 2 tablespoons milk 2 1/2 cups Honey Bunches of Oats cereal, crushed 2 cups sliced fresh fruit, such as strawberries and/or bananas 1 tablespoon sifted powdered sugar 1/2 cup maple syrup Preheat oven to 350°F. Spread each of 4 bread slices with 1 tablespoon peanut butter and about 2 teaspoons of jam. Cover with remaining bread slices to make 4 sandwiches. Break eggs into shallow dish. Add milk and beat with wire whisk for 30 seconds. Place crushed cereal in pie plate. Dip each sandwich into egg mixture, then into cereal, turning to evenly coat both sides. Press cereal gently into bread to secure. Place on lightly greased baking sheet. Bake 20 minutes or until golden brown. Cut each sandwich diagonally in half; top with fruit. Sprinkle with powdered sugar. Serve with syrup.

Total Time: 3 hours, 45 minutes Makes: 16 servings 2 cups Honey Bunches of Oats Greek Honey Crunch cereal, divided 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) margarine, melted 1 8-ounce package Neufchatel cheese, softened 1 cup sugar 2 eggs 2 tablespoons flour 1/4 teaspoon baking powder 1 tablespoon grated orange peel 1/4 cup fresh orange juice Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray 8-inch square baking pan with cooking spray; set aside. Place 1 3/4 cups cereal in food processor; process until finely crushed. Mix with margarine; press onto bottom of prepared pan. Set aside. Beat Neufchatel cheese and sugar with electric mixer until well blended. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing well after each addition. Blend in flour, baking powder, orange peel and juice; pour over crust. Bake 25 to 30 minutes or until center is set. Sprinkle with remaining 1/4 cup cereal; press gently into top of dessert to secure. Cool completely. Cover and refrigerate several hours or until chilled. Cut into squares to serve. Store leftovers in refrigerator. Special Extra: Sprinkle with 2 teaspoons powdered sugar just before serving.

Caramel Balls

Rainforest Chewy Bars

Total Time: 15 minutes Makes: 7 servings 20 caramels 1 tablespoon water 2 cups Honey Bunches of Oats Greek Honey Crunch cereal, divided Microwave caramels and water in medium microwavable bowl on high 1 1/2 to 2 minutes or until caramels are completely melted. Stir in 1 1/2 cups of the cereal. With hands slightly moistened with cold water, shape cereal mixture into 21 small balls, each about 1 inch in diameter. Crush remaining 1/2 cup cereal; place in shallow dish. Roll cereal balls in cereal until evenly coated. Tip: If kids help out in the kitchen, teach them about food safety. In addition to washing hands thoroughly before starting, make sure long hair is pulled back. When shaping food by hand, caution children not to lick their fingers or put their hands in their mouths during preparation.

Total Time: 10 minutes Makes: 24 servings 1/4 cup honey 2 tablespoons butter 1 10-ounce package marshmallows (about 36 marshmallows) 6 cups Honey Bunches of Oats Greek Honey Crunch cereal 1 cup dried apricots, raisins or dried cranberries chopped 1 cup almonds, chopped 1/2 cup sunflower kernels Microwave honey and butter in large microwaveable bowl on high 1 minute; stir until well blended. Add marshmallows; toss to coat. Microwave 1 1/2 minutes or until marshmallows are puffed; stir until well blended. Add remaining ingredients; mix well. Press cereal mixture firmly into greased 13x9-inch pan. Cool. Cut into 24 bars.


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, March 28, 2013 Page 13

THAT’S ENTERTAINMENT! VIDEO SELECTIONS Mar. 12: Duke Not Rated Fangoria Presents: Germ Z Not Rate Miss Dial R

Motorway R R Mar. 19: Spongebob Hobbit: Squarepants: An Unexpected The Complete 8th Journey Season Special Edition Not Rated PG-13 Storage 24 Zero Dark Thirty R Bachelorette R Straight A’s R Dark Feed R Shadow People PG-13 Jack the Giant Killer Not Rated Rust and Bone R Price Check Not Rated 24-Hour Love PG-13 Hellgate Not Rated Adventures in Appletown Not Rated Cyberstalker

KENNEDY STREET CAFE

PG-13 Fangoria Presents: Entity Not Rated 23 Minutes to Sunrise Not Rated WWE: Elimination Chamber Not Rated Mar. 26: Lincoln PG-13 Killing Them Softly R Parental Guidance PG Collection R Stand Off R Day of the Falcon R To the Arctic G Death from Above Not Rated Frankenstein Theory R Easy Money R

Bangkok Revenge Not Rated Healed by Grace Not Rated Population: 2 Not Rated Royal Affair R LEGO Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Out Not Rated

Union Square Not Rated The Men Who Built America Not Rated Animus Not Rated Discipline Not Rated Pawn Shop Not Rated

Solution on page 15

11 Kennedy Street- Ph 362-6040

Stop in for some simply

Great Food! Call Us For Catering: 814-362-6040 Let Us Cater Your Party!

Value Menu Items Starting at

$1.00! 75 Forman Street Bradford, PA


Page 14 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, March 28, 2013

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CHRONOLOGICAL LISTINGS Engagements, Marriages, Births & Deaths

ENGAGEMENTS:

THOMPSON\ CARTER Mike Thompson of Randolph, N.Y., and Brenda Fitch of Rew announce the engagement of their daughter, Susie Nadine Thompson, to Jason Christopher Carter, son of Don and Debbie Carter of Smethport. A wedding is planned for June 8 MARRIAGES: (None) BIRTHS: MAR. 15, 2013: Son, to Corinne and Carl Parker, Allegany, NY. MAR. 16, 2013:

Son, to Amanda Calkins and Derek Horning, Salamanca, NY. Daughter, to Crystal Weishan and David McLarney, Salamanca, NY. Daughter, to Jackie Krouse and Frederick Angell II, Bradford, PA. MAR. 18, 2013: Son, to Francesca and Ryan Keck, Port Allegany, PA. Son, to Michelle Fillhart, Bradford, PA. Daughter, to Emilee Close and Aaron George, Olean, NY. Son, to Kira Zink, Portville, NY. MAR. 19, 2013: Daughter, to Amanda and Jason Luther, Portville, NY.

MAR. 21, 2013: Son, to Natasha Skaggs, Bradford, PA. Son, to Valerie Weaver, Bradford, PA. MAR. 22, 2013: Daughter, to Danielle Cowles and Shane Levia, Olean, NY. DEATHS: MAR. 15, 2013: RO B I N E T T E , Keith A. – 24, of Port Allegany, PA. MAR. 16, 2013: FAY, Gary L. – 66, of Kane, PA. KOHLER, Gerald D. – 69, of Bradford, PA. MAR. 17, 2013: FRIEDMAN, Bennett B. – 89, of Bradford, PA.

KELLY, Peggy Zenner – 84, of Bradford, PA. COON, Leona M. Gifford – 83, of Smethport, PA. ARICK, Helen L. Boyer – 86, of Bradford, PA. MAR. 18, 2013: STRABEL, Wally – 53, of Harmony, formerly of Smethport, PA. SAMPLE, Jeffrey A. – 61, of Kane, PA. MAR. 19, 2013: WALTERS, Mary F. Myers – 77, of Smethport, PA. MAR. 21, 2013: H U L I N G S , George L. Jr. – 74, of James City, PA.

YOUR WEEKLY HOROSCOPE MARCH 28 - APRIL 3, 2013

ARIES - (Mar. 21 - Apr. 19) What has existed between you and someone else needs to alter in some way. TAURUS - (Apr. 20 - May 20) You had a good reason for committing to or supporting something or someone a while back. Circumstances have changed now.You reserve the right to review this. GEMINI - (May 21 - June 20) If ever there was a time to let your heart rule your head, it is now. Let your heart take over, for this week, anyway. CANCER - (June 21 - July 22) Whatever transpires this week will be sudden but nothing you cannot deal with. LEO - (July 23, - Aug. 22) The time has come to spell out very clearly what you want, why you want or need it and how one or two people can assist you. VIRGO - (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22) What gets launched or decided now has long term implications for your bank balance. LIBRA - (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22) It’s time to show yourself and a few others how like minds and common interests can bring fantastic results. SCORPIO - (Oct. 23, - Nov. 21) It’s a case of you getting back what you give out, so be sure to transmit what you would like in return and all will be fine. SAGITTARIUS - (Nov. 22 - Dec. 20) It might go against your better judgment to refrain from overreacting in some way but you would be well advised to try. CAPRICORN - (Dec. 21 - Jan. 19) You know what has reached the end of its usefulness. It’s time to let go and move forward. AQUARIUS - (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18) As much as you want truth, whole truth and nothing but truth, it appears unlikely you’ll get it. PISCES - (Feb. 19 - Mar. 20) Push aside pride and don’t be afraid to accept help available to you now.

How To Talk To Your Doctor About LASIK

(NAPSI)—More than 16 million people have benefited from LASIK eye surgery. If you or someone you care about would like to be among them, consider this: The first step is talking with a LASIK surgeon. According to a recent survey by the American Refractive Surgery Council (ARSC), 80 percent of people who need vision correction are thinking about LASIK—but only 2 percent make their way into the surgeon’s office to find out if they’re good candidates for LASIK or if the safe and effective vision correction procedure is right for their vision and lifestyle. Some people avoid talking to eye care professionals about LASIK because they’re not sure how to pick a surgeon or what to ask when they visit the surgeon’s office. To help, ARSC offers a few pointers: • To pick a surgeon, check the Internet, the chamber of commerce, and medical organizations such as the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. Get referrals from friends and family members who had the procedure. Ask them about their experiences. Speak with your personal physician and optometrist. Once you find a surgeon, get additional references from patients. • Ask about the surgeon’s experience. The more, the better. A reputable surgeon should welcome any inquiries into his expertise. It is not uncommon for a highly experienced surgeon to have performed more than 25,000 procedures. He or she should also meet the highest standards for selecting patients—including screening out those who aren’t good candidates. That can be 15 to 25 percent of patients. Certain health issues, thin corneas and other factors may preclude the procedure. • Choose experience over price. It is natural to want to get a good deal, but you can’t put a price on your vision and health. You should never feel pressured to have the procedure performed; a consultation shouldn’t feel like a sales process. • Ask about technology. All LASIK surgeons don’t have access to the same technology. Not all practices invest in the most advanced equipment. To ensure that you’re getting the best care, you need to understand which LASIK technology is available and why a particular one is recommended for your vision correction. • Be comfortable with your surgeon. He or she should be eager to answer all your questions and help educate you so you can make an informed decision. You should be made fully aware of the risks and benefits. Be wary of a practice that overpromises. LASIK is a terrific procedure but there are limits to what it can achieve. Remember that your eyes will continue to change as you age and you may still need reading glasses when you’re older. If you’ve been thinking about vision correction options, you can get information to assist you with your decision at: www.americanrefractivesurgerycouncil.org


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, March 28, 2013 Page 15

JOURNAL CLASSIFIED ADS EMPLOYMENT: Need market research participants to evaluate local establishments. Apply FREE: Shop.BestMark.com or call 800-969-8477. J-3/21-28/13; 4/4/13 CARS/VANS/ TRUCKS:

2BR,1BA For starter home/ retirees, avail. immed. 814-368-9586

Sharks Take It Away

CROSSWORD SOLUTION

HOMES FOR SALE: 36 NORTGATE DRIVE - $119,000 3 br 1&1/2 bath ranch, open floor plan, new kitchen with stainless appliances, large deck, new windows and siding. gas fireplace call 814-449-5487

2003 Grand Cherokee Laredo, 99k miles, exc. cond. Asking $4,750 OBO. Call 814-887- 2 Houses For sale 2169 $15,000 OBO, owner financing 2003 Dodge 2500 avail. Call: 716-378Quad Cab w/ 8ft 1879 bed,work truck, white, excellent MISCELLANEOUS: mechanical condition. Has a few For Sale: • Maple bumps and yeah... dining room w/ 6 its got a Hemi! Hi chairs and hutch • miles but drives like Kenmore HD Gas a truck with 50K dryer •24X36 Craft mies. $6800. Desk •Wood TV 814-598-9292 stand, cupboard on bottom, fits 27” TV 2002 Ford F-150 •Black TV cabinet Super Crew, 4 door, fits •27” TV •2 - 27” 4WD, bed liner, TV’s Call (814) 362southern truck - no 1282 rust, 111 k miles, $7,900. Exc. condi- Leer fiberglass tion, reliable 717- truck cap for small858-2818 er pick up trucks - 6ft, 4in long by 5 APARTMENTS ft wide. $100. Roll FOR RENT: bar - fits small pick 1bedroom $525 up trucks. $50. Call utilities included 814-596-8932 no pets accepting section 8 814-598- •Portable 1778 or 814-558- Dishwasher 5404 •Jewelry Armoire 3 bedroom lower apt in bradford., •Large Chain-link no pets. please call dog kennel 1-716-373-3360 •Misc. Area Rugs Clean & nice 1br $525/mo. includes All Excellent Conutilities. 362-2584 dition, call: 814-598-2775 nice lg. 3br apt., $600/mo + util., inexpensive to heat, absolutely no pets! Electric Wheelchair, call betty @ 814- like new (4 mos. old),$1500 OBO. 368-3761 363-7564 Spacious 2br lower, PETS/SUPPLIES: $500+g & e. all city util. incl. 558-2447. Free to a quiet home: Indoor male HOMES FOR tan/white 4 month RENT: old kitten. 814-331-6949 Mobile Home ,

SUDOKU SOLUTION

Bradford Journal Photo The Sharks take the ball down court during the Sharks vs. Hawks under 6 soccer match. The Bradford Community Soccer Club game was played March 23rd at the Fretz Middle School gymnasium. (See the videos in our photo gallery.)

Bradford Coin Shop Deal With An Established Shop Established 30 Years

• Can Make Housecalls • FREE Verbal Appraisals

SELL NOW WHILE PRICES ARE HIGH! Wanted: Silver Coins Paying $18.00 per Dollar Average or Better Old Silver Dollars1878-1935 $20.00 -$25.00 each !

Paying $2.50 each for: 1965- 1969 Half Dollars GOLD ! Ver y High Prices Paid For Gold Items : 10 K arat & 14 K arat Yellow- Dental Gold - 18 K arat Gold

Coin Collections Wanted! 15 Chestnut Street, Bradford, PA 814-362-1980 or 814-331-5235


Page 16 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, March 28, 2013

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JUST PASSING TIME THEME: “The Twenties” ACROSS: 1. Property held by one party for the benefit of another 6. Band booking 9. Mary’s pet 13. Blood circulation organ 14. Under the weather 15. Last test 16. Beech tree fiber textile 17. Jersey call 18. 2:3, e.g. 19. Conceited 21. *Common Twenties description 23. Relations 24. Update, as in iPod 25. Read-Only Memory 28. Light beige 30. Mother? 34. “____ to it!” 36. Space above 38. Respected Hindu 40. Bride screen 41. Suggestive of an elf 43. *7-Up was one such drink created in the twenties 44. Betty Page, e.g. 46. Italian money 47. Commoner

48. Type of advice 50. Cecum, pl. 52. “But I heard him exclaim, ___ he drove out of sight” 53. Fiber used for making rope 55. “For ___ a jolly...” 57. *a.k.a. ____ ___ 61. *Speakeasy serving 65. Accepted truth 66. Earned at Wharton or Kellogg 68. Infested with lice 69. As opposed to down feather 70. *Woodrow Wilson, e.g. 71. Relating to the ulna 72. Boundary of surface 73. ___-Wan Kenobi 74. Smooth transition DOWN: 1. Woolen caps of Scottish origin 2. ____ canal 3. Pakistani language 4. Library storage 5. *”The Jazz Singer,” e.g. 6. Long John Silver’s gait7. International workers’ group 8. Civil War movie starring Washing-

ton and Freeman 9. One with burning pants 10. Prefix often preceding #1 Across 11. *”____ Street” by Sinclair Lewis 12. It features postings 15. Bar brawl, e.g. 20. Cry of surrender 22. The loneliest number? 24. Be sufficient or adequate 25. Please get back to me 26. WWE’s Titus _____ 27. Easternmost state 29. *1920’s Jazz great, Jelly ____ Morton 31. Coarse file 32. Oar pin 33. Opposite of seeker 35. It fits in a socket 37. Cars have a spare one 39. *1927 was his hit season 42. Popular ball game snack 45. Slumber party wear 49. Carry a suitcase? 51. God of the

(Crossword Solution on page 15)

winds 54. Moderato, e.g. 56. *What “Pretty Boy” Floyd did in the 1920s 57. Humorous an-

WORD SEEK

ecdote 58. What Borden did

61. Island near Java Lizzie 62. Black ____ 63. Brother of Jacob 59. Move like a bul- 64. Swirling vortex let 67. *Hairstyle 60. Z in DMZ


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The Easter Bunny Has Been Shopping At

Timeless Treasures For

Melissa & Doug Toys Folkmanis Puppets & Douglas Plush Toys Stop In And See Our Selection 1-814-331-4884 10 Chestnut Street Bradford, PA

Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, March 28, 2013 Page 17

Kristin’s Konsignments Through April 29th

SALE! SALE! SALE!

EVERY ITEM 50¢ IN TIME FOR EASTER Notice: MAY 1st- Moving To 34 South Avenue Across from Bridal Boutique

Ph 814-598-4311 4 Boylston St. Bradford, PA

PERSONALIZE YOUR CLOTHING! Bottorf Embroidery & Screen Printing For Your Sports Teams And Work Teams

And Holidays Like This! 217 W. Washington Street Bradford, PA 16701

Phone 814-362-0536 www.bottorfembroidery.com

Tips For Soothing A Fussy Baby (NAPSI)—The next time a crying baby practically has you in tears, don’t despair. First, remember, all babies cryit’s how they communicate. Next, realize that constant crying may be colic, and a visit to the pediatrician may be in order. Finally, consider these tried-andtrue ways to soothe an infant. What To Do • Bath time. A warm bath helps many babies to calm down. • Music soothes. Playing soft music or singing lullabies can help. • Move it. Sometimes a brief excursion and some fresh air will do the trick. • Talk the talk. Talk to your baby in a soothing voice, carrying her from room to room. Point out the decorations. Show her the baby in the mirror. • Go for a drive. Some babies find the car so soothing that it’s the only place they’ll fall asleep. Gas may be expensive but your peace of mind is probably worth a drive around the block. • Turn on a fan or noise machine. The white noise effect is similar to a pregnant belly and could calm your little one down. • It’s a wrap. Swaddle your baby up in a light blanket with her arms across her chest. Swaddled babies often sleep longer and more soundly. • Check the thermostat. Your baby

could be too hot or too cold. • Make it swing time. Babies love the soft, soothing motions of infant swings, and these are often the best way to get your baby to stop crying and go to sleep. To help, Graco has reinvented the swing with a new gliding motion, inspired by the gentle back and forth that moms use while comforting baby in their nursery glider rocker. Every baby is unique, so parents can customize the vibration, swing speed and melodies with optional plug-in, plus they have a five-point harness for peace of mind that their baby is secure. Graco’s Glider family of swings offers parents several options from which

to choose—from a lightweight petite version up to a 2-in-1 high-end elite, and several versions in between. The full-size Glider swings boast ingenious frame designs that use 40 percent less space than other leading full-size swings, giving parents more space. All are lightweight and portable, with a roomy seat combined with plush body for support and three recline positions. So the next time a crying baby is getting the best of you, remember these simple tips—and some great new products—and you’ll be well on your way to enjoying a blissful sound for new moms and dads: the quiet of a happy baby. Where To Learn More: You can find additional information about gliders online at: www.gracobaby.com/gliders


Page 18 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, March 28, 2013

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Getting Unused Medications Out Of Your Home Safely (NAPSI)—Here’s a surprising statistic: More than 4 billion prescriptions are written every year in the U.S. and approximately 40 percent of these drugs aren’t taken according to directions. Failing to finish a prescription medication is one of the most common issues, with Americans leaving 200 million pounds of medication unused annually. In some cases, patients may stop taking a drug once they feel better. Other situations leave caretakers with significant amounts of excess medications. These unused medications can pose a number of problems. If left in the medicine cabinet, they can cause accidents with young children or may be abused by teens and adults. The problem is not as uncommon as some might think— nearly 7 million Americans over the age of 12 report having used prescription drugs in the past month for nonmedical reasons and the numbers are increasing. The Lack of Good Disposal Options In light of these figures, many people are seeing the importance of disposing of unused medication. Even when motivated to do so, however, people can be faced with limited options for getting rid of medications responsibly. In the past, some sources recommended flushing unused medicine down the toilet, but recent evidence shows trace amounts of pharmaceuticals in waterways and drinking water supplies. There have been over 1,000 published reports of pharmaceuticals in sewage, surface waters, groundwater and elsewhere, and an estimated 40 million people in the U.S. are exposed to it. Due to

these findings, government authorities now say pharmaceuticals should not be disposed in the toilet or sink. Throwing medication in the trash does not effectively neutralize the potentially harmful substances in the drugs. Mail-in disposal products are also available, but only for a limited range of substances, and they also require labels to be left on the medications, raising privacy concerns. Finally, some communities organize collection programs, but these can be inconvenient to access due to limited hours and the necessity for law enforcement to be present. Even when drugs are successfully collected through these programs, their eventual incineration can cause air pollution. A New Method For Easy Disposal Fortunately, a new product has recently been introduced to meet the need: a pouch with a specially designed inner packet of a drug-deactivating ingredient. Users simply place their medications into the pouch, add a small amount of water, seal it and dispose of the pouch in the household trash. A proprietary activated carbon system in the pouch neutralizes the medication, chemically deactivating the drug. After disposal, the pouch continues to work by keeping the drugs chemically bound so they cannot leach into groundwater from the landfill. The main ingredient in the pouch, activated carbon, is used extensively in municipal water purification and in emergency treatments of drug overdosage. The pouch works with any

Preventing Cancer In The Community (NAPSI)—Once the leading cause of cancer death for women in the United States, cervical cancer is now the most preventable female cancer. Yet it affects women of color more than it does white women. One reason is that women of color are diagnosed with cervical cancer at a later stage than are white women. Black women are more likely to die from cervical cancer than women of other races or ethnicities, possibly because of decreased access to Pap testing or follow-up treatment. Almost all cervical cancers are caused by a persistent infection with human papillomavirus (HPV). Almost everyone who is sexually active will be infected with HPV sometime in his or her life. Most of the time the infection goes away, but sometimes, HPV infections can lead to cancer. Fortunately, many of the HPV infections that cause cervical cancer can be prevented with vaccination. HPV vaccine can decrease cervical cancer rates and help

improve the health of women of color in every community. Dr. Iyabode Beysolow, a pediatrician in the Immunization Services Division at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), explains: “We have an entire generation of girls we could protect from getting cervical cancer. Every year, 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer

prescription pharmaceutical product, including controlled drugs and narcotics. It’s compatible with drugs in tablet, capsule, liquid or patch form. The Medsaway Medication Disposal System is an affordable and convenient way to increase the safety of your home and dispose of medications responsibly. It’s available in drugstores and online. Retail locations can be found at: www.medsaway.com and 4,000 die. If we can protect girls now with HPV vaccine, we could drastically reduce these numbers.” HPV also causes vulvar, vaginal, penile, anal and oropharyngeal (back of throat, base of tongue and tonsils) cancers. Screening programs don’t exist for these cancers, so HPV vaccine is even more important for prevention. There are many ways to reduce your risk for HPV-related cancer: • Get the HPV vaccine for boys and girls when they are 11 or 12 years old. • For adult women, see your doctor regularly and get a Pap test when your doctor recommends it. • Follow up with your doctor if your Pap test results are not normal. • If your doctor says you have cervical cancer, ask to be referred to a doctor who specializes in treating cancers like this. • Help spread the word that HPV vaccine is cancer prevention. For more information, visit: www.cdc.gov/Features/HPVvaccine/


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, March 28, 2013 Page 19

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Page 20 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, March 28, 2013

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Know Your Telemarketing Rights (NAPSI)—How do you know if a telemarketing call is a scam? That friendly voice on the phone may belong to an honest salesperson who is just trying to make a living or a crook who wants to trick you out of your money. Three-quarters of the adults recently surveyed by Consumer Federation of America (CFA) said that they think it is hard for most consumers to tell the difference. And while nine in ten are concerned that telemarketing calls from companies they haven’t done business with before might be fraudulent, many do not know their basic telemarketing rights. Knowing your telemarketing rights can help you spot fraud, because legitimate companies usually follow the rules; scammers don’t. Is an unfamiliar company calling you even though your phone number is on the National Do Not Call Registry? Is it a recorded sales pitch when you never gave the company written permission to make that type of “robocall” to you? Is the company’s number blocked on your caller ID? CFA’s new guide to Understanding Your Telemarketing Rights and Avoiding Fraud explains what telemarketers should and shouldn’t do and how you can report violations. If the telemarketer is violating your rights, STOP! HANG UP! It may be a scam. Other danger signs of telemarketing fraud include: • Pressure to act immediately or you’ll lose this great opportunity • Promises that you can make easy money working from home • Offers to help you get a loan, fix your credit record, settle your debts, save your home from foreclosure or recover money you’ve already lost to a scam, if you pay a fee in advance

• Guarantees that you can make big returns on investments with little or no risk • Requests that you pay a fee to enter a sweepstakes or lottery or send money for taxes, bonding, or legal expenses to claim your winnings. It’s also a danger sign if a prize is being offered as part of a sales pitch and the telemarketer doesn’t tell you that no purchase is necessary. Another clue is how you’re asked to pay. Fraudsters usually want to get paid fast and in cash—they don’t want

Going Boldly Neutral (NAPSI)—When it comes to home decorating, what’s hot now are cool neutral tones, and here’s why: Neutral colors let you establish a palette for the bigger items-floors, doors, furniture and molding-that will stand the test of time. Neutrals also let you transform a room by adding vibrant pops of color through artwork, brightly painted walls, area rugs, and accessories. What’s New In Neutrals Even neutrals trend, however, and according to HGTV.com, the latest focus is on lighter browns and soft grays. To stay at least a step ahead of these color trends, Minwax recently introduced two new shades of its popular Wood Finish Interior Wood Stain: Weathered Oak and Classic Gray. These soft wood-stain colors work well in all types of light and bring a

peaceful calm to the room. With this as a backdrop, you can have the freedom to be bold with the balance of the room’s decor, from the paint on the walls to the fabric on your furniture. Learn More: For more information on wood stain as well as decorating inspiration, go to www.minwax.com

to wait for checks to clear or for payments to go through the credit card system, so they look for other ways to get the money. If a telemarketer has money transfer as the only method of payment it accepts, beware! Those services should only be used to send money to companies you know and trust and to individuals you have met in person. You should always have the choice of whether to use money transfers or other ways to pay. Scammers may even suggest that you put cash between the pages of a magazine and send it to them. Legitimate telemarketers would never ask you to do that. They are also exploiting new payment methods, telling people to send them the money on a prepaid card or to put it on a MoneyPak, a product that can be used to transfer funds to prepaid cards or make payments to authorized merchants, and give them the serial number. Their aim is to cash in and disappear before you realize that you’ve been robbed. Crooks are also taking advantage of prepaid cell phones, Internet phone service, caller ID “spoofing” and other technologies to mask who and where they are. Often, they’re in foreign countries, making it difficult for U.S. law enforcement to pursue them. Since money sent to scammers is often gone for good, learn how to protect yourself from telemarketing fraud and other scams at www.consumerfed.org/fraud


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Common Myths Of Organ Donation:

There is a severe organ shortage in this country. Despite continuing efforts at public education, misconceptions and inaccuracies about donation persist. It’s a tragedy if even one person decides against donation because they don’t know the truth. Following is a list of the most common myths along with the actual facts: Myth: If emergency room doctors know you’re an organ donor, they won’t work as hard to save you. Fact: If you are sick or injured and admitted to the hospital, the number one priority is to save your life. Organ donation can only be considered after brain death has been declared by a physician. Many states have adopted legislation allowing individuals to legally designate their wish to be a donor should brain death occur, although in many states Organ Procurement Organizations also require consent from the donor’s family. Myth: When you’re waiting for a transplant, your financial or celebrity status is as important as your medical status. Fact: When you are on the transplant waiting list for a donor organ, what really counts is the severity of your illness, time spent waiting, blood type, and other important medical information. Myth: Having “organ donor” noted on your driver’s license or carrying a donor card is all you have to do to become a donor. Fact: While a signed donor card and a driver’s license with an “organ donor” designation are legal documents, organ and tissue donation is usually discussed with family members prior to the donation. To ensure that your family understands your wishes, it is important that you tell your family about your decision to donate LIFE. Myth: Only hearts, livers, and kidneys can be transplanted. Fact: Needed organs include the heart, kidneys, pancreas, lungs, liver and intestines. Tissue that can be donated include the eyes, skin, bone, heart valves and tendons. Myth: Your history of medical illness means your organs or tissues are unfit for donation. Fact: At the time of death, the appropriate medical professionals will review your medical and social histories to determine whether or not you can be a donor. With recent advances in transplantation, many more people than ever before can be donors. It’s best to tell your family your wishes and sign up to be an organ and tissue donor on your driver’s license or an official donor document. Myth: You are too old to be a donor. Fact: People of all ages and medical histories should consider themselves potential donors. Your medical condition at the time of death will determine what organs and tissue can be donated. Myth: If you agree to donate your organs, your family will be charged for the costs. Fact: There is no cost to the donor’s family or estate for organ and tissue donation. Funeral costs remain the responsibility of the family. Myth: Organ donation disfigures the body and changes the way it looks in a casket. Fact: Donated organs are removed surgically, in a routine operation similar to gallbladder or appendix removal. Donation does not change the appearance of the body for the funeral service. Myth: Your religion prohibits organ donation. Fact: All major organized religions approve of organ and tissue donation and consider it an act of charity. Myth: There is real danger of being heavily drugged, then waking to find you have had one kidney (or both) removed for a black market transplant. Fact: This tale has been widely circulated over the Internet. There is absolutely no evidence of such activity ever occurring in the U.S. While the tale may sound credible, it has no basis in the reality of organ transplantation. Many people who hear the myth probably dismiss it, but it is possible that some believe it and decide against organ donation out of needless fear.

Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, March 28, 2013 Page 21

April Is National Donate Life Month At this moment, between 30,000 and 40,000 Americans are suffering from kidney disease so serious that the only remedy would be a transplanted kidney. Yet fewer than one-third of those patients will receive a transplant. Most people ignore patients in need of a transplant. Those potential donors simply refuse to consider donating a kidney even though all they would have to do is sign a card declaring their willingness to become an organ donor in the event of their death. Cards are available at the National Kidney Foundation at (800) 622-9010. Physicians match kidney-disease patients with available organs according to blood and tissue type. Anyone who signs a card should be sure to inform his or her family, because doctors will need their consent at the time of the donation. Healthy donors can donate a kidney while they are alive if a relative or friend is in need. In fact, transplants involving healthy donors have the highest rate of success. Unfortunately, of the more than 36,000 people needing transplants, only 11,099 actually received them- because of the acute shortage of donors. As a result, many patients died. The problem has been worsening in past decades as statistics show. In 1988, a total of 739 patients died awaiting a kidney transplant, and 750 died the next year. The death toll continued to rise through 1996 from 917 deaths in 1990 to approximately 1900 deaths in 1996. In many cases, kidney transplantation is the best treatment option. When transplanted kidneys come from healthy donors, operations are successful more than 70 percent of the time, and recovering patients can look forward to a near-normal life span.

THIS MESSAGE BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FOLLOWING BUSINESSES:

Organ Transplantation & Donation Facts:

*People of all ages and medical histories should consider themselves potential donors. Your medical condition at the time of death will determine what organs and tissue can be donated. *On average, 110 people are added to the nation’s organ transplant waiting list each day--one every 13 minutes. *Organs and tissues that can be donated include: heart, kidneys, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, corneas, skin, tendons, bone, and heart valves. *On average, 70 people receive transplants every day from either a living or deceased donor. *There is no national registry of organ donors. Even if you have indicated your wishes on your drivers’ license or a donor card, be sure you have told your family as they will be consulted before donation can take place. *More than 87,000 people are on the nation’s organ transplant waiting list. Almost 700 of them are 5 years old or younger. *All major religions approve of organ and tissue donation and consider donation the greatest gift. *On average, 18 patients die every day while awaiting an organ, simply because the organ they needed did not become available in time. *An open-casket funeral is possible for organ and tissue donors. Related Internet Sites Coalition on Donation www.donatelife.net National Marrow Donor Program www.marrow.org

American Red Cross (blood and tissue donation) www.redcross.org The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network Operated by UNOS under contract with HRSA. www.optn.org U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Web site for Organ Donation www.organdonor.gov


Page 22 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, March 28, 2013

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Spring Can Be Especially Challenging For Asthma Patients Spring Allergies May Trigger Increased Inflammation in the Airways (NAPSI)—While many people are excited about the warmer weather and blooming flowers that springtime brings, nearly 40 million Americans are also preparing for the onslaught of seasonal allergy symptoms. For some, springtime allergies can feel like a cold that just won’t go away, but for others, spring allergies can be a trigger for more serious respiratory conditions like asthma. People with asthma can experience chronic inflammation in both their large and small airways, which in turn can make the airways of the lungs very sensitive. Similar to tree limbs, the airways of the lungs are divided into “branches,” or bronchial tubes that begin with the large, main bronchi and then break off into many small airways in the lungs. Increasing evidence suggests that these small airways, when inflamed, may play a significant role in contributing to asthma symptoms and attacks. If inflammation is not treated properly, each time the airways are exposed to triggers, like pollen or other spring allergens, the inflammation increases and asthma symptoms are more likely to occur. There have been many advances in drug delivery over the past several years, which have led to the availability of treatments that target the small airways in particular—and when used daily, as prescribed, have the ability to improve asthma control. “About half of all asthmatics also

have allergies,” said Dr. LeRoy Graham, pediatric pulmonologist at Georgia Pediatric Pulmonology Associates. “Spring allergies may seem like a small inconvenience to some people, but for a person with persistent asthma, allergy season can be very problematic, particularly among people who may not have been keeping up with daily asthma treatments before spring allergies hit.

Shortcuts To A Great Lawn

(NAPSI)—There’s good news—and some shortcuts—for homeowners who want to be at the cutting edge of lawn care. Here are some tips to achieve a beautiful green space: • For starters, cut a lawn shorter--1.25 to 2 inches—in the fall and leave it longer in the summer. • If you have a healthy lawn, don’t bother with bagging the clippings. Fine clippings make good mulch. • Let technology help save time and money while helping your lawn to look its best. For example, the enhanced Honda HRR Series of lawn mowers is designed to deliver easy operation, high performance and superior fuel efficiency. “There are four different HRR mod-

els, each with standard features including an easy-start, four-stroke engine and a 3-in-1 Clip Director® for effortless switching from bagging to mulching without additional equipment,” said Alex Torre, lawn care expert at Honda Power Equipment. To learn more, visit the website at www.honda.com

During spring allergies, daily asthma management is critical to help reduce inflammation in the large and small airways of the lungs and control asthma.” While inflammation can be a defense mechanism for the body, it can also be harmful if it occurs at the wrong time or lingers when it is no longer needed. When allergens, like pollen, are inhaled, the body can mistake them for an invader and attack them. When this occurs, the body produces chemicals that cause inflammation around the allergen to isolate and destroy it. The airways of people with asthma are even more sensitive to allergens, which can cause the inner linings of the airways to become inflamed, leaving less room for air to move through. Additionally, the muscles surrounding the airways tighten up and the mucus glands in the airways may produce thick mucus, which can further block the large and small airways. While asthma is a chronic condition and has many triggers beyond just spring allergens, it can be successfully managed and may not hinder people from doing the things they enjoy. A new website, www.GetSmartAboutAsthma. com, offers tips about managing asthma and inflammation in the large and small airways. The website also offers downloadable materials, like a symptom tracker, doctor discussion guide and asthma diary, so that patients can track their own asthma symptoms and triggers, during spring allergy season and throughout the year.


Page 23 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, March 28, 2013

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Tips For Making Your Home Spectacular From Top Designer And Best-Selling Author (NAPSI)—What makes a house a home? The answer for Dena, acclaimed designer and author of “The Painted Home,” is simple: Look at every room as an opportunity to reflect who you are by surrounding yourself with the things you love. From the kitchen, a warm and welcoming space, to the bedroom, a haven for relaxation and dreaming, Dena offers a host of insider tips and practical, whimsical DIY projects in “The Painted Home” that can bring out the designer in anyone. “There are countless yet inexpensive ways to transform the everyday into something special,” says Dena. “With a trip to the flea market, some needle and thread, a glue gun and, of course, paint, there’s no limit to what you can do to turn your home into a place that is uniquely yours.” Dena Designs’ home products include everything from rugs and wallpaper to stationery and children’s decor and can be found in more than 15,000 retail outlets, including Dillard’s and Bed Bath & Beyond. Dena’s favorite DIY home design projects include: Layered Glass Vases: Create a oneof-a-kind centerpiece with a collection of different-sized, clear, cylindrical vases. Print out color copies of fabric or use wallpaper, sturdy gift wrapping paper or other patterned material. Use double-stick tape to adhere the paper to the inside of the vase. Insert a smaller vase into the larger one and fill with water and fresh-cut flowers. One-of-a-Kind Slip Cover: Slip covers are a great way to revamp a chair and make it washable. Dena recommends a white slip cover that provides a clean palette to let your inner designer flourish. Cut circles, leaves or any shape out of a mix of favorite fabrics. Place the slip cover on the chair and arrange the shapes. Use a simple over-and-under running stitch ¼” from the edge of the fabric to add charm and secure the cutouts to your slip cover. Stenciled Wall: Stenciling a wall is easy and inexpensive-and adds an interesting focal point to the room. Dena includes a stencil in her book, or you can create your own. Beginning at the bottom corner of the wall, adhere the stencil with low-tack masking tape. Put a small amount of acrylic or stencil paint onto a palette. Using a stencil brush, apply paint perpendicularly to the wall. Repeat the pattern until the wall is covered. Decoupage Plates: To help create an eye-catching wall, Dena suggests

grouping together a collection of similar objects, such as decoupaged plates. Using thin paper, print copies of fabrics, colorful designs or family photos to adhere to clear glass plates. Cut the copies to fit the plates, leaving a ½” border around the edge. Use a foam brush to spread thin coats of Mod Podge on the back of the plate and the front of the image. Adhere the image to the plate

Parent Power

and work out any air bubbles. Dena uses a cork to gently roll out bubbles. After the plate dries, use a metallic gold marker to create a border around each plate. For the complete steps for these projects, visit www.denadesigns.com For a copy of “The Painted Home” by Dena, visit www.amazon.com

and how your kids learn. • Get active to bring up any problems or questions at a home-school association or a parent- teacher organization meeting. • Communicate clearly, calmly and forcefully about any issues, first to teachers, then to principals. Let them know you want to help them work out the right balance. Ask for whatever your concern is to be explored, at internal professional development and teacher training sessions. Educators should be encouraged to come up with ways to help students do better.

(NAPSI)—Good news for parents who wonder whether their children are getting a quality education, and if not, whether there is anything they can do about it. The experts at the Center for Education Reform, the leading voice in education reform issues in the U.S., Learn More:For further facts and adhave some suggestions about how par- vice, go to www.edreform.com ents can empower themselves to get the answers and results they deserve: How to Help Improve Your Child’s Education • Know Your Power: Check out the Center’s Parent Power Index, an interactive tool that parents can use to discover whether their community gives them the power to improve education— and if not, what to do to get it. • Know your options. Understand what choices you have about where, what

Bradford Journal Issue Mar. 28, 2013  

Fourth Issue March 2013

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