Page 1

Southern Sudan Annual Report 2009

realising potential


ABOUTBRAC BRAC, a development organisation, was founded in Bangladesh in 1972 by Fazle Hasan Abed. Over the course of our evolution, BRAC has established itself as a pioneer in recognising and tackling the many different dimensions of poverty. Our unique, holistic approach to poverty alleviation and empowerment of the poor encompasses a range of programmes in economic, social and human development. Today, BRAC has grown to become the largest southern NGO employing more than 120,000 people, the majority of whom are women, and reaching more than 110 million people with our development interventions in Asia and Africa. Since 2002, we have been using our experiences of innovating and scaling up multi-faceted anti-poverty programmes to energise and accelerate poverty alleviation efforts in other countries. Currently we have country programmes in Afghanistan, Liberia, Pakistan, Sierra Leone, Southern Sudan, Sri Lanka, Tanzania and Uganda. We also provide support to other NGOs in Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Pakistan and Peru.


Contents


BRAC in

SOUTHERN SUDAN From our launch in 2007, BRAC has become the largest NGO and provider of microfinance in Southern Sudan. We now operate 45 branches in seven states with more than 22,000 microfinance members. Up to the end of 2009, we had disbursed USD 5.67 million in loans to poor women. BRAC takes an integrated approach to helping people rise out of poverty and realise their potential. We provide support services in agriculture, health and youth education. BRAC’s programmes are bolstered by rigorous research, monitoring and auditing. To build capacity we comprehensively train our members and staff. At the end of 2009 we employed 462 Sudanese (92% women), many of whom are promoted within the organisation.

Women attend weekly Villages Organization (VO) meeting in courtyard of a house in Quanchi Amer Sadhu neighbourhood in the city of Lahore, the capital of Punjab Province in Pakistan.


Chairperson’s Statement

It is quite amazing to see how enthusiastically Southern Sudan’s poorest people have embraced the multifaceted opportunities that BRAC provides to help them realise their potential. In 2009 we achieved significant growth in all of our all livelihoodenhancing programmes that are so essential to breaking the cycle of poverty. BRAC is now the biggest NGO and microfinance provider in Southern Sudan. As an example of our growth, the number of microfinance borrower groups – all women - more than doubled from 662 in 2008 to 1,425 in 2009, a tribute to the hard work of our staff and the effectiveness of the programme in reaching out to the poorest of the poor. Our cumulative loan disbursement increased to USD 5.67 million. We plan to disburse USD 8.3 million more in 2010. Unique among the top microfinance institutions, we provide the support of health, adolescent development, youth education and agriculture services. If microfinance can be seen as the heart of BRAC’s work, perhaps the Adolescent Girls Initiative is the soul. AGI is aimed at saving girls from early marriage and pregnancy through a network of neighbourhood clubs coupled with

livelihood training and microfinance. With funding from the World Bank, we will open 100 clubs in four states in 2010. In the clubs, the girls will receive life-skills training and encouragement through a variety of activities to find their own voice and express themselves. Agricultural development is essential to meet the food crisis in Southern Sudan, where the capacity to produce food plummeted during decades of civil war. As our response, we stepped up our agriculture Programme in 2009. We began with a collective demonstration farm as a pilot project in 2008 in Central Equatoria state, and expanded to three more states in 2009. We broadened the Programme to include individual demonstration farmers and general farmers. Expansion will continue in 2010 as we bring the Programme to three more states. For example, we intend to increase the number of general farmers we train and support from 400 in 2009 to 2,400 in 2010. Essential health care is central to alleviating poverty; people can’t make money when they’re sick. From our microfinance members, we train Community Health Volunteers who give health-care services and health information to their neighbours, and sell

health-related products to supplement their income. There are now 120 CHVs taking the pulse of their community’s health in Central Equatorial and Jonglei states. We will add 100 more in 2010. With our participation in the Sudan Recovery Fund we have established a presence in all 10 states in Southern Sudan. Under the United Nations Development Programme, the fund awarded BRAC the responsibility to implement its small grants fund of USD 2.5 million to national NGOs and community-based organisations in every state. We have screened the groups, supported their capacity building and direct implementation of agriculture, education, water and other initiatives. BRAC staff will monitor the projects. This gives us a window into more states where we can introduce our Programmes. We conduct rigorous research and evaluation activities to continuously check on the effectiveness of our Programmes. Since the Research and Evaluation Unit for East Africa Programmes was launched in 2008, the regional research team based in Kampala, Uganda, has initiated impact studies of all our development Programmes and 15 operational research projects.


microfinance livelihood development services

............... ............. .............. ............. .............. ............... .............. ............... ............. ............... ............. .............. ............. .............. ............... .............. ............... ............. ............... ............. ..............

............... ............. .............. ............... ............. .............. ............... ............. .............. ............... ............. .............. ............... ............. .............. ............... ............. .............. ............... ............. .............. ............... ............. .............. ............... ............. ..............


PROGRAMMEHIGHLIGHTS “The conditions are tough in Southern Sudan. It’s hot, it’s not always safe, but we are committed to doing something for the poorest of the poor in the country.” M. Golam Mostofa (34), Programme manager for Microfinance, BRAC Southern Sudan. Microfinance is the heart of BRAC’s integrated approach to alleviating poverty and helping poor Southern Sudanese women realise their potential. More than 23,000 women are members of 1,425 community-based microfinance groups throughout Southern Sudan. They gather weekly in villages, towns and city neighbourhoods to make repayments on their loans and apply for new ones. “I built this building for my business, pay school tuition for my children and I’m constructing my house,” said Ajieth Nyanluak Garang, 28, who runs a small restaurant in Bupthok Market, Bor, Jonglei State. “I feel really happy because BRAC came to Southern Sudan so our women can become selfreliant.” Ajieth began in business as a tea-maker, earning 150 pounds (USD 66) a month. With BRAC loans she began preparing meat, fish and a local flat bread called kisra. Now the mother of three pays four workers 300 pounds (USD 132) each a month and earns a monthly profit of 950 (USD 475). “I’ll make a plan for saving. As the children grow up they’ll find everything has been organised by their mother.” Like Ajieth, borrowers are expanding their small businesses with loans and other livelihood development services that are central to our multifaceted approach. Susan Louise Ayaa, branch manager for microfinance in the Hai Gabat office, Juba, said that in the space of three years, borrowers have been able to scale up their loans from 500 pounds (USD 220) to 800 (USD 350) to 1,300 (USD 570). One of Susan’s group members, Beatrice Kojoki, 22, has followed exactly that microloan trajectory in improving her shop in Gabat Market selling plates, cups, soap, salt, cooking oil, basins, nails and other hardware. “Before BRAC I just put things I was selling on a table. With my first loan I constructed this small store where I could sell my goods.” At first, Beatrice’s

BRAC Pakistan Annual Report 2009

sales were 20 pounds (USD 8.75) a day; now her daily revenue can reach 180-200 pounds (USD 7987.70). “This money has really improved my life.” Beatrice faced a setback in May 2009 when the government demolished squatter settlements in Juba and she lost her home. “I used some of my loan to build a new house. From this money I was also paying school fees for my son, for eating and for expanding the business.” The women are often able to make big changes in their businesses from the first loan. Carmela Bavowa Rebean, 42, sits among sacks of beans, flour and other staples at the Konykony Market in Bor. The mother of eight began in 2008 with 500 pounds (USD 220). “I saw the difference. I could buy a lot of sacks, build my family home and pay school fees, which I couldn’t pay before.” BRAC wants to take the microfinance model into more remote areas. “The challenge here is hunger,” said Golam Mostofa, Programme manager for microfinance. “People are eating once a day. They are not working. There are problems with tribal conflicts. They have no money but we provide loans without collateral so they can do some business. We need to move more into the interior where conditions are worse. My satisfaction will be in reaching them and helping them.”

PROGRAMME ACHIEVEMENTS 2009

23,237

members and 15,787 borrowers across 1,425 groups added over the last year.

USD 2.27

............. ............. ............. ............. ............. ............. ............. ............. ............. ............. .............

......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... .........

........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........

.... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....

.... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....

45

branches in seven out of 10 states – Central Equatoria, Eastern Equatoria, Jonglei, Lakes, Upper Nile, and Western Bahr el Gajal – up from 17 branches in four states previously. We are planning to add the remaining three states in 2010, moving into areas that are basically untouched by other microfinance providers.

million during the year for a cumulative total of 5.67 million. Our target in 2010 is to disburse USD 8.3 million to 40,000 borrowers.

306

staff by the end of 2009 on the microfinance team, compared with 120 in 2008.

04/05


4

PROGRAMME DESCRIPTION BRAC's microfinance Programme has been designed to serve large numbers of poor people with reliable access to cost effective financial services.

BRAC provides more than just microfinance. We use the microfinance groups as a social platform to deliver scaledup services in health, education, business development and livelihood support - all critical components needed to ensure that poor people can break the cycle of poverty. Programme Components Women's Groups: Community partnerships and institution building are essential for poor people if they are to change their economic, social and political conditions. We deliver our microfinance and other Programmes through organising groups of poor women who come together to improve their socioeconomic position. BRAC microfinance branch offices conduct area surveys and consult with community leaders and

local elders to select the 25-30 members of each group. The group is then sub-divided into smaller groups of five, each with their own elected leader. The members of the small groups take coresponsibility to solve peer repayment problems. New borrower groups meet four times before any loan disbursement takes place. After that, they meet weekly to discuss credit decisions with their dedicated BRAC credit officer and make their loan repayments. BRAC provides training and technical assistance to its members and others in the community, empowering them to earn more income from existing activities and start new ones. Microloans At the core of the Programme are microloans, which are exclusively for the women participating in the group process. Borrowers range in age from 20-50 with little or no education. BRAC lends to women who are not served by other microfinance institutions. Borrowers typically operate businesses that provide products or services to their local communities.


Women with seasonal businesses, such as farming related activities, may also be eligible for shorter term loans. SUDAN RECOVERY FUND Microfinance is not the only way to promote financial development. The United Nations Development Programme’s Sudan Recovery Fund for Southern Sudan (SRF-SS) aims to facilitate a transition from humanitarian aid to recovery assistance. In 2009, the SRF-SS awarded BRAC the responsibility to implement its small grants fund of USD 2.5 million to as many as 70 national NGOs and community-based organisations in all 10 states. BRAC has screened these groups, supported their capacity building and direct implementation of agriculture, education, water and other initiatives. The objective of the projects – 47% in agriculture - is to make quick returns to the community.

do their best. We are committed to perform well,” he said. M. Abu Bakar Siddique, Country Manager, said the World Bank will choose some of the projects for longer-term funding. “This can be a bridge to provide support to community projects in the interior of Southern Sudan. It is very important.”

Microloans Most popular loan uses Microloans Most popular loan uses Retailing – grocery, hardware stores etc. Running a bar/drinks shop Food cooking and vending Local beer brewery Charcoal selling

Khan M. Ferdous is managing BRAC Southern Sudan’s coordination efforts and said the grants will be distributed in two rounds of USD 1.25 million. “We want to release the funds as soon as possible. Already we’ve selected our monitoring staff in all 10 states. Our new colleagues are very young and will

Selling raw fruits and vegetables Selling second hand clothes/shoes Running a beauty parlour Vegetable cultivation Poultry and livestock rearing Tailoring

BRAC Pakistan Annual Report 2009

1 ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... 2 ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... 3 ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ........... ...... ......... ...........

04/05


youth education alternative learning programme

.............. ........ ....... ............. ........ ....... ............. .............. ............. .............. ........ ....... .............. ........ ....... ............. ........ ....... ............. .............. ............. .............. ........ ....... .............. ........ ....... ............. ........ ....... .............

.............. ........ ....... ............. ........ ....... ............. .............. ............. .............. ........ ....... .............. ........ ....... ............. ........ ....... ............. .............. ............. .............. ........ ....... .............. ........ ....... .............

.............. ........ ....... ............. .............. ........ ....... ............. ..............


PROGRAMMEHIGHLIGHTS “Our biggest success was to be able to open all the schools that we planned. The Ministry of Education wanted them open by June and we did it. We completed the training courses for Programme staff and teachers. And UNICEF provided the educational materials.” M. Kabir Ahammed, manager of the education WIn post-conflict Southern Sudan, BRAC has pioneered a non-formal education Programme for children who never had the chance for an education or who had dropped out of primary school. So far we have opened 110 “second-chance” learning centres in Juba, Torit, Bor and Rumbek with financing from the Strømme Foundation, BRAC USA and BRAC UK. The goal is to prepare the students to enter the formal government school system at the Primary 5 level. If you are a young girl living in Southern Sudan today, you only have a 1% chance of completing your primary education. This means that every year only 500 girls complete Primary 8 from the 64,000 young girls who are eligible. And out of those 500, only half will be taught by a trained teacher. As a result, nearly 90% of women in Southern Sudan are illiterate. There are also only 21 secondary schools in a region about the size of Eastern Europe. Our approach to education draws from the innovations of our low-cost, non-formal primary education model that operates nationwide in Bangladesh and Afghanistan, but adapts its approach to meet the needs of the situation in Southern Sudan. BRAC has been working on education in Southern Sudan since 2002 with UNICEF providing technical assistance in curriculum design and operational management. All the resulting schools were located in the rural areas and enrolled only girls. In 2008, we launched our own Programme with the target of opening 1,000 non-formal primary schools within five years. Nine-year-old Chol Makuek is a student at the school in Cuei Atem Village, Bor. “I’d like to be a leader in the world. I want to learn what I don’t know. I like science because I learn about keeping my body clean. I want to be a doctor.”

BRAC Pakistan Annual Report 2009

We have structured the curriculum so the students cover Grade 1 to Grade 4 more quickly than the government schools. Children attend the school six days a week, finishing a grade in nine months and then moving to the next grade without a vacation. The Programme targets children aged between six and 11 years who never enrolled in school before or who dropped out before attaining the basic skills of reading, writing and arithmetic. Many never had any opportunity to attend a school before because of decades of civil war and insecurity. At 14, Foni Mary Justin is an orphan in Juba who never went to school. Her mother was poisoned by neighbours in 1996 and her father died of TB in 1999. There were neither hospitals nor drugs. Foni is in Primary 2 now at Munuki school. “I like English and math.” Joan Edwina William, 25, has been a community organiser in the education Programme in Juba for two years. She studies economics at Juba University and wants to become an accountant. Joan spent the war years with her siblings in Uganda and came back in 2007. She supervises 10 schools, covering the ground between them on foot. “The pupils are getting something from the education as I see them improve. Now they’re able to read.”

PROGRAMME ACHIEVEMENTS 2009

3,300

........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. .....

110

schools in our Education Programme in 2009, up from 50 in 2008. The 60 new schools are in Juba in Central Equatoria state, Bor in Jonglei state and Rumbek in Lakes state. With funding from the Strøme Foundation, we plan to open 30 more schools in 2010 in Yei, Central Equatoria.

out-of-school children identified and enrolled through our community organisers – of whom 62% are girls – from the poorest households. Some 35-40% are the sons and daughters of our microfinance members. We continue to focus on our goal of helping Southern Sudan achieve the Millennium Development Goal of universal primary education and gender parity in primary schools by 2015.

04/05


PROGRAMME DESCRIPTION The goal of BRAC's Education Programme in Southern Sudan is to educate children who have dropped out of school or never enrolled so they can enter the formal government school system. Our Education Programme follows the government curriculum of the four-year lower primary cycle. We intend to open 1,000 schools in 10 states of Southern Sudan within five years. A total of 30,000 students will be enrolled. At least 60% of the students will be girls 8-11 years old. We are aiming for 95% of the children to transfer to the higher level

Primary Level 5 in public schools. All learning materials are provided free of charge. Teachers are recruited locally. Prospective teachers are contacted by BRAC staff and encouraged to submit an application. We hire only women who are established as local residents and have a minimum of eight years schooling.

of primary cycle when they complete their lower primary cycle with BRAC.

The main features of our approach are: I School timing flexibility; I Operating in a close proximity to student's house; I Small class sizes managed by female teachers; I Little or no homework; I Child-friendly teaching environment ; I Close and supportive supervision; I Relevant curriculum providing basic education and life skills; I No financial cost for students or guardians; I Close involvement of parents and communities in school management.

We admit 30 to 35 pupils per school and employ one teacher to provide a four-year school cycle. We follow the Government Curriculum. Once pupils attain a Primary Level 4, they can be mainstreamed to

We conduct house to house surveys to identify prospective students and teachers and cross check our findings with local education officials to prevent duplication and identify drop-outs.

One of the distinctive features of BRAC’s approach is its involvement of a wide range of stakeholders including community members, local government officials, and provincial and central education officials.


Potential teachers are hired by BRAC and given 20 days of basic teacher training designed to be proactive and participatory; placing emphasis on practice and role-play teaching. Teacher training includes topics such as the basic concepts of education, child psychology, different teaching and learning techniques and how to deal with child disabilities. One female community organiser from the locality is recruited to look after 10 schools each. She visits each school twice a week to ensure the attendance of the learners and the progress of learning. Teachers also receive monthly refresher training throughout the school cycle to hone and strengthen their abilities. All teachers are women, which helps make parents comfortable sending their daughters to school. This also serves to increase the status of women in the community. A school building is rented in the local community, normally a one-room structure made of bamboo or mud with a metal roof, no further than one kilometre walking distance from the students' houses. Students are taught a curriculum that encompasses both basic primary education as well as relevant life

BRAC Pakistan Annual Report 2009

skills, such as topics related to health and agriculture.

NEW: ADOLESCENT GIRLS INITIATIVE PROGRAMME Education is a major component of BRAC’s Adolescent Girls Initiative (AGI) in Southern Sudan. With funding from the World Bank, we will open 100 clubs in 2010 through 10 branches in four states. The Programme’s objectives are to empower the adolescents aged 15-24 socially and financially. There are six components – a safe place for socialisation, life-skills training, livelihood training, financial literacy, savings and credit services, and community sensitisation. Abu Bakar Siddique, BRAC Country Manager, said the livelihood education will include teaching skills for both self-employment and wage employment. “Not all girls will have opportunities to invest in their own enterprise, so we will be looking to provide training in areas such as hotels and tourism. We will contact employers to assess the demand.” For those adolescents who want to start their own businesses, we’ll provide money through microcredit. BRAC’s 20 years of experience working with adolescent goups in Bangladesh has shown their average loans are much less than for adults. The World Bank has chosen the BRAC Research and Evaluation Unit for East Africa Programmes to undertake a baseline survey and ingoing evaluation of the impact of AGI.

04/05


health livelihood development services

.......... ............... .................... ..... .. .......... ............... .................... ..... .. ............... .................... ..... .. .......... ............... .................... ..... .. .......... ............... .................... ..... .. .......... ............... .................... ..... .. .......... ............... .................... ..... .. .......... ............... .................... ..... .. .......... ............... .................... ..... .. ..........

.......... ............... .................... ..... .. ..... .......... ............... .................... ..... .. .......... ............... .................... ..... .. .......... ............... .................... ..... .. .......... ............... .................... ..... .. .......... ............... .................... ..... .. .......... ............... .................... ..... .. .......... ............... .................... ..... .. .......... ............... .................... ..... ..


PROGRAMMEHIGHLIGHTS “I want to improve our country. The mothers need knowledge how to care for their children. I give thanks to BRAC because they’re learning something about first aid in their homes.” Joy Micah Tumalu, 43, community organiser, Munuki branch, Juba. She spent the war years as a refugee in Central African Republic. BRAC takes a multifaceted approach to delivering essential health care in Southern Sudan. We focus on the prevention of malaria, tuberculosis (TB), and HIV/AIDS, the reduction of infant and under-five mortality rates, increasing accessibility to health by taking health care to the doorstep of the people, and improving utilisation of government and private health facilities. Like many other African countries, Sudan lacks comprehensive healthcare. Decades of civil war have made the situation worse and millions of returning internally displaced people and ultra poor lack access to a constant source of food – leaving 26% of the population undernourished. The health care situation in Southern Sudan is much bleaker than for the rest of the country. Under-five mortality is considerably higher and more children are susceptible to die from easily treated illnesses such as malaria (26%), pneumonia (19%) and diarrhoea (22%). For adults, the numbers of malaria cases in the south are 500 per 1000 people, which is more than double the estimated numbers for the north. The World Health Organisation estimates that health coverage is only 30%. Only 5% of pregnant women in Southern Sudan will be attended by a skilled health care professional when giving birth. At the centre of BRAC’s approach are the Community Health Volunteers (CHVs), who are women selected from their microfinance groups and trained to provide basic health care. Every day, 120 dedicated CHVs take the pulse of their communities served by eight BRAC branches in the Juba area. In 2010, the health Programme will be expanded to three branches in the Bor area in Jonglei state. The CHVs earn a small income from selling health care products, such as condoms, birth control pills, water purifiers, antihistamines, antacids, worm remedies, analgesics and other over-the-counter medicines. For serious cases, they refer patients to other health facilities.

BRAC Pakistan Annual Report 2009

“Since I started to work with BRAC, people know me in the community, and even some of them call me ‘doctor’ because they take medicines from me and get advice,” said CHV Sunday Flora Eluzai, 30, in Juba. She has more than 150 households in her catchment area and visits about 15 households a day. CHVs are supported and supervised by Community Health Workers (CHWs), who are staff members responsible for implementing the BRAC Health Programme at the branch level. Among their duties, they go into the field to help CHVs conduct community Health Forums on such topics as sanitation, hygiene, HIV/AIDS, and malaria. Mosharraf Hossain, area health coordinator, said the free antenatal services began in July 2009 and every month 270 to 350 checkups are performed. “Also every month we organise refresher training courses for this purpose,” he said. The health workers check the pregnant woman for danger signs of edema, anaemia and convulsions, check the position of the foetus, and offer advice on proper food and rest.

........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. .....

“Usually, access to this kind of service is limited by the distance to hospitals. The women are very pleased with our help in their homes because they can’t afford transport,” Mosharraf Hossain said.

PROGRAMME ACHIEVEMENTS 2009

8

60

extra Community Health Volunteers (CHVs) trained to bring essential care services to their neighbourhoods bringing the total number of CHVs to 120 by year end. CHVs treated 1,270 patients during the year.

1,169

branches being operated under BRAC Southern Sudan’s health initiative in 2009 with three in Jonglei state to be added in 2010.

1,626

free in-home antenatal checkups performed by our team of 17 Community Health Workers (CHWs) under a new BRAC Programme that recognises poor women can’t afford transportation to health facilities.

health forums conducted by CHWs in 2009, with another 1,467 planned for 2010.

04/05


1

4

PROGRAMME DESCRIPTION The BRAC Southern Sudan Essential Health Care Programme (EHC) is a scalable model of community health care. The overall goal of the EHC Programme is to improve health conditions and increase access to health services by providing basic health services in communities where BRAC has an established microfinance group. One member of each BRAC borrowing group is designated and trained as a Community Health Volunteer (CHV). CHVs serve the

I

I

I

......................

I

health needs of the entire community, with particular attention to poor women and children. Programme Objectives To increase reproductive health care services by raising awareness, ensuring antenatal care (ANC)

I

I

and post-natal care (PNC) visits, and facility-based deliveries. To reduce the incidence of malaria, especially among pregnant women and children, by enhancing control and prevention. To bring positive behavioural change for prevention of HIV/AIDS and ensuring access to HIV/AIDS services through community sensitisation and participation. To develop a community based approach to increase and sustain TB case detection and cure rate as per the Millennium Development Goals; To improve basic sanitation and hygiene by bringing behavioural change and ensuring access to safe water and latrines. To mobilise women and disseminate information through village meetings and home visits. To collaborate with the Government to further facilitate and strengthen the implementation of national tuberculosis, malaria and immunisation Programmes.


PROGRAMME COMPONENTS Reproductive Health Care One of BRAC's primary concerns is to improve reproductive health care awareness and service utilisation. To fulfill this objective, Community Health Volunteers (CHVs) identify pregnant women during their household visits and inform the Community Health Worker (CHW). The CHWs perform antenatal checkups in the home, raising awareness of pregnancy care and pre-natal danger signs. The CHV keeps a check on whether her clients have taken their Tetanus Toxoid (TT) vaccine. She also raises awareness of the importance of Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT) for HIV/AIDS, and Preventing Mother to Child Transmission of HIV (PMTCT). Malaria Control During household visits, the CHV identifies suspected cases of malaria and refers the patients to the nearest government health centres. She follows up to determine test results and see if the patient is taking their anti-malarial medication. A relative of the patient is put in charge of supervising the drug intake according to their prescription. The CHV then conducts a follow-up visit to ensure the patient's recovery and to make sure that the patient has not developed further complications. The CHV keeps records of this information in her household visit register. We are delivering home-based management of malaria as part of the Child Survival Programme of the Ministry of Health, Government of Southern Sudan. This is a project in four counties of Lakes state. Through a community network of our CHVs, treatment for malaria in children up to five years of age is provided through artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), relevant information and counselling as well as follow-up and referral for severe cases. TB Control CHVs implement a well-tested, community-based approach for increasing and sustaining TB case detection and treatment. During household visits, CHVs ask simple questions related to suspected TB cases (based on symptoms). When a suspected TB victim is identified, the CHV motivates that person to be

BRAC Pakistan Annual Report 2009

tested at a nearby government facility. She explains the dangers that TB can pose to the sick person as well as the rest of the family. She then follows up on the patient to determine the test results and advise accordingly. Family Planning During regular household visits, the CHV mobilises and motivates women to use modern methods of contraception. She provides clients with birth control pills and condoms. For other temporary and/or permanent methods, couples are referred to government primary and secondary healthcare facilities. Community Health Initiatives BRAC takes a multi-pronged approach to community health education. We offer community health forums on issues such as a malaria, TB and HIV prevention, maternal health, family planning, and sanitation. Basic Curative Services CHVs are trained to diagnose and treat some basic ailments such as diarrhoea, dysentery, common cold, helminthiasis, anaemia, ringworm, scabies, hyperacidity and angular stomatitis. They refer individuals with suspected conditions to local public and private health facilities. CHVs earn a small income by selling over-the-counter medicines to patients.

NEW INITIATIVES In a new initiative, BRAC is the survey coordinator and implementer for a malaria prevention Programme covering four counties with a population of 355,000 in Lakes state. BRAC is setting up a field office and providing education efforts, training and workers to distribute home-based management of malaria. Community-based distributors will provide artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) medication to children under five while referring other patients to the nearest health facilities. It is part of a campaign coordinated by the international health organisation PSI and funded by the Global Fund.

04/05


agriculture livelihood development services

............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............................. .................. ........... ........ ...................... .................. ........... ........ ................................ .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........ ............. .................. ........... ........


PROGRAMMEHIGHLIGHTS “BRAC has changed my life by providing seeds and food and tools for my farming. As an extension worker, I teach the farmers how to use modern techniques. I feel confident and happy because my people are getting support and skills in agriculture.” James Mawei Mayom (35), agriculture entrepreneur/extension worker, Jonglei state BRAC Southern Sudan launched a novel pilot project in 2008 on the banks of the Nile River near Juba – an eightacre collective demonstration farm using modern agriculture methods where the produce of 27 participating local farmers went to their cooperative. Its success led to an expansion in 2009 to four states and a broadening of the initiative to add individual demonstration farmers as well as general farmers. The Programme is our response to Southern Sudan’s food crisis. So much of the area’s food needs are shipped in from Kenya, Uganda and other countries even though it is estimated that more than 70% of Southern Sudanese are engaged in agricultural activities for their livelihoods. The objectives of the Agriculture Programme are to ensure food security; employment and income generation; utilisation of fallow land; diversification of cropping patterns; introduction of modern technology and the use of organic pesticide, Integrated Pest Management, manure, etc. During the long civil war, there was widespread destruction of farms and essential infrastructure. The farming communities are slowly recovering but face a number of problems including low crop yields per hectare, a lack of availability of high-quality seeds, and under-utilisation of low-cost irrigation methods. To tackle these problems, we have linked with partners such as the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (quality seeds and tools), the World Food Programme (food to sustain the farmers as their crops grow), and the Bangladesh Battalion of the UN Mission in Sudan (engineering, preparing fields with bulldozers and tractors). In selecting the farmers for the Programme, we target returnees and rural poor but active household heads, especially women. Other vulnerable groups include orphans, widows, people with disabilities, single parents and demobilised soldiers.

BRAC Pakistan Annual Report 2009

For the demonstration farms, we arrange to level the land, plough the fields, provide high-quality seeds, tools and irrigation. The farmers are trained in line planting, plant spacing, proper weeding and other techniques. Severe drought was a problem throughout Southern Sudan in 2009, but BRAC’s irrigated fields produced around double the yields of farmers outside the agriculture Programme. “BRAC has eradicated poverty from my life,” said Dabora Khor Kelei, 57, leader of the collective demonstration farmers on the edge of the Nile River in Bor county, Jonglei state. BRAC established the 10-acre farm in 2009. “I want BRAC to keep this effort.” The 20 experienced farmers range in age from Ajok Anyieth Awoul at 28 to Amour Deng Ayom at 60. “I want to dig even at night,” said Amour. “We did not know each other before,” said Dabora. “When we started the garden we started knowing each other gradually. Unity is not a simple thing. We need to keep united for our vision.”

........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. .....

BRAC’s Agriculture Programme has also attracted the interest of other NGOs and the Southern Sudan government. “The Minister of Education told us to spread this model in all 10 states,” said Shawkat Hasan, BRAC’s Programme Manager, Agriculture.

PROGRAMME ACHIEVEMENTS 2009

4

collective demonstration farms in four states up from one small pilot project near Juba in Central Equatoria. The three new states in which we expanded into are Eastern Equatoria, Western Equatoria and Jonglei.

732

the total number of workers in agriculture comprising of 80 farmers on the four collective demonstration farms, 200 individual demonstration farmers and 400 general farmers. As we expand much further in 2010, we expect there will be 4,224 farmers in the Programme. To support the farmers, we received seeds and tools from the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation, and food from the World Food Programme.

52

agricultural entrepreneurs/ extension workers appointed and training for 36 government field-level agriculture staff conducted in 2009.

04/05


1

4

PROGRAMME DESCRIPTION The Agriculture Programme addresses the problems of poor crop productivity, lack of resources and large areas of fallow land in post-conflict Southern Sudan. We are evaluating three approaches to see which is the most effective: collective demonstration farms, individual demonstration farms, or support for general farmers. Collective Demonstration FarmsBRAC established four collective demonstration farms, each on 10 acres of land. Twenty local farmers were

......................

selected from the community to work on each demonstration plot. They are split into two groups of 10 farmers and come every day to work the farm. All the produce from the farm goes to the farmers' cooperative. BRAC coordinated developing the land, providing a water pump so the farmers can produce

crops during the dry period, and giving technical support with the help of local government officials. By seeing better results from improved seeds and effective agricultural tools, we hope other farmers will be encouraged to cultivate production on their fallow land. Individual Demonstration Farms Due to 20 years of internal conflict and civil war in Southern Sudan, huge areas of land were left fallow. When farmers returned they lacked the resources to get restarted. BRAC Southern Sudan launched demonstration projects in four states to encourage crop cultivation on fallow land. We created 200 crop demonstrations with the individual farmers of the communities. Land size for each demonstration is one acre. BRAC provides improved seeds, tools, training and also technical support. The focus is on cultivation of high-yielding crops, such as maize, sorghum and vegetables. Malaria Control


During household visits, the CHV identifies suspected cases of malaria and refers the patients to the nearest government health centres. She follows up to determine test results and see if the patient is taking their anti-malarial medication. A relative of the patient is put in charge of supervising the drug intake according to their prescription. The CHV then conducts a follow-up visit to ensure the patient's recovery and to make sure that the patient has not developed further complications. The CHV keeps records of this information in her household visit register. BRAC is participating in a new malaria prevention Programme in four counties in Lakes state. Funded by the Global Fund and coordinated by PSI, the Programme aims to increase the provision of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) to 60% of children under five with fever. As implementer, BRAC has trained community based distributors to make home visits, dispense the medication and promote awareness and participation. TB Control CHVs implement a well-tested, community based approach for increasing and sustaining TB case detection and treatment. During household visits, CHVs ask simple questions related to suspected TB cases (based on symptoms). When a suspected TB victim is identified, the CHV motivates that person to be tested at a nearby government facility. She explains the dangers that TB can pose to the sick person as well as the rest of the family. She then follows up on the patient to determine the test results. If the patient tests positive, the CHV can also act as a Direct Observation Treatment Short Course (DOTS) agent. DOTS involves second party observation of a TB infected person taking a prescribed course of medication so that the patient does not default on taking their medications, which results in drug resistance. Family Planning During regular household visits, the CHV mobilises and motivates women to use modern methods of contraception. She provides clients with birth control pills and condoms. For other temporary and/or permanent methods, couples are referred to government primary and secondary health care facilities.

General Farmers General farmers grow crops on small holdings near their homes. Generally the land size is a half acre or less. They cultivate sorghum, sesame, ground nut, vegetables, etc. with seeds provided by BRAC. We also provide training and tools. The total number of general farmers was 400 - 100 from each state. Besides these farmers, BRAC also provided seeds and technical support to other farmers for proper utilisation of homestead land. These farmers cultivated sesame and ground nuts as well as vegetables on a small piece of land less than half an acre. The total number of these farmers was 2,646: 660 in Juba, 668 in Torit, 958 in Bor and 360 in Yambio County. Basic Curative Services CHVs are trained to diagnose and treat some basic ailments such as diarrhoea, dysentery, common cold, helminthiasis, anaemia, ringworm, scabies, hyperacidity and angular stomatitis. They refer individuals with more complicated conditions to local public and private health facilities. CHVs earn a small income by selling over-the-counter medicines to patients.

AGRICULTURE SUPPORT INITIATIVES Agriculture entrepreneurs/extension workers and Programme organisers BRAC appointed 52 agriculture entrepreneurs/extension workers and eight Programme organisers in the four demonstration locations to provide support to the selected farmers. They coordinate Programme implementation at the area office level, organise training for farmers, ensure timely input supply to farmers, and also conduct

BRAC Pakistan Health Care Objectives Awareness building of the Health Programme Pregnancy related care: Ante-natal check ups for all pregnant mothers in the area of coverage Collaboration with government to educate about malaria, polio and diarrhoea Immunisation programme targeting 100% of children under five Safe drinking water, sanitation and hygiene overall Programme supervision. The agriculture

BRAC Pakistan Annual Report 2009

04/05


recruitment, training and research

............. ............ .................. ......... .......... .......... ............. ............ .................. ......... ......... .......... ............. ............ .................. .................. ......... .......... ............. ............ ............ .................. ......... .......... ............. ............. ............ .................. ......... .......... .......... ............. ............ .................. ......... ......... .......... ............. ............ .................. .................. ......... .......... ............. ............ ............ .................. ......... .......... ............. ............. ............ .................. ......... ..........

............. ............ .................. ......... .......... ............. ............ .................. ......... .......... ............. ............ .................. ......... .......... ............. ............ .................. ......... .......... ............. ............ .................. ......... .......... ............. ............ .................. ......... .......... ............. ............ .................. ......... .......... ............. ............ .................. ......... ..........


RECRUITMENT By December 2009, BRAC Southern Sudan was employing 462 Sudanese people, of whom 92% are young Sudanese women in their 20s or 30s who are looking for the fast career trajectory that BRAC offers our staff. Jobs that were advertised and filled in 2009 included credit officers and branch managers, school supervisors, health workers and agriculturalists. In addition to these staff, BRAC engaged 36 expatriates and sector specialists for the smooth operation of our Programmes. Often a woman is hired as a credit officer for our microfinance Programme and can quickly progress to become branch manager and then area manager. Some women start as volunteers – such as a community health volunteer – and can go on to be promoted to full-time paid positions. In the last 12 months, we promoted 39 women to managerial positions. Training is the backbone of BRAC’s Programmes in Southern Sudan. As BRAC hires new staff, many of them straight out of college, it is critical to provide them with sufficient orientation and training. In addition, BRAC believes in constantly investing in upgrading existing staff, helping them learn new skills and grow within the organisation. All BRAC’s courses are conducted by professional facilitators who have considerable experience in Bangladesh and internationally.

CAPACITY BUILDING BRAC Southern Sudan builds capacity through all our Programmes. For example, In the education sector, we open schools in disadvantaged areas where education services are weak or non-existent and recruit and train staff and teachers. In health care, the focus is on providing primary health care and training Community Health Workers and other health-care staff. Water and sanitation projects will focus on the immediate needs of communities as well as facilitating the development of water management committees and other community services.

BRAC Pakistan Annual Report 2009

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION BRAC Southern Sudan benefits from a regional Research and Evaluation Unit for East Africa Programmes that BRAC has established in Kampala, Uganda. In its second year of operation, the unit grew significantly in terms of staff and projects undertaken, shifting its focus from data collection in 2008 to analysis in 2009. The unit is an in-house but independent facility supporting BRAC’s existing development Programmes in Uganda, Tanzania and Southern Sudan with continuous and rigorous evaluation. The unit provides analysis of emerging issues so we can continue to innovate and become more effective. With the addition of two researchers in 2009, there are now five on staff, plus field manager, survey quality controller, data manager and 30 data enterers. “Whenever we have a big survey we hire around 50 data collectors and supervisors as field staff,” said Research Manager Abebual Zerihun. BRAC’s data centre in Kampala, which receives all the data from the three countries, went to two shifts a day in 2009 to handle the workload. In 2009, the unit conducted three impact evaluations to measure the effects and extent to which Programme goals were achieved, five formative studies to help create Programmes specific to the needs of target groups and ensure Programme acceptability and feasibility, and 11 operational studies to aid in Programme operations and improvement.

........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. .....

The research findings are a critical means of communicating with wider audiences about BRAC experiences on what works and what does not. For example, in 2009 we presented papers at conferences in Washington, DC, and Kampala, reported on our findings to five workshops for Programme staff at BRAC area offices, and emailed reports to partners, staff and universities. In 2010, BRAC is sponsoring a global microfinance summit for Africa and the Middle East in Nairobi where we will distribute 12 research reports to delegates. We conduct studies in collaboration with researchers from partner research institutions. New initiatives include an agreement with the World Bank for conducting research on adolescent girls in Southern Sudan, and another with Makerere Institute for Social Research in which MISR researchers will work collaboratively with BRAC researchers on areas of common interest.

04/05


five big research questions

1 Who chooses to participate in BRAC’s programmes?

2 What changes as a result of programme participation? (For example, adopting technology, asset ownership and financial knowledge, attitude towards savings, having clubs/social space and life-skill training, added impact of livelihood-training and microcredit.)

3 To what extent do programme beneficiaries benefit from the interventions?

4 Is there a “multiplied” effect conditional on the availability of a selection of BRAC’s programmes, such as microfinance plus agriculture?

5 How successful are BRAC targeting strategies in reaching the poor?


........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. ..... ........ ..... ...... ..... ......... ...... .......... .... .. .....

BRAC Pakistan Annual Report 2009

04/05


Audited

Financial Statements Of BRAC Southern Sudan Year Ended 31 December 2009


Southern Sudan_April 18,2010  

realising potential Southern Sudan Annual Report 2009 Since 2002, we have been using our experiences of innovating and scaling up multi-face...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you