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Post-Earth Occupation // The final question my thesis raises is regarding the post-earth colony. Originally I had intended the earth community to bear some resemblance to the future post-earth evacuation community – which is to say: alone. However I have concluded that in order to create the best evacuation community possible, the evacuees must have an existing connection to the people they are leaving behind. This community cannot be quarantined off in a desert waiting for the day they may have to jettison. They must be part of the human community in order to best represent it in a future post-earth society. They must work and live among people that will not evacuate, perhaps in order to fully understand the weight of their responsibility.

There is highly research literature suggesting what these space stations of the future might look like. O’Neill and others suggested a cylindrical craft that rotates between 1 and 3 times per minute creating a centrifugal force capable of replicating gravity. These crafts would be immense: several kilometers long and wide and hold many thousands of people.

Some of the advantages to this living situation are a more accessible solar energy source, a 24 hour light source to grow foods, a controlled environment that would eliminate the threat of natural disasters, ease of obtaining raw materials from local asteroids or moons, and relatively low cost of transporting raw materials. Nearly all features of the earth could be mimicked in such an environment, and the structure is Early concepts for the location of these possible with current technology. post-earth colonies changed away from the Moon and Mars, even though they share some resemblance to the earth. Texts by Gerard K. O’Neill of Princeton and NASA, make an excellent case for permanent space station occupation. Unless a colony is planned for another planet without aspirations of leaving, it is hard to argue for a permanent colony on a planet or moon with no atmosphere. Neither Mars nor the Moon offer much protection from threats experienced in space. Imagine the entirety of space is a two dimensional plane. Our habitats on planets are like deep holes in this plane, which require incredible amounts of energy to escape from. O’Neill argued that it would be highly advantageous to remain in space permanently, returning to planets, moons or asteroids only for the collection of raw materials for future building.

Tohoku Spaceport  

Design documentation for a commercial/evacuation spaceport in Ishinomaki, Japan.

Tohoku Spaceport  

Design documentation for a commercial/evacuation spaceport in Ishinomaki, Japan.

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