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Bradford’s Weekly Newpaper

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Bradford Journal

VOL. 172 NO. 33 BRADFORD JOURNAL/MINER THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2013 www.bradfordjournal.com Bradford Journal/McKean County Miner/Mount Jewett Echo Phone 814-465-3468

Family Enjoys First Night Of Festa Italiana

Bradford Journal Photo Ed and Cheryl Spittler on the left sit with their daughter Abbie Spittler and her boy friend Chad Clark in the food court during the Italian Festival in Bradford, August 15th. It was the first night of the festival and they were having a great time at the event on Festival Way. (See photos in gallery.)

Getting Together At Festival To Have Fun

Take A Look At Event

Bradford Journal Photo Melissa Fiebelkorn and her daughter Emma Fiebelkorn 4, spend time in the food court, August 15th, during the first night of the Italian Festival. This is their first time at the festival. (See photos in gallery.)

This Week’s August Event Is: Crook Farm Country Fair Saturday August 24th & Sunday August 25th INDEX Local News/Weather Comments & Opinions

Bradford Journal Photo These young people were having a good time at Festa Italiana, August 15th. Left to right are Rachel Martin 15, Bry Stahlman 15, Alex Daughenbaugh 14, Nick Arnold 14, Wesley Stahl 14, Dawson Mealey 14, and Meghan Wilber 15. They tell us that the festival is a great place for all of them to get together and have fun. (See photos in gallery.)

2 3 Obituaries 4 Social News 6 Back To School Page 9 Comics 13 Classifieds 15 Word Seek/Crossword 16 Bradford Journal P.O. Box, Bradford, PA 16701 www.bradfordjournal.com Phone: 814-465-3468


Page 2 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, August 22, 2013

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LOCAL NEWS Crook Farm Country Fair Begins This Weekend The 34th Annual Crook Farm Country Fair will take place this weekend at 476 Seward Avenue in Bradford, PA on Saturday, August 24th and Sunday, August 25 th from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The cost of admission is $4.00 Per Person with Children Under 12 admitted Free. The music schedule is jam-packed with fun, friends, and favorites. For a complete listing check out the Fair schedule located on page 8 of this issue. New in the food vendor category this year being offered is Organic Produce. Also, there will be available: Walking Tacos by the Rotary Club; Sausage, Beef on Weck, Chicken & Biscuits by Krispy Kritters; Snow Cones & Ice Cream by the BAHS Cheerleaders; Hot Dogs by the Lions Club; Chicken BBQ by the Volunteer Firemen; Ham & Cheese Hoagies by the SPCA; and last but not least, everyone’s favorite, Funnel Cakes by the Lions Club. Also under the Craft Vendors category being offered are: Avon by Penny Updegrove; Wendy Stout – felted handbags, mittens made from recycled sweaters and more; Jack Learn – wooden items & band saw boxes (Saturday only); Mary Steele – magnetic therapy jewelry; Michele Streich – Chocolates; Pennie Hopkins – scented candles, aroma bears, and air fresheners;

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Young Family Spends Time At Festa Italiana

Bradford Journal Photo On Thursday evening, August 15th, shortly after the opening of this year’s Italian Festival, Bradford residents Tim Munday, Jessica Hahn and their child, 11-week-old Camden Munday, spend some time with refreshments at a table in the food court. (See photos in gallery.) Creations by Betty & Jennifer – phrase signs, baby items, corn packs, & dog and cat items; Mary McBride – Florals; Fresh Start Soaps & More – handmade bath, body, candles & more; Alfred Ostrander – jewelry in sterling silver & 14Kgold filled; Dru Cary – beanies for Diabetes; Curt Olson – Elk Jerky;. Carol Olson – candles & dried flowers; Timeless Treasures – fall deco, wreaths, & yard art; Gold Canyon Candles by Angel Shipman; Miche Purses by Vicki Miller; Pampered Chef by Chris Moshier-Baer; Vicki Borowsky – premade scrapbook pages & photo accessories; Scensy Candles by Jo Moshier; Thirty One by Stephanie Behan; Maryann Peterson/Colette Harrison – handmade children items, hair accessories and more.; J & J Enterprises – nature jewelry, sleigh bells, home deco items; Bev Green – kitchen

sets, scarves, hats, slippers, wheelchair/ walker bags; Tastefully Simple by Robbie Yonoshonis; Tupperware by Margie Harris; Mary Kay Cosmetics by Karen Colley; Creative Memories by Tricia Wingard; Beauty Control by Greatchen Daugherty; Enchanted Mountains of Cattaraugus County Tourism; Enchanted Herb Gardens – herb mixes, teas, fairies, gnomes, dried flowers, & bird feeders; Elizabeth Jankowski – Handcrafted jewelry; Heavenly Scents & confections – soy candles, tarts, smelly jellies, and crocheted items; Kristi Neel – Paparazzi Jewelry and accessories; Designs by Lori Phillips – Handmade jewelry, assorted purses, wallet, rag quilts & dreamcatchers; Pam Ervolina – Childrens pillow & (Cotinued on page 6)

THE BRADFORD AREA 5-DAY WEATHER FORECAST

Thursday, August 22: Mostly sunny today with a chance of showers and thunderstorms in the afternoon. High of 81°. Thursday Night: Mostly cloudy tonight with a chance of showers and thunderstorms. Low of 58°.

Friday, August 23: Mostly sunny and nice today with a high of 75°. Friday Night: Mostly clear tonight and a little cooler with an overnight low of 53°.

Saturday,

August 24: Mostly sunny and nice today with a high of 75°. Saturday Night:

Partly cloudy tonight with an overnight low of 53°.

Sunday, August 25: Mostly sunny and warm today with a high of 77°. Sunday Night: Partly cloudy tonight with temperatures rising late. Low of 55°.

Monday, August 26: Cloudy and a little cooler with a shower or thunderstorm in the area today. High of 75°. Monday Night: Mostly cloudy tonight with a low of 54°.

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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday,August 22, 2013 Page 3

5 ¢ENTS WORTH

It’s A Matter Of Opinion... Guest Columnist

by Grant Nichols

Most of the photos for this issue were taken Thursday, August 15th during the first evening of Bradford’s Festa Italiana. Some show the participants in the food court, some under the entertainment tent, some along Festival way, and some along the street and at the game and food concessions. Those pictures that were taken but not in hard copy can be found in our photo gallery‌‌. Over the weekend, we also attended the wedding of our daughter, Rebecca Nichols, former women’s soccer coach at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford, at a beautifully written informal ceremony conducted by the Kent County Clerk of Peace, in Dover, Delaware, August 17th. Photos and a couple videos surrounding the wedding event can be found in the photo gallery associated with this issue‌‌..Remember that this weekend, August 23-24 and 25 brings with it this year’s 34th Annual Crook Farm Country Fair at the Farm location, 476 Seaward Ave., Bradford. While the musical entertainment will begin on Friday the 23rd, the two main days will continue to be Saturday and Sunday. The schedules for events and other pertinent information regarding this event can be found in abundance throughout this issue. Remember also, that our last edition, issue of August 15th contained write-ups regarding the acts scheduled to be performed under the main tent. While our last issue is easily obtained by going to our digital archives, additional copies of last week’s paper can be printed for the asking, at Copy Connection, located along Chestnut Street, Bradford‌‌‌ Our Back to School, Safety for School Days, page in this issue is brought to us courtesy of Burns & Burns Associates, Inc., The New Keystone, Timeless Treasures (look for their booth at the Crook Farm Country Fair), Bradford Fairway Sales and Leasing, Hedlund Glass, and Bradford’s Tasta Pizza. With the new school year beginning, it’s time to brace ourselves for school bus traffic, and let our children know how to behave safely on the buses and in the schools‌‌..We were wondering how many people have read the sign along Kennedy Street, just outside of the Cavallero’s Store complex that exclaims “Beer, Wine, and Soda making Kits and Suppliesâ€? without seeing the word “Sodaâ€?? Since we missed it, until recently, we thought it might be a good thing to remind our readers of this beverage-making hobby possibility for children and inveterate designated drivers alike.

“Loss of Respect - Void of Reverence� The loss of respect has been on the increase as the family unit has gone from a two parent to a single parent household. This is, however, a second progression of the losing of respect which took a huge jump when both of the parents became wage earners leaving children to fend for themselves more and more. The two parent family unit with one parent not working is the best environment for children to have a good chance to learn and retain the ability to have respect for themselves and others. Self respect and the lack thereof is on display starting with how one treats one’s body, one’s relationships and one’s appearance. The perception over time has changed as to ownership of the body and has extended to a fetus which is actually a body within a body. Respect for the fetus has been reduced to an expendable in all too many cases. This can be looked at from the perspective of reverence which is a spiritual perspective or extension of respect. The evolution of the single parent family unit has been accompanied with the decrease of spiritual education and membership in a religious sect. The old axiom “The family that prays together stays together� has a lot of truth in it. If only everyone would pause for but only a few moments before each meal and at bedtime to pray and show a little respect for one’s

-by Bob Perry existence,then the level of respect in the world might grow, not disappear. The divorce rate is reflective of the decline of respect for the institution of marriage and can be correlated with the loss of a relationship with one’s creator. Note that the divorce rate in America is above 50%, and speaks for itself. The mere understanding of the word ‘commitment’ is not truly understood by those entering into matrimony and without understanding that it is not only a promise but an obligation. If either married partner does not view the union as an obligation the marriage will fail. One should not feel guilt if the other party is the one that fails in fulfilling the obligation. Reverence is a feeling or attitude of deep respect. For those who lack respect there is a ‘void’ in the capability of showing reverence. To me there should be a reverence show by everyone to the ’self’ is all respects. This includes recognizing the negative influences (acts, thoughts, addictions, etc.) that enter one’s life and avoid, or eliminate them. To obtain reverence it is essential to gain a perspective of who one is and know that there is a higher intelligence that is responsible for creation. When one gains a respectful, submissive attitude of mind in affection and esteem for creation and the creator, one is showing reverence. Gain reverence and keep it.

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Page 4 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, August 22, 2013

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OBITUARIES Tyler Johnson Tyler Jacob Johnson, 18, of 348 Derrick Road, passed away Tuesday (Aug. 13, 2013) at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, N.Y. Born Sept. 6, 1994, in Bradford, he was a son of David and Stacey (Abers) Johnson. Tyler was a 2012 graduate of Bradford High School, where he excelled in auto shop. He had been accepted at the Universal Technical Institute in Philadelphia. He was employed at Burger King. He enjoyed waterfowl hunting, go cart racing at the Back River Raceway in Wellsville, N.Y., bowling, playing backyard football, and XBox. He was a member of the Krispy Kritters Relay for Life Team for the American Cancer Society. Surviving are his parents; a sister, Sami Jo Johnson, and a brother, Hunter Johnson, both at home; a paternal grandmother, Sue Johnson of Limestone, N.Y.; maternal

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grandparents, George and Linda Abers of Bradford; maternal aunts and uncles, Steve Abers, Shannon and Donovan Severy, Stuart and Kris Abers; paternal uncle and aunt, Tom and Lynn Johnson; and many cousins. Burial was in Willow Dale Cemetery.

Veteran Participant

Julianna Barton Julianna Rose Barton, 10, of 344 West Washington St., passed away Thursday (Aug. 15, 2013) at her residence, surrounded by her loving family. Born June 4, 2003, in Bradford, she was the a daughter of Frank W. Barton III and Jessica L. Stidd Marrone. She is survived by her father Frank Barton III of Smethport, her mother and stepfather Jessica and Ray Marrone of Bradford; a brother, Alex T. Barton at home, two stepbrothers, Andrew S. (Lynea) Marrone of Ward, Alaska, and Anthony T. (Tanika) Marrone of Goldsboro, N.C.; maternal grandparents, Bob and Kathy Stidd of Bradford; paternal grandparents, Frank and Patricia Barton Jr. of Bradford; paternal great-grandparents, Russell and Ann Trumbull of Lewis Run; paternal stepgrandmother, Patricia Marrone of Eldred; maternal uncle, Bobby Stidd; paternal uncle, Eric (Kara) Barton; step paternal uncles and aunts, Marty and Tracey Marrone, Jimmy and Christina Marrone and Tadd and Tricia Torrey; a niece, Brooklinn Marrone and cousins, Brenden Stidd, Jezlyn Barton, Alex and Josh Marrone and Christy, Patrick and Olivia Torrey, and several great aunts and uncles. Burial was in Willow Dale Cemetery.

Bradford Journal Photo Alyssa Taylor, a many year veteran Festa Italiana participant gives us a little pose before taking ownership of her purchase, a hot meatball sub, August 15th. It was the first night of the event and she was just getting started with the 2-1/2 day festival. (See photos in gallery.)

BRADFORD AREA BUSINESS DIRECTORY Kennedy Street Cafe 11 Kennedy St., Bradford, PA

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USPS-062-740 Postmaster: Send address changes to: Bradford Journal P.O. Box 17 Bradford, PA 16701-0017 Phone: 814-465-3468 Copy Deadline: Noon Saturday Published every Thursday at 69 Garlock Hollow. Bradford, PA 16701, Except for the third Thursday in the month of June. Subscription In Advance (By U.S. Mail) Yearly/$50.00 Within County Yearly/$68.00 Outside County Internet Color Version $15.00 yearly Email Color Version $26.00 yearly

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Grant Nichols Publisher Debi Nichols Editor Don Poleteo Military Correspondant Periodical postage paid at USPS Bradford, PA 16701-9998


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday,August 22, 2013 Page 5

BUSINESS & PERSONAL FINANCES Should You Become Executor of Someone’s Estate? One of the most important decisions you’ll make when writing your will is determining who should be named executor of your estate. Even if you’re just leaving behind household goods and a small savings account, someone – whether appointed by you or the state court – must settle your affairs. Some people consider it an honor – or duty – to take responsibility for ensuring that their loved one’s final wishes are carried out. But serving as an executor can be onerous and time-consuming, even for those with a strong financial or legal background. In a worst-case scenario, executors who act imprudently or in violation of their duties can be sued by beneficiaries and creditors. Plus, you’ll likely have to deal with the dreaded probate, a court-supervised process of locating and determining the value of the deceased’s assets, paying final bills and taxes, and distributing what’s left to the heirs. Before you agree to serve as an estate’s executor, make sure you understand what will be required of you. Major responsibilities often include: • Manage paperwork on behalf of the estate, including the will, trusts, insurance policies, bank, investment and retirement account statements, birth and death certificates, marriage, prenuptial agreement or divorce papers, military service records, real estate deeds, tax records, etc. • If the estate is complicated or likely to be contentious, you may want to hire a lawyer and/or accountant to help navigate the maze of paperwork. • File a certified copy of the will with the local probate court, which will determine if probate is necessary. • If the probate court confirms you as executor, you’ll be issued a document called “letters testamentary,” which gives you legal authority to act on the estate’s behalf, including opening a bank account in the name of the estate to pay outstanding debts (loans, utilities, medical bills, credit card balances, etc.) • Notify all interested parties of the death. These might include: government agencies (Social Security, Veterans Administration, Medicare, U.S. Post Office, DMV); financial institutions; creditors; current and former employers; retirement plan administrators; investment firms; insurance companies; doctors and other professionals; landlord or tenants; utilities, etc. • You’ll often need to send a copy of the death certificate to close out accounts, claim insurance benefits, change ownership of assets or accounts to the estate or a beneficiary, so order ample copies through the funeral home or county health department. • Locate assets, including personal

-by Jason Alderman property, bank accounts and safe deposit box contents, and ensure that they are protected until sold or distributed to inheritors. This may involve updating home and car insurance, changing locks, overseeing appraisals of property that must be sold, etc. • Collect money owed to the estate, such as outstanding wages, insurance benefits, retirement plan benefits and rents. • Notify heirs about their bequest. • File the deceased’s final federal, state and local tax returns, as well as federal and state estate tax returns, if applicable. • Once probate has closed, you will distribute the remaining assets to named beneficiaries.

• Because acting as an executor can be very time-consuming (often taking months or years), you are allowed to charge the estate a fee for your time – usually a percentage of the estate’s value, as dictated by state law. In short, both parties should thoroughly understand what’s required of an estate’s executor to make sure it’s a good fit. There’s no shame in saying no if it’s beyond your abilities, and plenty of professional help is available – and advisable – if you do need assistance.

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Drive Carefully! It’s Back-To-School Time!


Page 6 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, August 22, 2013

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AREA SOCIAL NEWS Bradford Area Calendar of Events: AUGUST 2013: AUGUST 22: Knitting Club 1-3pm Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. Whether you are an expert knitter or have never picked up a set of needles, this informal club is for you. Meets weekly in the Carnegie Room. For more information, call the Bradford Area Public Library at 814-362-6527 AUGUST 23: Petting Zoo 10:30am-11:30am Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. For more information, contact the Bradford Area Public Library at 814-362-6527. AUGUST 24: Crafternoon Bradford Area Public Library, W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. Casual craft program to meet the needs of a busy family. Fun project for families to do at their own convenience. Miscellaneous crafts will be provided throughout the day – stop in and make a fun project! AUGUST 24-25: Crook Farm Country Fair and Old Time Music Festival 10am-5pm Historic Crook Farm, 476 Seaward Avenue, Bradford, PA. Bradford Landmark Society’s annual event featuring bluegrass, folk, and American traditional music and dance, great food, crafts, vendors, demonstrations, and tours to learn about the way of life for Erastus & Betsy Crook, one of Bradford’s pioneer families in the 1870s.

Admission: $4, children under 12 free. For more information, check out: www.bradfordlandmark.org AUGUST 26: Read to Me 10:30am Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA Read to Me is a special storytime where children can read to a special library guest. For more information, contact the Library at 814-362-6527. AUGUST 27: First Day of School Bradford Area School District Writing Center 3-5pm Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. To assist students and adults who need guidance with homework or work-related writing. For more information, e-mail marietroskosky@hotmail.com AUGUST 28: Story Time 10:30am Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. Preschool craft-related program. Opportunity for young children to interact with others their age while listening to stories, making projects, and enjoying snacks. For more information, contact the Library at 814-362-6527. AUGUST 29: Knitting Club 1-3pm Bradford Area Public Library, 67 W. Washington Street, Bradford, PA. Whether you are an expert knitter or have never picked up a set of needles, this informal club is for you. Meets weekly in the Carnegie Room. For more information, call the Bradford Area Public Library at 814-3626527

Crook Farm Country Fair (Continued from page 2)

Bradford Post 108 Friday - August 23rd DINNER SPECIAL:

Garlic Spaghetti with Scampi

Friday Fish Fries Members & Guests Only 22 Pine St. Bradford

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blankets; Betty Burkehouse – Homemade scarfs & Christmas items; Partylite by Pattie Fitzsimmons; Robert Bean – wood items, frames, wine rack, games, candy dispensers & desk organizers; Marvin & Helen Riddle – beeswax candles, woodturning, cutting boards and more; Josie Hind – children and adult handcrafted jewelry sets; South Hill Designs by Paula Bayline; Inspired by Peaches – furniture & decorations; Behan Unique – customized pictures, handpainted glasses & mugs ; and , Randy Kohler – wooden toys. So come on out and enjoy the Fair! There’s plenty of vendors, food, music and entertainment. And, don’t forget to tour the Crook Farmhouse and buildings while you’re there!

Bradford TOPS #16 The weekly meeting of Top’s # 16 was held on Thursday afternoon, August 15th, at the First Presbyterian Church was called to order by Leader Vickie Johnson with the Top’s Pledge and the song “The More We Get Together”. There were 26 members weighing in with a loss of 20 3/4 lbs. Best Loser of the Week was Pat Foote. Best Loser in Waiting and Officer of the Week was Anna Wells. Inspirations were given by Bev Hannon - “Courage is like a muscle, we strengthen it with use.” The Helpful Hint was given by Sue Della Valle “For dry fruit place them in the freezer for a half an hour before cutting. Take the fruit out and cut with a hot knife (dipping the knife in hot water) cut up the fruit”. Fashion Tip and Joke were given by Jeannie Miller, “Blue is the color, which will give you confidences in whatever you do”. The forbidden food for next week is Pizza. A reminder: next week is our picnic and we would like to have members come at 12:30 p.m. so we can help with table arrangements and setting up. The program was given by Jamie Larson on Motivation’s for Dieters, like the importance’s of keeping a a food chart, (bite it, write it). Do lots of activities to keep busy and many more. The meeting was adjourned with the Friendship Circle and the Top’s Prayer.

BIRTHS Daughter, Aug. 10, to Britney Kohler, Bradford , PA. Son, Aug. 11, to Monica and Jason Baker, Bradford, PA. Son, Aug. 16, to Chelsea Clark, Bradford,PA. Son, Aug. 16, to Sara Burgess and Dustin Holley, Lewis Run, PA.

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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday,August 22, 2013 Page 7

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Page 8 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, August 22, 2013

Look For Fried Dough

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34th Annual

Aug. 24 & 25 Sat. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sun. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Crook Farm Country Fair

476 Seaward Ave., Bradford, PA

Fun for the Whole Family!

This Year..... More Stages More Food Vendors Including Organic Food

More Entertainment OLD TIME COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL BEGINS FRIDAY, AUGUST 23RD AND RUNS THROUGH SUNDAY, AUGUST 25TH

ENTERTAINMENT ON THE MAIN STAGE SATURDAY, AUGUST 24TH: Bradford Journal Photo Left to right, Joanne Feely 15, Sierra Campbell 18, and Brooke Butler 17 walk along Festival Way, during the Festa Italiana, August 15th. They tell us that while they were looking for fried dough, they had to settle for another tasty Italian treat, spumoni. (See photos in gallery.)

Looking For Prizes

12pm – 12:30 Allegheny Hellbenders 12:45 – 1:15 Danielson/Hampsey 1:30 - 2:00 Dusty Trout Band 2:15 pm – 5:00 Crook Farm All Stars Keith Blackmon tribute w/Joe Kwiatkowski Hank Williams Tribute Jack Blodgett, Cassy Ann Powley

SUNDAY, AUGUST 25TH: 10:30am – 11:45am - Sunday Morning Harmony & Larry Combs - Gospel Sing Around 12 pm – 12:30 Rosebud Ramblers 12:45 pm – 1:30 WNY FiddleKids 1:45 - 2:45 pm - Old Time Square Dance Traveling Grangers 3:00 - 3:45 Egypt Hollow 4:00 - 4:45 p.m. Hamlin Station Bluegrass

MORE MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT

In the Jam Tent - On the Back Porch of the Farmhouse - and Around the Grounds

DEMONSTRATIONS AND EVENTS (ALL DEMONSTRATIONS & EVENTS TIMES ARE FOR BOTH DAYS 10 AM - 5 PM. UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED)

•Weavers • Quilters (in barn) • Blacksmith • Petting Zoo (Saturday) • Pony Rides with John Schoolmaster 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. • Kiddie Carnival • Broom Maker • Woodcarver • Civil War Ladies • Quilt Raffle • String Instruments • Chair Caning • Candle Making •Civil War Encampmehnt • Farm Tours • Story Teller • 1:30 pm Old Time Round & Square Dance

Bradford Journal Photo People are never too old to fish for prizes in the duck pond. Here, to prove our point, Matt Dennis 16, on the left, and Alex Colosimo 15, on the right, do a little fishing during this year’s Festa Italiana, August 15th. They tell us they’re just getting started, and that “it will probably take the next couple days of the event to get the whole experience”. (See photos in gallery.)

Admission $4.00 - Children under 12 with adult - FREE Proceeds go to the preservation and restoration of the Farm, Bakery, and Spring School Program

Food Stands Around Grounds Food For Everyone:

Chicken - Served 12-4 p.m., walking Tacos, popcorn, hot dogs, hamburgers, soft drinks, funnel cake, cotton candy, ice cream, snow cones, baked goods

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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday,August 22, 2013 Page 9

BACK TO SCHOOL!

Safety for School Days Drivers - Watch Out! •Stop Well Behind Buses Discharging Or Loading Children •Slow Down For Children Waiting For Buses

Tell Your Children! • Stand Away From The Roadway While Waiting For The Bus •Stay Seated While The Bus Is Moving •Get Off And On Buses At Designated Stops Only •Watch Out For Automobiles When Leaving The Bus •No Running In The School Hallways •No Pushing Or Shoving •No Yelling Or Fighting •Stay On School Grounds During School Hours •No Horse Play In The Lunch Rooms

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Page 10 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, August 22, 2013

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Sold Out Of Cannoli Convenient, Comfortable, Affordable

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Applications available at: The Rental Office, 2 South Avenue, Bradford, PA 16701 814/368-3342 Voice/Relay http://crossgatespropertymanagement.com/properties Applicants must be at or below HUD’s yearly income limits which are adjusted annually. Please call the Rental Office for current income limits. The complete eligibility criteria policy is available upon request.

Bradford Journal Photo Bradford Marching Owls Boosters, Thara Tyler, on the left, and Margo Quick on the right, work the Ice Cream and Cannoli booth during Festa Italiana, August 15th. They tell us they sold out of Cannoli within 45 minutes. (See photos in gallery.)


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday,August 22, 2013 Page 11

ON THE HEALTHY SIDE The Back Pain That’s Hard To Find (NAPSI)—Chronic low back pain is an experience shared by millions—and a mystery that often goes unsolved for years. The National Institutes of Health says Americans spend at least $50 billion a year on low back pain, and it is the most common cause of job-related disability. And much of that issue can be blamed on the difficulty of diagnosing the cause. Causes of Low Back Pain Low back pain is often generalized as coming from the spine, particularly degenerating disks. But studies have shown that 15 to 30 percent of chronic low back pain is actually caused by dysfunction of the sacroiliac (SI) joint, which transfers weight and movement between your upper body and your legs. The SI joint is frequently overlooked as a potential source of pain. SI joint pain can arise from a traumatic event or from degenerative conditions and can affect men and women of all ages. The pain can occur in the back, pelvis and buttock area or hip and it can shoot down the leg in a fashion that mimics sciatica. And that, in turn, can inhibit walking, sitting or sleeping. Most spine surgeons, however, are trained to look first at the vertebrae and spinal disks as sources of the pain, rather than the SI joint. And most MRIs and Xrays of aging spines show degenerating or narrowing disks that tend to support the more common diagnosis. One study has found that among “failed” spinal fusion patients—people who had their lumbar vertebrae fused and were still in pain afterward—the SI joint turned out to be the culprit in well over half the cases. Low Back Pain Treatments Treatments for SI joint pain include physical therapy, chiropractic manipulations, oral medications, and injections. If these treatments are not effective, surgery may be the next option considered. “We have come a long way in correctly identifying and treating the source of low back pain in our patients,” said Dr. David W. Polly, Chief of Spine Service at the University of Minnesota. Recent advances in minimally invasive surgical treatment for the SI joint offer a promising alternative for those in chronic pain. iFuse Implant System Solution The most common surgery in the U.S. for the SI joint is the iFuse Implant System from SI-BONE, which is intended for sacroiliac joint fusion for conditions including sacroiliac joint disruptions and degenerative sacroiliitis. iFuse involves the insertion of small titanium implants to stabilize and fuse the damaged joint. The personal and economic cost of back pain can be monumental, particularly when the source is not accurately identified. Chronic SI joint disorders remain (Continued on page 12)

AICR HealthTalk

-by Karen Collins, MS, RD, CDN American Institute for Cancer Research Q: I see there are California avocados Avocados contain the B vitamin folate and Florida avocados. Is there a differ- (especially California avocados), vitamin ence in nutritional value? K and fiber. Both avocados also contain A: Florida avocados are the larger, lutein (the carotene “cousin” of beta-carsmooth-skinned choices. California avo- otene that may promote eye health), but cados sold in supermarkets are the Hass the amounts don’t come close to what’s variety, and are smaller and have a pebbly in truly high-lutein vegetables like kale, skin that turns from green to a purplish- spinach and other cooked greens. Many black when ripe. The biggest nutritional people prefer the rich flavor of California difference between California and Flori- avocados, and for guacamole and other da avocados is their fat content. For each dips, it’s hard to beat their creamy texture. golf ball-sized portion (two tablespoons, For slices in a salad, however, some prefer or two to three thin slices), a California the way the Florida type holds its shape. avocado such as Hass contains 4.6 grams Either is a great way to add flavor, fiber of fat and the same portion of a Florida and a healthy fat to your meal while addavocado averages 3 grams of fat. More ing essentially zero sodium. For weight than half the fat in avocados is the healthy control, simply enjoy their good taste in monounsaturated fat (the type in olive moderate portions. oil) and saturated fat is minimal. You may sometimes see Florida avocados marketed as “lite” avocados – an effort to highlight their lower fat content. This difference in fat content means Florida avocados are a little lower in calories than the California types. For that golf ball-sized portion, the Florida variety has 36 calories versus 50 for the California one. Otherwise, nutritional value of the two types is similar.

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Page 12 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, August 22, 2013

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How to Get Kids Excited about the New School Year (StatePoint) In a perfect world, all children would be enthusiastic about starting a new school year. But in the real world, some children will be reluctant, nervous, or annoyed about

Taking A Small Break

Bradford Journal Photo Terri Lucas on the left, and Jen Morgan took a shift in the hot sausage concession in the food court, Thursday, August 15th on the first night of the Italian Festival. Here they take a break after a big rush for their sandwiches. (See photos in gallery.)

The Back Pain That’s Hard To Find

exchanging their summer fun for the classroom. How do you get kids motivated about going back to school? While you can’t dole out pep talks during the school day, you can take steps at home to get kids excited about school all year long: Set an Example Off to work? If you act grumpy about the day ahead of you, your kids will take your cue. Over breakfast, be positive and upbeat. If your kids have apprehensions about school, their friends or after school activities, talk to them in a constructive way about what’s bothering them. At dinner, remember to check in with them again. Tell them about what you did that day and ask them about what they learned. Make Schoolwork Fun Cool school supplies can inspire your kids to stay organized and motivated. Think colorful and cheerful designs and personalized back to school supplies, which can give kids a sense of ownership and pride over their school work. For example, MyChronicleBooks, creates folders, journals, spiral notebooks and even stickers that can be customized with names and school subjects. To foster after school learning, thinking, doodling and dreaming, consider personalized Ivy and Bean journals. Go the Extra Mile Encourage your kids to do more than just go to school and come home. It’s in their art classes, on the basketball court and playing in the concert band where they will discover their talents and in-

(Continued from page 11) a frequently undiagnosed condition, but once it is pinpointed, the iFuse technology offers a potential solution. (NAPSI)—A new educational program Learn More: For more information about the diagnosis and treatment of SI is building on children’s natural affinity joint pain, as well as the iFuse Implant for animals to encourage kids to be more System, visit www.si-bone.com calm, confident and caring. The program promotes the virtues of shelter pets—Mutt-i-grees®—and uses them to teach children social and emotional skills. Developed by North Shore Animal BEER ICE CREAM League America’s (NSALA) Pet Savers NY LOTTO Foundation in collaboration with Yale Restaurant closes 1/2 hour University School of the 21st Century and Hours: before the store funded by the Cesar Millan Foundation, Sun - Thurs 7 am - 9 pm the program is called the Mutt-i-grees August Special: Curriculum. Based on the emerging field Fri & Sat 7 am - 10 pm of social and emotional learning, it is de.75¢ Coffee & $3.00 signed to help kids manage their emotions, CONVENIENCE STORE Breakfast Sandwich get along with others, acquire empathy Open 7 Days A Week Both are available and compassion, and discover essential decision-making and teamwork skills. from 7 am - 9 am Recently, actress Renée Felice Smith loaned her time and talent to co-direct and film a Public Service Announcement

terests they didn’t know they have. Extracurricular and after school activities provide a great social outlet for kids and are where some of the best memories of school days are made. If the school doesn’t have programs that interest your child, investigate other classes, teams and activities offered locally. Customize Lunch Add a little flair to lunch room drudgery. Remember to always pack a favorite snack or dessert to give your kids something to look forward to midday. From pirates and princesses to dinosaurs and trains, ditch the paper bag in favor of a lunch box featuring your children’s interests. And personalizing the lunch box with their names can help prevent lost lunch mishaps. More information can be found at www.MyChronicleBooks.com. From brighter moods to better grades, getting kids excited about the school year will have positive consequences.

Pairing Kids And Pets To Promote Learning

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(PSA) for the Mutt-i-grees Curriculum. Smith, who appears on the CBS series “NCIS: Los Angeles,” was joined by a cast made up of 35 pre-K, elementary, middle and high school student volunteers. In addition to the human cast, the PSA features several Mutt-i-grees. The program is now in operation in over 2,000 schools nationwide and NSALA hopes that the PSA will bring the benefits of the Mutt-i-grees Curriculum to the attention of other school administrators. Said Smith, “The Mutt-i-grees Curriculum leads change by using children’s innate love for animals to teach a very simple lesson: Give love and you shall receive love.” To view the PSA or to learn more about the program and North Shore Animal League America, visit www.education. muttigrees.org or www.animalleague.org

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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday,August 22, 2013 Page 13

THAT’S ENTERTAINMENT! August 13: Olympus Has Fallen R Big Wedding R Company You Keep R Emperor Includes PG-13

What Maisie Knew R Hatchet III Not Rated CAT. 8 Not Rated Deadly Swarm R

KENNEDY STREET CAFE

VIDEO SELECTIONS Super Eruption Not Rated Super Storm PG-13 Once Upon a Time: The Complete Second Season TV-PG Compulsion Not Rated Hot Flashes R 3 Geezers! Not Rated Guillotines R Lost and Found in Armenia Not Rated Return of Joe Rich Not Rated WWE: Money in the Bank 2013 PG Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec PG Casper’s Scare School:

Season 2 Not Rated Chihuahua Too! Not Rated Winx Club: Magical Adventure Not Rated Totally Spies!: Season 1 Not Rated Bad Parents Unrated Donkey Kong Country Not Rated August 20: Epic PG Scary Movie V Unrated Killing Season R No One Lives R Shadow Dancer R Boardwalk Empire: The Complete Third Season TV-MA

Evidence Not Rated Rapture-Palooza R American Ghost Story Not Rated Amour PG-13 StreetDance PG-13 The Mini-Witch PG Who’s Watching the Kids? Not Rated Alvin and the Chipmunks: Driving Dave Crazier

Not Rated Pixie Hollow Games G Return to Never Land Special Edition; Includes Digital Copy G Scooby-Doo!: Stage Fright Not Rated Scooby-Doo!: Stage Fright Includes Digital Copy; UltraViolet Blu-ray/ DVD Not Rated

Solution on page 15

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Page 14 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, August 22, 2013

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CHRONOLOGICAL LISTINGS Engagements, Marriages, Births & Deaths

ENGAGEMENTS:

(None) MARRIAGES: (None) BIRTHS: AUG. 8, 2013: Daughter,Aug. 8, to Robert and Kimberly (Ramaege) Buchanan, Olean, NY. AUG. 9, 2013: Daughter, Aug. 9, to Harold (Moose) and Jennifer Reed, Salamanca, NY. AUG. 10, 2013:

Daughter, Aug. 10, to Bridget Laktash, Kane, PA. Daughter, Aug. 10, to Britney Kohler, Bradford , PA. AUG. 11, 2013: Son, Aug. 11, to Monica and Jason Baker, Bradford, PA. Son, Aug. 11, to Michael and Kristian Smith, Cattaraugus, NY. AUG. 12, 2013: Son, Aug. 12, to Joshua and Terri Peters, Olean, NY. Son, Aug. 12, to Jamie Stutz, Olean, NY. AUG. 13, 2013:

Smethport, PA. SHIRA, Janet Forsythe - 86, of Florida, formerly of Smethport, PA. AUG. 13, 2013: JOHNSON, Tyler J. - 18, of Bradford, PA. HERZOG, Donald M. – 88, of Naples, FL, formerly of Smethport, PA. AUG. 14, 2013: BURTON, Edna L. Dickerson - 100, of East Smethport, PA. LEACH, Dennis P. DEATHS: - 65, of Roulette, PA. AUG. 9, 2013: AUG. 15, 2013: COOK, Carl W. - BARTON, Julianna 80, of Wilcox, PA. R. – 10, of BradAUG. 10, 2013: ford, PA. GEER, Marilyn K. Shaw - 68, of Son, Aug. 13, to Caitlin and Anthony Johnson, Salamanca, NY. AUG. 15, 2013: Son, Aug. 15, to Paige Reynolds and Alex Hayes, Salamanca, NY. AUG. 16, 2013 Son, Aug. 16, to Chelsea Clark, Bradford,PA. Son, Aug. 16, to Sara Burgess and Dustin Holley, Lewis Run, PA.

YOUR WEEKLY HOROSCOPE AUGUST 22 - AUGUST 28, 2013

ARIES - (Mar. 21 - Apr. 19) A picture will become clearer and so too will a way forward for you and you-knowwho to finally build a necessary bridge. TAURUS - (Apr. 20 - May 20) You appear to be in a situation that involves placating others and one that expects a lot from you in that respect. GEMINI - (May 21 - June 20) What appears daunting and uncertain is, naturally, instilling a sense of fear. It’s time to summon courage to defeat it. CANCER - (June 21 - July 22) If anything is being done to safeguard yourself from upset experienced in the past, then prepare to experience a long-awaited freedom. LEO - (July 23, - Aug. 22) Time isn’t on your side in ways you wish it was but that doesn’t mean you won’t be breathing a sigh of relief when you succeed. VIRGO - (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22) Smile sweetly and leave aggression out of it, no matter how much support you believe you have from others to do so. LIBRA - (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22) To know the reality of a situation has got to be preferable to not knowing, even if it causes your eyebrows to rise. SCORPIO - (Oct. 23, - Nov. 21) You can get something you want but might need to be more flexible and less stubborn to get it. SAGITTARIUS - (Nov. 22 - Dec. 20) A promising development is imminent. CAPRICORN - (Dec. 21 - Jan. 19) You believe time isn’t on your side to bring about a development that will make you feel more secure.You’re about to be reassured that time isn’t working against you. AQUARIUS - (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18) Something needs to be said. The sky insists that saying it will do you and someone else a world of good. PISCES - (Feb. 19 - Mar. 20) Pressure is likely to continue for a little while yet. In the meantime, let a very positive development shine brightly over all that’s stressful.

A Learning Ally For Students And Teachers (NAPSI)—From elementary school through college, teachers are encouraging their students to listen to smartphones, iPods and iPads—both in class and at home. Books That Speak To Students Those devices are not just playing music and games. Instead, the pupils are using them with an app to listen to humannarrated literature, children’s books and required textbooks for school. The audiobooks and app come from Learning Ally, a national nonprofit that supports over 300,000 students with print disabilities such as dyslexia and visual impairment. Educators as well as parents are discovering that audiobooks are remarkably effective in helping students become better readers and more effective learners. Teachers report that dyslexic students who have spent years in special education, hating and avoiding reading, became readers in a day once they could access their books with this easy-to-use technology. Gaining access to the same books their peers are reading gets these students on an even playing field and helps them gain confidence in school. Many of them are now even reading “just for fun” for the first time in their lives. As one dyslexic student explains, “I like how listening reinforces the information for me. When I listen and follow along in the book, I get it from two senses—hearing and seeing each word.” How Teachers Keep Track Learning Ally’s educational technology is also helping teachers maximize their students’ use of audiobooks and keep better track of what they are learning. The organization has developed a Web-based tool that enables teachers to administer and track their students’ use of audiobooks from its library of over 80,000 downloadable textbooks and popular literature titles. The system, known as Teacher Ally, makes it easy for teachers to quickly find and distribute required reading material to students according to their educational needs. After adding titles to each student’s personalized “bookshelf,” teachers can download them directly to the student’s individual listening device or computer. Teacher Ally then helps teachers track student progress, including how many pages they’ve read of each title on their bookshelf. Through an efficient dashboard interface, multiple teachers at a school can access their own profiles, add individual student accounts, optimize and personalize instruction, and follow up with each child. The system saves a tremendous amount of time for busy teachers—while helping students with dyslexia and other print disabilities get the most out of their audiobook learning resources. Learn More: You can find further facts online at: www.LearningAlly.org/Teacher-Ally

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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday,August 22, 2013 Page 15

JOURNAL CLASSIFIED ADS CARS/VANS/ TRUCKS: 2008 Cadillac CTS, AWD, like new, less than 10k miles, $23,000. 814-368-5054 APARTMENTS FOR RENT:

8/1/13. $550/mo plus G&E. Call 814-368-4324

Enjoy Festa Italiana

3BR house at 10 Walker Ave, off st. parking, lg yard, $700/mo. + Util. Call Nicole, 3313730 Smethport: Very nice multiple BR homes (5,3,2) for rent with spacious yards. Call 5586112

Hospital location, 3BR, electric incl., $625/mo. Corner of N. Bennett & State St. Garage Incl. 814-331-3730 Very small 2BR trailer, kitchen furLower 2BR apt nished, water in4BR, 2BA House cluded. No pets, Call 814-366-1447 you pay utilities. $400/mo. 3621BR Upper, $400 5491 Bradford Journal Photo + Gas & Elect., 24 On Festival Way in Bradford, during the Walker Ave., No HOMES FOR Festa Italiana, August 15th, Joan Graves pets 558-3143 SALE: walks with her grandchildren, Eli Whole1BR house for rent. Newly remodeled, $425/ mo. Lewis Run References & Deposit 362-3310

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3 Bedroom lower apt in Bradford., MISCELLANOUS: no pets. Please call 1-716-373-3360 •2 End Tables & 1 Coffee Table set; Apartments for $40/set rent immediately. •1 Large wardNo pets robe; $35 716-378-2407 •1 Bench w/ back heart design $35 Apartments on (814) 596-0066 the Square Accepting Section 8 For Sale: 2 Grave Call 814-726-1108 Lot, Veterans Section McKean MeClean, lg, 2BR, 1BA, morial Park Rearear deck, 2nd fl, sonable Price Call: W/D, private ga- 814-598-7260 rage, no pets/ smoking, util. not Lawn Tractor: incl. $750/mo, call 12hp, new parts, 814-558-0532 asking $575. Call 598-0728 HOMES FOR RENT: 2BR trailer on front lot w/front porch, carport, new carpet & all appliances. Avail.

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Page 16 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, August 22, 2013

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JUST PASSING TIME THEME: 44. Officially al- 8. Bone hollow 9. Highlands hill“Back To School” lowed

ACROSS: 1. Group of wives 6. *Requires parental involvement 9. Cyberspace soliloquy 13.Yawning 14. Barley bristle 15. It’s controversial in fight against crime 16. Japanese bed 17. Decompose 18. *Found in art class 19. *Pedagogue 21. *Energy outlet 23. Magic’s infection 24. It often holds 24 25. Tax pro 28. First female Attorney General 30. Breath freshener 35. Two quarters 37. Grannies 39. Top of Lady Liberty 40. Seed covering 41. Virgo’s brightest star 43. “Laughing on the inside” in text message

side 10. It’s often denoted in red 11. Half of binary code 12. Used for styling 15. Trickery 20. 0 and 2, e.g. 22. “C’___ la vie!” 24. Pine, e.g. 25. *Calcium sulfate’s common name 26. Humorous slang for “Paris” 27. Set straight 29. Famous valley 31. This king was a merry old soul 32. Treasure collection 33. Perform in 34. *Not to be left behind 36. Custard dessert 38. Capone’s mark 42. Enophile’s senDOWN: sory concern 1. Dagger handle 45. Funny business 2. Flu symptom 49. Actor DiCap3. Pro ____ rio 4. Period 51. Goal-oriented 5. Large upright activity stone 54. Inspiration for 6.Young salmon 7. *Pencil type

46. Way, way off 47. Diabolical 48. Doghouse 50. Cupid’s counterpart 52. “The ___” by The Doors 53. Swerve 55. Bovine sound 57. *Junior’s ruler? 60. *Required substance 64. Editor’s insertion mark 65. Tarzan’s mom, e.g. 67. Papal court 68. Like a video game bird 69. *Sophomore’s grade 70. *Class action to find president 71. 100 centavos 72. Baseball Giant and hall-of-famer 73. “The Sun Also _____”

(Crossword Solution on page 15)

poets and musi- 58. Units of work 59. Infamous Rocians man Emperor 56. Eyes 60. Blowhole 57. All there 61. Wraths

WORD SEEK

62. Not naughty 63. Beanery sign 64. Upper limit 66. *Teacher’s apple-giver


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday,August 22, 2013 Page 17 Sweet Potato Pie with Fig and Pecan Topping Makes 8 servings Pie: 1 ready-made refrigerated pie crust 1 can (15-ounce) sweet potatoes 1/3 cup packed light brown sugar 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 large eggs 3/4 cup whipping cream Topping: 1/4 cup butter 1/4 cup packed light brown sugar 1 cup stemmed, chopped Blue Ribbon Orchard Choice or Sun-Maid Figs 2 tablespoons maple syrup 1 tablespoon brandy or water 1/2 cup chopped, toasted pecans Preheat oven to 450°F. Let pie crust stand at room temperature 15 minutes; unroll and press against side and bottom of 9-inch pie pan (glass recommended). Fold excess crust under and press together to form thick crust edge; flute. Drain sweet potatoes; mash or whirl in food processor until smooth (potatoes should measure 1 1/8 cups). In medium bowl whisk together sweet potatoes, brown sugar, spice and salt. Whisk in eggs, one at a time, and cream. Pour filling into crust. Bake pie 15 minutes; reduce heat to 350°F, shield edge of pie with a ring (or strips) of foil to prevent overbrowning, and continue baking for 25 to 30 minutes or until center moves slightly when shaken. Remove pie to wire rack to cool. For topping, in small saucepan stir butter and brown sugar over medium heat until melted. Stir in figs, maple syrup and brandy. Bring to a simmer and cook, stirring constantly, 2 minutes or until reduced to a thick, glossy syrup. Remove from heat and stir in pecans. Spoon evenly over warm pie. Cool. Chill for up to 8 hours before serving.

Chocolate Ganache Tart With Glazed Figs and Nuts

FAMILY FEATURES

hether you’re hosting a family dinner or making a dessert for a friend’s party, bring something special to the holiday table with these amazing dessert recipes. Each delicious bite stars the unique flavor only found in figs. With their rich honey-like sweetness and delightfully crunchy edible seeds, figs take foods from good to great. Available year-round from Valley Fig Growers, California dried figs are ready to eat right out of the package or can be easily diced, sliced or poached for cooking and baking. For more holiday recipes, visit www.valleyfig.com.

W

German Chocolate Cake With Broiled Fig and Coconut Topping Makes 2 single-layer cakes Cake: 1 18 1/4-ounce German Chocolate Cake Mix (Check cake mix for additional ingredients — oil, eggs, water) Fig-Coconut Topping: 1 cup stemmed, chopped Blue Ribbon Orchard Choice or Sun-Maid Figs 1 cup packed light brown sugar 1/2 cup butter 6 tablespoons whipping cream 1 cup flaked coconut 1/2 cup chopped, toasted pecans Follow package directions and prepare two 8-inch round cakes. Bake and cool as directed. For topping, in medium saucepan combine figs, sugar, butter and cream. Stir over medium heat until mixture comes to a simmer. Simmer 1 minute, stirring constantly. Stir in coconut and pecans. Spread warm topping on top of each cake layer, dividing evenly. Place one cake at a time on baking sheet or heatproof pan. Broil 4 to 5 inches from heat for 15 to 30 seconds, or until topping bubbles, watching constantly. Remove from oven. Repeat with second cake. Cool. Transfer cakes to serving plates to serve.

Chocolate Fig Crinkles Makes about 30 cookies 1 cup packed light brown sugar 1/4 cup butter, softened 2 ounces unsweetened chocolate, melted 2 large eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup all-purpose flour 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/8 teaspoon salt 1 cup stemmed, finely chopped Blue Ribbon Orchard Choice or Sun-Maid Figs 1/3 cup confectioners’ sugar Beat brown sugar and butter with electric mixer on medium speed until blended. Beat in melted chocolate. Beat in eggs, one at a time, and vanilla. In medium bowl, stir together flour, cocoa powder, baking powder and salt. On low speed, slowly beat into chocolate mixture. Stir in figs. Cover bowl and chill 3 hours. To bake, preheat oven to 350°F. Form 1-tablespoon portions of dough into balls. Roll in confectioners’ sugar. Place balls, 2 1/2 inches apart, on greased baking sheet. Place sheet in center of oven and bake cookies 7 to 9 minutes, until crackled on top and set around edges. Cool on wire rack.

Makes 8 to 10 servings 1 refrigerated pie crust, at room temperature 1 cup packed (6 ounces) Blue Ribbon Orchard Choice or Sun-Maid Figs, stemmed and halved* 2/3 cup water 1/3 cup packed brown sugar 2 tablespoons almond-, hazelnutor orange-flavored liqueur 1/2 cup whipping cream 6 ounces bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped 1 cup unsalted or lightly salted mixed nuts (omit peanuts and select hazelnuts, cashews, Brazil nuts, almonds and pecans) Whipped cream, optional Preheat oven to 450°F. Unroll pie crust and press into bottom and up side of 10-inch tart pan with removable bottom. Prick all over with fork. Bake until light brown, 9 to 11 minutes. Cool on rack. In small saucepan, combine figs and water. Bring to boil over high heat, then reduce heat and simmer until liquid is reduced to 1/4 cup, about 2 minutes. Stir in brown sugar and simmer, stirring, 1 minute. Remove from heat. Stir in liqueur. Let steep 10 minutes. Strain figs through fine-meshed sieve, reserving syrup. While figs cool, in small saucepan, bring cream to simmer over medium heat. Remove from heat, add chocolate and stir until smooth. Spread over baked crust. Refrigerate 5 minutes or until chocolate begins to firm up but is not set. Alternate fig slices and nuts in concentric circles on tart, pressing slightly into chocolate to secure. Chill 2 hours or up to 1 day. To serve, brush figs and nuts with reserved syrup. Remove side from tart pan and place tart on platter. Cut into wedges. Top with whipped cream, if desired. *Cut large figs (greater than 1 1/4-inch diameter at the base) into three lengthwise slices.

Chewy Ginger-Molasses Fig Cookies Makes about 30 cookies 2/3 cup packed light brown sugar 1/2 cup vegetable oil 1 large egg white 3 tablespoons light molasses 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger 1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon salt 1 cup stemmed, finely chopped Blue Ribbon Orchard Choice or Sun-Maid Figs 1/3 cup granulated sugar Preheat oven to 350°F. Beat brown sugar and oil in large bowl with electric mixer on medium speed until blended. Beat in egg white and molasses. In separate bowl combine flour, ginger, soda, cinnamon and salt. On low speed, slowly beat in flour mixture until combined. With spoon, stir in figs. Shape 1-tablespoon portions of dough into balls. Roll in granulated sugar. Place 2 1/2 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Place sheet in center of oven and bake cookies 7 to 9 minutes, until crackled on top and set around edges. Cool on wire rack.


Page 18 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, August 22, 2013

A Matter of Priorities

www.bradfordjournal.com

34th Annual

Aug. 24 & 25 Sat. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sun. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Crook Farm Country Fair

476 Seaward Ave., Bradford, PA

Fun for the Whole Family!

This Year..... More Stages More Food Vendors Including Organic Food

More Entertainment OLD TIME COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL BEGINS FRIDAY, AUGUST 23RD AND RUNS THROUGH SUNDAY, AUGUST 25TH Bradford Journal Photo During the Italian Festival, August 15th, Brett Butler, head baseball coach at UPB talks with a returning student, Andrea Gundlock and her mother Laura Gundlock of West Field, NY. Andrea, a soccer player is getting ready for another semester in Bradford, but first, even before unpacking, had to take advantage of the festival. (See gallery for photos.)

Family From Olean

ENTERTAINMENT ON THE MAIN STAGE SATURDAY, AUGUST 24TH: 12pm – 12:30 Allegheny Hellbenders 12:45 – 1:15 Danielson/Hampsey 1:30 - 2:00 Dusty Trout Band 2:15 pm – 5:00 Crook Farm All Stars Keith Blackmon tribute w/Joe Kwiatkowski Hank Williams Tribute Jack Blodgett, Cassy Ann Powley

SUNDAY, AUGUST 25TH: 10:30am – 11:45am - Sunday Morning Harmony & Larry Combs - Gospel Sing Around 12 pm – 12:30 Rosebud Ramblers 12:45 pm – 1:30 WNY FiddleKids 1:45 - 2:45 pm - Old Time Square Dance Traveling Grangers 3:00 - 3:45 Egypt Hollow 4:00 - 4:45 p.m. Hamlin Station Bluegrass

MORE MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT

In the Jam Tent - On the Back Porch of the Farmhouse - and Around the Grounds

DEMONSTRATIONS AND EVENTS (ALL DEMONSTRATIONS & EVENTS TIMES ARE FOR BOTH DAYS 10 AM - 5 PM. UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED)

•Weavers • Quilters (in barn) • Blacksmith • Petting Zoo (Saturday) • Pony Rides with John Schoolmaster 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. • Kiddie Carnival • Broom Maker • Woodcarver • Civil War Ladies • Quilt Raffle • String Instruments • Chair Caning • Candle Making •Civil War Encampmehnt • Farm Tours • Story Teller • 1:30 pm Old Time Round & Square Dance

Bradford Journal Photo An Olean, NY family enjoys the entertainment on the stage, August 15th during the open ceremonies of the Italian Festival. Amy Houghtaling, at the right is seen with (l-r) son Laverne Sterner 13, granddaughter Destiny Showers 2-1/2, granddaughter Ashley Wackwitz 1-1/2, and son Vincent Sterner 11. They come every year because they enjoy the entertainment. (See photos in gallery.)

Admission $4.00 - Children under 12 with adult - FREE Proceeds go to the preservation and restoration of the Farm, Bakery, and Spring School Program

Food Stands Around Grounds Food For Everyone:

Chicken - Served 12-4 p.m., walking Tacos, popcorn, hot dogs, hamburgers, soft drinks, funnel cake, cotton candy, ice cream, snow cones, baked goods

FREE ADMISSION

For Musicians Entering The Fairgrounds


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday,August 22, 2013 Page 19

How Cancer Caregivers Can Help Their Loved One (NAPSI)—If you’re among the more than 65 million Americans who care for a loved one living with a chronic illness, you have a unique understanding of this critical role. The value of caregiving is particularly evident for the more than 15,600 people who are estimated to be diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) each year, as persons diagnosed with CLL are typically elderly and often require care for an extended period of time. “Caregivers such as me play an active role in the management of our loved one’s disease, especially in the case of a chronic blood cancer like CLL,” said Karenann Pantozzi of Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey. “Some patients, like my partner Bob, may experience symptoms from their illness and side effects from treatment, so I found it to be important to provide the supportive care at home that he needs to help manage any problems.” Caregivers may be able to help their loved one remain in their own home and community while still providing the quality care and support they require. This may include driving to appointments, ensuring compliance to medications and preparing meals. Jayshree Shah, Nurse Practitioner, Hackensack University Hospital, says, “To best manage chronic illness care, it’s important for patients to have a full team of health care providers and supportive caregivers to understand and discuss all treatment options.” To be able to help their loved one, caregivers of CLL patients should strike a balance between time for themselves and maintaining an active role. Nearly threequarters of family caregivers report not going to the doctor as often as they should, 63 percent have poor eating habits and 58

percent have worse exercise habits than before taking on their role as caregivers. As a caregiver, you should: 1. Take charge of your life, and don’t let your loved one’s illness take center stage. You’re doing a very hard job and deserve time just for yourself. 2. Encourage your loved one to talk to you about his or her emotions. Patients with CLL may experience depression or anxiety, so it’s important to maintain an open dialogue. 3. Join a CLL or blood cancer support group with your loved one to hear other people’s stories, gain valuable insights and learn coping strategies. 4. Be open to the various online resources that are available for those living with CLL, including resources offering helpful tips on managing finances and navigating insurance during this difficult time. 5. Educate yourself about CLL. Knowledge is power. CLL is one of four main types of leukemia. It occurs when white blood cells, or lymphocytes, in bone marrow multiply, replace normal lymphocytes in the marrow and lymph nodes, and leave less room for healthy blood cells as well as platelets, resulting in infection, anemia and bleeding. Symptoms can include: • Swollen lymph nodes • Pain • Fullness below the ribs • Recurring infections • Tiring easily • Unintended weight loss • Shortness of breath during light activity. These symptoms develop slowly and are more likely to occur in older people. CLL is usually found during a routine blood test as part of a regular physical

exam. Treatments may include medication, surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. TREANDA® (bendamustine HCl) for Injection is a chemotherapy approved by the U.S. FDA for the treatment of patients with CLL. However, efficacy relative to first-line therapies other than chlorambucil has not been established. As with many medications, patients may experience side effects and require a change in therapy as a result, so it’s important for caregivers to be present during doctor visits. For more information about CLL treatments, ask your doctor or visit: www.TREANDA.com Indication:TREANDA is indicated for the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Efficacy relative to first-line therapies other than chlorambucil has not been established. Important Safety Information • Serious side effects, including low blood cell counts, infections, unexpected responses to TREANDA when placed in your blood, sudden and severe allergic responses, kidney failure due to fast breakdown of cancer cells, other cancers, and leaking of TREANDA out of your vein and into your surrounding skin, have been seen with TREANDA. Some responses, such as low blood counts, infections, and severe allergic skin responses (when TREANDA was given with allopurinol and other medications known to cause severe allergic skin responses), have caused death. Patients should be watched closely for these responses and treated quickly if any are seen. • Serious side effects may require changes in therapy, such as lowering the amount of TREANDA given, stopping the use of TREANDA, or waiting longer than expected between doses of TREANDA. • TREANDA should not be used in patients with a known allergic response to bendamustine or mannitol (an inactive ingredient in TREANDA). Women should be told not to become pregnant while using TREANDA. • The most common non-blood-related side effects associated with TREANDA (occurring in ≥15 percent of patients) are fever, nausea, and vomiting. The most common blood-related side effects associated with TREANDA (frequency ≥15 percent) are low red blood cells (oxygen carrying cells), low platelets (blood-clotting cells), and decreased number of three different types of white blood cells (infection-fighting cells). Bradford Journal Photo Full prescribing information is availKevin Baney, an old hand at the Festa Italiana, finishes up the day, August 15th at the able at http://www.TREANDA.com/pdf/ meatball sandwich concession, in the food court. He enjoys the festival, comes regu- TREANDA_final_PI.pdf. This information is provided by Teva larly, and knows how to win prizes. (See photos in gallery.)

Kevin Baney Finishes Up The First Day


Page 20 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, August 22, 2013

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Photo courtesy of Getty Images

FAMILY FEATURES

hey need to be able to eat it in 20 minutes or less. They need to be able to open and close all of the containers themselves. And it can’t go bad before they eat it. What are we talking about? The lunch your kids take to school each day. What you put in your child’s lunchbox might matter more than you realize. A recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found a significant amount of sodium in the foods toddlers commonly eat. It’s feared that similar levels of sodium are also found in a number of the foods older kids eat at school every day. As concerns rise about the early onset of high blood pressure, a major risk factor for heart disease, parents may want to re-examine those lunchbox choices. Why does sodium matter? A 2012 study of children and adolescents found that higher sodium consumption was associated with increased blood pressure. This effect was even greater in overweight and obese participants compared to normal weight participants. In addition, research suggests that children’s taste for salt develops as they are exposed to it. The less sodium children consume, the less they want it. Children’s taste for salt may be reduced if they are exposed to lower sodium diets at a young age. Eating less sodium can help lower blood pressure during childhood, which can help lower the risk of high blood pressure as an adult.

T

How much sodium is in your child’s lunchbox? Make-Your-Own Snack Mix Get your kids involved in making this healthy snack mix. Prep time: 5 minutes 1/4 cup raisins 1/4 cup dried cranberries Cook time: 0 minutes Yields: 4 servings Combine all ingredients, and toss well. Serve immediately, or store for later Serving size: 1/2 cup snack mix snacking. 1 cup toasted oat cereal Tip: Put snack mix in individual snack-sized 1/4 cup unsalted dry roasted peanuts bags for a great grab-and-go snack. (or other unsalted nut) Recipe and photo from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health

Where’s the sodium? Understanding sodium in foods can be confusing, especially when food that otherwise seems healthy may have high levels of sodium. Most of the sodium we eat doesn’t come from the salt shaker, but is found in processed and restaurant foods. This chart shows the Top 10 Sodium Sources for children and adolescents. How many of these have made an appearance in your child’s lunchbox?

What’s a parent to do? Here are some tips to help tackle high sodium in your child’s lunchbox:  Read food labels and compare the sodium amount in different products, then choose the options with the lowest amounts of sodium. Some varieties of bread can vary from 80 to 230 mg of sodium per slice. That can make a big difference in lunchtime sandwiches.  Pack fresh fruits and vegetables with lunch every day, like a small bag of baby carrots, snow peas, or grape tomatoes.  For a healthy snack, make trail mix using unsalted nuts, dried fruits and whole grain cereal.  When buying prepared meals, look for those with less than 600mg of sodium per serving. By packing a lower sodium school lunch for your children, you are not only setting them up for success in the classroom, but also in life. With your help, your children can develop healthy, low sodium eating habits that will last throughout their lives and help improve their heart health. For additional information about children and sodium and more tips for parents to help lower their family’s sodium intake, visit cdc.gov/salt.

Source: CDC


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday,August 22, 2013 Page 21

BACK TO SCHOOL!

Safety for School Days Drivers - Watch Out! •Stop Well Behind Buses Discharging Or Loading Children •Slow Down For Children Waiting For Buses

Tell Your Children! • Stand Away From The Roadway While Waiting For The Bus •Stay Seated While The Bus Is Moving •Get Off And On Buses At Designated Stops Only •Watch Out For Automobiles When Leaving The Bus •No Running In The School Hallways •No Pushing Or Shoving •No Yelling Or Fighting •Stay On School Grounds During School Hours •No Horse Play In The Lunch Rooms

•Choose Your School Friends Wisely •Stay Away From Drugs THIS MESSAGE BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FOLLOWING BUSINESSES: • Joanne Culbertson • • Shannon Rieger • James Campbell • Dave Caldwell

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Page 22 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, August 22, 2013

Poll: Most Americans Still Want Cursive Taught In Schools

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Stan Pecora MC’s Event

by Beth Miller (NAPSI)—Cursive is back in the spotlight. For the 2013 school year, learning to read and write in cursive may be an optional part of elementary school education in many U.S. public schools. The controversy about cursive lessons in modern classroom curricula is about more than reading grandma’s cookie recipes and signing credit card receipts, as many might think. The Back to Basics Law, signed this June in North Carolina, maintains that cursive fluency improves fine motor skills and lights up the creative parts of the brain more than typing does. And a recent College Board study showed that students who write their SAT essays in cursive score higher than peers who print them. However, most educators in the U.S. have sentenced cursive to a dismal fate. While it seems the debate is settled with the rollout of the Common Core Standards in 45 states, are curriculum designers making a mistake in eliminating it from classroom instruction? Despite the poor prognosis handed down for cursive instruction by educators, American adults and children feel strongly about its demise, with passions often flaring on both sides of the issue. Read any article on the subject online, and marvel at the sheer number of reader comments both in support of children learning to read and write in cursive and those who see it as antiquated and useless in the 21st century. For those in favor of its continued instruction, familiar questions often arise: How will kids read historical documents? What next...will schools stop teaching spelling because of computer spell-check programs? Beyond those oft-cited concerns, are there greater long-term implications on a generation that grows up not knowing how to read or write in cursive? Will cursive “illiteracy” harm them in the job market? What impression will cursive-fluent adults have on other adults who do not know cursive? According to a recent survey conducted online by Harris Interactive® on behalf of USA Gold pencils, almost 90 percent of Americans feel it is still necessary to practice reading and writing in cursive. And nearly eight in 10 adults and close to seven in 10 children believe cursive writing should be taught in schools, as it will always be necessary. When asked whether they feel that cursive writing is a skill that all workers, no matter their occupation, should know, 70 percent of U.S. adults agreed it is a skill that workers should

Bradford Journal Photo Stan Pecora, once again the Master of Ceremonies during the opening night of the Festa Italiana, August 15th tells the crowd that it was wonderful being raised in Bradford. It was here he learned the meaning of la familia, respect, trust, and old world values in a diverse community containing German, Irish, Scottish, Polish, Norwegian, and Portuguese populations. (See photos in gallery.)

possess. Additionally, more than half of all women in hiring positions indicated that cursive should be an essential skill for a job candidate. Before we tell students to put their #2 pencils down for good, there are more questions to ask. There’s the worry among some parents about the variances between the quality of education available at public schools and private schools. Will cursive continue to be taught in independent schools, thereby widening the knowledge gap among socioeconomic groups? Will more affluent parents find ways to teach cursive at home or seek out programs that offer it to their children in hopes of giving them a leg up in a competitive job market down the road? Hope is not lost for cursive loyalists. Since its instruction isn’t expressly prohibited in the Common Core, public school teachers may choose to continue offering cursive lessons in their

classrooms. And now that we’ve had a chance to hear from American adults and kids in support of keeping cursive in the classroom, teachers may begin to pencil it back into their lesson plans this school year and for years to come. Visit Target and Walmart stores or Amazon.com to purchase USA Gold #2 pencils for your students this school year. And join the conversation at: www.facebook.com/writedudes or on Twitter @thewritedudes Ms. Miller is a communications executive in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Value Menu Items Starting at

$1.00! 75 Forman Street Bradford, PA


Page 23 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, August 22, 2013

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Time For A Gut Check For Heart-Healthy Living Eats Following Long Day (NAPSI)—While heart disease continues to be the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States, keeping your cholesterol in check may keep you out of such statistics. High total cholesterol remains one of the top culprits in putting Americans at risk for

health tips include: • Probiotics aren’t just for digestive health: Clinical studies have shown that natural probiotics--the healthy bacteria in the digestive tract--can help maintain healthy cholesterol in adults by maintaining the amount of cholesterol the

this disease that kills 600,000 men and women every year. In fact, according to a report by the American Heart Association, 44 percent of the U.S. adult population has high total cholesterol. Cholesterol, a waxy, fatlike substance that’s found in all of the body’s cells, travels through the bloodstream in small packages called lipoproteins. There are two kinds of lipoproteins: low-density (LDL) and high-density (HDL). Over time, LDL (“bad”) cholesterol builds up in the arteries, narrowing them and preventing blood from getting to your heart. If a clot forms and blocks a narrowed artery, a heart attack can result. HDL (“good”) cholesterol carries LDL cholesterol away from your artery walls from other parts of the body to the liver, where it is removed. These combined levels make up the total cholesterol. While lifestyle changes like healthy diet and exercise have long been the tried-and-true prescription for cholesterol management, there are surprising new approaches to heart-healthy living, said Chris Mohr, Ph.D., R.D., expert in nutrition and exercise physiology. “There’s a lot of talk about probiotics and digestive health these days, but many Americans would be surprised to learn that heart health can be a benefit of natural probiotics,” said Dr. Mohr. “The first and most important steps in cholesterol management are lifestyle changes such as stopping smoking, a healthy diet and regular physical activity,” he added. “But there are definitely some cardiac advantages to certain foods and supplements that most Americans wouldn’t necessarily associate with them.” Dr. Mohr’s top multifunctional heart-

body produces and by maintaining the amount absorbed from food. • Fiber for a fit ticker: High- fiber foods don’t just keep you regular, they aid in maintaining heart health. Add fiber-rich foods like vegetables, fruits and beans, and also replace fiber-free carbohydrates (such as white bread, flour tortillas and even many breakfast cereals) with their whole grain alternatives. • Fat can be good: Fat isn’t always a bad thing, especially if you swap out saturated fats with unsaturated fats. Instead of butter, use olive or canola oil. Add foods rich in polyunsaturated fats (think salmon and walnuts) and monounsaturated fats, like avocados and almonds. Cardioviva™ is the first natural probiotic that has been clinically proven to help maintain healthy cholesterol levels in adults. Probiotics-bacteria that confer a health benefit to the host-are being studied to determine if they may have a more significant role in helping to maintain and improve health and wellness through the gut. Emerging science is evaluating whether supplementing the microbiome (gut bacteria) with probiotics can play a role in health and certain chronic diseases such as heart disease. These healthy bacteria may help to maintain healthy cholesterol levels in two ways: by maintaining the amount of cholesterol your body produces and by maintaining the amount absorbed from food. “Cardioviva™ is a natural way to fill the gap between diet, exercise and medication,” said Dr. Mohr. “In addition, healthy people who want to enjoy the digestive benefits of probiotics and

Bradford Journal Photo DJ McAlpine, volunteer worker at Festa Italiana, prepares a meatball sub for himself following a long day of activity, August 15th. He tells us it’s nice to be able to volunteer for the community event. It’s good he likes it because he’s volunteered to work for all three days of the festival. (See photos in gallery.)

also want to maintain healthy levels of cholesterol may benefit from this natural supplement.” The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) guidelines state that all adults age 20 or older should have their cholesterol tested once every five years. If you have borderline high or high results from your blood cholesterol screening, talk to a health care professional about how to manage your numbers. For more information, visit: www.mycardioviva.com

Bradfordjournalcolorissue8 22 13g  

Fourth Issue August 2013

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