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“All photographs are memento mori. To take a photograph is to participate in another person’s mortality, vulnerability, mutability. Precisely by slicing out this moment and freezing it, all photographs testify to time’s relentless melt.” ~Susan Sontag

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Vitruvian Lens Volume 3 Winter 2014 Editor E. Gibbons Art Historian Grady Harp Copy Editor Paul Rybarczyk & Grady Harp Layout, Design, Production E. Gibbons Design Consultant Dana Ranning Publisher Firehouse Publishing ISBN-10: 1940290015 ISBN-13: 978-1-940290-01-0 Information: Vitruvian Lens is a quarterly journal founded in 2013, www.VitruvianLens.com, produced by www.FirehousePublications.com. Subscriptions: Please visit www.VitruvianLens.com for the most current pricing, store locations, and subscription information once available. For questions, please e-mail LOVSART@gmail.com or call 609-298-3742. Price is subject to change without notification. Submissions: Vitruvian Lens considers submissions of artists and writers. Contact LOVSART@gmail.com, subject “V.L. Submission,” for additional information. Advertising: For advertising rates, wholesale bulk pricing, and other information, LOVSART@gmail.com. Distribution: Online through our website www.VitruvianLens.com. For information e-mail LOVSART@gmail.com. Printing: Published quarterly in spring, summer, autumn, and winter by Firehouse Publishing, headquartered at 8 Walnut Street, Bordentown, NJ 08505. © 2013 by Firehouse Publishing and Firehouse Gallery. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced without the express consent of Firehouse Publishing, Firehouse Gallery, and its owner, E. Gibbons. Important Disclaimer: No assumptions should be made about the gender or sexuality of any artist included in this book. Though all of the artists dedicate a significant portion of their portfolio to the classical male form, they are equally adept in other subjects as well. If you see something you’d like to purchase, contact the artist directly. Right: DDiArte, Square Sin, 2009 Cover: McAdoo, Longing, 2013 (cropped) Rear Cover: David Vance, Bo, 2010

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It is rare that we at Vitruvian Lens are surprised by an artist, but recently we were. Not yet out of high school, Colin is an amazing self-taught talent from the mid-west. He displays a sensitivity and eye far beyond his years. When we shared his work with a couple of internationally known photographers, their replies confirmed what we were already feeling and suspected:

Self-sufficient is one way I would describe the way in which I came about photography. What began as simply going outside in the dead of winter to take pictures of the sunset, turned later into something bigger, more powerful. It started with the purchase of my first digital camera in July of 2012. I photographed what I could, when I could, and edited in whatever way that I could–which was badly, more often than not. The subject typically was my younger brother or one of my friends, but once I saved up enough money for a tripod, I began using myself as a subject, and I liked that the most. Sometime that fall, however, my tech savvy younger brother found a way to get me a relatively newer version of Adobe Photoshop on our family computer.

"He's a prodigy... I've seen this work before... it's beyond astounding on so many levels... it gives me goosebumps and makes me weep... just remarkable. I have no idea what his influences are but there is nothing at all derivative. There is depth there that belies his age... magical... Can't wait to learn more about this creative phenomenon... I am humbled when I see this kind of talent." ~David Vance

Almost immediately my work changed as I powered through the ins and outs of photo editing on my own, without any instruction, or prior knowledge of the software. Eventually, people on some social media sites began to take notice, and I gained popularity among other photographers about my age. While this was occurring, I was taking an introductory art course at my high school, which was mandatory for enrolling in any further classes, including photography. By the time the second semester rolled around I began my first photography class. I had quite a following on the iPhone/Android application Instagram with 13,000 followers, as well as a small support group on the Yahoo! photo sharing site, Flickr: about 500 contacts/followers. From there I began to grow, and that growth still occurs today, as it will tomorrow, and in the future.

"His photographs are beautiful! I encourage him to continue with his photographic passion! ~Dianora Niccolini With the guidance of his parents, Firehouse Publishing is working on a solo project to feature Collin McAdoo's broader portfolio. We include him in this edition because his portfolio, by nature, features mostly male figures– himself. We suggest you visit his website to see a more full representation of his portfolio. Vitruvian Lens: Please introduce yourself to our readers and how you became interested in photography. Collin McAdoo: I am from Delaware, Ohio. Left: Ferringer, The Well of Souls, 2013 Right: Ferringer, Loss II, 2013

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V.L.: How much editing is “too much” editing ? C.M.: I don’t think there really is a limit on how much editing someone could do. I think that as long as the artist feels they have portrayed whatever they wished to portray, everything should be acceptable. Who are we to criticize someone on the expression of their feelings? Because that’s just what they are–their feelings. V.L.: Are there any circumstances like weather, environment, model, etc. that you prefer as an artist? C.M.: In my art I find myself trying to target the essence of any particular scene that I’m trying to photograph/create: The soul of it. Often times I shoot in nature with natural light, sometimes with the assistance of a reflector, and with a model in neutral clothing. I do this because I don’t want the viewer to be distracted by anything. I want their focus to be on the model, and more specifically on their face. In my personal opinion, there is no better subject for expressing the mood of any particular scene than the human figure.

McAdoo, Falinn Inni, 2013

V.L.: Where can people see more of your work and contact you? C.M.: A very large majority of my work will be on my Flickr Photostream, under the under name “collinmcadoo.” www.flickr.com/people/80844482@N02 Any reader can contact me via Flickr: Collin McAdoo, or on my Facebook page: Collin McAdoo Photography. Until I am 18, I do share all my communication with my parents. These are the only two sources that we check regularly. There may be more info on my Facebook page about other ways you can communicate with me and make a purchase that will go toward my college fund. Any of the images in this book can be purchased through my Fine Art America account here:

collin-mcadoo.fineartamerica.com

Above: McAdoo, Untitled, 2013 Left: McAdoo, To Be Saved, 2013

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Vitruvian Lens: Mr. Vance, please tell us a bit about yourself. David Vance: I graduated with a BFA from Rochester Institute of Technology and have been a photographer for over 40 years doing mostly commercial portraiture and fashion for advertising and public relations. My fine art photos, mostly male nudes, have appeared in several anthologies as well as 11 monographs. My prints have been exhibited in galleries from Palm Springs to Paris.

I definitely see a change in the acceptance of the male form. It began to some degree with the inclusion of the male figure in advertising. Men were not really considered sex objects by the general public before the Calvin Klein underwear campaigns. Of course in the history of art men have always been there, but more recently the appeal of men in art has increased with the general population.

V.L.: Many figurative photographers focus almost exclusively on the female form; why do you include more male figures n your portfolio? D.V.: I have lots of females in my commercial work. In my personal work, which is mostly nudes, I focus on men. It's easier to find models willing to work for trade–they pose nude and in return I photograph them for portfolio images. V.L.: When we see an unattributed image on the internet, it's often easy to tell it's by you. What do you feel makes your work so unique? D.V.: One thing is that I’ve been doing it since I was 14. My work is different because I know who I am. I have had a lifetime of experience that has developed my taste and style. I am unique because my experience is unique. V.L.: Have you encountered any issues about having the male figure in your work? D.V.: Of course there are those who find nudity, especially male nudity offensive. So yes, my work has sometimes been censored or overlooked because of content. Left: Vance: Eric-Fabric, 2002 Right: Vance, Bo, 2010

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Sample Edition Pages missing, low resolution, and watermarked For full printed edition please visit www.vitruvianlens.com Vance, Bamboo Pole, 2010

Vance, Enzo Uplifted, 2011

V.L.: Have you ever been brought to tears in front of a work of art? D.V.: Yes, in Paris at the Louvre. It was El Greco’s Christ on the Cross Adored by Two Donors. It was a painting that I loved as a child and it was overwhelming to actually see it up close in person.

I know from experience that the Universe is always providing me with a constant flood of inspiring faces and bodies. I am most inspired by innocence and enthusiasm in the models I choose. V.L.: When will you retire? D.V.: It’s my art that keeps me going! I don’t think I will ever stop what I am doing until I can no longer lift a camera.

V.L: What subject is the most challenging for you as an artist to capture? D.V.: I have the most difficulty with people who are insecure. If someone is uncomfortable in front of my camera, it takes a lot more energy, because they can’t fully enjoy the experience and I pick up negativity immediately.

To explore more of David Vance's work, please visit his websites or email him.

V.L.: Who would be your dream model be? D.V.: What a difficult choice… I could give you a list. The truth is I get to photograph so many beautiful men I already feel blessed.

davidvancephotographer.blogspot.com www.davidvanceprints.com www.davidvance.com info@davidvance.com 12

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Vance, Jake Hoop, 2013

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PHOTOGRAPHY: INCEPTIONS, CONCEPTIONS, CONTRAPTIONS, ART REGARDING THE REPRESENTATION OF THE MALE FIGURE By Grady Harp Photography is the most contemporary form for capturing the universal and timeless fascination with the male figure, and the presence of this journal, Vitruvian Lens, capitalizes on that fact. While it is the raison d'être for presenting the art form of photography as it is being practiced today by the artists whose works are contained in this journal, and as we term photography as the newest instrument for creating art, not replacing the brush and canvas, or pen and paper, or three dimensional sculpture, but instead adding another instrument for expression, in truth photography has a considerably long history. Retracing those steps very briefly justifies its permanent position in the echelon of tools that create art.

In the late 1830s French creator Joseph Nicéphore Niépce developed the first portable camera obscura that enabled artists to make permanent images of the transmitted pictures. With the invention of emulsion plates which allowed the near instantaneous capturing of an image, he, in collaboration with Louis Daugerre, created the first Daugerreotypes. Daugerreotypes increased the popularity of portrait art and were a popular art form until the 1850s. In the 1870s, Richard Maddox introduced gelatin plates that allowed photographic images to be stored, to be created from smaller hand held cameras, and alter exposure times by using a mechanical shutter. The shutter releases were mechanically rigged instead of manually opened. It was during this time of dry processing that British photographer Eadweard James Muybridge perfected processing of action images and mechanically rigged cameras to take his now famous action pictures. He could not have put his rows of cameras into action if each had to individually be processed on the spot. In the 1880s George Eastman in his Kodak Company created a flexible roll of film negating the need for the constant changing of solid plates. Rolls of film allowed photographers to comfortably take multiple exposures to be developed later in the lab.

Though the term photography was first used by the scientist Sir John F.W. Herschel in 1839 as the science and art of recording images by means of capturing light on a light-sensitive medium, such as a film or electronic sensor, the origins date back to the fifth century BC with the Chinese concept of the pinhole camera. In the early first century AD Iraqi scientist Alhazen introduced the concept of the camera obscura, an early adjunct to such artists as da Vinci and Michelangelo who used the novel aid to assist their recreating of images.

Left: BigKugels.com, Unattributed, Model possibly boxer Christopher "Bat" Battalino

Header: Image by Eadweard James Muybridge

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BigKugels.com, Untitled Studio Image

BigKugels.com, by Louis Igout. Late 1890s

their male models as works of art. They were classical sculptures staged in real life, languid Pre-Raphaelite youths on the rocks, Olympic athletes and Roman soldiers posing on the fields of Germany and in the studios of Paris. While bodybuilders like Sandow enjoyed popularity through their own mass-produced cabinet cards, most early male nude photography featured less-built-up models and seemed to have been printed more with art than marketing in mind. And while the works of Eadweard Muybridge, Thomas Eakins, Max Koch and Otto Rieth were studies for painting, architecture, and human locomotion,

photographers like Guglielmo Plßschow and Wihelm von Gloeden produced enduring works of art in the photographs themselves. Their work led the way for such masters as Edwin Townsend, George Platt Lynes, and Al Urban.’ The images here share the markers of those who led the brigade. Vitruvian Lens celebrates the photographic artists who continue to honor the beauty of the male figure as art today and into the future. "How beautiful maleness is, if it finds its right expression." ~D.H. Lawrence

More vintage images at bigkugels.com Left: BigKugels.com, by EdwinTownsend

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DDiArte is the duo of Ze Diogo and Diamantino Jesus. They are from Madeira Island, Portugal. ZĂŠ Diogo is a chemical engineer and Diamantino Jesus is a designer, but both are self taught photographers.

DD: When we started doing photography, no one wanted to work with us, so we took photos of each other. When we got more known, it was easier to convince men from our gym and friends to participate–and of course because we think a man's body is equally as beautiful as a woman's.

Vitruvian Lens: Tell us a bit about DDiArte. DDiArte: When we set up DDiArte in 1999, it was a painting workshop where we brought together the best of both of us for the purposes of creating paintings on canvas. In 2003, after several experiences in the field with digital photography, we discovered the ideal means to express our creativity: digital photography, artistically enhanced.

In the beginning some people got angry and some really furious when we asked them if they wanted to pose for an artistic nude! Now we receive many emails from people of different ages asking to participate in our productions. V.L.: What is it about your approach that sets your work apart from other photographers of the figure? DD: Perhaps because we get very inspired in the classic painters, religion, mythology, and try to deliver a message from our time. What we most like is the way classical painters played with light and shadows, the volumes of the bodies, the classical beauty of nudes, and their poses. We try to emulate many of these characteristics into our photos.

While some of our works can be seen as satirical in a globalized world, others can be seen as purely beautiful, to be contemplated. Some pieces shout out against discrimination, while others pay an indelible homage to beauty. V.L.: Many figurative photographers focus almost exclusively on the female form, why do you include more male figures n your portfolio?

Left: DDiArte: Fanal 1, 2012 Header: DDiArte, Us at Milkway, 2010 Below: DDiArte, Rocks, 2013

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DDiArte, Cubic David, 2009

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DDiArte, Waiting for Dessert, 2006

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Below: DDiArte, Mallosi, 2013

Above: DDiArte, Trapped in Black, 2009

V.L.: Have you ever been brought to tears in front of a work of art? If so, share that experience. DD: Yes, our huge project about women and breast cancer. It is a project we did with ladies that had or survived to breast cancer. When we finished the photo editing of nearly 40 models, we were completely in tears. V.L.: What subject is the most challenging for you as an artist to capture? DD: As we work with non-professional models, sometimes it's very hard to make them emote physically what we want to transmit in the photo.

To learn more about DDiarte check out their websites for their most current projects.

http://1x.com/artist/63782 www.olhares.com/ddiarte facebook.com/ddiarte

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Enzo Truppo was born in 1972 in Naples, but resides in a municipality located in the north of the Neapolitan capital, Frattaminore. Since childhood Enzo understood the need to open his mind to stimuli and interests which allowed him to open up to world around–looking for an ideal language to translate everything.

V.L.: Do you have a favorite model? E.T.: My favorite model became a friend over the years; his name Salvatore Mazzarella. He arrived in my studio at a young age to request a photo book to show agencies so he could become a professional model. He participates in many of my projects.

Even as a child he felt the urgent need to delve into all that lives and resides around him. After graduating from Lower Secondary School at age 14 he abandoned his Higher Studies of accounting and went to work at a photography studio, thanks to a friend. Since the beginning, he was fascinated by this powerful expressive form which has an immediacy and strength suitable for his temperament and communicative energy. Vitruvian Lens: Tell us about your approach to photography. Enzo Truppo: My photographic projects are born from ideas which take shape gradually, shot after shot, through collaboration with my models. The male figure is part of my expressive language, both physical and spiritual. I have no prejudices in the use of the human figure in photography; their use is aimed at the realization of my stories. The models chosen are friends and acquaintances with whom I build a professional and stimulating relationship.

Left: Truppo, Motherly Love, 2013

Truppo, Curves of the Soul, 2013

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V.L.: Can you tell us about your exhibitions? E.T.: My images have never been displayed in a formal exhibition though I have, with some friends, exhibited in a theater. I never sold my art work, though I do take wedding pictures. I don't consider myself an "artist." For me, photography is the most natural expression of existence with all its corollary ideas, actions, and passions. If I meet a client or gallery representative who wants to marry his ideas or style with mine, that would be an immense pleasure–to share and collaborate on projects. It has to be something I am passionate about though. V.L.: What do you do when finances are tight? E.T.: During periods when work and sales are down, I focus more seriously and tirelessly on my craft. In addition to photography, I love to immerse myself for one or two days a week in nature–mountain landscapes in particular–to recharge physically and spiritually.

Truppo, Hysteria Adam 3, 2013

V.L.: Are there any projects you would like to share with our readers? E.T.: In June of 2012 I opened a website, Essence of Black and White Photography, later renamed– B&W SOUL VISION, where I explore daily with a group which has been formed there, with authors from all continents. Our topic is photography in black and white with discussions on the strength of the photographic language in our collective imaginations in everyday life.

Nature has a great creative power that allows me to concentrate my energies, to clarify my ideas, and to serve as lifeblood for my creativity. V.L.: What is the most challenging for you to capture as an artist? E.T.: The most difficult subjects to photograph and capture for me are animals. Nature photography requires knowledge of the animal's world and the environment in which they live. Animals are unpredictable and it takes infinite patience to capture their natural beauty.

Please explore more of Enzo Truppo's work and videos through the following websites. Some with long addresses were shortened for this publication using TinyURL.com.

V.L.: Who would be your dream model? E.T.: If it was possible I would like to photograph an artist of the past, Charlie Chaplin. He was so multi-talented, and as a model, would have been a dream!

http://tinyurl.com/Ln7hmsu http://tinyurl.com/mt88yqm www.facebook.com/groups/bwsoulvision blogsoulvision.wordpress.com www.flickr.com/photos/98685342@N02 http://youtu.be/yz2JM8RsgPs

Left: Truppo, Hysteria Adam 2, 2013

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Truppo, Motherly Love 3, 2013

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Vitruvian Lens: Please tell us about yourself. Frank Aron Gårdsø: First, I am from Oslo, Norway. I have no formal education and started to work when I was just 15 years old. I have been a professional dancer, and worked as a make-up artist at the Norwegian National Academy of Theatre. I then moved on to work in the film industry, which I still am professionally connected to in different ways. I create props, do some art direction, and production design. I can edit, do cinematography, and direct from time to time. Most of my education comes from working up the ladder.

want to try to execute. I don’t see myself as a “photographer” who will reinvent the wheel. V.L.: Have you encountered any issues about having the male figure in your work? F.G.: Not that I can think of. I do live in a country where nudity is not a big issue. We are comfortable with our nakedness and our sexuality. So I can’t say I have had any issues with having a male figure in my work. I live in Norway, in Scandinavia. Here we see nudity on prime time television.

V.L.: Many figurative photographers focus almost exclusively on the female form, why do you include more male figures n your portfolio? F.G.: Hmm, hard to answer, but I guess it’s because I know the male form better than the female. Somehow I think the male models are easier to ask to get naked in front of the camera. It’s not that I never take pictures of the female form. I have done that too. V.L.: What is it about your approach that sets your work apart from other photographers of the figure? F.G.: I think that question is much easier to ask people who see my photos. When I set up a shoot, it’s just because I have a rough idea I

Gårdsø, Angkrit,2008

Left: Gårdsø, Duets, 2011

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Gårdsø, Eder, 2009

Gårdsø, Maurs, 2012

V.L.: What subject is the most challenging for you as an artist to capture? F.G.: It actually all depends on the model. Sometimes you just end up taking 300 images and none of them are good. Then the next time you take just two and they are perfect! So it’s not really a subject issue. It’s more a model issue–and again, mood.

I stumble upon his pictures here and there, and I have to buy them. It started a few years ago. So now I have eight paintings of his. Mostly I do buy because of my work in the film industry. I can always use the paintings as props or in some production design. V.L.: If you could wave a magic wand and anyone in the world could be your next male model, who would that dream model be? F.G.: Hmm, that’s a tough question to answer. It’s in the same category as "which move is the best movie you have ever seen?" So if I were to just say the first name that comes to mind it would be Takeshi Kaneshiro, he is a work of art.

V.L.: If you could own just one work of art, which one would it be? F.G.: It must be some of Salvador Dali’s work or Erwin Olaf. If not that, I gladly take a building from Zara Hadid–I think that’s a work of art. V.L.: Do you collect art? F.G.: I tend to buy painted pictures at flea markets and second hand stores. I have paintings from the same painter on all my walls.

You can explore more of the artists work at his website: http://500px.com/frankenstyle or www.wix.com/fr3575/studiotrolliord 28

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Michel Gelin was born in 1980 in Zurich and now lives in Winterthur Switzerland. His interest in nude photography began when he was 24 years old. A visit to an exhibition of works by Andreas H. Bitesnich in Vienna was his very first encounter with nude photography. The sensual and clear artwork of Bitesnich inspired Gelin to self-study photography. Gelin draws a lot of his ideas for posture and posing from dancing. For ten years he practised competitive dancing–Latin and ballroom. Dancing in competitions means practicing the same movements day after day, hour after hour, in front of a mirror. It is similar in photography; setting up the light, improving the technical skills, and learning how to make models understand what the photographer wants. So the experience gained from dancing makes Gelin fully aware that it is hard work to improve, but that it is worth doing.

Vitruvian Lens: What is it about your approach that sets your work apart from other photographers of the figure? Michel Gelin: Photography is my hobby and my passion–I do not have to earn money with it–on the contrary–I spend my money on photography. I think some of differentiation to other photographers’ work is due to my job in marketing and having to deal with such questions daily. In photography I find myself not paying attention to this issue during photo

Gelin’s work follows clear lines and clear shapes. He does not make use of stage props and works most of the time with the nude body only. The background and the light form the stage, while the shadows are the clothes of the model. The poses of the models are often symmetric and geometric. The tension of the postures chosen makes the models’ muscles become visible and reveal the strength of the male body. Gelin is always looking for the perfect light on skin to produce shiny reflections and deep shadows to accentuate the muscles, and give the body a clear form.

Left: Gelin, Steffen, 2011

Gelin, Adrian, 2012

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V.L.: Tell us about your very first exhibition. M.G.: Unfortunately there is none. This is something I always have in mind. But an exhibition needs a certain amount of perfect pictures and the money to have them printed and framed. As my own expectations are very high, and I like to have a series of photos that fit together for an exhibition, I have, so far, not participated in one. I think in the meantime I should have some work to put on display. I just need some time prepare everything. V.L.: When did you know you wanted to be a photographer? M.G.: It was never my intention to become a photographer, at least not as a job. I like photography as a passion, a hobby, a field where I can use my creativity in many ways. V.L.: Do you have a secret talent? M.G.: I think I am very good at structuring information; finding similarities and creating clusters. Like compressing a lot of information into one final conclusion. Defining orders how things should work, extracting the quintessence out of it, and explaining it in an easy way to others. This is probably why my pictures are very clean and clear. V.L.: Have you ever been brought to tears in front of a work of art? M.G.: Yes of course. Especially dancing as a form of art can bring me to tears. If someone moves emotionally to beautiful music, this results in a wave going from the dancer to the audience. Depending on my mood, I can be caught very easily by this wave, I get goose pimples and watery eyes. V.L.: What subject is the most challenging for you as an artist to capture? M.G.: A challenge is to take photos of a couple for several reasons. It is more difficult to set the light for two or more models; you risk one model taking the light from the other. It is also a challenge for the photographer–you probably do not like both models equally–you risk focusing more on the model you prefer.

I think that happens anyway, but I always try to fight against it because I want to give both models the same chance, and I do not want to put one in the shadow of the other. V.L.: If you could own just one work of art, which one would it be? M.G.: I love sculptures. Unfortunately I do not have the space that is necessary for placing one. If I had, it would probably be a statue by Auguste Rodin. His works are sensual masterpieces of art. It is appealing to look at the perfection of all those bodies formed perfectly as sculpture. V.L.: Do you collect art? M.G.: I think that is what I have started to do over the past few months. I engaged a very young and talented artist called Joel (canvas13.tumblr.com) to paint a picture for my bedroom. I gave him the measurements and some ideas and he created a stunning work of art. This was the first time that I really concerned myself with art. I have also found an Italian artist via his tumblr-blog. He is called Luca Mantovanelli. I immediately liked his work and ordered a painting from him through a gallery in Sweden. I think I have really started to taste blood and I will collect more art in future. (http://lucamantovanelli.tumblr.com) V.L.: If you could pick anyone in the world to be your next male model, who would that dream model be? M.G.: Hmm… I would love to shoot a series of portraits with the French actor and singer JeanBaptiste Maunier, known from the movie “Les Choristes” 2004. He played the role of a poorly behaved boy with a beautiful singing voice. While he was a young boy at that time, he grew up to an attractive young man. His very impressive face and nice brown hair, as well as his tall/athletic body would be very nice to put in a scene. I think he has a great personality and it would be fun to work with him.

Please explore more of the artist's work at his website: www.michelgelin.com

Left: Gelin, Steffen, 2011

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Artists Interviewed

Artists from Edition 2

Recommended Galleries

Collin McAdoo www.tinyurl.com/KNQW942

Jim Ferringer www.modelmayhem.com/140448 2 www.redbubble.com/people/jimm 150

Lyman-Eyer Gallery Provincetown, MA www. lymaneyerart.com

David Vance www.davidvanceprints.com www.davidvance.com DDiArte http://1x.com/artist/63782 www.olhares.com/ddiarte facebook.com/ddiarte Enzo Truppo http://tinyurl.com/Ln7hmsu http://tinyurl.com/mt88yqm Frank Aron Gürdsø http://500px.com/frankenstyle www.wix.com/fr3575/studiotrolliord Michel Gelin www.michelgelin.com

Artists from Edition 1 Nectario Karolos Papazacharias www.nectariopapazacharias.com Ed Freeman www.edfreeman.com David Jarrett www.davidjarrett-photography.com

J.D. Dragan www.jddragan.com Gregg Friedberg gefriedberg@gmail.com gfriedberg.deviantart.com Adi Nes Jack Shainman Gallery, NYC www.jackshainman.com Adam Collier Noel www.adamcolliernoel.com www.coccoandsalem.com FL www.lymaneyerart.com MA Aernout Overbeeke www.aernoutoverbeeke.com www.behance.net/aernoutoverbe eke

Leslie + Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, Manhattan, NY www.leslielohman.org PHD Gallery St. Louis, MO www.phdstl.com Lizardi/Harp Gallery Pasadena CA 626-791-8123 Galerie Mooi-Man Groningen, Netherlands www.mooi-man.NL Recommended Websites FirehousePublications.com TheArtOfMan.net PowerfullyBeautiful.com

Heitor Magno www.flickr.com/heitorm Michel Guillaume www.michelguillaume.fr www.shootingmode.com.

100ArtistsBook.com 100ArtistsBook.tumblr.com www.sachetmixte.com www.VitruvianLens.com

Ren Hang www.renhang.org

www.BigKugels.com

Max Woltman www.maxwoltman.com

Other Books We Publish Powerfully Beautiful www.createspace.com/3382894

E. Gibbons www.firehousegallery.com/info.htm www.lymaneyerart.com

365 Art Quotes www.createspace.com/3904538

Dianora Niccolini www.dianoraniccolini.com

100 Artists of the Male Figure www.100ArtistsBook.com The Art Of Man www.TheArtOfMan.net

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Explore The Art of Man: Fine art of the male figure in traditional media. www.TheArtOfMan.net

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The classical male figure in art history, available in soft cover, and online at www.TheArtOfMan.net

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Sample Edition Pages missing, low resolution, and watermarked For full printed edition please visit www.vitruvianlens.com

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Vitruvian Lens #3  

LOW RESOLUTION SAMPLE. Vitruvian Lens strives to discover and showcase photographers with a fine art approach to the male figure in their w...