Page 1


THE PORTFOLIO OF BRADFORD PRAIRIE

objectMATTER

o b j e c t · m AT T E r I grew up in a house filled with paintings of fallen angels, a series my uncle has been working on for over thirty years. As a kid, I used to ask him, “Why so many?” “It’s not really about the angels,” he would say. As I grew older, my uncle taught me all about conceptual art, “In art, the object matter is the painting—the angels. The subject matter is yourself.” As an adult, I now understand my uncle’s angels. The textures, the layers—they are part of who he is. Each flake of paint is an embodiment of his state of mind—like pieces of his soul. The best brands also have souls. It’s the reason why people can be so loyal to brands—they trust them like old friends. In branding, the object matter are the physical things: the packages, the websites, the logos. The subject matter comes from an interpretation of those objects by the viewer in the form of feelings, emotions, and ideas.

1


2

LA L暮NEA

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3

I N d U St R Y 路 H O S P I TA L I T Y


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g + T Y P E D E S I g N

aRt dIRectoR · CANDICE LOPEz

t Y p e fac e S · B R A N D O N + L I L L I A N

objectMATTER

lA lÍNEA OVErVIEW

The Pebble Beach Company, which operates three resorts on Monterey’s historic 17-Mile Drive, wants to expand its offerings to cater to affluent guests who want a less traditional experience. The new hotel, named La Línea, artfully connects to Monterey’s Latin roots, with architecture inspired by Spanish modernism. This sophisticated boutique hotel, with sleek décor and exceptional service, is a quiet and unique alternative to other properties in the area. PrOBlEm

La Línea requires décor and branded items that enhance the natural beauty of Monterey’s rocky cliffs, without getting in the way. At the same time, the branding must have a one-of-a-kind look and feel, in line with a high-end hotel. La Línea must speak to modern aesthetics with a humanistic touch of the hand. sOluTION

La Línea caters to a middle aged, wealthy audience, 40–55, with a taste for timeless aesthetics. The branding is sophisticated and modern, but has a playful side. The logo, a line-crafted image of a bull, flirts with the name, which translates to “the line” or “edge.” To complete the branding, a custom typeface was created that fits La Línea’s avant-garde attitude and human-centered style. The typeface has the build and proportions of a Didone but with curved terminals that make it more friendly and allow for tighter letter spacing. Branded items make use of the custom typography and a sophisticated mélange of neutral grays and natural materials that pay tribute to the hotel’s spectacular natural beauty and contemporary architecture. The minimalism carries into the website, which features black and white photography of the hotel and surroundings, with a simple, flat interface.

3


4

LA L暮NEA

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3

I N D U ST R Y 路 H O S P I TA L I T Y


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g + T Y P E D E S I g N

aRt dIRectoR · CANDICE LOPEz

t Y p e fac e S · B R A N D O N + L I L L I A N

objectMATTER

Design Thinking

POsITIONING The most effective brands are built on an excellent understanding of the market—the competition, the customers, and the trends. A new hotel in Monterey needs to be carefully positioned to differentiate itself from the dozens of other hotel choices in the area. The project’s positioning strategy began with creating a brand matrix that paired the competition’s overall style against their price point.

Positioning Strategy: TA r G ET m A r k ET

La Línea, which is driving distance from Southern California and the Bay Area, is positioned to offer a holiday or weekend retreat for wealthy couples, ages 40–55. The hotel will fill a gap in the current Pebble Beach offerings by targeting guests who prefer a more modern experience. Ar CHITECTurE

La Línea’s building, situated on a coastal bluff, will have a minimalist look inspired by Spanish Modernism that will differentiate the hotel from others in the area. I N T E r N AT I O N A l T r AV E l

International travel has been on the decline due to threats of terrorism, economic uncertainty, and poor exchange rates. La Línea will offer a safer and more budget-friendly alternative to a European vacation. s PA N I s H C u I s I N E

The cuisine of southern Spain, currently one of the most influential in the food world, will be offered at La Línea’s restaurant, drawing in dining enthusiasts. sErVICE

La Línea’s service will be executed in a less-intrusive, European style, contrasting other hotels in the area.

5


6

LA L暮NEA

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

Logo

A b b r e v i at e d l o g o s

K EY a d j e c t i v e s

MINIMALIST S O P H I S T I C AT E D LUXURY

colors

typography

Brandon Grotesque

ABCDEFGHIJKLMN OPQRSTUVWXYZ

N atural MODERN ELEGANT

TYPE DESIG N

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3

I N D U ST R Y 路 H O S P I TA L I T Y


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g + T Y P E D E S I g N

aRt dIRectoR · CANDICE LOPEz

t Y p e fac e S · B R A N D O N + L I L L I A N

objectMATTER

FIELD NOTES:

People misunderstand minimalism as being just about getting rid of things—making do with as little as possible. This is not exactly true. Minimalism is not about emptiness, it’s about purity—an exercise in priorities. As a result, good minimal designs are usually more rich with content. To me, a well crafted piece of Nigiri sushi is more tasty than the heinous deep-fried roll, served over a zig-zag of spicy mayonnaise. Good sushi is minimalism. A bowl of plain white rice is not minimalism—it doesn’t accomplish the goal of providing a complete meal.

7


8

LA L暮NEA

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3

I N d U St R Y 路 H O S P I TA L I T Y


cat e g o R Y 路 B R A N D I N g + T Y P E D E S I g N

aRt dIRectoR 路 CANDICE LOPEz

t Y p e fac e S 路 B R A N D O N + L I L L I A N

objectMATTER

9


10

LA L暮NEA

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3

I N d U St R Y 路 H O S P I TA L I T Y


Cat e g o r y 路 b r a n d i n g + t y p e d e s i g n

art director 路 candice lopez

t y p e fac e s 路 B r a n d o n + L i l l i a n

ObjectMatter

11


12

LA L暮NEA

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3

I N D U ST R Y 路 H O S P I TA L I T Y


C a t e g o ry 路 brandin g + type desi g n

a r t d ir e c t o r 路 candice lope z

t y p e f a c e s 路 B randon + L illian

O b j e c t M atter

13


14

LA L暮NEA

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3

I N D U ST R Y 路 H O S P I TA L I T Y


C a t e g o ry 路 brandin g + type desi g n

a r t d ir e c t o r 路 candice lope z

t y p e f a c e s 路 B randon + L illian

O b j e c t M atter

15


16

H AY D E N P L A N ETA R I u M

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R uA R Y 2 0 1 4

INdUStRY 路 MuSEuM


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g + I N T E R A CT I v E

aRt dIRectoR · SEAN BACON

t Y p e fac e S · D I N + A R C H E R

objectMATTER

HAyDEN PlANETArIum OVErVIEW

The Hayden Planetarium, at the American Museum of Natural History, has climbed in notoriety and traffic since its redesign in 2000. The museum has decided that building a separate brand and website for the planetarium would help it better communicate its mission and allow it to continue its growth. PrOBlEm

A brand language had to be developed that would speak to the primary target audience of boys, ages 6–16, while maintaining a clean and respectable look expected of a public institution. It was important to differentiate the museum by avoiding the overused styles commonly found in the science field. The brand would have to be executed across various applications, including environmental, interactive, and apparel. sOluTION

A mixture of DIN, set in a condensed weight, and Archer, set in italics, gives the brand an energetic and friendly look that appeals to the target audience while remaining clean. Blue tones were avoided because of their overuse in science branding and to differentiate the planetarium from the museum, which uses blue in its logo. Instead, a bright orange is used alongside a muted brown to achieve a fresh and lively look. The new mark, which references the mechanics of the solar system, is simple and accessible. A set of t-shirts was designed that showcase the flexibility of the mark and demonstrate the underlying wit and pride that permeates the brand. The new website uses educational and fun interactive elements like Explore the Universe, where the visitor locates the planetarium while learning about the vastness of space. This emphasis on interactivity carries on into the exhibits, where a touchscreen console challenges visitors, faced with a limited fuel supply, to find efficient routes through the solar system.

17


18

H A Y D E N planetari u m

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

Logo

TA G L I N E

Keep Looking Up REVERSED L o g o s

CO L ORS

K EY A DJECTIVES

ENGAGING

ACCESSIBLE

INSPIRING

CLEVER

FRIENDLY

EDUCATIONAL

typography

DIN Next Condensed

Archer

ABCDEFGHIJKLMN OPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890

ABCDEFGHIJKLMN OPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890

10

dat e 路 F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 4

INDUSTRY 路 MUSEUM


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g + I N T E R A CT I v E

aRt dIRectoR · SEAN BACON

t Y p e fac e S · D I N + A R C H E R

objectMATTER

FIELD NOTES:

Naming

Science education is something that I care a lot about, but I’m constantly let down by science-related branding. It’s always either the outdated sci-fi look, or it’s just too unfriendly and high-minded. It’s almost like science is afraid of not being taken seriously.

Lots of people are scared of the number 13—so much so that most office buildings omit the floor, skipping from floor 12, directly to floor 14.Really, After the all, opposite who would want to start a business in an office that is true. People find science intimidating. Science-related branding be trying to take could potentially bring aboutshould misfortune? In extra light hard of this, how could the edge off. I wanted the Hayden branding to be friendly and 131accessible. 3 be a goodAfter nameall,for the new gallery—won’t the name scare away science is a humanistic pursuit—it’s about potential visitors? learning to interact with the world around us. No. The answer lies in an examination of the target market. Not that art lovers aren’t superstitious, but contemporary art is all about facing our fears and challenging ourselves to look at things in a new way. Our target market is the type that would gladly pay $28.50 to view an upside-down urinal and tweet about it afterwards. Afraid of the number 13? Nah. If anything, it only adds to the intrigue.

19


20

H A Y D E N planetari u m

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 4

INDUSTRY 路 MUSEUM


C a t e g o ry 路 brandin g + interacti v e

a r t d ir e c t o r 路 sean bacon

t y p e f a c e s 路 din + A R C H E R

O b j e c t M atter

21


22

H AY D E N P L A N ETA R I u M

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R uA R Y 2 0 1 4

INdUStRY 路 MuSEuM


cat e g o R Y 路 B R A N D I N g + I N T E R A CT I v E

aRt dIRectoR 路 SEAN BACON

t Y p e fac e S 路 D I N + A R C H E R

objectMATTER

23


24

H AY D E N P L A N ETA R I u M

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R uA R Y 2 0 1 4

INdUStRY 路 MuSEuM


cat e g o R Y 路 B R A N D I N g + I N T E R A CT I v E

aRt dIRectoR 路 SEAN BACON

t Y p e fac e S 路 D I N + A R C H E R

objectMATTER

25


26

RIPE

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 N O v E M B E R 2 0 1 3

INdUStRY 路 FOOD + WINE


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g + PA C K A g I N g

aRt dIRectoR · CANDICE LOPEz

t Y p e fac e S · v E R L Ag

objectMATTER

rIPE OVErVIEW

Ripe is a food and wine subscription box that gives customers a chance to taste and understand the culinary culture of countries around the globe. Each monthly delivery takes on a theme of a wine-producing country. The box contains wine, olive oil, and other food items from that country, as well as a recipe card with information and storytelling from a prominent local chef. PrOBlEm

A packaging system had to be designed to give subscribers a taste of the country each month, while providing a compelling presentation that would ignite their senses. Brand language needed to appeal to the target audience of upscale food and wine lovers, ages 30–45. To keep the costs down, the format of the box and bottles had to be standardized and remain the same every month. sOluTION

Ripe subscribers are immersed in the culture of the featured country through a blend of photography, illustration, and storytelling. The Ripe subscription box is designed with a bellyband, covered with imagery of the food, cities, and landscapes of each showcased culture. The bellyband unhooks from the box and unfolds to reveal an illustrated map of the wine regions from the country, with photographs and folklore highlighting these locations. Inside the box, a conversationdriven recipe card details advice and photos from the guest chef. The recipe itself is simplified and executed in a visual style with handwritten typography to connect with intermediate and advanced home cooks. The products, which are used in the recipes, are sourced from small producers in the featured country and packaged with illustrations, instructions, and local anecdotes. The wine bottle is wrapped with a branded tissue paper to match the design of the other items without having to change the label. All of these items fit snugly into the customized box and are delivered with style to the doorstep of culinary aficionados.

27


28

RIPE

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 3

INDUSTRY 路 FOOD + WINE


cat e g o R Y 路 B R A N D I N g + PA C K A g I N g

aRt dIRectoR 路 CANDICE LOPEz

t Y p e fac e S 路 v E R L Ag

objectMATTER

Design Thinking

DIFFErENTIATION With the recent boom in popularity of subscription boxes, potential customers are overwhelmed with the number of choices they have. Ripe required a concept and design that would set it apart.

Key Differences: FOOD AND WINE

By offering both food and wine, Ripe can offer a more complete dining experience compared to other clubs. The wine and food come from the same regions and are selected to pair well together. COOkING

By featuring recipes from celebrity chefs, Ripe will appeal to cooks and dining enthusiasts. Recipes are simplified to focus on flavors and techniques, rather than exact quantities and cooking times. C u lT u r E A N D T r AV E l

By selecting a wine-producing country as a theme for each month, Ripe can use storytelling and photography to appeal to those interested in travel. Cultural elements give the brand a more authentic voice.

29


30

RIPE

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

Logo

MArK

typogrAphy

VERLAG

ABCDEFGHIJKLMN OPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890

Journal

ABCDEFGHIJKLMN O P Q R S TU V W X Y Z 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0

coUNtries

FRANCE

SPAIN

ARGENTINA

AUSTRALIA

ITALY

SOUTH AFRICA

NEW ZEALAND

CHILE

BRAZIL

GREECE

c o L o r s A N d i L LU st r At i o N s

Key Adjectives

CULTURAL

PHOTO-DRIVEN

SIMPLE

HAND-DRAWN

EXCITING

APPETIZING

10

dat e 路 N O v E M B E R 2 0 1 3

INdUStRY 路 FOOD + WINE


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g + PA C K A g I N g

aRt dIRectoR · CANDICE LOPEz

t Y p e fac e S · v E R L Ag

objectMATTER

FIELD NOTES:

There is a special joy in receiving something in the mail and taking it out of the box. One only needs to search ‘unboxing’ on Youtube to find evidence of this phenomenon. It all seems a bit silly when you watch the videos, but who isn’t guilty of waiting anxiously for their Amazon order to arrive, checking the tracking information over and over? I wanted opening the Ripe box to be like a mini adventure. As you discover what products are included in the box, you interface with the packaging through a series of fun interactions. Unhook the sleeve, unwind the string, lift off the tray—I wanted each step to be different and clever.

31


32

RIPE

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 N O v E M B E R 2 0 1 3

INdUStRY 路 FOOD + WINE


cat e g o R Y 路 B R A N D I N g + PA C K A g I N g

aRt dIRectoR 路 CANDICE LOPEz

t Y p e fac e S 路 v E R L Ag

objectMATTER

33


34

RIPE

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 N O v E M B E R 2 0 1 3

INdUStRY 路 FOOD + WINE


cat e g o R Y 路 B R A N D I N g + PA C K A g I N g

aRt dIRectoR 路 CANDICE LOPEz

t Y p e fac e S 路 v E R L Ag

objectMATTER

35


36

RIPE

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 3

INDUSTRY 路 FOOD + WINE


C a t e g o ry 路 brandin g + P A C K A G I N G

A R T D I R ECTO R 路 C A N D I C E L O P E Z

t y p e fac e s 路 V E R L AG

O b j e c t M atter

37


38

z E N A N D T H E A R T O F JA PA N E S E g A R D E N I N g

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R uA R Y 2 0 1 3

INdUStRY 路 PuBLISHINg


cat e g o R Y · P u B L I C AT I O N + P H O T O g R A P H Y

teXt · MICHAEL PRAIRIE

t Y p e fac e S · g A R A M O N D + g O T H A M

objectMATTER

ZE N G Ar D E N I N G OVErVIEW

Zen and the Art of Japanese Gardening is book about the history, philosophy, and practice of Japanese gardening. The project was a collaborative effort between my father, who wrote the text, and me, contributing the design and photography. The goal of the project was to produce a preliminary version of the book, at a low cost, that could be pitched to publishers. PrOBlEm

My father, who has maintained his own Japanese garden for twenty years, is an expert on Japanese gardening and wrote a manuscript that reflects a depth of knowledge and experience. Although written in a poetic style, the manuscript needed photography and other elements to make the reading process enjoyable and instructive. The task was to illustrate material that might otherwise be challenging to understand. sOluTION

I took two trips to the Japanese Garden in Portland, Oregon, and photographed my father’s personal garden to collect enough imagery to create the preliminary version of the book. The photographs are carefully composed to illustrate the concepts being discussed on each page. To further connect the text to the imagery, forty-six relevant haiku, written by Japan’s classic poets, have been set into the text. In tune with the Japanese aesthetics discussed in the book, the layout is minimal with no decorative elements. The book is an astute mixture of geometric sans-serif typography for headlines and old-style serif text with plenty of character. Large minimalistic grayscale numbers mark the start of each new chapter. Ample leading, white space and generous margins give breathing space to the spreads, complemented by lush, verdant photography. The cover features my father’s own garden shears, a metaphor for many of the concepts in the book, and a reference to Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, the origin of the book’s title.

39


40

Z E N A N D T H E A R T O F JA PA N E S E G A R D E N I N G

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N D U S T R Y 路 P u blishin g


C a t e g o ry 路 P U B L I C A T I O N + P H O T O G R A P H Y

TE X T 路 M I C H A E L P R A I R I E

t y p e fac e s 路 G A R A M O N D + G O T H A M

O b j e c t M atter

41


42

Z E N A N D T H E A R T O F JA PA N E S E G A R D E N I N G

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N D U S T R Y 路 P u blishin g


C a t e g o ry 路 P U B L I C A T I O N + P H O T O G R A P H Y

TE X T 路 M I C H A E L P R A I R I E

t y p e fac e s 路 G A R A M O N D + G O T H A M

O b j e c t M atter

43


44

COMMuNITY

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R uA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N d U St R Y 路 H O S P I TA L I T Y


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g + L AYO u T

aRt dIRectoR · SEAN BACON

t Y p e fac e S · D I N + T R E N D S L A B

objectMATTER

COmmuNITy OVErVIEW

Community is a non-profit restaurant with the purpose of feeding the homeless while providing a warm setting for family-style dining. The restaurant has a pay-what-you-can-afford system, giving customers the option to pay extra to help fund the restaurant’s mission or to pay less to enjoy a great meal in times of financial hardship. The restaurant relies on donations and volunteers from the community, support from local farms and purveyors that offer products at reduced rates. Local chefs also volunteer their time to run special dinners to raise money and promote awareness of the high rate of homelessness in the city. PrOBlEm

Community must appeal to a socially conscious upper middle class clientele through branding, food, and décor with a friendly, up-market style. It is essential to attract this key demographic of customers with resources to support the restaurant. Given these objectives, a warm, casual feel is in line with the values of the restaurant. Further visual cues could be exacted from the Italian-style dedication to simple food. sOluTION

A large communal table in the center of the restaurant was constructed from reclaimed wood to emphasize the social aspect of the restaurant. Diners are encouraged to sit at the communal table alongside strangers and make new friends. The branded applications are printed on textured cream stock for a warm and inviting look. Playful mixing of fonts and type treatments, set in red, give a nod to the Italian roots of this eatery. Additional applications include menus, receipts, and several forms to facilitate both membership and volunteerism. The forms are handstamped with the Community seal to bring the essential human-element into the branding. At the end of the meal, diners are presented with a receipt that tabulates the meal and offers suggested donation amounts for various levels of income and support. Diners are also presented with a volunteer card, so that they can donate time to make up for underpaying their bill, or just to support the restaurant.

45


46

COMMUNITY

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N D U ST R Y 路 H O S P I TA L I T Y


C a t e g o ry · brandin g + layo u t

a r t d ir e c t o r · sean bacon

t y p e fac e s · D I N + T R E N D S L A B

O b j e c t M atter

Design Thinking

THE BIG IDEA The best brands are built around a set of core values rather than a specific product or service. This is especially true in non-profit branding­—it is much easier for people to support a non-profit when it is made clear exactly what the organization stands for. Developing the branding for Community started with a clarification of the organization’s mission.

Realization of the Big Idea: W hat ’ s the C O N C E P T ?

Community was started by a group of friends who wanted to change the priorities of the restaurant business. Rather than operating strictly as a business only concerned with the bottom line, Community would operate as a non-profit organization with the goal of feeding and caring for people. who s u ppo r t s co m m u nit y ?

Community is supported primarily by diners, who make donations based on what they can afford. The organization also relies on support from memberships, volunteers, and local farms. what ’ s the ta r get m a r k et ?

A typical Community supporter is 30–45, upper-middle class, with a progressive outlook and a love of food. H O W D O E S C O MMU N I T Y G I V E B A C K ?

Community gives back by giving away meals to people who need it and by supporting programs that benefit the homeless. W hat ’ s the c u l t u r e ?

Community is built on a progressive attitude of openness, acceptance, and understanding. The restaurant maintains high standards while having a casual and friendly atmosphere. W hat a r e the G oa l s ?

To provide a good dining experience for everyone, even during times of financial hardship. Put a dent in homelessness through support and raising awareness. Give job opportunities to local people who need a leg up. To serve as a place for strangers to meet and mix and inspire people to care for one another. T he B ig idea

Feeding Humanity.

47


48

COMMUNITY

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

Logo

S e al

CO L OR s

typography

A A

Trend slab

Din Next

A B C DEFGH I JKLM N OP QRS T U V WXYZ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 890

ABCDEFGHIJKLMN OPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890

TYPE STY L ES

M M M K EY a d j e c t i v e s

ICO N S

RUSTIC

WARM

RECLAIMED

FARM TO TABLE

CASUAL

NON-PROFIT

FRIENDLY

TEXTURED

10

dat e 路 F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N D U ST R Y 路 H O S P I TA L I T Y


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g + L AYO u T

aRt dIRectoR · SEAN BACON

t Y p e fac e S · D I N + T R E N D S L A B

objectMATTER

FIELD NOTES:

I love the idea behind a communal table. Striking up a conversation with someone new is a great way to enhance a casual meal. Others agree—communal tables are definitely on the rise. I’ve even seen them at chains like TGIF and Rubio’s. That being said, I’ve rarely had a good experience—communal tables are almost always executed poorly. Here’s how to do it right: Make sure it’s right for the restaurant. The communal table at Rubio’s is bad—their customer base is too diverse and is mostly looking to just get a quick bite. Privacy is still important. Communal tables should be wider and have a centerpiece that runs down the middle. This way, couples can sit next to each other and enjoy some separation from strangers, while still facilitating conversation. Communal tables are optional. The communal table should only make up a small portion of the total seating at the restaurant. If the communal table is always the last to fill up, something’s wrong.

49


50

COMMUNITY

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N D U ST R Y 路 H O S P I TA L I T Y


C a t e g o ry 路 brandin g + layo u t

a r t d ir e c t o r 路 sean bacon

t y p e fac e s 路 D I N + T R E N D S L A B

O b j e c t M atter

51


52

COMMUNITY

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N D U ST R Y 路 H O S P I TA L I T Y


C a t e g o ry 路 brandin g + layo u t

a r t d ir e c t o r 路 sean bacon

t y p e fac e s 路 D I N + T R E N D S L A B

O b j e c t M atter

53


54

WA R R I O R S

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 M A R C H 2 0 1 3

I N d U St R Y 路 E N T E RTA I N M E N T


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g

aRt dIRectoR · AMY LEvINE

t Y p e fac e S · D I N N E X T

objectMATTER

WA r r I O r s OVErVIEW

Warriors is a series of shows from the La Jolla Playhouse. Ruined, Inherit the Wind, and Milk Like Sugar each contain characters who, under difficult circumstances, display incredible tenacity and will. To market the series, La Jolla Playhouse wanted to create logos for each show, a mailing brochure for the series, and environmental graphics. PrOBlEm

It was important that the serious theme of the series is reflected in the brand language and design style. The designs also had to capture the imagination of the viewer and help them relate to the characters. Although the subject matters of the three shows are very different, the common thread between them needed to be emphasized to create a unified message. sOluTION

To give the viewer a sense of the drive and hardship found within the characters of the shows, black and white photography of people’s faces is used throughout the marketing material. The photos are treated in a high-clarity style to bring out the wrinkles, sweat, and other details that represent a person’s journey and hardships. In contrast with the black and white photography, expressive red paint highlights the eyes and facial expressions of the photographs. The thick, painterly marks remind the viewer of their primal side. The logos are created with the same black and red color scheme to match. Ruined, a drama that follows women in the thick of the Congolese civil war, uses a logo where the typography serves as the legs of African figures. Inherit the Wind, a play about the Scopes Monkey Trial, uses an effect in its logo where the word ‘wind’ is reflected, revealing the word ‘mind’ as a hidden message. This word sits in contrast to the cross which replaces the letter ‘t.’ Milk Like Sugar, a comedy/drama about the struggles of modern African American teenagers facing pregnancy, uses loud typography in its logo, with a baby’s bottle finding its way into the word ‘Milk.’

55


56

WA R R I O R S

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 M A R C H 2 0 1 3

I N D U ST R Y 路 E N T E RTA I N M E N T


cat e g o R Y 路 B R A N D I N g

aRt dIRectoR 路 AMY LEvINE

t Y p e fac e S 路 D I N N E X T

Design Thinking

lOGO DEVElOPmENT

mIND mAPPING

CONCEPTs

rEFINEmENT

objectMATTER

57


58

WA R R I O R S

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 M A R C H 2 0 1 3

I N d U St R Y 路 E N T E RTA I N M E N T


cat e g o R Y 路 B R A N D I N g

aRt dIRectoR 路 AMY LEvINE

t Y p e fac e S 路 D I N N E X T

objectMATTER

59


60

WA R R I O R S

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 M A R C H 2 0 1 3

I N d U St R Y 路 E N T E RTA I N M E N T


cat e g o R Y 路 B R A N D I N g

aRt dIRectoR 路 AMY LEvINE

t Y p e fac e S 路 D I N N E X T

objectMATTER

61


62

WA R R I O R S

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 M A R C H 2 0 1 3

I N D U ST R Y 路 E N T E RTA I N M E N T


C a t e g o ry 路 brandin g

a r t d ir e c t o r 路 amy le v ine

t y p e fac e s 路 D I N N E X T

O b j e c t M atter

63


64

CITY COLLEgE SEAL

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3

I N d U St R Y 路 E D u C AT I O N


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g

aRt dIRectoR · CANDICE LOPEz

t Y p e fac e · g O T H A M

objectMATTER

CITy COllEGE sEAl OVErVIEW

To celebrate City College’s centennial, the former seal needed to be redesigned to reflect the up-to-date values and diversity of the school. Designed in 1958, the previous seal carries with it symbolism and iconography from the school’s past. The project required a discovery phase, exploring the values and history of the school, a concept phase, to find the best structure and layout, and a design phase, in which the typography and illustration were executed. PrOBlEm

A survey of students, faculty, and staff revealed that the dated seal did not speak to, nor reflected, the diverse and urban nature of the campus or community. Despite this, the old seal’s iconography was steeped in history and would bring real equity to the new design. Working with the college historian, we uncovered information revealing the priority of various icons needed refinement. sOluTION

The visual hierarchy of the new seal is improved by grouping together the scroll, plume, and compass, which symbolize varied aspects of education. These icons are now intertwined, to simplify the composition and serve as a metaphor for a unified learning process. The key, symbolic of the school’s mission, rightfully moves up in scale and emphasis. The knight’s helmet was crafted to overlap the shield, removing the negative visual impression that it was floating. The helmet was flipped, facing the right and looking forward. All the illustrations were reworked with unified line-weights in a more simplified graphic style. Unnecessary elements, such as the decorative plumage, were edited to further simplify the design and bring attention to the meaning of symbolic elements. The updated seal is set in Gotham, a typeface popular among institutions like the 9/11 Memorial—chosen for its wide capitals that are serious but have a human side. “Strength and Inspiration,” taken from the superintendent’s speech at the birth of the school, was added to directly convey the spirit and mission of San Diego City College.

65


66

CITY COLLEGE SEAL

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3

I N D U ST R Y 路 E D U C AT I O N


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g

aRt dIRectoR · CANDICE LOPEz

t Y p e fac e · g O T H A M

objectMATTER

Design Thinking

sEAl rEFINEmENT

To create the first digital version of the seal, the icons and other illustrations were sketched and quickly vectorized. The type and other seal elements were laid out.

The knight’s helm was simplified and redrawn to break the picture plane at the top, splitting the type into two sections. The icons were changed to a more graphic style and sized to fit more snuggly into their spaces. The shield and background were simplified. The motto from the school historian was added.

The knight’s helm and plume were redrawn in a more attractive style. The keys were simplified. The compass and quill were adjusted to improve their proportions. Text and line weight was unified and made heavier throughout. The background was further simplified and the seal’s inner stroke was removed.

The knight’s plume was redrawn to improve type fitting. The scroll was filled in to help with legibility at small sizes. The quill was redrawn in a curvier style to prevent misinterpretation. The seal’s outer stroke was removed and the background style was changed and made heavier. The date and its scroll were added.

The knight’s helm was reduced in size and reproportioned. The type was made heavier and the quill was redrawn in a more attractive style. The date was simplified and its scroll was removed. Line weight was further increased and unified.

67


68

CITY COLLEGE SEAL

p r o j e c t · 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

Logo

ICO N o g r a p h y + SY M BO L IS M

Helm Strength

Key Education

Quill Art & Language

Compass Engineering

Shield Protection

Scroll Science

M OTTO

STRENGTH • INSPIRATION

Year

typography

Gotham Black

1914

ABCDEFGHIJKLMN OPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890

K EY a d j e c t i v e s

HISTORICAL

CREDIBLE

REPRESENTATIVE

OFFICIAL

TIMELESS

SYMBOLIC

10

dat e · D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3

I N D U ST R Y · E D U C AT I O N


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g

aRt dIRectoR · CANDICE LOPEz

t Y p e fac e · g O T H A M

objectMATTER

FIELD NOTES:

The seal included many elements in its design—fitting them all into one tight and balanced package was no easy task. Whenever I ran into an issue, it always seemed like the solution came in the form of finding flexibility in the illustration. For instance, a solution was needed to accommodate the fact that the words “San Diego” were shorter than the words “City College.” Illustration was the answer. The knight’s plume was simply redrawn to take up more space on the left than on the right. The plume was also crafted to lock up tightly with the letters. Now everything fit together nicely.

69


70

CITY COLLEGE SEAL

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3

I N D U ST R Y 路 E D U C AT I O N


C a t e g o ry 路 brandin g

A R T D I R ECTO R 路 C A N D I C E L O P E Z

t y p e fac e 路 G O T H A M

O b j e c t M atter

71


72

YONDER MAg AzINE

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 M A R C H 2 0 1 4

INdUStRY 路 PuBLISHINg


cat e g o R Y 路 E D I T O R I A L

aRt dIRectoR 路 SEAN BACON

t Y p e fa c e S 路 M R S E Av E S + S C O T C H R O M A N

objectMATTER

yO N D E r OVErVIEW

Yonder is an independent travel and culture magazine for well-educated, open-minded, adventurous travelers, ages 35-50. The magazine caters to those who seek escape from typical tourist destinations to discover the authentic culture of a place. The publication collaborates with independent photographers and writers from all over the world who are anxious to tell the story about where they live, or what they have unearthed through their travels. PrOBlEm

Because of budget limitations, the self-directed magazine often relies on submissions from its readers. The layout system for the magazine needed to be flexible enough to allow for content from many different contributors to be shown. A system was needed to discover and produce consistently high-quality content for each issue. sOluTION

The layout of the magazine uses a flexible 12-column grid that allows body copy to be broken up with quotes, captions, field notes, and small photos. Feature articles are photo-driven, with more white space than most magazines to allow the photography room to breathe. Pull quotes are set in light colors over the copy, giving visual interest to the layout. Compelling infographics unveil layers of complex information in a way that both informs and inspires. The magazine also includes quick reads about food, interviews with artists, information about geopolitical changes, and other content. The magazine maintains an online community, where writers and photographers can submit sample content and ideas for stories. This community selects stories and destinations that they find intriguing. The most up-voted submitters are then hired to expand on and create content for the story, in collaboration with the editors of the magazine. Yonder differentiates itself from competing travel publications with the direction of the magazine driven by a passionate community of readers, rather than a few editors.

73


74

YONDER MAG AZINE

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 M A R C H 2 0 1 4

INDUSTRY 路 PUBLISHING


C a t e g o ry 路 E D I T O R I A L

a r t d ir e c t o r 路 sean bacon

t y p e f a c e s 路 mrs ea v es + scotch roman

O b j e c t M atter

75


76

YONDER MAG AZINE

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 M A R C H 2 0 1 4

INDUSTRY 路 PUBLISHING


C a t e g o ry 路 E D I T O R I A L

a r t d ir e c t o r 路 sean bacon

t y p e f a c e s 路 mrs ea v es + scotch roman

O b j e c t M atter

77


78

YONDER MAG AZINE

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 M A R C H 2 0 1 4

INDUSTRY 路 PUBLISHING


C a t e g o ry 路 E D I T O R I A L

a r t d ir e c t o r 路 sean bacon

t y p e f a c e s 路 mrs ea v es + scotch roman

O b j e c t M atter

79


80

E D uA B R O A D

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R uA R Y 2 0 1 2

I N d U St R Y 路 E D u C AT I O N


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g + I N T E R A CT I v E

pa R t N e R · K E N N ET H A S A R E

t Y p e fac e S · E A M E S + M uS E O S A N S

objectMATTER

E D uA B r O A D OVErVIEW

EduAbroad is an education consulting firm that helps young students from Asia get an education in the United States. As a startup, the company has struggled to compete with larger firms due to their lackluster branding and website. A branding overhaul along with a new website, brochure and marketing materials was needed to help the company grow. PrOBlEm

Although Asia is known for their commitment to education, parents are often apprehensive about sending their kids overseas, in the hands of strangers. For this reason, it is essential that branding and design convey strong credibility and professionalism. The primary target audience of upper middle to high income parents requires a visual language that is inspirational and emphasizes safety. Designs aimed at the secondary market of kids aged 8–15 should be dynamic and fun. Branded materials need to be sympathetic to an intimidating journey and incorporate styling cues offering warm remembrances of home. sOluTION

EduAbroad’s new branding is photo and typography-driven with a blend Eames Century Modern and a clean sans-serif typography for body copy that communicates across languages with inspired professionalism. The new website uses inspirational full-screen images along with interactive content that helps clarify the scheduling and itinerary of the EduAbroad programs. A marketing video was created that traces the journey of young students embarking on a short trip to the United States. It offers parents a clear understanding of the program while emphasizing the quality of the learning experience. A package of branded applications was created to facilitate safe and efficient field trips. The designs showcase the ability of the EduAbroad brand to appeal towards kids through the use of bright colors and playful typography. Print material uses photography with an overlay of bright colors to inject energy.

81


82

E D UA B R O A D

p r o j e c t · 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

Logo

colors

TA G L I N E

Explore, Learn, Live. L A N G U A GES

EN 中文 日本語

K EY A DJECTIVES

I NSPI RAT IO NA L E N E RGE T IC O P T I M I ST IC I N T E RNAT IONA L F RI E N DLY PE R SO NA B L E T RUST WO RT H Y

i ma g e r y

typography

Eames Century Modern

Museo Sans

ABCDEFGHIJKLMN OPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890

ABCDEFGHIJKLMN OPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890

10

dat e · F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2

I N D U ST R Y · E D U C AT I O N


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g + I N T E R A CT I v E

pa R t N e R · K E N N ET H A S A R E

t Y p e fac e S · E A M E S + M uS E O S A N S

objectMATTER

FIELD NOTES:

My local taco shop has an expensive, custom-designed menu board. Unfortunately, Scotch taped all around the menu board are the specials—typed out in crappy fonts, garnished with random clipart, and printed on sheets of fluorescent-colored paper. What's the point of buying an expensive menu board, only to ruin it? As a startup, EduAbroad is always looking to save money by cutting corners on design. While I understand the impulse, it's a mistake to do so. Branding is a long-term game. It might seem like you're saving money by using that Microsoft Word template, but in the long run you are losing money by lowering the perceived value of the company's services. John Gardner has said that storytelling is a "continuous dream that is broken by bad technique." Well, branding is storytelling. Your fancy website does you no good if the flyer you just handed out looks amateurish. I know budgets are tight. I feel for the owners, I really do—but, as a startup, you have to dress the company for the job it wants, rather than the job it has.

83


84

E D uA B R O A D

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R uA R Y 2 0 1 2

I N d U St R Y 路 E D u C AT I O N


cat e g o R Y 路 B R A N D I N g + I N T E R A CT I v E

pa R t N e R 路 K E N N ET H A S A R E

t Y p e fac e S 路 E A M E S + M uS E O S A N S

objectMATTER

85


86

E D uA B R O A D

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R uA R Y 2 0 1 2

* EXPLORE * HiROMi SHiMAMURA PROGRAM DIRECTOR

+ LIVE +

I N d U St R Y 路 E D u C AT I O N


cat e g o R Y 路 B R A N D I N g + I N T E R A CT I v E

pa R t N e R 路 K E N N ET H A S A R E

t Y p e fac e S 路 E A M E S + M uS E O S A N S

objectMATTER

* LEARN *

www.eduabroad.us

87


88

E D UA B R O A D

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2

I N D U ST R Y 路 E D U C AT I O N


C a t e g o ry 路 brandin g + I N T E R A C T I V E

pa r t n e r 路 K E N N ET H A S A R E

t y p e fac e s 路 E A M E S + M US E O S A N S

O b j e c t M atter

89


90

1313 gALLERY

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R uA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N d U St R Y 路 A R T + E D u C AT I O N


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g + L AYO u T

pa R t N e R · D O N O vA N S A L A z A R

t Y p e fac e S · g O T H A M X- N A R R OW

objectMATTER

1 3 1 3 G A l l E ry OVErVIEW

1313 Gallery is a new space for contemporary art at San Diego City College. Wayne Hulgin, the director of the gallery, has ambitions of elevating the exhibition venue beyond “another student gallery.” The vision was to appeal to potential affluent sponsors while serving both the campus and community. The branding had to attract art lovers and visiting artists from well outside the bubble of academia. PrOBlEm

The gallery had to be positioned to distinguish itself from other campus galleries while offering something new to the downtown art scene. Because of the limited budget, marketing material had to be easily executable by the art department, while maintaining a consistent and professional look. The logo also demanded the ability to work with a sponsor’s name. The gallery needed a marketing plan that could attract visitors and get out the word out. sOluTION

A flexible and expandable identity system, which incorporates event and artist information into the logo, was created. This system allows a custom logo to be easily created for each event, which could then be applied to templates for consistent marketing materials. The changing logo injects energy and sophistication into the language, but maintains a unified look necessary to develop a strong brand. Branded applications use clean sans-serif typography set in bright shades of magenta and cyan that are consistent with the gallery’s modern architecture and mid-century décor. The identity was detailed in a brand manual and applied to a range of materials, including web and stationery. To jumpstart the gallery’s reputation for showcasing edgy, contemporary art, a guerilla marketing campaign was launched to entice big-name artists to show their work. Rather than marketing to visitors, the gallery would reach out to individual artists in extraordinary ways. Landing a big-name artist would generate significant buzz, giving the new gallery momentum. To achieve this, a set of Russian nesting dolls, created using a wheat paste collage, was created for artist and street activist Shepard Fairey. These handcrafted dolls, which paid homage to Shepard’s art and to the Constructivist movement, were delivered to his studio in Los Angeles inside a crate filled with shredded currency.

91


92

1 3 1 3 Gallery

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N D U S T R Y 路 A R T + E D u cation


C a t e g o ry 路 brandin g + layo u t

p a r t n e r 路 D ono v an S ala z ar

t y p e f a c e s 路 g otham x - narrow

O b j e c t M atter

Design Thinking

CREATIVE BRIEF

OVERVIEW

1313 Gallery is a new fine art gallery at City College, set to open for Fall 2014. The gallery is located on the first floor of the new Arts and Humanities Building, completing construction by the end of November 2013. The gallery is entered through a 500 square foot lobby that will feature a reception desk, bamboo floors, mid-century furniture and a glass wall on one side. The 2,700 square foot main gallery features 14-foot ceilings, bamboo floors, and tall slit windows. Outside, there is a 1,900 square foot sculpture garden with concrete pavers in a fenced and secured area. M I SS I O N S T A T E M E N T

1313 Gallery, at San Diego City College, is a forum for exploring contemporary art in a variety of media. Through innovative exhibitions, the gallery engages and inspires the academic population and the surrounding San Diego community. D iffe r entiation

1313 Gallery will have a larger and newer space, with more convenient parking compared to other downtown galleries. The gallery can distinguish itself by maintaining high standards for the art it shows, and by leveraging its connection to an academic institution. Unlike other school galleries, 1313 Gallery will push to attract people from outside academia. m a r k eting s t r ateg y

To create buzz around the launch of the gallery, and to set a high initial standard for the art, 1313 Gallery will reach out to specific big-name artists. Landing a famous artist will attract large crowds from the target market and will entice a sponsor to come aboard. f u nd r ai s ing

In order to fully carry out its vision, the gallery will need to raise money from the community. There are several sources of funding that are being explored: Big Sponsor, such as a large corporation or a wealthy individual that could provide a large donation or an agreement of continued support. A big sponsor could be added to the name of the gallery or be shown in the marketing material. Grants from government and foundations. Community Donors could provide small to medium donations or sign up for monthly or annual donations. Visitor Donations could be collected at shows or other events. Commissions from art sales. D E S I G N I M P L I C AT I O N S

1313 Gallery requires an identity that is in line with the art it shows: sophisticated and contemporary. The identity will be used in marketing material, web, signage, and apparel. It is important that the identity and marketing material communicate the mission of 1313 Gallery in an authentic way. Trendy concepts should be avoided. DESIGN CONSTRAINTS

Accommodation for sponsor is required in the lockup of the logo with a system to allow for the sponsor to change regularly. Ease of execution due to budget constrains, the marketing material must be simple enough to be executed by the art department.

93


94

1313 gALLERY

p R o j e c t · 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

Logo

1 3 1 3 GA L L E RY

e XpANded Logos

iMAgery

Logo coLors

editoriAL coLors

A R T I N N OVAT I G AG E I N S P I R E O P E N CO N T E M E X H I B I T M E TA DIRECTSOPHI Key Adjectives

SOPHISTICATED

MID-CENTURY

MODERN

CONTEMPORARY

INNOVATIVE

URBAN

typogrAphy

Gotham X-Narrow

Requiem Text

ABCDEFGHIJKLMN OPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890

ABCDEFGHIJKLMN OPQRSTUVWXYZ ����������

10

dat e · F E B R uA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N d U St R Y · A R T + E D u C AT I O N


cat e g o R Y · B R A N D I N g + L AYO u T

pa R t N e R · D O N O vA N S A L A z A R

t Y p e fac e S · g O T H A M X- N A R R OW

objectMATTER

FIELD NOTES:

Lots of people are scared of the number 13—so much so that most office buildings omit the floor, skipping from floor 12, directly to floor 14. After all, who would want to start a business in an office that could potentially bring about misfortune? In light of this, how could 1313 be a good name for the new gallery—won’t the name scare away potential visitors? No. The answer lies in an examination of the target market. Not that art lovers aren’t superstitious, but contemporary art is all about facing our fears and challenging ourselves to look at things in a new way. Our target market is the type that would gladly pay $28.50 to view an upside-down urinal and tweet about it afterwards. Afraid of the number 13? Nah. If anything, it only adds to the intrigue.

95


96

1313 gALLERY

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R uA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N d U St R Y 路 A R T + E D u C AT I O N


cat e g o R Y 路 B R A N D I N g + L AYO u T

pa R t N e R 路 D O N O vA N S A L A z A R

t Y p e fac e S 路 g O T H A M X- N A R R OW

objectMATTER

97


98

1 3 1 3 Gallery

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N D U S T R Y 路 A R T + E D u cation


C a t e g o ry 路 brandin g + layo u t

p a r t n e r 路 D ono v an S ala z ar

t y p e f a c e s 路 g otham x - narrow

O b j e c t M atter

99


100

1313 gALLERY

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R uA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N d U St R Y 路 A R T + E D u C AT I O N


cat e g o R Y 路 B R A N D I N g + L AYO u T

pa R t N e R 路 D O N O vA N S A L A z A R

t Y p e fac e S 路 g O T H A M X- N A R R OW

objectMATTER

101


102

1313 gALLERY

p R o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R uA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N d U St R Y 路 A R T + E D u C AT I O N


cat e g o R Y 路 B R A N D I N g + L AYO u T

pa R t N e R 路 D O N O vA N S A L A z A R

t Y p e fac e S 路 g O T H A M X- N A R R OW

objectMATTER

103


104

1 3 1 3 Gallery

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N D U S T R Y 路 A R T + E D u cation


C a t e g o ry 路 brandin g + layo u t

p a r t n e r 路 D ono v an S ala z ar

t y p e f a c e s 路 g otham x - narrow

O b j e c t M atter

105


106

1 3 1 3 Gallery

p r o j e c t 路 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e 路 F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 3

I N D U S T R Y 路 A R T + E D u cation


C a t e g o ry 路 brandin g + layo u t

p a r t n e r 路 D ono v an S ala z ar

t y p e f a c e s 路 g otham x - narrow

O b j e c t M atter

107


109

BRAND IDENTITIES

p r o j e c t · 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

dat e · 2 0 1 2 – 2 0 1 4

Chinese Law Group

Catalan Tapas Restaurant

Education Consulting Firm

Congolese War Drama

Social Networking App

Scopes Trial Play

English Pub & Grill

Education Mobile App

Healthcare Non-profit

Ratchet Belt System

Coming of Age Musical

Community College Seal

I N D U S T R Y · Vario u s


C a t e g o ry 路 I D E N T I T Y + B R A N D I N G

A R T D I R ECT I O N 路 C A N D I C E L O P E Z + S E A N B A C O N + A M Y L E V I N E

O b j e c t M atter

110


111

T hank Y O U


objectMATTER

Cheers This book is dedicated to all the friends that I’ve learned from or shared a laugh with, to my family for always being there, and to my mentors at City College who refused to stop pushing me. Thank you.

sPECIAl THANks TO

Sean, Candice, Rafa, Steve, Aliya, Nina, Donovan, Alicia, Kathryn, Kenny, Skeletor, Heber, Joaco, Mom, Dad, and Uncle Phil.

Copyright 2014, Bradford Prairie. All rights reserved. This book was printed by Blend in San Diego on 80-pound cover, silk finish. Some of the photography and icons are from Getty/iStock and The Noun Project. No portion of this book may be used or reproduced without written permission from the author.

112


Object Matter  

Bradford Prairie Graphic Design Portfolio 2014