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the Number 185 April 2019 50p Website: www.bromleyparishchurch.org

News of Saint Peter and Saint Paul BROMLEY PARISH CHURCH Church Road Bromley BR2 OEG "Proclaiming the Word and Work of God" Member of Churches Together in Central Bromley


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Contacts & Editorial

April 2019

Vicar Reverend James Harratt vicar@bromleyparishchurch.org Churchwardens Martin Cleveland Anne Horner-Tree wardens@bromleyparishchurch.org Parish Office Hours: 9:30am to 12 noon 020 8464 5244 – please use this number for all enquiries Contact: Lynn Hedges, Parish Administrator administrator@bromleyparishchurch.org For contributions to the Key, or if you would prefer to receive the Key by email, please contact thekeyeditor@gmail.com Dear Reader, Welcome to the April edition of the Key! Enclosed you will find the ministry team letter from Peter, a Mothering Sunday sermon from Anne and also the first part of an article written by Anne for the Key to mark 25 years since the ordination of women in the Church of England. The rest of the article will follow next month, to mark a rather special anniversary! This edition also includes a tribute to Celia Yeo, who sadly passed away. Thank you to her family for sharing her story with us. Details of musical concerts are included and the Reflection was written by Alison. Please also check the Diary Dates at the back of the magazine for all the services that will be taking place in Holy Week. Many thanks for all your contributions and support with the Key, please send content for the May edition before 28 April. I hope you enjoy this magazine and wish you all a very happy Easter. Lisa


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Letter

April 2019

The letter this month has kindly been provided by Peter Cheshire, Licensed Lay Minister at BPC. Many thanks Peter for writing this for the Key. CARNIVAL TO CROSS On Saturdays, I enjoy attending choir rehearsals at a German Saturday School in Islington. Three days before Shrove Tuesday, we celebrated Carnival - a big event in Catholic parts of Germany. Children and adults stood in a large circle. An elderly lady played the squeezebox and everyone sang what can best be described as ‘daft Carnival songs’. One particular song and dance, the ‘Rucki Zucki’, is familiar to Londoners over a certain age. It was almost exactly the same as the ‘Hokey Cokey’. I felt joyful watching the children singing in German, putting their left leg in and out, shaking it all about, doing the ‘Rucki Zucki’ and declaring that that is indeed what it’s all about. In the days leading up to Shrove Tuesday, German TV is full of Carnival. In places like Cologne, local customs are celebrated in the local dialect and people enter into it all with great enthusiasm. Dressing-up and pretending to be someone else is traditionally part of the fun. But, at exactly midnight on Shrove Tuesday, the partying comes to an abrupt end. Bars, cafes and restaurants throw everyone out, and an eerie silence descends on the streets. This sudden solemnity is impressive. You suddenly realise that the huge contrast between the jollity of a few minutes before midnight and the current silence is the focal point of Carnival. Lent has begun. Lent’s penitential theme resonates to a deep-seated human need. It’s wonderful that we can expose all our faults and failings to God, without expecting him to be angry, or to condemn or punish. We can come as recipients of God’s promise to respond to our penitence with love and forgiveness. Jesus’ words explain this, and bear fruit in his great act of salvation on the cross. Honesty, vulnerability and the expectation of forgiveness all help to show why, ultimately, the whole process of penitence results in healing. One of my favourite hymns sums it up: ‘Let in the light: all sin expose to Christ, whose life no darkness knows. Before his cross for guidance kneel; his light will judge and, judging, heal.’ On Ash Wednesday, the set gospel reading for the day (John 8:1-11), showed this healing forgiveness in action. It was the story of the woman caught in adultery. During this season of Lent, may each one of us personally discover the immense healing that God’s loving forgiveness brings. May each of us hear the words of Jesus speaking to us, his voice kind but firm and reassuring, saying “Neither do I condemn you. Go and sin no more”.


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Sermon

April 2019

This month’s sermon is by Rev Dr Anne Townsend. It was written for Holy Trinity in Lamorbey, but Anne has kindly also shared with us at BPC through the Key. MOTHER MAINTENANCE I’ll never forget the stunned silence at supper that day. I was really tired. I was holding down a full-time job (leaving for work in the City at 5.00am every morning) and running our household at the same time. I’d exhausted my patience and energy, and felt like collapsing and bursting into tears in front of my husband and three teenage children. Instead, I took a deep breath and announced, ‘Where I work, everyone has a day off except for me. From now onwards, I’m going to take a day off every week, starting tomorrow!’ They were gobsmacked - no one said a word. I added, ‘I’ll put a list of jobs to be done tomorrow on the ‘fridge door – and it’s over to you to get everything done.’ My three children have never forgotten their shock at my announcement, and remember how they used to bring their friends home and into the kitchen to look at that dreaded list - to get sympathy from them! Have you ever thought that mothers need looking after? Jesus understood that. One of the very last things that he did, when he was dying on the Cross, was to make sure that his great friend, John, would open his home to his mother and look after her. He knew that she would need this. I reckon that in many families, the car gets looked after better than the mothering person. When I use the word ‘mother’, I’m meaning the person who carries the weight of the day-to-day care for the family – this might be a birth mother, a father, a foster or adoptive mum, your Gran or Grandad, or caregiver. To state the obvious, these days mothering is done by both men and women. When I speak of mother as being ‘she’, then please change it to ‘he’ if that fits your particular family better. My cars always had manuals that told me exactly how to look after them, and how to get the best out of them. We could play with the idea of mothers and cars both needing proper attention – and neither functioning at their best if neglected. Most of us expect our cars to last five to ten years, but mothers are meant to last forever. Mine lived till she was 102 years old. After the age of 98, she started calling me ‘Mummy’ every time I visited her. Our roles were reversed.


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Sermon

April 2019

I have a user’s manual for almost everything, and I can call it up on my computer or smartphone. But when I Googled the words ‘user-manual for human mothers’ there was nothing. So, we’ll have to invent one ourselves. Cars have engines, so let’s start there. An engine needs tuning to keep it running at its best. If it will accelerate from stationary to 60 mph, in just five seconds that’s great! I reckon that the performance of a mother’s engine is even more amazing. From lying in bed, fast asleep, she can accelerate to reach the bedside of a crying child within seconds - she’s fast and reliable. BUT she can’t go on performing like this endlessly – she needs breaks to keep her up to peak performance. We might imagine she needs a relaxing bath and nap every 100 miles and, in an ideal world, a baby-sitter and a night out every 1,000 miles, and a week’s holiday every 10,000 miles with someone else to look after the children. Car’s batteries need recharging regularly. Recharging mother isn’t too difficult. Tiny handmade presents, little notes, unexpected hugs and kisses, and the extra ‘I love you’, all go a long way towards recharging the batteries of those caring for children. When I was stressed and short-tempered, my children would appear carrying trays bearing glasses of iced tea to cool me down. They knew I loved iced drinks and it usually worked like magic. It made the world of difference to know they’d realised I was at the end of my tether. This was their way of lovingly calming me down.. Cars have carburettors that flood and cause trouble. Occasionally, a mother’s carburettor floods. When this happens, prompt and sympathetic attention is required. This might take the form of clean tissues to mop up tears, a soft shoulder, a hug and a cuddle and a cup of tea. Brakes always need attention. Make sure mother uses hers to come to a full stop from time to time, or to slow down if necessary. Being able to see the funny side of things, and have a good laugh together can put the brakes on potentially tricky situations. Once when my son, David, and I were arguing about something at the top of our voices, he stormed out, only to reappear half an hour later, and to hand me a note reading, ‘Dear Mummy, I hate you, lots of love, David’. We both saw the funny side of this, started to laugh and have laughed about this ever since. What about fuel? No one can run on empty or nearly empty. It appears that many mothers can manage indefinitely on coffee, everyone else’s leftovers, and salads. But the chance of a nice meal out, just for two people, will greatly add to her efficiency and top up her emotional resources. *The car idea is adapted from http://www.godswork.org/inspiration100.htm


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Sermon

April 2019

Most people go to a lot of trouble to polish and look after their car’s bodywork. Mother needs to have time to attend to her body – to exercise, to get her hair done and to buy new outfits occasionally. Mothers need tune-ups - regular, genuine, compliments are a quick and easy way of keeping a mother purring contentedly. Never take her for granted.

The trouble with thinking of mothers as being like cars, is that they are not things that are there to look after us. Mothers are people with feelings, who love us and need loving in return. I reckon that if we look after her, then this fantastic creation and gift from God, who we call ‘Mummy’, will last a lifetime and will pour out love to those who need her the most – you and me. Jesus knew his mother needed looking after – and ours do too, in little and big ways. We look after our mother because we love her. It’s easy to glamourize how life might have been for Jesus’ mother, Mary.

There she was, an unmarried teenager, expecting a baby. At full-term pregnancy, she was forced to flee her homeland as a refugee, and bumped along on the back of a donkey to find shelter for the night. When I was a missionary in Thailand, I had to ride on my bicycle to the clinic to have one of my babies delivered (that was bad enough) but Mary rode on a donkey - the mind boggles! Soon after her baby was born, a very old man, Simeon, saw something special in Jesus and warned Mary that this baby was going to cause her agonizing pain and grief. When we see her, at the foot of the Cross, watching her son being crucified, we see what true love is all about. She shows us that love is vulnerable, it suffers and it takes risks. That’s what mothering love is like – so value it and do your best to keep it functioning as best it can.


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Music at BPC

April 2019

Bromley Parish Church Saturday Morning Concerts presents Piano recital given by Constance Chow (Concert Pianist) Saturday 13th April 11.30am Admission Free

Retiring Collection

All welcome: Coffee served from 10.15 The Saturday morning concert on 13th April is being given by Constance Chow, a London based pianist. Do come along! Programme Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) - Jeux d'eau Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) - Valses nobles et sentimentales Robert Schumann (1810-1856) - Papillons, Op. 2 Franz Liszt (1811-1886) - Un sospiro, Trois études de concert, S.144

Born in Hong Kong, pianist Constance Chow moved to Britain in 2009. Constance makes frequent appearances on musical stages across the UK and Europe, as well as in Hong Kong. Constance is a Master graduate of the Guildhall School of Music & Drama, where she studied piano performance under the tutelage of Paul Roberts. She completed her undergraduate Music studies at King’s College London, when she also studied the piano with Tessa Nicholson at the Royal Academy of Music. Constance received a full scholarship to attend Music at Albignac Piano Summer School in 2015. Whilst studying at King’s, she was generously supported by the Hong Kong Scholarship Fund. She was also a contralto choral scholar at the renowned college chapel choir, and with this group performed both as a pianist and as a singer in the U.K. and abroad. Constance is currently a London-based concert pianist, accompanist, and piano teacher. For more information, please visit her website www.constancechow.com


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Music at BPC

April 2019

Bromley Parish Church Bank Holiday Recital Ben Bloor (The London Oratory) Organ Recital Easter Monday 22nd April 11.30am Admission by programme £10 (Including refreshments served from 11.00)

The Bank Holiday Organ recital on Easter Monday (22nd April) is being given by Ben Bloor. Ben is currently Organist of the London Oratory Church where he accompanies the professional adult choir for weekly Mass and Vespers and oversees the famous Downes/Walker organ. He combines this with a busy freelance recital career and the post of School Organist at Westminster School, where he teaches organ and plays for services in Westminster Abbey. Previously, he held organ scholarships at Derby Cathedral, St George’s Chapel Windsor Castle, New College Oxford and Westminster Cathedral, and was the Assistant Sub-Organist at Rochester Cathedral. Ben was the winner of the 2012 Northern Ireland International Organ Competition, and a semi-finalist in the inaugural Wadden Sea International Organ Competition held in Denmark in January 2017. He was awarded second prize in the Boston Bach International Organ Competition 2018 and holds a First-Class Honours degree in Music from the University of Oxford and the Limpus prize for highest marks in the 2013 FRCO examinations. Ben is a recipient of the Worshipful Company of Musicians’ Silver Medal for his contribution to organ-playing.


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Regular Events

Lychgate Lunches

Alternate Wednesdays at 12 noon, ÂŁ4 including coffee held at Bromley Parish Church To book or cancel, call Sue on 020 8460 5242

April 2019


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Parish Profile

April 2019

March 12th this year saw the beginning of three months of celebrations of a very special Silver Jubilee—marking 25 years since the ordination of women into the priesthood in the Church of England. Rev Dr Anne Townsend was one of those first female priests to be ordained, on the 21st May 1994, and she has kindly shared her personal memories of this time and of her mother, who was one of the women campaigning for this change. The first part of the article is here, and the second part will follow in the May edition of the Key. CELEBRATE WHAT’S NORMAL? My words, ‘These days, I need to remember that I’m a bit of a “Has-Been”!’ are guaranteed to elicit the fierce response from my husband , ‘That’s not true!’ When it comes to thinking of celebrating the 25th anniversary of the ordination of women to the priesthood, I feel I’m sitting in the ‘Has-been, Forget-it Bin’. After all, what is there to celebrate? Women are now firmly established and respected in most church circles. Aged 81, I’m delighted to have lived long enough to see women bishops becoming the norm. You don’t celebrate ‘normal’ – or do you? It wasn’t always like this. My mother trained as a doctor in the days when only the Royal Free Hospital accepted female medical students. Having achieved this, one of her goals in life was to see women ordained as priests before she died. The topic was our family’s blue touch-paper. Mention the words ‘ordination of women’ and off they’d go. There’d be an explosion of father versus mother, engaged in erudite, logical theological arguments – she ‘for’ and him ‘against.’ Emotions then coloured the discussion – him with an ancient gut-level feeling that it was ‘wrong’, and she (sister of four boys) with her passionate conviction that male and female might be different in physical structure but, of course, they were equal in all senses that really mattered.

My mother, who lived till she was 102 years old, quietly campaigned for women to be priested during many years of representing the Lichfield diocese on the General Synod. She longed to help change church cultural norms. When she wrote for publication, it was under her maiden name, to preserve her marriage. I worked as a missionary doctor in Thailand for 16 years, unquestioningly performing priestly roles when necessary. At that time, just one Church of England priest served the entire country. We lived in the back-of-beyond, and I didn’t think twice at presiding at Communion and preaching in the Thai language when needed. I baptised new believers in isolated pools and rivers, offered absolution to the dying and blessing to the living. God needed people to do this and we missionaries (believing in the ‘priesthood of all believers’) filled the gap, sharing Jesus’ love as best we could. Sixteen years later, on return to England, I realised that this ministry must be curtailed. As a former missionary doctor, my sex was overlooked occasionally and I was invited to preach in a few churches but that was all. I could no longer exercise


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Parish Profile

March 2019

my God-given vocation because I was female - and my Church, the Church of England, forbade it. I saw no reason to enlist in another denomination which welcomed women’s ministry. In those years, I discovered that God used my voice, not in the pulpit, but through books and magazines. I wrote over 20 books for the popular religious market, covering subjects I could have preached about had it been permitted. God took my written words, and literally thousands of people have thanked me for the personal life-changing effects of some of those books. My gift seems to have been that I articulated what many evangelical Christians were thinking and worrying about, but hadn’t had the courage to admit or discuss with anyone else. The most costly was the book ‘Faith without Pretending’ in which I was honest about a ‘breakdown’, a suicide attempt, and subsequent faith shifts to a different, deeper experience of God. The Church of England hadn’t muzzled me. Having a ‘breakdown’ in my late 40’s, and wrestling with God during a year ‘off-sick’, to my total amazement I found myself being gently nudged to knock at the door labelled ‘ordination’. I was even more amazed when it opened. My mother was excited, ‘Of course – you’re a priest already!’ My father (by then a vicar) barely acknowledged it, and couldn’t bring himself to attend my ordination services. Training completed (on the Southwark Ordination Course), the crunch came when, a year after being deaconed, my male peers were to be ordained as priests but we women were excluded. The men were up in arms, sought an interview with the bishop, offered to refuse to be priested if that would bring about change – to no avail. In the event, we women swallowed our tears, read the Bible passages, prayed the intercessions and administered the bread and wine at their ordinations. It reminded me of my fifth birthday party. I’d gone down with Measles, was stuck upstairs in bed listening to all the other children enjoying themselves downstairs at my party! I was there, two years later, outside Church House, Westminster, at the General Synod when the vote swung in favour of the ordination of women to the priesthood. We laughed, sang, danced and wept together on the pavement when the news was relayed out to us. I rode home atop a double-decker bus, heart singing with joy and wondering, ‘What would these passengers think if they knew a woman was sitting here who soon will be ordained as be a priest?’ The unthinkable was at last thinkable!


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Advertisements

April 2019

Church Rooms for hire. Available for hire for your Meetings, Parties, Receptions, Study and Exercise Classes, etc. We have varied, comfortable, no smoking accommodation with kitchen facilities and disabled access and toilet facilities to the rooms.

Rooms can be viewed on: www.bromleyparishchurch.org For bookings contact Alison Kay Tel: 020 8777 4164


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April 2019


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Celia Yeo

April 2019

Below is the eulogy from the family of Celia Yeo, whose funeral took place in March. Thank you for sharing this with us. Good afternoon and, on behalf of Dad, David and Tim, can I start by thanking you all for coming today to help us celebrate and give thanks for Mum’s life. It’s wonderful to have so many of you here with us, and it has been lovely for us to receive so many cards and emails in which you shared your reminiscences of Mum. You will all have your own unique perspectives on Mum’s life, and I hope that I will reflect some of your memories in what I say. As I look back over Mum’s life, I think it is fair to say that she did lead a remarkable life. But, in one sense, the final years of her life were perhaps the least remarkable. The stroke that she suffered in July 2013 left her physically disabled and, more cruelly, unable to speak. She knew what was said to her, she knew what she wanted to say, and she knew she was not saying the right words – but she was just unable to find the right words. Despite this, her personality, her inner strength and resolve remained, and her facial expressions and body language made it quite clear how she felt and what her mood was. So perhaps, on reflection, maybe her stoicism and perseverance to prevail through this extremely difficult situation was, in fact, remarkable. Celia Pearce was born on 25th October, 1933 at the West London Hospital in Hammersmith – the second child of Sir George and Lady Pearce, and a younger sister to her 12year old brother, Cecil. Yes, that’s right, “Cecil and Celia” – a bit of a mouthful. As would have been customary in those days, her father did not attend the birth but neither was he waiting nervously nearby – instead, he was 4½ thousand miles away in Northern India. He was an Inspector-General in the Indian Imperial Police (as it was then), and he had remained in India while his wife, Muriel, had travelled home to give birth. As a result, Mum set-off on her first long-distance journey aged only 5 weeks old, when she embarked with her mother on the steamship Mantua on 1st December 1933, and set sail for Bombay by way of the Mediterranean and the Suez Canal. From Bombay, there was then just an 800-mile road journey to get to Lucknow, east of Delhi, where the family lived. Mum maintained a keen interest in travel and, especially in her retirement, was able to travel extensively and quite far afield. In particular, she went with her sister-in-law, Ann, on a trip to Uzbekistan and China, and then, in 2001 with Dad, she returned to India for the first time since her childhood and re-visited her childhood home – occupied by the current Police Inspector-General, who was most welcoming when they turned up on his doorstep! Due to the onset of WWII, instead of being sent to boarding school in England like her brother, Mum instead went to board at the Hallett War School in Nainital, a colonial hill station in the Himalayan foothills only 40 miles from Nepal. Then, in 1946 with the end of the war and with the partition of India imminent, Mum did return home, aged 13, and attended Headington School in Oxford. Here she completed her Oxford School Certificate and went on to take A-Levels in Music and History together with achieving Grade 8 on the piano. After Headington, she went to the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London, from which she graduated in 1956 having completed her teacher training in piano, singing and class teaching. Mum moved straight into her teaching career which she spent at three girl’s schools in south London – initially as the Junior Music Mistress at Selhurst Grammar School (195661), and then at Sydenham High School (1961-65). And it was during a summer holiday from Selhurst Grammar School that she went to the Downe House Summer Music School – a singing week led by David Willcocks, who had recently become the conductor of


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Celia Yeo

April 2019

the Bach Choir. It was on this course that she met Dad and, in the following few months, they both joined the Bach Choir… the rest, as they say, is history. Mum and Dad got married on 2nd January 1965 at Holy Trinity Church on the Brompton Road – one of her bridesmaids told me only recently that she and Mum spent the evening before the wedding sewing buttons down the back of the Mum’s dress, but that they ran out of time to do the sleeves so she was literally sewn into them and, at the end of the evening, had to be cut out. After a short break to bring up her young family, Mum returned to teaching in 1975 as Head of Music at Stratford House School in Bickley, where she remained through to her retirement in 1992. Throughout her teaching, she didn’t just focus on the most talented pupils, but was always looking for ways to introduce as many pupils as possible to the joys of music. On the Stratford House School Facebook page, one of her former pupils commented: “She had such an enthusiasm for music and teaching – and she was a fantastic character with a brilliant sense of humour. She opened the world of music to me.” But involving everyone did not mean dropping her standards, and she expected her pupils to do the very best they could. Tim found an old recording of the school’s Nine Lessons and Carols Service, which not only had the full service with plenty of carols and all the readings, but opened with at least 25 minutes of full orchestral music before the first carol was even sung. And another pupil wrote: “I fondly remember her getting so frustrated with us all singing “We wISH you a merry ChrISTmas” – and someone’s added “And HarK the herald angels sing.” Teaching was never a 9-5 job for Mum, and she was always ambitious for her pupils and actively sought out opportunities to inspire them. Another pupil wrote “It was due to her that we got to sing ‘Judas Maccabeus’ at the Festival Hall and the ‘Messiah’ at the Albert Hall. Both were truly magical events.” I also came across Mum’s reference when she left Sydenham High School, in which the Head Mistress wrote “She also drew in boys and girls from neighbouring schools, and parents, and members of staff, to join with the senior forms for semi-impromptu singing together of… [wait for it]… Haydn’s Creation and Mendelsohn’s Elijah.” I’m not quite sure how you do a semi-impromptu performance of either of those, but it would have been typical of Mum to give it a go. And while she was keen to nurture emerging talents, she was also eminently pragmatic – another pupil commented “I have such fond memories of her total despair at me being just so rubbish at music. Instructing me not to sing in the choir but just to mouth the words, as well as not blowing on the recorder and just to move my fingers! Always makes me laugh!!” What comes through again and again was Mum’s enthusiasm for music, her passion for teaching, her high aspirations for the pupils, and the fun she had at the same time. Of course, it was during these years that she also brought up us three boys, and music and church were a huge part of our lives. It was expected that we would all sing in the church choir, play the piano and another instrument – but at least we were free to choose what the 2nd instrument would be! And if you thought the holidays might be for relaxing from the busy term-times, you’d be wrong. We all have fond memories of the ‘Easter Singers’ – a mixed group of friends who, for many years, met up at Easter to sing services in the tiny church on Holy Island, off the coast of Northumberland After a busy term, you might have thought that driving three small boys (and, on one occasion, a Siamese cat) to Northumberland to spend five days rehearsing lots of early church music and performing in a freezing cold church, while


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Celia Yeo

April 2019

staying in a shared communal house might all be too much… but Mum took it in her stride. Of course there were a few occasions when she didn’t… the evening before our family summer camping holiday gained a reputation as the most likely occasion in the year when there would be a “melt-down”, and there was an infamous occasion when – in frustration at the lack of help from us boys – the plug was literally cut-off the TV. But such occasions were relatively few. Mum retired from full-time teaching in 1992, but retiring from teaching did not mean retiring from music. Within a year Mum and Dad became the joint secretaries, and later chairmen, of the Bromley Festival of Music and Speech. Here they worked tirelessly to develop the festival and expand its reach – spread over four weekends in March, in this year’s festival there are over 200 music classes and nearly 100 speech classes, so you can imagine what a vast task it is to organize all of this. This year’s festival kicked-off last Friday, so I can only apologise to Monica and the Committee for the timing of today’s service. I know that late entries were always the bain of Mum’s life, so can I re-iterate that entries for this year’s festival closed back on 22nd January so it’s too late for any of you to enter. But, as Mum would have said, she’d be delighted to see you next year. Mum decided to retire from the festival after 20 years, and her unstinting voluntary work was to have been recognized at her final committee meeting by a surprise visit from the mayor, to present her and Dad with civic awards. Sadly, that was the morning she had her stroke – although they did receive a home visit from the mayor some months later. As I said at the start, you will each have your own memories of Mum, and I hope that you recognize her character in what I have said. She did lead a remarkable life, fitting in so much and sharing her passions and enthusiasm with so many people – who often started out as pupils or pupil’s parents, but became friends and fellow music lovers with her. And, of course we, as a family, were hugely blessed to have her as our mother – she cared deeply for us all, set an amazing example of commitment for us, shaped our lives, smiled and encouraged us, and loved us as only she could. For this, we will be forever grateful. As I was preparing for today and squirrelling through the mountains of paperwork at Penshurst Green, I came across a tribute to Mum’s Dad, written by his vicar when he died in 1971, part of which applies equally well, I think, to Mum. It closes: “We have lost a real friend and a grand Christian. Celia would brush aside any such tribute and would undoubtedly tell those of us, who miss her so much, that it little matters who we are, so long as we are faithful in our various callings and put all we have got into our work. We can hear her saying: ‘Carry on the good work. I’ve tried to do my little bit. I’m sure you’ll all do yours.’” Thank you


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Saint’s Day

April 2019

29 April – Catherine of Siena: or, how to survive in a large family Catherine of Siena, who was born 1347, should be the patron saint of anyone who has grown up in a large family, and mastered the two vital skills for survival: how to stand up for yourself, and how to make peace with others. Catherine had siblings! At least 19 of them. Her father was a Sienese dyer, and Catherine was the youngest. Her parents wanted her to marry, but Catherine did not. She became a nun instead, a member of the Dominican Third Order. Perhaps after sharing a house with at least 22 people, Catherine wanted some peace and quiet: in any case she spent six years in solitude, giving herself to prayer and penance. Then she moved back into the world, through nursing the local sick people, and then beginning to travel. Catherine travelled frequently, with a number of her ‘disciples’ – a mix of Dominicans and Augustinians, and even an English Friar. Wherever they went, people listened to their proclamation of the total love of God through Jesus Christ, and their calls to reform and repent. There were some spectacular conversions. Catherine could not write, but soon someone else was taking down her ‘Dialogue’ by dictation – it ran to 383 letters. Catherine’s thoughts centred on Christ crucified, the supreme sign of God’s love for man. The quality of these letters made them widely read for years to come. A godly woman who could lead and teach…. soon new opportunities presented themselves: in the last five years of her life, Catherine found herself involved in the politics of both State and Church. This included trying to make peace during the Great Schism in the Church after 1378, when Pope Gregory XI died, and two new popes – bitter rivals – claimed the papacy. Catherine wore herself out in trying to promote peace, had a stroke on 21 April 1380, and died eight days later. (A warning to ecumenists everywhere?!) Catherine soon became Siena’s principal saint, loved for her writings and her example of godliness and self-sacrificing love. Her house and an early portrait survive at Siena, and her memory lives on today: she was declared a Doctor of the Church in 1970, nearly 600 years after her death.

Saint’s Day plus Bible Bites, Puzzle, Mouse Makes and Prayers are courtesy of Parish Pump.


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Noticeboard

April 2019

Please use this space to pass messages on to the Church community – whether it is a prayer request, a thank you, a craft idea, a recipe...

If you can, please support Kate who is running the Virgin London Marathon on 28 April in aid of Crisis. Her fundraising page is: https://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/kateeperon Thank you and good luck Kate!


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Noticeboard

Bromley Deanery Quiz Night

April 2019


Puzzle

April 2019

Answers: ACROSS: 1, Priesthood. 7, Replica. 8, Get up. 10, Calf. 11, Governor. 13, See you. 15, Not see. 17, Incident. 18, Sake. 21, NSPCC. 22, Trample. 23, Perishable. DOWN: 1, Papal. 2, In it. 3, Shalom. 4, Huguenot. 5, Outings. 6, Procession. 9, Perseveres. 12, Mordecai. 14, Escapee. 16, Snatch. 19, Apple. 20, Lamb.

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Across 1 ‘You are a chosen people, a royal — ’ (1 Peter 2:9) (10) 7 Exact copy (Joshua 22:28) (7) 8 Jesus’ first words to Jairus’s daughter, ‘My child, — — ’ (Luke 8:54) (3,2) 10 Idol made by the Israelites while Moses was on Mount Sinai (Exodus 32:4) (4) 11 Role allotted to Joseph in Egypt (Genesis 42:6) (8) 13 ‘Lord, when did we — — hungry and feed you?’ (Matthew 25:37) (3,3) 15 ‘Though seeing, they do — —; though hearing, they do not hear or understand’ (Matthew 13:13) (3,3) 17 Happening (1 Kings 21:1) (8) 18 ‘Whatever was to my profit I now consider loss for the — of Christ’ (Philippians 3:7) (4) 21 National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (1,1,1,1,1) 22 Stamp on (Amos 2:7) (7) 23 Liable to rot (1 Corinthians 15:42) (10)

Down 1 Of the pope (5) 2 ‘The earth is the Lord’s, and everything — — ’ (Psalm 24:1) (2,2) 3 Hebrew word for the kind of peace that Jesus promised (6) 4 Member of a 16th-century Protestant reform movement in France (8) 5 Sing out (anag.) (7) 6 Ceremonial column of people on the move (1 Samuel 10:5) (10) 9 One of the things love always does (1 Corinthians 13:7) (10) 12 Esther’s cousin who foiled a plot to assassinate King Xerxes (Esther 2:7, 22) (8) 14 See cape (anag.) (7) 16 ‘No one can — them out of my hand’ (John 10:28) (6) 19 Often mistakenly identified as the fruit that led to the first sin (Joel 1:12) (5) 20 ‘He was led like a — to the slaughter’ (Isaiah 53:7) (4)


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Mouse Makes

April 2019


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Bible Bite

April 2019


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Reflection

April 2019

Many thanks to Alison Kay for sharing her reflection on a Royal Academy exhibition. Pictures not words Bill Viola and Michelangelo Alison Kay Sometimes words are not enough, however articulate we are, however expressive and however meaningful, it doesn’t quite get to the essence of what we are trying to say, believe or understand. Easter is a particularly tricky time in the Christian calendar, to sometimes interpret what we hear, and to process it into something that works for us. We are challenged with death, resurrection and new life. In a refreshing exhibition at the royal Academy last month , the work of Michelangelo and Bill Viola were matched together, Viola inspired by Michelangelo centuries later, is drawn by the same themes of death and transcendence. Viola was inspired by the shape of spirituality Michelangelo was able to express in his drawings. Viola expresses them in video form. On entering the galleries there are the intricately detailed drawings of Michelangelo on the walls and the vast video screens of Viola’s moving images opposite. Opposite yet similar. I shall concentrate on Viola and how he inspired me. It is a shock to be stood before the video of a lovely lady giving birth to her child, and you must wait patiently for some time to see the waters break, head appear or actually witness the birth. Next to her is a person floating from a torrent of water, bubbles burst, the shape is obscured and then slowly forms, disperses and again emerges, the third scene is of the artist’s mother dying, frail and transparent. It leaves the same guilty feeling that staring at an accident does. There it is playing out in front of you on the huge screens, the passage of time- life to death. In the last room we see Violas five angels, on five huge separate screens. It is like watching creation, life and death and seeing expressed in the words of the curator ‘the ineffable light of the divine death and transcendence.’ Colours roll about the screen, rise up are washed away, disintegrate, radiate and vanish. They conjure up the vision of the world being created in Genesis and also the Big Bang and Black Hole theory. Expressing what is hard to believe and understand in words, becomes so comprehensible in vision. For a moment I understand what it is to be born, to have life, to die and have eternal life. I can’t express it in words, but it has inspired me by vision. I have fed my soul.


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Prayer

April 2019

Easter prayer of thanks Gracious, loving Father, Thank you for the wonderful reality of Jesus’ resurrection on that first Easter Day. Thank you that, because Jesus is alive, life has meaning and purpose. When we don’t understand why some things happen, when life is difficult, when we are struggling through pain and loss, help us to know your risen presence and love in our lives. Help us to choose to trust you. Help us always to be thankful for your amazing Easter gift of life and hope. In Jesus name, Amen. By Daphne Kitching


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Diary Dates

Tuesday 2 April 10.00am Toddler Praise 7.30pm CTCB Lent Course - BPC 7.30pm Bell ringing practice Wednesday 3 April 10.30am Holy Communion followed by coffee 12noon Lychgate Lunch Thursday 4 April 10.00am Healing Prayer meeting 11.00am Holy Communion at Eversleigh Residential Home 6.00pm Junior choir practice 7.30pm Adult choir practice Friday 5 April 1.00pm Wedding blessing Saturday 6 April 10.00am-12.30pm Starter Pack donation collection morning 10.15am Saturday coffee & Traidcraft

April 2019

Saturday 13 April 10.15am Saturday coffee & Traidcraft 11.30am BPC Saturday Morning Recital Sunday 14 April Palm Sunday 8.30am Morning Prayer 10.30am Parish Communion with Little Fishes & Procession of Palms 6.30pm Anthems and Readings for Passiontide Monday 15 April Holy Week 8.00pm Compline Tuesday 16 April Holy Week No Toddler Praise 7.30pm Bell ringing practice 8.00pm Compline

Wednesday 17 April Holy Week Sunday 7 April 10.30am Holy Communion followed by 8.30am Morning Prayer coffee 9.00am Family Breakfast Club 10.00am Parish Communion followed by 12noon Lychgate Lunch 8.00pm Stations of the Cross the APCM Thursday 18 April Tuesday 9 April Maundy Thursday No Toddler Praise No choir practice 7.30pm Bell ringing practice 8.00pm Parish Communion with Foot 7.30pm CTCB Lent course - BPC Washing & Watch Wednesday 10 April Friday 19 April 10.30am Holy Communion followed by Good Friday coffee 9.00am Family Breakfast Thursday 11 April 11.15am March of Witness 2.15pm Fellowship 12noon Three Hours at the Cross 6.00pm Junior choir practice 7.30pm Adult choir practice


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Diary Dates

Saturday 20 April Easter Eve 10.15am Saturday Coffee & Traidcraft Sunday 21 April Easter Day 6.00am Easter Liturgy followed by breakfast 8.30am Holy Communion 10.30am Parish Eucharist Monday 22 April 11.30am Bank holiday organ recital Tuesday 23 April No Toddler Praise 7.30pm Bell ringing practice Wednesday 24 April 10.30am Holy Communion followed by coffee Thursday 25 April 2.15pm Fellowship 6.00pm Junior choir practice 7.30pm Adult choir practice Saturday 27 April 10.15am Saturday Coffee & Traidcraft Sunday 28 April 8.30am Morning Prayer 10.30am Parish communion with Little Fishes Tuesday 30 April 10.00am Toddler Praise 7.30pm Bell ringing practice

April 2019

Profile for BPC

The Key  

The Monthly Publication for Bromley Parish Church

The Key  

The Monthly Publication for Bromley Parish Church

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