Page 1

Auction N°7 30th Nov 2017


Graham Wall Real Estate 2 Tole Street Ponsonby PO Box 998 Shortland St Auckland 1140 New Zealand

Graham Wall +64 21 951 368 graham@grahamwall.com

Ollie Wall +64 21 520 514 ollie@grahamwall.com

Photograph: Simon Wilson Shingle Roof House Designed by Fearon Hay

Andrew Wall +64 21 520 508 andrew@grahamwall.com


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PHILJAMES Little Sponge Man 2, 2016 thrown porcelain, hand carved, on-glaze-painted 45 x 33 x 33 cm Courtesy the artist and Galerie Pompom, Sydney


bowerbank ninow

Auction N°7 30th November 2017 Opening

Wednesday 22th November, 2017 Viewing

Thursday 23rd November – Wednesday 29th November, 2017 10am – 5pm Thursday 30th, 2017 10am – 1pm

Auction

Thursday 30th November, 2017 6.30pm

Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will pay the artist a voluntary resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Bowerbank Ninow are the first and only auction house in New Zealand to pay resale royalties to artists. buyer's premium A buyer’s premium of 17.5% will be charged on all items listed in this catalogue. GST (15%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

colophon Bowerbank Ninow Auction N°7 November 30th, 2017 Catalogue of works Edition of 3500 ISSN 2537-6594 Design Direction Editor Design Photography

DDMMYY Andrew Clark Elliot Ferguson Sam Hartnett, John Collie

312 Karangahape Rd. Newton Auckland 1010 New Zealand +64 9 307 8870 info@bowerbankninow.com bowerbankninow.com Simon Bowerbank +64 21 045 1464 simon@bowerbankninow.com Charles Ninow +64 21 053 6504 charles@bowerbankninow.com


bowerbank ninow

Auction N°2 30th March 2016 Opening

Wednesday 23 March 2016 6pm Viewing

Thursday 24 – Tuesday 29 March 2016 10am – 5pm Wednesday 30 March 2016 10am – 1pm

Auction

Wednesday 30 March 2016 6.30pm

Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will pay the artist a voluntary resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Bowerbank Ninow are the first and only auction house in New Zealand to pay resale royalties to artists. buyer's premium A buyer’s premium of 15% will be charged on all items listed in this catalogue. GST (15%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

colophon


auction n°7 — November 2017

Contents Plates

24

Essays Arnold Manaaki Wilson Insight, Aesthetics and Dicipline

114

Sean Kerr Bad Language

118

William Alexander (Bill) Sutton Shifting Shadows

120

Lauren Winstone Swimming Against the Tide

122

Séraphine Pick Fantastic Reality

125

Don Driver A Revolution Within: Merz and the assemblages of Don Driver

128

Paul Cullen Precarious Knowledge

132

John Reynolds An Expert Undercooking

134

Michael Parekowhai Original Copies

138

Gavin Hurley The Uncanny Valley

140

et al. The Science of the Irrational: Text, mysticism and communication in the work of et al.

144

Index

147

How to participate in the Auction

158

Conditions of Sale

159

25


P

L

A

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T

E

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auction n°7 — november 2017


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26


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 1

Laurie Steer The Want of It 2014 ash glaze and iron on wild-clay ceramic 90mm x 120mm x 120mm

est

$600 - $800

27


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Lot 2

Terry Stringer untitled 1989 screenprint and enamel on aluminium signed Terry Stringer in ink lower right 200mm x 320mm

est

$1,400 - $2,200

28


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 3

Michael Parekowhai Acts c. 1993 lost wax bronze cast 80mm x 140mm (overall)

est

$3,500 - $5,500

29


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Lot 4

Tony De Lautour untitled 2008 glazed white earthenware stamped TDL on underside 115mm x 195mm x 80mm

est

$800 - $1,600

30


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 5

Reuben Paterson Laocoön 2012 glitter on cast resin and glass, edition of 15 60mm x 500mm x 250mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

31


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Lot 6

John Reynolds Day Light 1997 oilstick, printed paper and drawing pins on canvas 95mm x 145mm

est

$250 - $350

32


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 7

Ava Seymour La Dormeuse 2005 c-type photograph signed Ava Seymour, dated 2005 and inscribed La Dormeuse in ink on Michael Lett label affixed verso 240mm x 290mm

est

$800 - $1,200

33


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Lot 8

Ava Seymour AK 79 2004 c-type photograph 250mm x 775mm

est

$2,000 - $4,000

Lot 9

Ava Seymour Christmas Suit 1995 c-type photograph, edition of 5 495mm x 362mm

est

$2,000 - $4,000

34


auction n°7 — November 2017

35


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Lot 10

Paul Cullen Models, Methods and Assumptions 2012 found book, acrylic and pencils signed Paul Cullen and dated 2012 in ink 220mm x 65mm x 145mm

est

$700 - $1,400

36


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 11

Paul Cullen Models, Methods and Assumptions 2012 found book, acrylic and pencils signed Paul Cullen and dated 2012 in ink 222mm x 40mm x 147mm

est

$700 - $1,400

37


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Lot 12

Lauren Winstone Whisky Bottle, from Iris 2002 saggar-fired ceramic 210mm x 100mm x 80mm

est

$500 - $800

Lot 13

Lauren Winstone Bottle, from Iris 2002 saggar-fired ceramic 180mm x 65mm x 55mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 14

Lauren Winstone Lidded Container, from Iris 2002 saggar-fired ceramic 90mm x 65mm x 55mm

est

$200 - $400

38


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 15

Michael Hight Port Waikato 2001 ink and acrylic on paper dated 23.IV.01 and inscribed PORT WAIKATO in brushpoint lower left; signed M HIGHT, dated 23.IV.01 and inscribed PORT WAIKATO in ink verso 153mm x 205mm

est

$200 - $400

39


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Lot 16

John Reynolds That Words Are Dust 2004 paint marker and acrylic on canvas, edition 1/10 signed REYNOLDS dated 2004 and inscribed THAT WORDS ARE DUST #1 oil paint marker on acrylic 225 x 300 in ink verso 300mm x 225mm

est

$450 - $850

40


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 17

John Reynolds Study for Desert Rd. IV 2003 paint marker and acrylic on canvas signed REYNOLDS, dated 2003 and inscribed oil paint marker on Acrylic Enamel and STUDY FOR DESERT Rd. IV in paint marker verso 350mm x 275mm

est

$800 - $1,300

41


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Lot 18

John Reynolds All Truth is Crooked 1997 oilstick, acrylic, printed paper and drawing pins on canvas (diptych) 350mm x 550mm (overall)

est

$1,100 - $1,600

42


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 19

John Reynolds Kafka's Reflection: One must defraud no-one 1997 oilstick, acrylic, printed paper and drawing pins on canvas 335mm x 280mm

est

$900 - $1,500

43


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Lot 20

Peter Robinson untitled 1990 acrylic on paper signed P Robinson in graphite lower left verso 1495mm x 970mm

est

$4,000 - $6,000

44


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 21

Darryn George Arawhata #2 2006 oil on canvas signed Darryn George and DW George, dated 2006 and inscribed 'Arawhata #2" in ink upper edge verso; Milford Galleries label affixed verso 1000mm x 1500mm

est

$7,000 - $12,000

45


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Lot 22

Gavin Hurley Helen (Lona) 2003 oil on hessian 408mm x 303mm

est

$4,000 - $7,000

46


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 23

Gavin Hurley Dr Meyer 2003 oil on hessian 408mm x 304mm

est

$4,000 - $7,000

47


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Lot 24

Gavin Hurley Jig-Map 2002 collaged found paper 190mm x 255mm

est

$700 - $1,200

48


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 25

Gavin Hurley The Voyages of Captain Cook 2002 collaged found paper 240mm x 170mm

est

$700 - $1,200

Lot 26

Gavin Hurley Kiwi Critic 2002 collaged found paper signed GJH, dated 2002 and inscribed Kiwi Critic in graphite lower edge verso 216mm x 138mm

est

$700 - $1,200

49


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Lot 27

SĂŠraphine Pick untitled 1995 oil on canvas signed Pick and dated 95 in brushpoint lower right 380mm x 380mm

est

$3,000 - $6,000

50


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 28

Séraphine Pick untitled 1995 oil on canvas signed Seraphine Pick and dated 95 in graphite lower right 380mm x 380mm

est

$3,000 - $6,000

51


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Lot 29

John Baldessari Throwing Three Balls In The Air To Get A Straight Line (Best Of Thirty-Six Attempts) 1973 photolithograph (12 Â panels) 175mm x 250mm (each panel)

est

$6,000 - $9,000

52


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 30

Paul Hartigan String-Ball 2007 argon tube light, perspex, electrical fittings signed Paul Hartigan, dated 2007 and inscribed "STRING-BALL" in paint marker verso 1020mm x 350mm x 180mm

est

$7,500 - $13,500

53


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Lot 31

Ian Scott Small Lattice No. 238 c. 1991 acrylic on canvas signed Ian Scott and inscribed 516. 36" x 36". "SMALL LATTICE NO. 238." in ink upper edge verso; Ferner Galleries label affixed verso 920mm x 920mm

est

$5,000 - $7,000

54


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 32

Ray Haydon Untitled (Cube IV) 2010 mahogany 210mm x 170mm x 165mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

55


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Lot 33

Don Driver Red Pocket (with blade) 1981-2 tarpaulin, found woollen skirt, rubberised canvas, twine and sickle signed By Don Driver, dated Finished 1982 and inscribed Red Pocket (WITH BLADE) 1981 in ink verso 1085mm x 810mm

est

$6,000 - $9,000

56


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 34

L Budd & Lionel B Lionel's lotus bag N.1 2008 acrylic and packing tape on paper carry bag 450mm x 430mm

est

$1,800 - $2,600

Lot 35

L Budd & Lionel B Lionel's lotus bag N.2 2008 acrylic and packing tape on paper carry bag 450mm x 430mm

est

$1,800 - $2,600

57


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Lot 36

Brendon Wilkinson Basics 1999 modelling putty, oil, flocking, found can signed Brendon Wilkinson and dated 1999 AD in brushpoint underside 110mm x 75mm x 75mm

est

$800 - $1,600

58


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 37

Graham Fletcher Untitled (Head 4) 2014 acrylic on ceramic 240mm x 230mm x 300mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

Lot 38

Graham Fletcher Untitled (Head 3) 2014 acrylic on ceramic 245mm x 230mm x 250mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

59


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Lot 39

Shane Cotton Tableau XII 1997 oil on canvas signed COTTON and dated '97 in brushpoint upper right; signed Shane L Cotton, dated '97 and inscribed TABLEAU XII in graphite verso 350mm x 455mm

est

$8,000 - $16,000

60


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 40

Shane Cotton Tableau IX 1997 oil on canvas signed COTTON and dated '97 in brushpoint lower left; signed Shane L Cotton, dated '97 and inscribed TABLEAU IX in graphite verso 350mm x 455mm

est

$8,000 - $16,000

61


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Lot 41

Richard Killeen untitled c. 1969 ink on canvas 860mm x 830mm

est

$9,000 - $16,000

62


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 42

Robert Ellis Korowai 1968 ink, oil pastel and watercolour on paper signed Robert Ellis and dated 1968 in ink lower right 720mm x 540mm

est

$2,000 - $4,000

63


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Lot 43

Michael Parekowhai Kapa Haka (Maquette) 2014 automotive paint on fibreglass, edition of 100 410mm x 125mm x 100mm

est

$8,000 - $12,000

Lot 44

Peter Robinson This Weeks Special c. 1994 oilstick and acrylic on found crate 845mm x 1000mm x 355mm

est

$10,000 - $15,000

64


auction n°7 — November 2017

65


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Lot 45

SĂŠraphine Pick Glamour Wounds 2004 oil on canvas signed S. PICK and dated 2004 in brushpoint lower right (right panel); signed S. PICK and dated 2004 in brushpoint lower right (left panel); Brooke Gifford Gallery label affixed verso (left panel) 375mm x 560mm

est

$4,500 - $6,500

66


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 46

Séraphine Pick untitled 2000 oil on canvas signed Seraphine Pick and dated 00 in brushpoint lower right 455mm x 610mm

est

$7,500 - $12,500

67


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Lot 47

Carl Sydow Around 1971 perspex and plastic hose 203mm x 380mm x 380mm

est

$3,000 - $6,000

Lot 48

Milan Mrkusich Raw Umber with Blue (linear series) 1979 acrylic on board signed M. Mrkusich, dated ’79 and 1979 and inscribed RAW UMBER WITH BLUE (linear series) in brushpoint verso; Peter Webb Galleries Ltd label affixed verso 1200mm x 1200mm

est

$55,000 - $75,000

68


auction n°7 — November 2017

69


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Lot 49

Arnold Manaaki Wilson Hine of the Lake 1976 wood signed Manaaki Wilson, dated Remake 1976 and inscribed Hine of the Lake and Monday March 05 in ink underside 1680mm x 455mm x 285mm

est

$8,000 - $16,000

70


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 50

Arnold Manaaki Wilson untitled (from Toki series) 1976 wood 1100mm x 155mm x 100mm

est

$4,500 - $6,500

71


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Lot 51

Arnold Manaaki Wilson Maquette for Carving c. 1975-85 ceramic 285mm x 245mm x 150mm

est

$2,500 - $3,500

Lot 52

Arnold Manaaki Wilson Portrait of Rangitinia Wilson c. 1955-60 enamel on ciment fondu 365mm x 180mm x 260mm

est

$3,500 - $5,500

Lot 53

Laurie Steer Squirrel Trap 2014 ash glaze and iron on wild-clay ceramic 570mm x 340mm x 350mm

est

$2,500 - $3,500

72


auction n°7 — November 2017

73


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Lot 54

Andrew McLeod untitled (diptych) 2012 acrylic on canvas signed AM in brushpoint lower right (right panel) 180mm x 255mm (overall)

est

$2,500 - $3,500

74


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 55

Gordon Walters Window II 1987 gouache on paper signed Gordon Walters and dated 87 in graphite lower left; inscribed Window II in graphite lower right 510mm x 375mm

est

$9,000 - $12,000

75


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Lot 56

Damien Hirst The Hours Spin Skulls 2009 gloss acrylic on plastic skull, compact disc in jewel case 140mm x 140mm x 210mm

est

$12,000 - $16,000

76


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 57

Gregor Kregar Matthew 12:12 Cup Australia Large #3 2011 porcelain, edition of 20 signed GK and dated 2011 with incision underside; signed Gregor Kregar in ink on artist's label affixed underside 400 x 220 x 500mm

est

$1,500 - $2,000

77


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78


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 58

Michael Smither In Bed 1995 oil and alkyd on board signed MDS and dated 95 in brushpoint upper right 1202mm x 962mm

est

$45,000 - $65,000

Lot 59

Bill Sutton Landscape Elements 1970 oil on board signed WA Sutton and dated '70 in brushpoint lower right 595mm x 1210mm

est

$25,000 - $35,000

79


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Lot 60

Don Driver Trouser Piece 1981 canvas, found woollen pants, found socks, denim and synthetic rope signed By Don Driver, dated 1981 and inscribed "TROUSER PIECE" in ink verso 1725mm x 2240mm

est

$15,000 - $20,000

80


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 61

Don Driver Time 1992-7 Xerox, magazine cuttings, canvas, tarpaulin and vinyl signed Don Driver, dated 1992/97 and inscribed "Time" in ink verso 960mm x 730mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

81


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Lot 62

Denis O'Connor Anima 1997 flocked wooden oar, slate inkwell, vinyl record and brass 1680mm x 300mm x 300mm

est

$1,500 - $2,500

82


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 63

Michael Parekowhai Messines 2001 c-type photograph, edition of 8 1550mm x 1250mm

est

$16,000 - $22,000

83


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Lot 64

Russell Clark Seated Figures 1954 cement 650mm x 600mm x 370mm

est

$25,000 - $35,000

84


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 65

Greer Twiss Walking Victory 2011 wax, cloth, steel, plywood, perspex and lead signed Twiss, dated 11 and inscribed Walking Victory with incision 350mm x 390mm x 265mm

est

$5,000 - $8,000

85


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86


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 66

Sean Kerr Fucked 2008 cast resin, edition of 2 215mm x 165mm x 130mm

est

$500 - $800

Lot 67

Karl Fritsch untitled 2017 shibuichi and graywacke signed KF and dated 17 with incision underside 40mm x 1000mm x 65mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

Lot 68

Karl Fritsch untitled 2017 shibuichi and pounamu signed KF and dated 17 with incision underside 40mm x 1000mm x 65mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

87


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Lot 69

et. al. untitled 2004 screenprint and masking tape on paper, transparent vinyl record in polythene sleeve, edition of 100 330mm x 330mm

est

$150 - $300

Lot 70

et. al. untitled 2004 c-type print on paper, edition of 100 1180mm x 780mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

88


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 71

Ralph Hotere Kyrie Eleison No. 5 1974 oil on canvas signed Hotere, dated Port Chalmers 74 and inscribed Kyrie Eleison 5 (Requiem Series) and BLG Cat 10 in brushpoint verso 1070mm x 1065mm

est

$30,000 - $60,000

89


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Lot 72

Heather Straka They fought desperately with their paddles 2003 oil on cotton on board signed H Straka, dated 2003 and inscribed They fought desperately with their paddles/ Joker in graphite verso 825mm x 540mm

est

$5,500 - $7,500

90


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 73

Rohan Wealleans untitled 2004 acrylic and drawing pins on board signed Rohan Wealleans and dated 2004 in ink verso 640mm x 400mm

est

$2,500 - $3,500

91


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Lot 74

Roger Mortimer Red Milk Bottle 2007 china paint on ceramic 240mm x 85mm x 85mm

est

$2,800 - $3,600

92


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 75

Reuben Paterson untitled (Time and Place) 2001 sequins, pins, polyurethane foam 300mm x 250mm x 150mm

est

$500 - $1,000

93


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Lot 76

Richard Killeen untitled (interior) 1963 monoprint on paper signed Killeen, dated 1968 and inscribed 3043 in graphite lower edge 95mm x 120mm

est

$150 - $350

94


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 77

Séraphine Pick untitled 1998 oil on canvasboard (7 panels) 180mm x 120mm (each panel)

est

$5,000 - $8,000

95


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Lot 78

Judy Darragh Riverscape 1990 synthetic fur, paua shells, transparency and light fitting on board signed Judy Darragh, dated 1990 and inscribed "riverscape" in ink verso 825mm x 970mm x 150mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

96


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 79

Simon Ingram Automata Painting No. 1 2004 acrylic and graphite on linen signed SIMON INGRAM and inscribed AUTOMATA PAINTING NO. 1 ACRYLIC, LINEN. 500 x 500 in ink lower edge verso 505mm x 505mm

est

$3,500 - $5,500

97


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Lot 80

John Reynolds Small Burial VI 1989 ink and oil stick on blackboard, artist-selected frame inscribed SMALL BURIAL VI in ink lower right; signed REYNOLDS and dated 1989 in ink upper edge verso 278mm x 278mm

est

$1,000 - $1,500

98


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 81

Allen Maddox untitled c. 1976 oil on hessian 940mm x 520mm

est

$6,000 - $8,000

99


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Lot 82

John Reynolds Acronyms, etc. #301 2004 paint marker on canvas signed REYNOLDS, dated 2004 and inscribed ACRONYMS, ETC. #301 in ink verso 100mm x 102mm

est

$200 - $400

Lot 83

John Reynolds Mandarin Studies #110 2014 acrylic on canvas signed REYNOLDS, dated 2014 and inscribed MANDARIN STUDIES #110 in ink verso 100mm x 103mm

est

$200 - $400

Lot 84

John Reynolds Story 2004 paint marker on canvas, edition 10/10 signed REYNOLDS, dated 2004 and inscribed STORY (multiple) in ink verso 103mm x 100mm

est

$150 - $300

Lot 85

John Reynolds Big Silver Light #8 2006 spray paint on canvas signed REYNOLDS, dated 2006 and inscribed BIG SILVER LIGHT #8 in ink verso 100mm x 102mm

est

$150 - $300

100


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 86

John Reynolds Acronyms, etc. #765 2007 acrylic and paint marker on canvas signed REYNOLDS, dated 2007 and inscribed ACRONYMS ETC #765 in ink verso 100mm x 101mm

est

$200 - $300

Lot 87

John Reynolds Acronyms, etc. #261 2004 paint marker on canvas signed REYNOLDS, dated 2004 and inscribed ACRONYMS ETC #261 in ink verso 100mm x 102mm

est

$200 - $300

Lot 88

John Reynolds Cheap Money #31 2008 paint marker on canvas inscribed JOHN REYNOLDS/CHEAP MONEY/2008/OIL ON CANVAS/10 x 10 CM in stamped text verso; inscribed #31 in ink verso 100mm x 102mm

est

$100 - $250

Lot 89

John Reynolds Mandarin Studies #112 2014 acrylic on canvas signed REYNOLDS, dated 2014 and inscribed MANDARIN STUDIES #112 in ink verso 103mm x 100mm

est

$200 - $400

101


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Lot 90

Andrew McLeod Downfall 2006 screenprint and acrylic on linen, edition 3/10 signed Andrew McLeod in paint marker lower edge 200mm x 225mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

102


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 91

Roger Mortimer Dear Gina somewhat shakely I write... 2000 acrylic on canvas 272mm x 317mm

est

$800 - $1,200

103


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Lot 92

Don Driver Fibre Glass 1996 enamel on fibreglass and polystyrene on board, artist-made frame signed BY DON DRIVER, dated "1966" and inscribed "Fibre Glass" in brushpoint verso 940mm x 1240mm

est

$5,000 - $8,000

Lot 93

Miranda Parkes Dreamer 2006 acrylic on canvas signed parkes, dated 06 and inscribed 'Dreamer' in ink verso 470mm x 470mm x 660mm

est

$6,000 - $9,000

104


auction n°7 — November 2017

105


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Lot 94

Terry Stringer An Ancestor Speaks c. 1978 screenprint and oil on wood 155mm x 115mm x 37mm

est

$300 - $800

106


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 95

Gregor Kregar I Disappear (Black) 2013 ceramic, edition of 20 220mm x 605mm x 105mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

107


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Lot 96

Michael Smither untitled 1977 screenprint on paper signed MDS in graphite lower right; dated 1/35/77 and inscribed 170 in graphite lower left 265mm x 410mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 97

Michael Smither untitled c. 1980 screenprint on paper 280mm x 610mm

est

$300 - $600

108


auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 98

Peter Siddell Harbour 1985 screenprint on paper, edition 59/80 signed Peter Siddell and dated '85 in graphite lower right; inscribed 'Harbour' in graphite lower left 395mm x 325mm

est

$500 - $800

109


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Lot 99

Agnes Martin Untitled #4 1990 lithograph on vellum, edition of 2500 304mm x 304mm

est

$500 - $800

Lot 100

Agnes Martin Untitled #2 1990 lithograph on vellum, edition of 2500 304mm x 304mm

est

$500 - $800

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auction n°7 — November 2017

Lot 101

Grant Banbury Paper Parcel 15 1983 acrylic and thread on paper signed Grant Banbury in ink verso; dated 1983 and inscribed Grant Banbury, Paper Parcel 15, Mixed, image - 32 x 24.5 in ink on Denis Cohn Gallery label affixed verso 320mm x 245mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 102

Grant Banbury Paper Parcel 17 1983 acrylic and thread on paper signed Grant Banbury in ink verso; dated 1983 and inscribed Grant Banbury, Paper Parcel 17, Mixed, image - 32 x 24.2 in ink on Denis Cohn Gallery label affixed verso 320mm x 242mm

est

$300 - $600

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Lot 103

Billy Apple The Given as an Art-Political Statement: Alterations (completed 20 February, 1980) 1980 exhibition poster 595mm x 420mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 104

Billy Apple Alterations: The Given as an Art-Political Statement 1980 exhibition poster signed Billy Apple in ink lower right 595mm x 420mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 105

Billy Apple Towards the Centre: The Given as an Art-Political Statement 1980 exhibition poster 415mm x 290mm

est

$300 - $600

112


E

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auction n°7 — November 2017

S

A

Arnold Manaaki Wilson Insight, Aesthetics and Discipline

114

Sean Kerr Bad Language

118

William Alexander (Bill) Sutton Shifting Shadows

120

Lauren Winstone Swimming Against the Tide

122

Séraphine Pick Fantastic Reality

125

Don Driver A Revolution Within: Merz and the assemblages of Don Driver

128

Paul Cullen Precarious Knowledge

132

John Reynolds An Expert Undercooking

134

Michael Parekowhai Original Copies

138

Gavin Hurley The Uncanny Valley

140

et al. 144 The Science of the Irrational: Text, mysticism and communication in the work of et al.

Y

S


lots 49-52

auction n°7 — November 2017

Arnold Manaaki Wilson Insight, Aesthetics and Discipline

art education and towards a more inclusive and experimental methodology.² While he was teaching at Elam, Weeks’ work was still broadly speaking figurative (although influenced by Cubism to some extent), not yet showing the push towards abstraction that occurred later in his career. However, Weeks’ taste for the modern and his willingness to allow his students the freedom to explore provided fertile ground on which Wilson’s practice was to flourish.

Arnold Manaaki Wilson (Ngāi Tūhoe, Te Arawa), along with Ciff Whiting, Mere Lodge, Fred Graham, Marilyn Webb, Muru Walters, Ralph Hotere, Para Matchitt, Katarina Mataira and Selwyn Wilson, was part of what came to be known as the “Tovey Generation.” This group of artists and educators were trained by Arthur Gordon Tovey, a transformative figure in the history of arts education in New Zealand. He was the first person to suggest that the teaching of art in schools ought to incorporate a bicultural approach, acknowledging the depth and breadth of the Māori visual arts tradition. Tovey must have been an extremely charismatic and dedicated individual, considering that despite his lack of any academic art qualifications (although he had studied under H.L. Richardson at Wellington Technical College in the 1920s, alongside his friend Len Lye) he was made the arts and crafts supervisor at the Department of Education in 1946. In this role, Tovey began a scheme under which art teachers were given specialist training and technical skills, and Māori educators were some of the first recruits to this program, including Wilson and his cohort.

Kavanagh, on the other hand, was much more of a traditionalist, an academic figure sculptor and Fellow of the Royal British Society of Sculptors. Kavanagh’s work was largely based on Classical models, although works such as his reliefs for the Walthamstow Town Hall, executed in a futurist/ deco style, show that he was willing to innovate. However, his major works are technically skilled academic bronzes, such as his head of a Russian Peasant (c.1935-9) held in the collection of the Tate in London. Wilson clearly learned much from Kavanagh about the handling of volumes, as well as the technical aspects of modelling and casting lifelike human figures; Portrait of Rangitinia Wilson, with her well-defined, striking cheekbones and brows and carefully observed and naturalistic cheeks, eyes, nose and lips, shows definite traces of Kavanagh’s influence. After graduating from art school, Wilson began to re-engage with the idea of Māori art, while continuing to develop and absorb the modernism that was gradually filtering through into New Zealand.³ The 1956 Auckland Art Gallery show of Henry Moore’s sculptures was doubtless a watershed moment for Wilson, as it was for other New Zealand modernists such as Russell Clark. By the time his work was included in the 1968 shows Recent New Zealand Sculpture at the Auckland Art Gallery and New Zealand Māori Culture and the Contemporary Scene at the Canterbury Museum, Wilson had emerged as a fully-committed modernist sculptor, whose works now showed a range of twentieth-century artistic influences, including Brancusi, Picasso, Moore and Hepworth. Wilson was unequivocal about the role he saw for modernist practice in the future of Māori art, contending that “reviving so-called Māori arts and crafts is a dead loss . . . All they’re doing is reviving something that doesn’t apply to the Māori’s present-day attitudes and way of life.”⁴ Wilson seems to have felt strongly that for art to be a vital, living part of Māoritanga, it would need to evolve, and to look to the future rather than recreating the knowledge and traditions of the past. However, this forward-thinking approach was nevertheless grounded firmly in those same traditions; in Ngahuia Te Awekotuku’s estimation, Wilson’s work “assimilated and yet extended nga mahi a nga tipuna; he understood and articulated their legacy of ancestral insight, powerful aesthetics and measured discipline.”⁵

Tovey’s passion for education, and his commitment to the idea of New Zealand as a bicultural nation where Māori and Pakeha art traditions would both be relevant and celebrated, are clearly evident in the career of his student Arnold Wilson. Like Tovey, Wilson was a passionate educator, and his work reflects a modernist approach that was, at the time, met with confusion, if not outright hostility, by both the Pakeha public and Māori traditionalists. However, like visionaries throughout history, Wilson persevered, secure in the knowledge that posterity would prove him right. His intuition that both traditions could have something to gain from each other seems, in retrospect, to have been correct; through the contributions of Wilson and his contemporaries, the history of modernism in New Zealand has become inextricably linked to the Māori art movement. Whereas overseas Modernism often co-opted the art traditions of non-European cultures for its own ends (stemming perhaps from the Cubists’ interest in African sculpture and Japanese woodblock printing) in New Zealand twentiethcentury Māori were in the unique position of being able to engage with Modernism on their own terms and to incorporate its strengths into a robust, pre-existing artistic tradition. Arnold Wilson’s work draws directly on a modernist tradition that he would have encountered at the Elam School of Fine arts, from which he graduated in 1955—the first Māori person to do so. While there, he was mentored by John F. Kavanagh and John Weeks.¹ Weeks had himself been instrumental in moving Elam’s curriculum away from the traditional, figure-drawing based academic approach to

Wilson’s disciplined approach can be clearly seen in the three abstract sculptural works reproduced here: Hine of the Lake (1976), an untitled work from the Toki series (1976) and another untitled 115


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maquette (c. 1975-85). Hine of the Lake’s rounded forms and central void are a clear nod to Henry Moore’s biomorphic body-forms; likewise, the work’s title recalls Moore’s primal, earthy female figures. However, the work’s incised koru and beak-like head, faintly resembling a manaia motif, link the work to Māori traditional forms, while its vertical format recalls the carved poupou lining the walls of a whare whakairo, although freed to stand upright in three dimensions. The work’s poised solidity and rugged materiality are typical of Wilson’s sculptural approach, also evidenced in the Toki series. The title of this series refers to “nga toki a nga kaumātua,”⁶ invoking a traditional adze. The work’s tapered form evokes an adze or axe, although the details at the base of the “blade” also allow the work to be read as an abstracted face or perhaps the body of an eel, with its long, flattened tail and open mouth. However, the work functions equally as a formal essay in modernist abstraction, an exploration of intersecting planes and volumes. Like Hine of the Lake, it juxtaposes rounded organic shapes with flattened angular surfaces that recall the subtly twisting facets of the 1957 work Tane Mahuta, held in the collection of the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki. Designed to lean against a wall, like a tool waiting to be used, the work also confronts assumptions about the traditional place of sculpture in the gallery, and the role of walls as display spaces.

Lot 51, P.72 Arnold Manaaki Wilson Maquette for Carving c. 1975-85 ceramic 285mm x 245mm x 150mm

Lastly, the clay maquette depicted here provides a glimpse into Wilson’s working methods. As a prototype for a larger sculpture this work has a sense of scale that belies its small dimensions, suggesting the breadth of the sculptor’s vision. Two stalks, tendrils or poles diverge and stretch upwards, topped by forms that could be seed pods or perhaps human heads. The work’s smooth lines and clarity of purpose suggest the influence of Hepworth or Brâncuși; it can only be imagined how impressive this sculpture would have been had Wilson had the opportunity to realise it on a larger scale. andrew clark

1

Jonathan Mane-Wheoki, “Arnold Manaaki Wilson: The Godfather of Contemporary Māori Art,” Art New Zealand no. 96, (Spring 2000): 95.

2

Peter Shand. 'Weeks, John', first published in the Dictionary of New Zealand Biography, vol. 4, 1998. Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, https://teara.govt.nz/en/biographies/4w10/ weeks-john (accessed 2 November 2017)

3

Mane-Wheoki, “Arnold Manaaki Wilson,” 95.

4

Ibid., 97.

5

Ngahuia Te Awetokutu, “Arnold Manaaki Wilson: Te Wakaunua,” in Ngahiraka Mason, Turuki Turuki! Paneke Paneke!: When Māori Art Became Contemporary (Auckland Art Gallery, 2008), 89.

6

Ngahiraka Mason, Te Taumata Exhibition Series: Arnold Wilson (NorthArt Gallery, 2010), u.p.

Lot 50, P.71 Arnold Manaaki Wilson untitled (from Toki series) 1976 wood 1100mm x 155mm x 100mm

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lot 66

auction n°7 — November 2017

Sean Kerr Bad Language

instantly transgress the social compact, opening up a new range of possible responses and readings. Emma Bugden sees Kerr’s use of “bad language” as part of a larger project that works to “re-enact stages of human development, but not in any coherent order.”³ In this reading, Kerr’s use of profanity in his work is a deliberate act of regression into a juvenile state, a mode in which play, performance and misbehaviour blend together.

I got this hilarious email from the GovettBrewster [Gallery] saying “The bucket is not working, the ghost is not working, the fart is not working” and so on. When things break down it can be very funny. —Sean Kerr

Fucked might also be read as a kind of crystallised speech act, a visualisation of the moment when something goes wrong and a curse is uttered. Kerr’s practice is not solely sculptural; his work includes performance, video and audio components, in all of which sound plays an important part. The idea of sound as a disruptive element is central to Kerr’s multimedia practice, in works such as Neon Fart and Locker (both 2010). Kerr’s choice of words is also, perhaps, a nod towards a particularly kiwi, and exclusively spoken, vernacular. New Zealanders are versatile swearers: “Fucked” can mean, depending on the context, “broken,” “tired,” or “drunk.” The work is perhaps a bit of each. Although Fucked isn’t one of Kerr’s multimedia constructions, it has the same anarchic spirit; a little provocation, a deviant gesture and the echo of a hurried shout.

In the work of Sean Kerr, comedy and tragedy are never far apart. As Jon Bywater perceptively notes, the most interesting thing about Kerr’s use of humour in his art is “the possibility that these works are not actually that funny.”¹ When we are confronted by a work like Fucked (2008), our initial response might be a laugh or a snort, a quick, base-level response to humour generated solely from the unexpected encounter with an everyday profanity in a fine arts context. The (intentional) flaw running through the resin pour is part of the joke, too—as an artwork, the object is, itself, “fucked,” but then again, it was doomed from the start. However, the real joke is uncovered when we think through the steps that Kerr took to get us to this point: making a mould, pouring and curing resin, finishing and cleaning his work, placing it in a gallery. . . all to deliver such a damp squib of a punchline. Of course, Kerr has a definite agenda: his work is an investigation of the often-proscriptive boundaries and conventions that regulate fine arts discourse and gallery practice. In particular, Kerr has an axe to grind with the modernist canon, and especially with how the ongoing art historical focus on figures like Colin McCahon and Ralph Hotere draws attention away from other strands of artistic discourse in New Zealand. As influences, Kerr prefers to cite international figures such as Bruce Nauman and Vito Acconci, but also New Zealand performance artists such as Bruce Barber, Peter Roche and Phil Dadson, and postmodernists like Billy Apple.²

andrew clark

It might seem somewhat counter-intuitive for a self-confessed disciple of the performance art tradition to laboriously produce a tangible sculptural object like this nugget of resin, but that’s sort of the point; Kerr’s determination to place physical works in the gallery space is a backhanded jab at the institutions, expectations and identities that surround the idea of sculpture and sculptors. He often builds monumental works that are self-defeating and futile in their grandiosity, such as Digitus Impudicus (2009), a giant pink inflatable finger that deflates when people come near it. Like the Digitus itself, Fucked is a shambolic trophy of thwarted ambition, a sly critique of art’s tendency to be used as a tool for self-aggrandisement. Fucked is also, of course, a word “made flesh,” and is thus necessarily a comment on the role of language in art. Kerr is interested in words, and particularly in how profanity has the ability to 119

1

Jon Bywater, “Chucking Pies, Pissing on Velvet,” in Sean Kerr, Bruce is in the garden; so someone is in the garden (Auckland: Clouds, 2010), 35.

2

Tobias Berger and Sean Kerr, “The Illusion of Pissing in the Corner,” in ibid., 24.

3

Emma Bugden, “Shit Shit Shit,” ibid. 54.


lot 59

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William Alexander (Bill) Sutton Shifting Shadows

Lot 59, p.55 Bill Sutton, Landscape Elements 1970, oil on board, 595mm x 1210mm

All the shapes I wish to use are about me in our natural environment.¹ —W. A. Sutton

period. The term “regionalist,” so often applied to Sutton and a number of his South Island contemporaries, including Doris Lusk and Olivia Spencer Bower, suggests their output has no relevance beyond where they were executed. Sutton’s own words tend to refute this reading; he memorably stated that he “had no desire to create or recognise national totems,” a startling assertion given the status he has retroactively been accorded. Ultimately, Sutton’s positioning as an icon of a nationalist, regional style of New Zealand Modernism needs rethinking, and the relevance of his works, divorced from their status as the kinds of “totems” that Sutton refers to, warrants exploration. Arguably, such positioning of Sutton’s practice comes at the expense of work produced in the latter period of his career, when he began to engage more fully with the possibilities of Modernism. As aspects of abstraction invigorated his approach and extended his thinking, he produced some highly original, lyrical and almost classical paintings, that reconfigure the landscape in bold and striking ways.

The distinctive ochre-coloured landscapes of W. A. Sutton are synonymous with Canterbury’s dry arid summers. Inspired by the landforms, geological structures, seasonal changes, weather and cloud patterns, his paintings are governed by and immersed in a sea of yellow ochre. The varying moods of the Canterbury landscape, where the artist was born and trained, and where he lived his whole life, became a vital touchstone for him, stimulating numerous series of paintings over the course of a productive career that spanned more than six decades. Initially working in a pseudo-impressionist manner, following in the footsteps of his tutors at the Canterbury College School of Art, Sutton produced one-off representational landscapes. After a near two-year study period in London and exposure to Cezanne and other international artists, his real breakthrough came with Dry September (1949), painted on his return to New Zealand. This work, with its dramatic perspective, bridge structure, riverbed and distant ochre hills, highlighted Sutton’s “new interest in compositional structure.”²

By 1960 Sutton found his previous figurative approach wanting, and he began experimenting with various forms of abstraction, while still relating his work to direct experience and observations of his environment. He travelled constantly throughout Canterbury and into the foothills and the Port Hills region, recording his observations on the spot in pencil and with watercolours. Later, back in the studio, he distilled and reworked his findings, often onto expansive canvases that bridge the gap between

However, through constant reproduction both Dry September and Sutton’s now iconic composite work Nor’wester in the Cemetery, both painted when the artist was in his early thirties, have to a great extent come to define his contribution to New Zealand art during this 120


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pure, imaginative abstraction and traditional observational landscape painting.

horizontal catches the eye like a stone protruding from a grassy plain.

His extensive Grasses series, dating from the early sixties, were produced concurrently alongside his Composition series and Landscape Elements series. The Grasses consisted of repeated rhythmical curves of thick paint applied across the whole surface of the painting to form flowing patterns suggestive of movement and rustling grass. Overlaying richly-coloured glazes allowed the textural quality of the thickly painted curves to shine through and, by eliminating the sky and removing conventional perspective, he brought the viewer close in, practically immersing them in the picture plane by removing the conventionally comforting points of reference afforded by a horizon.

The image appears to project forward. At times it reads as if the viewer is looking through layers of space, thus creating a sense of depth. The striking curved forms throughout the painting appear playful on one level and somewhat decorative on another. As these forms organically grow and mutate almost into complete circles, occasionally turning in on themselves, they are suggestive of subtle koru patterns. The fuzzy edges of many forms in the painting are the result of a stipple application, the hairs of the paint brush spreading as it makes contact with the board, creating small moments of texture that energise the image. Undoubtedly, the Landscape Elements series is directly linked to the Threshold series, another important body of work Sutton produced during the early seventies. In these works, repeated river terrace landforms are constantly refined, manipulated and re-interpreted in a continual flow of yellow ochre paintings. Sutton’s considered investigations of the intersection between Modernist methodology and traditional, sincerely-felt appreciation for the possibilities of landscape produced an intriguing body of work that remains vital and refreshing to this day.

Landscape Elements (1970) is a fine example from an important series that began in 1962 and continued intermittently over a ten-year period. At least fourteen works from the series have been identified. Less textural than the Grasses series, the Landscape Elements series appears bolder in both concept, design and intent. In commenting on the genesis of the series Sutton stated that he “was intrigued at the pattern that clouds' shadows made as they passed over rolling hillsides. The patterns would shift and shift and shift and shift and so I drew a lot of gentle diagonals crisscrossing and filled them in with patterns which appeared to shift on the canvases.”³

grant banbury

The first works in the series appear bolder and less refined in execution than those that would come later. Containing repeated straight diagonals, they are stronger tonally and without circular or rounded forms. The largest in the series measures over two metres in width. The melding of greys, yellow ochres and umber tones in Landscape Elements (1970) is characteristic of Sutton’s work. After years of painting, the artist ultimately reduced his palette to just four colours—black, white, yellow ochre and raw umber—and would comment that these gave him all he needed to work. One clear horizon appears in the widelyreproduced Landscape Elements V, painted the same year, in contrast to the multiple horizons suggested in Landscape Elements, which tilt and shift creating a feeling of constant movement, evoking riverbeds, soft tussock and the passing of time. Aerial perspectives filter through into this image too, resulting in a more complex, layered presentation than in the more directly representational works. As with most paintings in the series, the dark-shaded areas feel superimposed over a light palecoloured ground, creating an image that can be read from any viewpoint. Momentarily, the viewer’s eye settles almost on the middle of the painting, where a small, crisp 121

1

“Nineteen Painters: Their Favourite Works,” Islands 10, Summer 1974, Vol. 3, No 4, 1974, 376.

2

Lara Strongman, 101 Works of Art, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu, 2015, 194.

3

Deborah Shepard interview with W. A. Sutton, audio tape, 20 March 1982, Robert and Barbara Stewart Library and Archives, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu.


lots 12-14

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Lauren Winstone Swimming Against the Tide

Lot 14, p.38 Lauren Winstone, Lidded Container, from Iris 2002, saggar-fired ceramic, 90mm x 65mm x 55mm

Lauren Winstone has gathered expertise in swimming against the tide. Quietly, but with a positive energy, this is what she has always done. Early on, as an art student, she chose clay as a principal medium in a time when it was viewed as fit only for use in making maquettes for bronze casting. The very mention of ceramic brought shudders of disbelief that such a material could be viewed as suitable for any sort of expression in “real art.� Now, with an MFA and a growing number of notable exhibitions and residencies achieved, she is still working with it. However, clay is currently labelled a medium du jour and the barriers erected between Fine and Applied arts, or what might be viewed as conceptual versus process driven expression, have largely crumbled and artists are crossing what previously seemed insurmountable barriers and travelling in both directions.

video and other post-studio pursuits usually regarded as lying within the domain of Fine Arts. Then, as the wheels of art fashion grind relentlessly on, some graduates from Fine Arts courses now consider evident process as de rigueur, which has led to sometimes curious ventures: exhibited ceramics evidencing construction glitches and kiln accidents that raise eyebrows within ceramic-community culture, yet that are sometimes regarded as engaging developments in wider art circles. Conversely, some such radical departures from ceramic conventions can enliven a culture inclined to over-reaction when protecting traditional values (yet also welcoming of new concepts when those values are acknowledged and respected). Winstone’s work sometimes deals directly with the assumptions surrounding these scenarios, and elsewhere neatly sidesteps all such associations.

Some members of the embedded-in-clay community have widened their parameters and extended vocabularies based in ceramics to encompass installation, performance,

Winstone works with the vessel, a focus seen as conservative even in ceramic circles, themselves often deeply conservative particularly with regards to functionality. Early work by Winstone 122


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dealt with the still life—a trend begun by the Australian Gwyn Hanssen Pigott (Australia) and Ann Verdcourt (UK/NZ) and still explored by some ceramicists. The ceramic still life is an amalgamation of the quintessential vessel and the installation format and, from a contemporary art perspective, runs some risk of appearing ingenuous or even opportunistic, as it echoes fine art practices without necessarily acknowledging for the conceptual basis of those practices. It honours neither historical precedence nor utility, and can present as no more than a reconfiguration of formalist elements, in which multiplicity itself becomes the only signifier. However, the work by these two trend-setters deserves expansion and recognition. Verdcourt entered into the ceramic still life genre through Luit Beiringa, at the time Director of the Manwatu Art Gallery, who was aware of the Dannevirke immigrant/resident’s ceramics. He invited her to participate in a 1980 mixed-media exhibition entitled Still Life is Still Alive, and she turned to “old friend” Georgio Morandi’s paintings, with which she was familiar from her training at the Luton School of Art, London. Verdcourt’s three-dimensional work was a successful addition to a largely painting-based show and, from there, she exhibited often in public galleries in the lower North Island and was regularly shown by Janne Land. Verdcourt’s early works could literally translate two dimensional compositions back to three, interested as she was in vivifying what had been flattened by painting’s processes. Soon however, her fierce wit and lively imagination kicked in and she made versions of paintings that could only be fully engaged with in the round. Not quite Magritte (1985) offered a version of Magritte’s Man in a Bowler Hat with the bird’s nest and contained eggs resting snugly inside the hollowed back of the man’s hat; a detail possibly hidden in the painting. Her series The Velasquez Girls depicted Spanish princesses in their heavily panniered garments, with all manner of other occupants beneath the hooped framework supporting their elaborate skirts. Elsewhere, a simple still life of jugs and beakers would see the jugs replaced by Verdcourt’s version of tetrapak milk cartons, but remaining carefully balanced in colour and arrangement when viewed from every possible direction.

Lot 13, P.38 Lauren Winstone Bottle, from Iris 2002 saggar-fired ceramic 180mm x 65mm x 55mm

In contrast, following a long career making what was often considered among the best of the wood-fired Anglo-oriental inspired tableware, Hanssen Pigott’s still lifes arose from an homage to two friends whose close deaths unsettled her world. She made them each a bowl that were exhibited together as Two Inseparable Bowls in a 1988 Fletcher show in Auckland. Seeing possibilities in this format, she expanded the number of pieces exhibited in each group and at the same time turned from oriental to deliberately occidental subtleties of form. The feet of her bowls disappeared, becoming internalised and rounded; contours were simplified, lines pared back so that nothing

Lot 12, P.38 Lauren Winstone Whisky Bottle, from Iris 2002 saggar-fired ceramic 210mm x 100mm x 80mm

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more might be taken away. Such works were always produced in porcelain, fired with wood and took days to complete, but drifting with a delicacy of bloom to a glazed surface unobtainable by any other means. The work remained traditional and domestically scaled, but at the same time strikingly idiosyncratic and original. Hanssen Pigott became internationally successful.

other hand, I would leave behind. . . The broken silver lighter, the saucerless cup, the cruet stand minus the vinegar. The scattered bones of home, the rags, the relics. Shards washed ashore after shipwreck. . . any life is a rubbish dump even when being lived, and more so afterward.” Winstone is drawn to such ideas, of preciousness mixed with redundancy, and, while she acknowledges a certain cynicism, there also lies in such passages a good account of the sense of helplessness that can be attached to collected objects and ornaments.

These initiatives generated an international ceramics trend with many variations on the theme (effective and otherwise), which easily became associated with fine arts in the press and elsewhere.

The body of work seen here is clearly handworked, following initial throwing, yet almost denies having been made from a workable, receptive material. Instead, it carries an air of fragility, even brittleness, offering a seldom seen perspective on a medium that practitioners customarily strive to display as still impressionable and malleable even following firing. This stamp of a different materiality in her work is further enhanced by the limited palette, all of which adds up to an uneasy sense of looking down the wrong end of a time tunnel to something more resurrected or excavated than made; a contained apprehension of record, both within the material and with what that material represents. Winstone’s objects refer to function but are outside any context of use and thus become signs of themselves.

However, such installations, in the field of contemporary ceramics, might also be viewed as an expression of the conflict that can arise between a desire for inclusion in a higher status or more lucrative field and a fear of losing the identity that accompanies membership in group who perceive themselves as marginalised by the material apartheid instituted by the modernist regime. Conversely, there is ample evidence that many people cloistered within ceramics’ enfolding community culture are comfortable there, have no wish to mix their media and are content with making what they do. There is no indicator that ceramics is failing any breathon-the-mirror test. To the contrary, it is more active currently than it has been for some time, although only a small proportion of the works produced cannot be labelled as traditional, even nostalgic—a tendency that has always been ceramics’ Achilles heel.

And so she circles, skirting close associations with obviously “pottery-ish” customs and forms and, instead, approaching her work through research and reflection; yet, she arrives at not dissimilar objects that nevertheless have her own stamp entombed within their distinctive materiality. Winstone’s training is to think through a piece before commencement, as opposed to a more established way of working that allows the next encounter’s plan to arise out of the making process itself. Interestingly, she now finds, under the time constraints imposed by new home ownership and childraising, that the latter method raises its head more frequently. We can only watch while her balancing of the two approaches, as she swims against tides, continues to support her making of engaging work in clay.

In contrast, Winstone has successfully negotiated both fields in her work with the ceramic still life. During a visit to Wellington, she was introduced to some pots in Te Papa’s collection, and another, very different, group of ceramics in a Cuba Mall junk shop: a whisky bottle, a flower-gathering peasant figurine, a Greek bowl and a commemorative souvenir plate. Using this disparate set of objects as her cues, Winstone set out to make, “a hallway collection that might sit in a skinny passageway and be passed by numerous times over a morning,” that she envisaged as sitting somewhere between “being new or of my own invention and of being a replica of an existing collection.”

Moyra Elliott

This concept was amplified in work produced for an exhibition showcasing emerging artists at Lopdell House Gallery entitled of Heralds and Harbingers. In the works from this show, Winstone engaged with Margaret Atwood’s then-recently published book The Blind Assassin, which contains evocative passages capturing the life and after-life of the sort of functional objects that continue to hang around even after their use-by date is long gone. As Iris, the main character, Atwood wrote that, when visiting her old house at night, “My various possessions were floating in their pools of shadow, detached from me, denying my ownership of them. I looked them over with a burglar’s eye, what might be worth the risk of stealing, what on the 124


lots 27-28, 45-46 & 77

auction n°7 — November 2017

Séraphine Pick Fantastic Reality

Lot 46, p.67 Séraphine Pick, untitled 2000, oil on canvas, 455mm x 610mm

textured by stories, both real and unreal, and like fables, mythologies, and legends, her narrative paintings reveal a world that is invaded by things too strange to believe. More accurately, Pick paints the world in all its strangeness, depicting the uncanny, the magical, even the supernatural in the settings of our ordinary lives. But the recent shift in Pick’s practice has to do with how she expresses differently, in earlier and later paintings, the stranger elements in our mundane existence.

In 2009, a little before Séraphine Pick started work on the paintings that would make up the 2015 exhibition White Noise, Felicity Milburn wrote, “For an artist whose career has so far spanned just over fifteen years, Séraphine Pick’s oeuvre accommodates some audacious leaps in subject matter and style. Never one to play it safe, she continuously reinvents her practice, always chasing down new directions—their sense often only becoming clear a few years down the track.”¹ My first experience of Pick’s practice was at the exhibition White Noise. Euphoric figures dominated the gallery, with picture planes peopled by rollicking hippies, slumbering drunks, masked societies, bearded and bare-bottomed men, and vaguely threatening hoodlums. Curated by Sian van Dyk in 2015 for The Dowse Art Museum in Lower Hutt, the exhibition presented fabulous paintings produced in the five-year period between 2010–15.

Over the past few decades, Pick has become well known for dreamy paintings that dip in and out of everyday life. Her earlier artworks explore seemingly illogical or non-realist aspects of existence. Bathtubs, beds, and benches are neatly stacked, and sometimes, a black balloon blows across the page like tumbleweed on a desert road. There are strange things issuing forth from the navels of pubescent teens, like tables (Love School, 1999), trees (Snow, 2001), or firebreathing ghosts (Untitled, 2000). Some women appear to have paper bags for faces, others have their faces replaced by whole buildings, and some are entirely faceless (Looking Like Someone Else series, 1997). With these early works, Pick

Pick’s paintings are “fabulous” not only for the cheerfulness of some of them, but also because of the word’s connection to “fable,” by way of the Latin root fari, which is “to speak,” or fabula, which is a story or play. Pick’s paintings are 125


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brings fables and folktales into the language of contemporary painting. She gives fantastic traits to characters, such as levitation or invisibility, which help to encompass real life in phantasmagorical ways.

Pick—imbued with a certain kind of visionary power, it implies a world with a pseudo-familiar logic that aims to reveal the peculiarity of our times. The supernatural realm blends with the natural, familiar world. Like the recent painting of mosh-pit scenes (Superstar, 2015), Halloweenesque carnivals (Sevens, 2013), routines of nightowls (Conehead, 2013), this painting points to a re-mystification of the everyday.

From painting to painting, there is a family resemblance between the furniture, frocks, flasks, and fans. Repeated forms appear across multiple artworks. Her 1995 series of lush paintings in pink includes a chorus of thin and straight objects like lipsticks, eyeliners and cigarettes. As Allan Smith had once written, “it’s a connected world of refrains and repetitions that forms the psychic playground of Pick’s early art.”² Like the stuff of dreams, some of these objects adopt supernatural qualities. A record player doubles as a stage for shady couples (Untitled, 1998), and a cloud of a crowd of people waft upwards from the stomach of a giant (Love School, 1999). By way of these fabulous elements, the paintings express the workings of an inner life, the subconscious or unconscious, the repressed and inexpressible. As Milburn writes, “It is in the rarefied, magical ground of Pick’s dreamscapes . . . that those impulses of sensuality, violence and unfurling imagination combine, creating intoxicating parallel universes that draw us ever closer even as they confuse and disconcert us.”³

Leaving behind the symbolic stuff of dreamscapes, recently, Pick turns her attention outwards. In the first instance, the recent shift in Pick’s practice can be described as proceeding from fantastical painting in a realistic tone, to realist painting in a fantastical tone. In other words, her new paintings express, primarily, a fantastic view of the real world. She moves from external magic to the magic implicit in the recognisable material reality of peoples and places. The aim becomes not to confabulate magical elements but to allow the magic to come from the intensity of an effort to portray the irrational nature of the rational world. Her atmospheric paintings realistically reflect the strangeness of people and our contemporary techno-crazed environment. These days, Pick is fascinated by questions of the collective consciousness, popular culture, belonging and misrepresentation, and how the internet might be changing our behaviour. To produce the White Noise paintings, for example, she sourced imagery from the internet with an improvised logic. Looking for classical figurative forms, she searched for people lying down to a find a hoard of images of drunks. But despite this interest in the aleatory possibilities of digital technologies, Pick chooses a lifestyle without an active online social media presence. She paints from a studio in Lyall Bay, New Zealand, where, on an outcrop of Wellington’s raw harbour, she continues to seize the mysterious and the magical that breathes in our everyday lives.

At the time of Pick’s survey exhibition in 2009 at the Christchurch Art Gallery, Milburn wrote, “What drives Pick’s work, from the romantic to the sinister, the flamboyantly public to the brutally private, is her absolute faith in the power of images to take us into other worlds, whether they are those we distantly remember, or those we can only dream about.”⁴ Pick introduces us to such characters from other, somewhat familiar worlds in an untitled 1998 artwork rendered in grey-blue tones. On seven panels, there are masked people with nondescript faces, or hairy masks, or wolf faces, or buildings for heads, or heads upon heads. A nude figure balances a jug on her back, and there are couples embracing in various picture planes. These paintings swing from fantastical otherworldly settings to real-life subjects, and fall somewhere in between as a disorienting mixing of the two.

balamohan shingade

Pick’s paintings are realistic, not because of a photographic devotion to representation, but rather due to their clarity in depicting an atmosphere, her radical faithfulness to the rendering of moods. Hers is a magical kind of realism, a fabulism of sorts. “What I do,” she said in a radio interview, “is translate something into an atmosphere or a feeling.”⁵ Indeed, there is a vaguely sinister feel to an untitled painting from 2000. On a desert terrain populated sparsely by a few flowers, two teens and a four-legged animal are involved in, what looks like, a surreal ritual. One is naked, adorned only by a long white garland and headphone. From her bellybutton emanates a fire-breathing face. She stands poised and looks towards her companion in the red frock who drapes a sheet over a sleeping or dead body. This painting is recognisably 126

1

Felicity Milburn, ‘Tell Me More,’ Séraphine Pick. Christchurch: Christchurch Art Gallery, 2009. p. 11.

2

Allan Smith, ‘Guten Morgen/Gute Natcht,’ ibid. p. 53.

3

Felicity Milburn, ibid. p. 17.

4

Felicity Milburn, ibid. p. 11.

5

Standing Room Only, ‘Séraphine Pick.’ Radio New Zealand, 21 June 2015.


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Don Driver A Revolution Within: Merz and the assemblages of Don Driver

Lot 60, p.80 Don Driver, Trouser Piece 1981, canvas, found woollen pants, found socks, denim and synthetic rope, 1725mm x 2240mm

In the war, things were in terrible turmoil. What I had learned at the academy was of no use to me and the useful new ideas were still unready. . . . Everything had broken down in any case and new things had to be made out of the fragments: and this is Merz. It was like an image of the revolution within me, not as it was, but as it should have been. —Kurt Schwitters ¹

regionalism that fetishized the landscape (and were, necessarily, thus beholden to Romantic traditions about the sublime in nature), Driver chose a different approach. His work draws on a physical culture that already exists, but that also already has the requisite aesthetic qualities to allow its components to be reassembled into works like those of his American and European contemporaries.

Schwitters’ idea seems so simple, in retrospect: to make a new art from the broken, fragmented detritus (both physical and mental) of the modern industrialised city, left in the wake of a war that had decimated the European continent. However, in this one impulse would lie the seeds of a whole raft of radical ideas and movements: Pop Art, Conceptual Art, performance, happenings, installation art, Fluxus, Arte Povera, and, ultimately, postmodernism.

In this way, by deploying the burlap sacks, farm tools and second-hand clothing seemingly precipitated out of the substance of late-20th century regional New Zealand (for anyone familiar with this particular time and place, even the smell of some of Driver’s works can evoke nostalgia), Driver effortlessly solved what is perhaps the principal dilemma confronting artists from this part of the world: How to make art in a location and culture vastly removed from the centres of cultural power and influence. Driver’s trick was to make internationally-minded work, that draws on the legacy of Schwitters through artists like Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenberg, Jasper Johns, Joseph Cornell, Jean Tinguely and Donald Judd, but using the materials he had to hand, the “fragments” of culture that settled to the bottom in his hometown of New Plymouth. His assemblages are thus inherently grounded in

This idea (at some number of removes, perhaps, but nonetheless so) is also the motive force behind the practice of Don Driver. For Driver, the idea that the objects of physical culture surrounding him in provincial New Zealand already possessed the aesthetic qualities required to make art must have been his own “revolution within.” Rather than deriving his work from ideas of nationalism and 128


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their own time and place, recording material culture at the same time as they document an artist grappling with the cutting-edge intellectual and aesthetic concerns of his era.

considered them primarily for their formal qualities, as examples of modernist compositional technique. However, they ultimately came to be understood as carriers for cryptic narratives, their choices of objects conveying oblique meanings that gradually emerge under close examination. Driver’s works are no different. In Trouser Piece, the matched socks and trousers that make up the work’s structure are faintly comical, like clothes laid out on a child’s bed, but the absent forms they imply are also sinister, traces of bodies whose status and identity we are unable to determine. Are these discarded army pants the belongings of soldiers slain in battle, or repurposed cast-offs worn by labourers or farmers? The dirty, bedraggled scrap of denim that trails from the middle of the work is also disconcerting, a ragged trace that speaks of decay and, perhaps, of violent acts: ripping, tearing, shredding.

Contesting the idea that the rise of photography was what “rendered mimetic art redundant,” Beat Wyss asserts that Schwitters’ work in particular demonstrates that avant-garde art does not represent the alternative to mechanical reproduction—it is the continuation of mechanical reproduction by artistic means. Like photography, an assemblage picks up the traces of reality . . .² Is Driver, then, a documentarian? A possible comparison would be his fellow Taranaki artist Fiona Clark, whose works from the 1970s and ‘80s show, in the hyper-saturated colour of the early C-type process, the conventional aesthetics of the era. Indoors, we see floral prints, browns, pinks, oranges and yellows that are at once disturbingly earthy and noxiously chemical, juxtaposed against what lies outside both the frame and the domestic scene: gumboots, mud, fence posts. These characteristics can be seen in Driver’s work as well, a world of sheds and op shops, worn and dirty home furnishings, clothing and toys mingling with the rough, utilitarian surfaces of the agrarian economy: blades, sacks, tarps, timber, twine. Are we to see his works as collections of things, preserved and transported through time as a record of the fashions, luggage, farm tools and hardware of the 1960s, ‘70s and ‘80s? Yes, in a sense. However, like a photographer, Driver is not indiscriminate in what he chooses to show; his “lens” has more specific goals. As mentioned above, part of the reason Driver selects his materials is their aesthetic qualities.

As well as functioning as a formal element, the duffel in Red Pocket (with blade) also reads as carcass-like in its disembowelled state, its frayed seams and cracking vinyl “skin” a kind of memento mori for all bags, everywhere: as I am, so shall you be. The blade and skirt, suggesting male/female or domestic/agricultural dualities, are also inescapably evocative of violence and sexuality. The way Driver deploys tools in his works nearly always positions them as weapons; they hang menacingly against the soft components of the work like so many swords of Damocles, waiting to be used. When Driver’s wall hangings are transported, the tools must be carefully wrapped, so that they do not damage or puncture the other delicate components of the work. These evocative, often gothic associations are not accidents, mere by-products of a primarily formal practice; rather, the formal and potentially narrative or symbolic elements of the work are part and parcel, two manifestations of one process.

In a work such as Red Pocket (with blade) (1981), Driver places the orange skirt, brown duffel bag and rusted sickle against a blue tarpaulin to create a classic, abstract modernist composition, in which each element is carefully balanced to create a tense, dynamic system. The orange bailing twine by which the sickle is suspended becomes a linear form linking the curved element to the edge of the picture-plane, offsetting the blue negative space in the lower lefthand corner. In Trouser Piece (1981), five pairs of army surplus pants create a structure of vertical bands, while strips of fabric layered between and behind them create a sense of depth. The muted earth tones of the trousers, and of the green canvas tarpaulin support, are enlivened by the reds and yellows of the row of socks comically stitched down below the trouser cuffs. Although its materials are unconventional, this work is actually a tightly regimented example of the modernist aesthetic, not ultimately dissimilar from Judd’s stacked box constructions.

To know the “where,” “when” and “what” of Driver’s works helps us to approach them, but it leaves us somewhat adrift with regards to the “why” and “how.” Driver’s own statements on the matter are sparse and opaque, and rightfully so; it is scarcely his responsibility to explain himself to us, when the work already contains such a wealth of information, wearing its components (sometimes literally) on its sleeve(s). Schwitters is perhaps the best available model that we have for building an understanding of Don Driver’s work, and the best way of approaching Schwitters is through his own words, specifically what he had to say about his own brand/ideology/ methodology: Merz.³ Merzbilder [Merz-pictures] are abstract works of art. The word Merz denotes essentially the combination of all conceivable materials for artistic purposes, and technically the principle of equal evaluation of the individual materials. Merzmalerei [Merz-painting] makes use not only of paint and canvas, brush and palette, but of all materials perceptible to the eye.⁴

Rauschenberg’s “combines,” an obvious intermediary step between Schwitters and Driver, were originally understood through the lens of existing abstract expressionist practice, which 129


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The crucial phrase in this statement is “equal evaluation.” Schwitters, whose stated goal was to “efface the boundaries between the arts,”⁵ was eager to do so by extending the boundaries of the act of artistic creation to encompass all aspects of life, which led him to incorporate elements of the world itself into the artwork, first using collage but ultimately by turning the process back on itself, remaking his own house as the Merzbau: a total environmental installation that spread through his home at 5 Waldhausenstraße in Hanover like a virus, subverting the space of domestic normality into a riot of angular wooden forms and found objects. Subsequently destroyed in a British air raid in 1943, the Merzbau came to assume the aura of a legendary lost masterpiece; documented only by a handful of black and white photographs showing parts of one room, it is a tantalising entity that now exists largely in the imagination, a mirage or perhaps a dream. Although the Merzbau was perhaps the ultimate expression of Schwitters’ practice, it was not the totality of his work. The fact that Schwitters continued to paint representational portraits throughout his life suggests that this seemingly anodyne mode was also a potential aspect of Merz: as a conceptual framework, Schwitters’ creation was inclusive, rather than exclusive, further bolstering Wyss’ assertion that all of Schwitters’ practice was fundamentally mimetic in nature.

Plymouth still was from the centres of cultural influence at the time, it is worth remembering that New Zealand did not have television until 1960, when one state-owned channel began to broadcast, initially from 5 to 9 p.m. A second channel was not launched until fifteen years later. In this context, the desire to make contemporary, internationally minded art already marked Driver out as being on the fringe. When I look at Don Driver’s works, I think about my grandfather’s workshop, which was so crammed with tools, old coats, fishing tackle, and tins and jars containing all kinds of hardware that the space between the wall and the workbench was only wide enough for one person to fit sideways. He was the kind of man who would save old nails, hammering them flat to one day be re-used; to the best of my knowledge, he almost never threw anything away. Every time I am confronted by a Don Driver work in the flesh, I am taken back to that small room, and the hundreds of useful fragments and gadgets that resided there, amongst the smell of engine grease, salt water, rust and old oilskins. He wasn’t an artist, but I think, in its own way, that room was my grandfather’s Merzbau. The ideas of “Kiwi ingenuity” and the “no.8 wire mentality” have become decrepit clichés, but there is a kernel of truth in the idea of New Zealand as a nation of tinkerers and makers-do. There is something in us that pays attention to the minutiae of the physical world, that wants to save screws and string and rubber bands “just in case” they one day assume a new significance that we could not possibly have predicted. Don Driver is the unquestioned poet of this impulse, a chronicler of oddments and curiosities, the Homer of the lost screwdriver recovered from under the sink. In this, Driver’s Merz-practice speaks eloquently and truthfully about what it means to be from New Zealand, and of what dwells in the cluttered corners of our national identity.

All well and good; but what of the “why?” What was the reason that caused Schwitters to create a new term to encompass both art and life, to live through artmaking and make art through living? Beat Wyss, again, has a suggestion: Artists did not invent the collage, they discovered it: on advertisement pillars, in newspapers, on the pavement. The myth of the artist as the anticipating genius must be well and truly forgotten. The appropriate dictum for the modern period is rather: ‘Art imitates commerce and technology.’⁶ This, perhaps is the key to understanding the artistic lineage that Driver inherited. Driver’s works, like Schwitters’ Merzbilder, are representations of the intellectual, cultural and aesthetic montage that characterised the second half of the twentieth century. Their assemblage echoes the juxtapositions already prevalent in New Plymouth from the 1960s on, caught between rural and urban in an era when the rapidly escalating pace of technological change was transforming the fabric of society. After the Second World War, American consumer society began to filter through into New Zealand for the first time, bringing with it a new tendency for objects to be ephemeral and disposable, and for people to relate to them as products. Although Driver was of an older generation, he would also have seen the massive social upheaval of the 1960s drastically change the way young people thought about themselves and their place in the world. However, these influences didn’t mean New Zealand was necessarily close to the rest of the world; as a barometer of how removed New

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1

Kurt Schwitters, “Kurt Schwitters,” in Friedhelm Lach, Der Merzkunstler Kurt Schwitters, vol. 5, 335 (translation by John Elderfield). Cited in Dorothea Dietrich, The Collages of Kurt Schwitters: Tradition and Innovation (Cambridge University Press, 1993), 6-7.

2

Beat Wyss, “Merzpicture Horse Grease: Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction,” in Kurt Schwitters. MERZ – a Total Vision of the World, Annja Muller-Alsbach and Heinz Stahlhut, ed. (Bern: Bentelli Publishers, 2004), 74.

3

Like Dada, Merz was a neologism. Schwitters derived this term from the phrase “Commerz und privatbank” contained is his collage work Das Merzbild (1918-19). By using a term that had no previous associations, Schwitters was free to define Merz however he chose.

4

Kurt Schwitters, “Merzmalerei,” 1919, in Lach, vol. 5, 37. Cited in Dietrich, 17.

5

Kurt Schwitters, “Merz,” 1920, in Lach, vol. 5, 79. Cited in Dietrich, 18.

6

Beat Wyss, “Merzpicture Horse Grease: Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction,” 76.


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Paul Cullen Precarious Knowledge

unexpected new relationships (something shared with Merilyn Tweedie, to whom he was married for a time and had two children with). And, as the internet evolved and grew, Cullen’s art became increasingly relevant in thinking through these issues as the virtual, digital and networked infiltrated and transformed the fabric of reality. In many ways, Cullen’s installations were like analogue models of surfing the web from site to site on a whim. Everything in Cullen’s oeuvre is a paradox, an oxymoron, a circumlocution, an inversion, a subversion: a table might be turned upsidedown, a chair might sit precariously high atop a pole, a cardboard box might hold water; the functional is rendered useless, and the ornamental is given a new and essential purpose. There is something theatrical about these works, as though they were the stage set and properties of an avant-garde play. They are surreal in a manner reminiscent of Isidore-Lucien Ducasse, the self-styled Comte de Lautréamont’s description of a young boy as being as “beautiful as the chance meeting on a dissecting-table of a sewing-machine and an umbrella”—a line that Max Ernst helpfully glossed as representing “a linking of two realities that by all appearances have nothing to link them, in a setting that by all appearances does not fit them.” What if it all makes sense, but we’re on the outside looking in, and the key, primer, syntax or whatever, is dangling tantalizingly just out of reach?

Lot 11, p.37 Paul Cullen, Models, Methods and Assumptions 2012, found book, acrylic and pencils, 222mm x 40mm x 147mm

Te Awamutu-born Paul Cullen (1949-2017) was, without doubt, one of the most interesting and truly individual creative intelligences to emerge from New Zealand art in the mid-twentieth century. His influence as an educator, at Manakau Institute of Technology and AUT, was profound. Following a Diploma in Fine Arts from Ilam, he first drew attention as an artist for his installation work in Christchurch in the late 1970s, and in the early 1980s for his cane-based sculptures.

Books, particularly encyclopaedias, atlases and other textbooks, appeared a lot in Cullen’s work. They were concrete symbols of condensed, mediated, human knowledge, indexes between physical object and concept. Jorge Luis Borges was getting at this idea when he wrote the 1940 short story “Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius” about a parallel universe in which Berkeleyan subjective idealism (the idea that only the mind and its contents exist) is orthodoxy and our materialistic, rational worldview is heresy. Anticipating the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis that language conditions the way we think, Borges imagines that universe trying to colonise, or rather, transform and assimilate our universe, through a single anomalous volume of an encyclopaedia.

Cullen’s art, like that of Duchamp before him, (perhaps with a dash of Dada) was as playfully mischievous as it was cerebral, in love with paradox and unusual juxtapositions, documenting the Western world through a subtle critique of its material semiotics, from Formica tables, books, pencils and rulers, to the natural world, to the cult of scientism, and a general sense of precariousness and ephemerality. A bundle of canes might represent the universe, or at the very least measure it out. Like a good ironic pragmatist, he was interested in the processes and knowledges by which humans attempt to answer the big questions, rather than fussing over an ultimate, capital “T” Truth that might not even exist in the first place.

Cullen, I think, was after something similar. He wanted his audiences to reconsider their preconceptions about the epistemological machinery of the world, fluffing up the comfortable, arbitrary, collective and complacent cushions of the mind. He wanted us to think about the way we co-exist with things. A parallel to this methodology exists in the sixteenth century humanist Giulio Camillo’s “Theatre of Memory”: an elaborate wooden structure, part amphitheatre of symbols, part archive. If one stood in the middle of it and took it in simultaneously, Camillo believed an individual could magically download all the secrets of the universe.

It was Cullen’s BSc in botany that inspired his interest in the organisational logic of nature, leading in turn to a fascination with anthropology and the way humans organise themselves socially. He tried to represent these ideas physically and visually through artworks that themselves evolved throughout their duration, continually reorganising signs and signifiers in

Like Cullen, Borges, too, was somewhat ambivalent about attempts to catalogue knowledge. The seventeenth century philosopher John 132


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Wilkins once proposed an artificial universal language that would contain a description of a thing encoded into the structure of the word for it. Borges ruthlessly mocked the arbitrary and semiotic absurdity of this idea in his essay, “The Analytical Language of John Wilkins” (1942), for which he invented a fictional Chinese encyclopaedia, the Celestial Emporium of Benevolent Knowledge, that whimsically categorises animals as anything from “stray dogs” and “those that are included in this classification,” to “those that have just broken the flower vase” and “those that, at a distance, resemble flies.” This passage inspired Michel Foucault to abandon linear logic in his genealogical/ archaeological approach to knowledge systems, and a similar critical absurdism is everywhere evident in Cullen’s work. The encyclopaedia strikes again.

Beat poets, that annihilate the autobiographical part of the conscious process through a random and mechanical one. In the creation of the new artwork, a new equilibrium is established through negation. It’s an example of what the philosopher Bruno Latour calls “iconoclash”— we witness a violent act being done to an image, but we are unable to determine whether the act is destructive or constructive, and therein lies the frisson of it all. Cullen’s work, I think, also alludes to mathematician and philosopher Kurt Gödel’s ideas about recursive self-referential construction and his famous Incompleteness Theorem, which postulates that all attempts to understand the universe axiomatically are flawed by their need to reference something that is outside that universe and essentially unknowable. Art, after all, is an attempt to subvert Ludwig Wittgenstein’s assertion that some things are incommunicable and that “whereof we cannot speak, thereof we must remain silent.” How do you express what cannot be expressed? It’s a near-theological dilemma. One person cannot perfectly communicate their inscape to another, because language is contingent. Music comes close in its abstractness (and as the nineteenth century aesthete Walter Pater noted, all art aspires to the condition of music), but on the whole we can only bundle together a mechanism of signs and archetypes while hoping personal revelation will do the rest.

Cullen’s book and pencil sculptures distil many of these influences and interests into a compact but infinitely variable series of forms. They are deceptively simple yet multivalent objects, simultaneously uniquely individual and reiteratively modular. While the installations were the more dramatic manifestation of his interests, the pencil books are probably more familiar, are not site specific and are therefore more likely to be seen in dealer or institutional galleries. Books hold a unique place in culture as a concrete way of communicating information through the code of text. The idea of destroying a book has a range of associations; political, ideological, social, theological, and heretical. Pencils, on the other hand, represent the act of creation at the basic level, the starting point of a book, the making of art, and a rational measuring out of the universe. Cullen often fetishizes tools that represent physical creative processes, such as the old fashioned yellow HB pencil; something of an anachronism now, with a satisfying architectural form and primary colour that lends itself well to emphasis through repetition.

To imply, however, that it’s all pointy-headed conceptualism, would be to deny the quintessential fun and playfulness of Cullen’s art. First and foremost, these are objects and installations intended to be visually and spatially enjoyed as much as objects of virtù to inspire a discourse. The pencil books are like minimalist sculptures in the way they map out and define space with the most basic of materials, although not as extremely shorn of sign and signifier. They have a sort of charismatic personality and character all of their own. Cullen’s art functions just fine as eye candy on its formal aesthetic values alone; Saint Sebastians shot through with arrows. They are witty entertainments, conversation pieces, little jokes that make us pause and think. They are Duchampian readymades taking up the challenge of the objet trouvé to cock a snook at the absurdity of existence in an arbitrary universe. There’s an element of pop art too, a genealogical side street to illuminating the everyday, a soupçon of arte povera in their material modesty. Cullen gives permission to giggle in the po-faced Temple of the Muses.

Operating as a kind of visual pun, the pencil books negate the functionality of both book and pencil as they render each other mutually useless. It’s an attack on the physical nature of the world and the corporeal body. You can’t read that which lies between covers you can’t open (a category of forbidden knowledge) and you can’t write with a pencil sawn off for aesthetic effect or never sharpened in the first place (perpetually frozen in a state of useless potential). At the same time, a new function is created for both as they are reified as a new, single, aesthetic object for our contemplation.

The extraordinary thing is how many readings and conceptual spinoffs can be collected and compressed into such relatively simple, straightforward objects. That is a testament to Cullen’s peculiar genius. He passed away suddenly, earlier this year, felled by motor-neurone disease, far too soon and sorely missed.

That’s typical of Cullen’s art; a metaphorical variant on Jean Tinguely’s self-destroying machines, Robert Rauschenberg’s erased De Kooning drawing, or the cut-ups of the

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John Reynolds An Expert Undercooking

of lightness. When functioning at their very best, his works give the sense that they might have been made by happy accident—or else they make us feel as though we are privy to some secret, that we are being given a peek behind the curtain and into the artist’s mind.

In his 2007 Art New Zealand feature celebrating John Reynolds’ appointment as a New Zealand Arts Foundation Laureate, writer Roger Horrocks employed the choice phrase “expertly undercooked” to describe his work.¹ To be undercooked is to be in need of a little more time, a little more heat. For something to be expertly undercooked suggests that it was not so much taken off the hob too soon, as that it was removed at precisely the right moment to achieve a specific effect. It is a perceptive description of Reynolds’ work, which, despite sprawling across multiple mediums, always tends to deliver ideas that are still pink in the middle, challenging the viewer to continue the thought.

This is the true joy of Reynolds’ work: the feeling that you are part of a delicious in-joke. It is all about giving the appearance of simplicity but withstanding—even inviting—complex readings. This look of simplicity is achieved not only through the ostensibly honest language of drawing, but through a lightness of touch when it comes to confronting heavier subject matter. In perhaps his most celebrated work to date, Reynolds hand-painted 7073 tiny pre-stretched canvases to tackle the meaty idea of identity politics in language. Presented at the 2006 Sydney Biennale, Cloud sprawled across a prominent wall in the lobby of the Art Gallery of New South Wales, each 100 x 100mm white square emblazoned with a word or phrase mined from Harry Orsman's The Oxford Dictionary of New Zealand English: “LOLLY WATER, PAKEHA STYLE, GOOD AS GOLD, GREEN-LIPPED MUSSEL, URBAN MARAE, DEAL TO (SOMEONE), THE WOP-WOPS, POACHED EGG, WHARE, PORKER, SWIMMING TOGS, HEAPS.” Hung in a cloud-like formation, the canvasses become far more than the sum of their parts when floating together upon the wall, materially, monumentally and ephemerally representing an entire lexicon. Similar in form to the Cloud panels is Reynolds’ Acronyms, etc. series, which functions as kind of dispersed diary, tracking the artist’s daily reading and absorption of language. He describes them as “unglamorous” works— they are made quickly and their quickness is evident.³ Yet there is something alluring, even elegant, in the choice of the silver paint marker, which has become something of a trademark for Reynolds. The way the silver line shines and shifts, almost disappearing as one walks by, allows the small paintings to take on an almost spectral quality, solidifying only in ideal conditions of light and proximity. There is an affective quality to their lustrous surfaces—they move beyond their own materiality, glimmering and drawing the gaze. Spidery and slight against their white canvases, the silvery words become as elusive and fickle as language itself, their meanings shimmering across time and space.

Graduating from the Elam School of Fine Arts in the late 1970s, Reynolds began exhibiting in the early 1980s, won numerous awards in the 1990s and became a bona fide star in the new millennium. His early work was inspired by the American post-war movements of Abstract Expressionism and Arte Povera—in particular by the work of Cy Twombly, known for populating the abstract colour field with gestural scribbles and scrawled words. Reynolds’ 1989 painting Small Burial VI bears some signs of Twombly’s influence, although its flat, dark-green ground is a bold departure from the pale, neutral tones favoured by the American painter. Furthermore, Reynolds’ bold scrawls are barely abstracted— they could be koru, crosses, treble clefs, anchors, or pillars of ash, although their forms aren’t quite substantial enough to be decisively confirmed as any of these things. More than anything else, it is the candour and calligraphic qualities of Twombly’s paintings that can be seen echoed, reimagined and riffed upon throughout the years of Reynolds’ practice. For over thirty years, his work has remained consistently grounded in the language of drawing, so much so that he describes himself as a man obsessed by that particular alchemy that takes place when linear forms collide against flat ground. Even in my early work, painting was only the backdrop for the real drama—the drawing, often with a text component. For paint I would use an everyday commercial primer off the shelf in some crappy colour like pink, to avoid treating paint and colour as the key things.²

In spring of 2006, while coming down from the high of having exhibited Cloud at the Sydney Biennale, Reynolds confessed to the significance of the work in his oeuvre, saying: “I know that making Cloud  will change my life but how it will change, I don’t yet know.” Occupying one of the most generous and visible sites in the Biennale, Cloud launched Reynolds’ career to new heights. Having been a finalist for the Walters Prize once before in 2002, he was nominated a second time for Cloud in 2008. Although he didn’t take home the prize, he did receive an Arts Foundation Laureate Award—an honour that acknowledges practitioners who have already had a significant career but whose richest work still lies ahead. As

Preferring to work with anything but a paint brush, Reynolds tends to gravitate towards graspable materials such as Japanese enamel paint markers, graphite and oil sticks. The resulting paintings possess the crude, underworked qualities of drawings, allowing them to feel casual and spontaneous, to remain light. For an artist whose work is characterised by playfulness with a healthy dose of conceptualism, the more tentative, exploratory feel of drawing is crucial to producing this aura 135


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Cloud demonstrates, in Reynolds’ work, richness is often found in simplicity, and often through working within an economy of means. He uses the term “intimate immensity” to describe Cloud, which in many ways is typical of his work, employing simple materials (paint makers and cheap canvases from China) to evoke ambitious themes.⁴ The paint markers Reynolds so adores are uniquely suited to his practice because of how they mimic traditional drawing tools. They are materially fluid and conceptually ambiguous, blurring painting and drawing into a single act. The use of these pen-like tools in works such as Cloud, Acronyms, etc. and Cheap Money illustrate how Reynolds’ obsessive interest in an expanded field of drawing has seen him explore the diagrammatic qualities of text. Each of these works (or rather, series of works) make language material by committing words to canvas. However, they also work to abstract language, pulling words from their proper contexts to inflate or warp meaning, lending language the strange significance usually only enjoyed by objects that have been endowed with the status of “art.” The apparent crassness of Acronyms, etc. #301 (The Art World) makes this abstraction particularly visible when the phrase “The Art World” enters the very world it references and is turned into an object for the lust and scrutiny of its denizens.

Lot 86, p.101 John Reynolds Acronyms, etc. #765 2007 acrylic and paint marker on canvas 100mm x 101mm

Meanwhile, his Mandarin Studies (2014) examine the abstraction of language from a very different perspective, looking to an alphabet that is presumably quite foreign to Reynolds himself. From this position of distance, he explores the painted nature of Mandarin characters by applying them one on top of the other (as opposed to adjacent in vertical columns), each one drawn thickly in a different rainbow shade. This layering causes the characters to lose meaning, to become illegible even to those fluent in Mandarin as they dissolve into pure pattern, colour and form.

Lot 83, p.100 John Reynolds Mandarin Studies #110 2014 acrylic on canvas 100mm x 103mm

Textual paintings such as Kafka's Reflection: One must defraud no-one (1997) can be read in conversation with Colin McCahon, an artist Reynolds frequently invokes in his work. He admires McCahon particularly for his poetic uses of text within his refined compositions, and for his “habit of using whatever materials were available in the vicinity.”⁵ Like McCahon, Reynolds plunders words from literature, art history and religion, often juxtaposing grand or cerebral quotations with sparse evocations of the New Zealand landscape. This is precisely what he does in Kafka’s Reflection: The painting is composed of dense black portions of land against a smoky yellow sky. A line from twentieth century novelist Franz Kafka’s The Third Notebook is scrawled in purple and white across the upper portion of the work. Perhaps because I am accustomed to reading all of Reynolds’ works as engaging in wordplay at this point, I can’t help but be drawn to the Kafkaesque qualities of this scene: the vast alienating landscape; the

Lot 87, p.101 John Reynolds Acronyms, etc. #261 2004 paint marker on canvas 100mm x 102mm

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thinly veiled accusation hedged within Kafka’s quotation; the way the gloom is disrupted by four bright white holes in the paper, the meaning of which can only be guessed at. The evocation of ambiguous, or even uncertain, ideas in Reynolds’ work can be read as a way of exploring the tensions between simplicity and complexity. He probes these tensions through other means in his work, such as when he employs humour as a tactic to gently broach or mitigate more serious subjects. As Horrocks points out, ”humour can allow a way in for the non-specialist viewer,” just as ambiguity can allow for more broad and fluid readings of a work.⁶ Early in his practice, Reynolds recognised lightness as the greatest point of difference in his art. He has built his career on this feeling, creating a diverse body of works that are playful, informal, wry, whimsical—easier to evoke with abstract adjectives than with concrete descriptions. The seemingly disparate works in this group are united by this singular lightness of feeling that has made Reynolds such a beloved artist in the New Zealand canon. They are each minute in scale, yet push beyond the edges of their canvases, beyond their humble materials, defying definition and inviting speculation.

Lot 85, p.100 John Reynolds Big Silver Light #8 2006 spray paint on canvas 100mm x 102mm

Lucinda Bennett

Lot 6, p.32 John Reynolds Day Light 1997 oilstick, printed paper and drawing pins on canvas 95mm x 145mm

1

2

Lot 80, p.98 John Reynolds Small Burial VI 1989 ink and oil stick on blackboard, artistselected frame 278mm x 278mm

Roger Horrocks, “John Reynolds: Painting, Planting, Performance” originally published in Art New Zealand 122 (2007) http://www.art-newzealand.com/Issue122/reynolds. htm John Reynolds quoted by Horrocks in “Painting, Planting, Performance”

3

The Real Art Roadshow, “John Reynolds,” YouTube video, 7.29. Posted 26 May 2011. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ASArwrqPCg

4

Virginia Were, “Spring 2006 Studio: Silver Linings” in Art News New Zealand 26, no.3 (2006), 60.

5

Horrocks, “John Reynolds.”

6 Ibid.

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Michael Parekowhai Original Copies

of the work consisted of a collection of wooden enamelled tools such as a saw, a hammer, a walking stick, a sword, a ladder, an axe and a rifle strewn on the gallery floor, as if an unseen hand might begin plucking the tools from the pile. The full title, Acts. (10: 34-38) “He went about doing good” refers to the Biblical Book of the Apostles, which describes God’s salvation of humankind through the acts of Jesus Christ, and then recounts the founding and establishment of the Christian church during the the Roman Empire. The phrase refers to the deeds of Jesus Christ, “anointed with the Holy Spirit and with power: who went about doing good and healing all that were oppressed by the Devil”, while also irresistibly recalling the popular saying “the path to hell is paved with good intentions.” In a subsequent version of the work, the objects were displayed on sprues as if still in packaging (Acts II, 1994), and for Parekowhai’s 2015 retrospective at Queensland’s Gallery of Modern Art in Brisbane, Australia, they appeared in bronze, again strewn across the gallery floor (Acts III, 2015). Distributed about the space of the gallery, the tools signal that some kind of work has happened, or might happen. The objects perform their work as a spreading, multiple, compounded series of actions and events. Nineteenth-century Christian missionaries saw the dissemination of Christian teaching as necessary for their own and others’ redemption, the act of retelling the story of Christ an unsolicited salvation visited on the inhabitants of colonised countries. Perhaps there is also an association between the tools and the Calvinist Protestant ethic that emphasises hard work as a means of attaining the values of Christian spirituality. The tools that make up the Acts series are themselves multiples; the second iteration Acts II (1994), where the tools appear as kitset pieces still on their sprues, further underscores repetition and replication as the actions at stake. Acts can thus be seen as a means of redistributing meaning. If, after all, the point of spreading Christianity is to keep reproducing it through reiteration, these works reorganise the tools by which such work is completed.

Lot 43, p.5 Michael Parekowhai, Kapa Haka (Maquette) 2014, automotive paint on fibreglass, edition of 100, 410mm x 125mm x 100mm

The 2003 installation Kapa Haka (Pakaka) at Michael Lett’s original Karangahape Rd address featured life size fibreglass statues of a Māori security guard, modelled on the artist’s brother Paratene. In the initial installation, the figures stood guard inside the glass panels of the gallery’s street level entranceway, mimicking the real-life duties of a club bouncer on the latenight strip, or indeed, as a guard inside a gallery. Finished in automotive paint, the figures stood at the room’s perimeter, all shining surface and unyielding physical presence, as if to block entry into the white cube of the gallery space. This work offers a sharp commentary on the class and racial politics of the security guard as an artworld labourer. Seen from the street looking into the white cube gallery, the guard-figure was stylised as the clichéd cultural stereotype: the "unskilled" worker protecting the spaces of art world commerce. Being located on K’ Road,

There is a tension in Michael Parekowhai’s practice between the highly polished finish of his work and the unsettled and restless histories to which his objects and images refer. Viewers familiar with the recently installed sculpture of Captain Cook (The English Channel, 2017) within The Lighthouse on Auckland’s waterfront will have been struck by its high gloss surface. The body of this perfect, mute figure silently reflects the space around it, holding its site and audience in unflinching regard. Three earlier works from Parekowhai’s oeuvre, a maquette from the Kapa Haka series (2003), Messines, from The Consolation of Philosophy: Pik0 nei te matenga (2001), and Acts (from the body of work Acts 19932015), are equally as seductive and as challenging. The sequence of works gathered under the title Acts (1993 – 2015) were a reformulation of the popular Jack Straws game. The first iteration 138


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a hotspot of late night activity, further underscored this point. The work can be re-iterated in a number of configurations inside similar spaces, a line-up of muscle for hire (see the artist’s 2005 exhibition Rainbow Servant Dreaming at Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney, or the Auckland Art Gallery’s permanent display for other such examples). The sheen of the highly polished surface, and the way the figures were each named for a colour (Mr White, Mr Pink) characterises the guards as a pseudo-readymades—they look like factory produced models—and at the same time, the glossy surface emphasises the fetishistic quality of the mass-produced object as an art-world commodity. In this way, the work complicates its status as a work of art: it presents the stylisation of a problematic cultural stereotype as a commercial product. At the same time, the use of the artist’s brother’s body as the original “mould” for the work implicates (a similarly clichéd) desire for the authentic “original” copy, set against the politics of the Duchampian readymade.

monument, set against the blank white background as if an eternity stretches out around them. The garlands of flowers construct sculptural tributes to the lives lost, flattened into the glossy surfaces of framed large format photographs to be hung on the wall. In so doing, these pieces perform the act of memorialisation as decoration. The images are purposefully sentimental: fake flowers arranged like funeral home decoration, in muted white vases against empty and silent white backgrounds. Parekowhai’s piece is a forerunner to American artist Taryn Simon’s Paperwork and the Will of Capital, a collection of large format photos replicating the floral arrangements that decorated the venues in which famous treaties have been signed, which debuted at the 2015 Venice Biennale. Reproducing the bouquets that can be seen in official photographs of treaty signings, peacekeeping accords and special declarations, the photographs of these centrepieces reconstruct the stagecraft of international diplomacy. Where Simon has emphasised the materiality of corporate and political rituals—her bombastic palettes and mahogany frames evoke the pomp and ceremony of diplomatic symbolism and power plays—Parekowhai’s sustained focus on the theatres of battle that claimed the lives of Māori soldiers in the First World War is a hushed portrait of the disastrous consequences wrought by similar global politics.

This dichotomy is further compounded in the more recent iteration of Kapa Haka as a kind of wallpaper décor. In the installation Memory Palace, which opened the Queensland Art Gallery & Gallery of Modern Art retrospective, the statuettes lined the interior walls of a 1930s suburban house. Entered from the back door, viewers came upon another of Parekowhai’s stainless steel Captain Cooks. The maquettes of Kapa Haka decorated the domesticated interior space, and, in a nod to Magritte’s Golconda (1953), the security guard figures are interspersed with bowler-hatted and over-coated model businessmen carrying briefcases. The once imposing heft of the guards is here reduced and multiplied into decorative motif.

Philosophy is an imperfect consolation, as the unlucky Boethius was forced to accept. The title is cutting in its evaluation: there is no tribute fitting enough, no gesture of consolation or memorialisation (in actions or in language) that can or should provide the kind of easy closure that sentimental and nationalistic memorialisations of war in our culture seek to furnish. The rebuke is further sharpened by being viewed through a postcolonial lens; the pervasive cultural amnesia regarding the New Zealand Wars that preceded World War One by barely fifty years sits in stark contrast to the way Anzac Day poppies serve as a marker of national identity.

Modern art’s vexed relationship with décor and decoration is also how the 2001 series On The Consolation of Philosophy: Piko nei te Matenga mounts its complex mode of critique. Named for the elegiac Māori waiata, a lament for a fallen chief, and the fifth century work by the doomed Boethius, these photographs of floral arrangements act as monuments to the battles of World War One in which the Māori battalion fought. Each of the photographs features a resplendent bouquet, the kind of formal arrangement that might be found at a memorial service. The works are titled after the sites of confrontation in the First World War; the images function as tributes to the fallen soldiers and, like the metonymic Anzac poppies, as referents to the places and acts of war itself.

Perhaps the bouquets of the Consolation series are a summation of Parekowhai’s generous virtuosity. The way his objects are so appealingly and impeccably finished pulls their viewer close, yet they also remain coolly challenging, their precise, impeccable aesthetic demanding more of us than uncomplicated aesthetic admiration. It is as if, in their perfect finish, the objects reflect something of the deficits and discrepancies of their context—the unfinished business of the present. julia lomas

Messines (2001), named for the 1917 Battle of Messines in Flanders, Belgium, is a typically studied composition of scarlet rhododendrons. The bouquets of the Consolation series are each a small 139


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Gavin Hurley The Uncanny Valley

of portraiture, or the celebrity of identity, are quietly rinsed away. We are required to consider the ontological implications. The face, even at its most nonspecific and unemotive, even as a scaffold to accessorise, is still a sign, and is still communicating something to the viewer by virtue of its basic existence. Given human nature, even if we all looked like a Hurley type, how long would it be before we found some trivial point of difference to separate ourselves by and declare war on one other?

In the last decade or so, Auckland-based Gavin Hurley has emerged as an artist of significance in New Zealand. His simplified, largely symbolic portraits of Captain James Cook and various characters from the New Zealand’s early colonial period, painted with an ambiguously ironic humour, have propelled him to prominence. The style is immediately recognisable, even at a distance.

Two episodes from two science fiction television series come to mind. In an original series Star Trek episode from 1969, “Let That Be Your Last Battlefield,” the Enterprise picks up the last two survivors of a war that has destroyed all life on their planet. Their notable feature is that their faces are divided down the middle into a white and black half, and the two remain committed to destroying each other even though they are the last of their kind, because one’s face is the reverse of the other’s. It was a heavy-handed allegorical critique of prejudice, but humans do seem hardwired to seek out difference as a way of ordering their societies – something Hurley’s portraits purposely deny the possibility of. In the 1981 episode of Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, “The Dorian Secret,” the protagonists encounter two asylum seekers from a race in whose society everyone wears a mask and all mirrors are forbidden, because they claim to be horribly mutated. Mysteriously the two can go unnoticed among humans without masks because they look like normal, attractive, people. As it turns out, the reason the Dorians all wear masks is that the mutation has rendered them all identical-looking and the masks are the only way they can maintain some kind of collective sanity—is a similar reasoning behind the rather extreme barbering and tailoring that Hurley’s faces sometimes acquire?

Hurley’s technique stylises and flattens his subjects to a generic ambiguity where only their most irreducible identifying signs remain, but without falling into caricature. His painting style is a synthesis between the naivety of a nineteenth century amateur folk painter, the hard, mineral, cubist blankness of Fernand Léger, the Art Deco lustre of Tamara de Lampicka and Rita Angus, and the tightly cropped and strangely depersonalised celebrity screenprint portraits of Andy Warhol. Hurley’s work has a loose genealogical affiliation with the work of his contemporary Peter Stichbury (both graduated from Auckland’s Elam School of Fine Art within a year of each other, Stichbury in 1997 and Hurley in 1998), although Hurley eschews Stichbury’s concerns with modelling, volume and space. The effect of all this is thoroughly anachronistic and retrograde. There’s an ahistorical timelessness about Hurley’s art that fits everywhere and nowhere, a mindfulness and Zen-like self-negation. The portraits, especially, feel like some kind of identikit exercise in which wigs, whiskers and accessories are applied to a mannequin, Mr. Potato Head-fashion—the same cupid’s bow mouth, same arched eyebrow, same suggestion of philtrum between nose and mouth, eyes only differentiated by colour. The source material for Hurley’s painting often has a nostalgic resonance with the past. This trope was particularly overt in the ongoing series Boy with (2013–), cycling a stylised boy’s face, soft and rounded (suggestive of Rita Angus’ Head of a Maori Boy (1938), in the collection of the Auckland Art Gallery), through a series of borrowed adult facial accoutrements out of history, cribbed from a vernacular of melodramatic kitsch, paintings and old photographs.

As the founder of the Situationist International, Guy Debord, notes in his La société du spectacle (1967), in contemporary society any vestige of authentic life has given way to a facsimile, writing, “all that once was directly lived has become mere representation.” The effect has been greatly enhanced in recent years by social media and the rise of the selfie as the way we tend to authenticate our existence and experiences, like the replicant Leon in Blade Runner (1982) shuffling through his stash of photographs. When we are all reduced to identical poses and identical duck faces, how do we differentiate ourselves? Either we become more the same, or we try to find increasingly unique and extraordinary settings and guises. The popularity of cosplay may be a manifestation of the latter impulse, so perhaps that’s what Hurley’s characters are doing.

Hurley’s people are impassive, hieratic, schematic, and mask-like; somewhat androgynous, somewhat wistful, their frisson is partly an expression of the “uncanny valley” – the relationship between our hard-wired recognition of faces and the emotional response they elicit. The “valley” lies at the point of ambiguity where the face is just sufficiently not quite right to tickle our sense of the unheimlich or uncanny. This is further enhanced by the restricted palette of muted, ashen pastels, shaded with black and brown, giving the impression of a 1930s advertisement for a porcelain doll, or even earlier techniques like rustic eighteenth century pamphlet woodcuts. Any suggestion of the humanity

The two all-but-portraits reproduced here are representative of Hurley’s practice, with their muted tones and paint that almost completely fills the pictorial surface, leaving only a little of the ground visible—the apotheosis of subjectivity. They elicit the story-telling 141


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impulses of their audience, who are compelled to ask, “Who are they?” The anxious looking young man (like Rorschach ink blot tests, the impulse to see emotions in their blankness is unavoidable) might be an All Black of yesteryear, or a priest – it’s impossible to say because the collar is strategically cut off at the identifying point. The young woman (here even gender is an assumption), square-jawed and forthright, her hair merely suggested by a blonde nimbus—who is she? The hair is perhaps a 1960s cut. Dyed? It doesn’t match the eyebrows. The simple white collar gives nothing away.

upright posture, rather full of itself, as if to mock the provincialism and pettiness of cultural discourse in New Zealand’s petite goldfish bowl of an art world. There is no eye visible, but then again, the kiwi is a very myopic bird. A curious black triangle cut-out at the bird’s throat looks important. Is it a clue to the identity of a specific individual? Jig-Map is an altogether more complex work. The familiar contours of the map of Aotearoa, North Island, South Island and Stewart Island, are deconstructed into a contiguous tessellation of jigsaw pieces. On the one hand, it might just be an interesting visual caprice based on the old Waddington’s “Jig-Map” puzzles (the logo lettering is faithfully rendered herein). On the other hand, the palette hints that there might be more going on, some kind of commentary perhaps. The limited colour scheme—red, black and white—is reminiscent of kowhaiwhai, while the tabs and undulations of the jigsaw pieces are vaguely evocative of koru and pitau forms (or camouflage patterns for that matter). Is it a commentary on colonisation, of a land divided up and in the process of being put back together in different iterations? Of course, this may be reading a great deal more into them than the artist would like.

In Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s seminal Mille plateaux (1980)—subtitled in the English translation “Capitalism and Schizophrenia,” there is a section devoted to what the authors describe as “faciality.” In their view, the face is an imperial machine that destroys all languages and semiotic systems that it encounters. They explain, for example, that racism “operates by the determination of degrees of deviance to the White man’s face,” responding in turn by tolerating some traits, assimilating others, and, chillingly, erasing yet others altogether. They postulated that in the Western worldview, the ideal face all faces are measured by is that of Christ as represented in traditional Western art. Facialisation is the process by which the subjected are forced to adopt that face as the ideal. The default faces in Hurley’s art seem to be playing a similar game of degrees of separation, dismantling that faciality in a way that parallels Deleuze and Guattari’s attempt at the same task; to “no longer look into the eyes, but to swim through them, to close your eyes, to close your own eyes, and make your body a beam of light moving at ever-increasing speed . . .”

Hurley’s work evokes nostalgia, a homesickness for the past (and an unknown past at that), forensically reconstructed from historical detritus and unconsidered trifles sourced and assembled from a memory cloud of popular culture and fantasy. His art is a kind of extension of collective public memory, and is as much of an invention as memory often is. Hurley takes the traditional genres of portrait and history painting and completely inverts them. If the portrait is traditionally intended to commemorate and magnify an individual, Hurley rather chooses to scrub the subject’s individuality away, so that we must reconsider that person as an abstract sum of parts. If history painting traditionally seeks to record and glorify an event or narrative, Hurley strips it of these trappings, reduces it to an ironic and anonymous cartoon version of itself, and slyly inserts his own wry asides. As is common in Pop Art and postmodernism, there are no hierarchies of taste or importance to be seen. A history book is no more significant than a supermarket tabloid or a fashion magazine; a famous general or explorer is indistinguishable from a mask. There is something profoundly democratising and a little frightening in this idea, but surely that’s all part of the appeal.

Not heads, then, but, as Deleuze and Guattari put it in Anti-Oedipus (1972), “abstract machines of faciality.” There is an adroit deftness to the way Hurley manipulates flat planes of almost-colour on contrasting, thickly under-painted coarse hessian. The weave of the hessian is also responsible for the subtlety of the shading in these works, while other, slicker paintings rest smoothly on linen. It’s a technique made physical and material in the collages, comprised of expertly manipulated cut paper, sometimes erupting into Victorian beards and sideburns of various materials that thrust from the surface into the viewer’s space. The nineteenth century colonial period is a frequent touchstone in Hurley’s work, as evidenced by the many works that reference figures such as Captain Cook, Charles Darwin, Napoleon III and The Duke of Wellington. More recently, the paintings have begun to reference the collages.

ANDREW paul wood

Hurley works across a range of scales, sometimes large, sometimes intimate—as in the case of the collages Kiwi Critic and Jig-Map, that are no larger than the page from a B5 sketch book. Their single rough edge alludes to their having been torn from such a source. Whimsically playful and cartoonish, Kiwi Critic renders the iconic Apteryx in a somewhat uncharacteristic 142


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et al. The Science of the Irrational: Text, mysticism and communication in the work of et al.

mechanisms of institutions; thus, some of the texts embedded in the work feel like internal communications, whose rhetorical substance reflects a disjunction or argument taking place within an institutional context. Others seem to be directed outwards, part of a public campaign, although whether these communications are best read as propaganda, advertising or altruistic advisories is unclear.

The works of et al. persistently engage with various forms of pseudo-science and fringe thought, aberrant ideas that appear to conform to society’s consensus expectations about the functions of structures such as science, government and religion, but that actually subvert and misappropriate them. In this vein, the collective’s work has invoked Dianetics, the religious “technology” created by L Ron Hubbard around which Scientology was formed; psychic research and extrasensory perception; the orgone accumulator boxes of Wilhelm Reich; spirit photography and psychic mediumship; and various aspects of New Age, millenarian and Gnostic theology. In et al.’s work, these ideas are contextualised by being presented alongside content that deals with contemporary geopolitics, philosophy and science, simultaneously legitimising the “fringe” material and causing us to question the certainty with which we approach other, more conventionally “serious” intellectual pursuits.

This is the context within which to view works such as those reproduced here. The untitled poster work, from the 2004 Methods of investigation 4: invalidity of hermeneutic show, is characteristic of the textual component of et al.’s practice. The text reads, in part: This is not a religious or philosophical organisation. However, this information has already prompted many individuals to devote their entire energy to the transitional process. 2. If you have ever entertained the idea that there may be a REAL PHYSICAL level beyond the earth’s confines YOU WILL WANT TO COME TO THESE MEETINGS The first part of the text is delivered in what seems to be a measured tone, a seemingly rational appeal prefaced by the disclaimer that the “organisation” is not “religious or philosophical.” However, this tone quickly deteriorates, transitioning to an increasingly frantic personal address to the viewer; with the introduction of all-caps words, the text discards its veneer of moderation, becoming a full-throated plea for the viewer’s attention, participation and consent; we, the viewer “WILL WANT TO” attend the “MEETING,” the nature of which presumably involves transcendence to, or knowledge (gnosis, in fact) of a “level beyond the earth’s confines.” The exact nature of this “organisation” is unstated, but is presumably some kind of theosophical, gnostic, spiritualist or new-age belief system, attempting to attract new converts, desperate to impart its own knowledge, its own view of the universe, into new vessels.

Of course, exploding the distinction between fringe and mainstream, high and low, inside and out is a mainstay of postmodern practice, but what distinguishes et al.’s method of operation is how they present these deconstructions. These are works that offer questions rather than statements, and that often demand unpacking and investigation on the part of the viewer; indeed, it could be argued that viewing et al.’s work is an insufficient form of engagement, when what is really required is an act of reading. Although they are generally displayed in a gallery setting, these works are characterised by their literary (or, perhaps, para-literary) qualities. However, the absence of a consistent authorial voice—someone or something that the viewer/reader could feel was speaking to them—lends them a sense of opacity; often, they seem to be intercepted communications between “others” whose identities are likewise obscured, messages loaded with meanings half- or three-quarters-grasped, but presumably fraught with significance for their nebulous, unseen recipient. In this context, rather than an authorial agency, what et al. exercise is an editorial function: selecting and identifying texts, redacting, correcting and modifying them, and finally collating and presenting them in various forms and as parts of broader installations and interventions.

Accompanying the large print is a vinyl record, packaged using what appears to be a copy of the same image on paper, folded into an ersatz record sleeve and secured with the collective’s signature masking tape. This object is perhaps a vessel of the type mentioned above, an informational container, although the nature of the information contained on the record remains obscure; vinyl, as an obsolete medium requiring special equipment to play, creates a non-trivial barrier to retrieving the information encoded on the disc. Likewise, the record’s status as an art object means that there is a significant element of risk involved in playing it; there is a very good chance that it has never found its way onto a turntable, lest it be damaged. The disc itself is transparent, but the nature of the sound— whether music, speech or some other form of data—that it contains is opaque. Is it perhaps a

In this sense, the gestures towards metaphysics and fringe science that et al. incorporates are positioned as part of a dialectic between other parties whose nature, aims and methods of operation remain obscure to the viewer. Indeed, one of the core thrusts of the work seems to be exploring and critiquing the politics and 145


Lots 34-35, 69-70

bowerbank ninow

recruiting tool of some kind, a promotional item meant to beguile us into accepting the secret knowledge offered by the “organisation” mentioned on its wrapping? The object encapsulates et al.’s approach: not so much a communication as a depiction of the act of communication, and the problems that arise when information has to be transferred and interpreted. The idea of informational exchange is likewise challenged and problematised by the works Lionel’s lotus bag N.1 and N.2. These objects appear to be carrier bags—in a perhaps excessively literal reading, carriers for meanings or information—painted and with urgent, scraped inscriptions applied to their surfaces. Bag N.1 reads “lionel’s lotus bag” on its front, and “the creation of the universe is inexcusable” on the back, seemingly in parody of the kind of branding often applied to bags by high street shops; however, the text is an inverse echo of Romans 2:1, “Therefore thou art inexcusable, o man, whosoever thou art that judgest . . .,” turning this criticism back from the creation onto the creator, or, rather, the act of creation. This idea has similarities with one of the central concepts of Gnostic theology, in which an evil creator-God is the author of a phenomenal universe that must be overcome to uncover metaphysical truths. The “lotus bag” label necessarily invokes the flower’s association with Buddhist and Hindu iconography, suggesting how these religious traditions have diffused throughout the New-Age movement. The text on the second bag directly refers to Buddhism: the inscription reads, on the front, “the body is the tree/The mind is the clear mirror/Incessantly wipe and polish it/Let no dust fall on it." This appears to refer to a parable about the seventh-century Chinese Zen master Hui-Neng,¹ who, upon reading these lines written by another monk, countered with the speech on the back: "nothing like a tree/Nor a clear mirror/ Eventually not a thing exists/What is there then for the dust to fall on?" This story refers to the Zen concept of non-duality, in which the distinctions between self and other, between subject and universe, are impediments to the achievement of satori, or enlightenment. In Hui-Neng’s response, the idea of the mind as a “clear mirror” is shown to be a false analogy: “eventually not a thing exists.” Placing this complex of religious and philosophical ideas in the context of a shopping bag—a piece of commercial ephemera—suggests the idea of “shopping” for an ideology or a world view, and that spirituality can become merely another data point in an expanded informational ecosystem that sees no distinction between the sacred and the profane.

Lot 35, p.57 L Budd & Lionel B Lionel's lotus bag N.2 2008 acrylic and packing tape on paper carry bag 450mm x 430mm

ANDREW clark

1

P.T. Mistlberger, Rude Awakening: Perils, Pitfalls and Hard Truths of the Spiritual Path (John Hunt Publishing, 2012), 211.

146


I #

N artwork

D

E

history

X plate / essay

estimate

1

Laurie Steer The Want of It 2014 ash glaze and iron on wild-clay ceramic 90mm x 120mm x 120mm

Provenance Private collection, Tauranga.

p.27

$600 - $800

2

Terry Stringer untitled 1989 screenprint and enamel on aluminium signed Terry Stringer in ink lower right 200mm x 320mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.28

$1,400 - $2,200

3

Michael Parekowhai Acts c. 1993 lost wax bronze cast 80mm x 140mm (overall)

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Michael Lett, Auckland, c. 2005. notes This work relates to the larger sculpture Acts. (10: 34-38) "He went about doing good.", which is held in the collection of Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tāmaki (purchased 1993).

p.29/P.138

$3,500 - $5,500

4

Tony De Lautour untitled 2008 glazed white earthenware stamped TDL on underside 115mm x 195mm x 80mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, July 2008. exhibited Rohan Wealleans - Deep Heat and Tony De Lautour - Souvenirs, Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 22 July - 16 August 2008.

p.30

$800 - $1,600

5

Reuben Paterson Laocoön 2012 glitter on cast resin and glass, edition of 15 60mm x 500mm x 250mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited New Works, Gow Langsford Gallery, Auckland, 31 July - 31 August 2013.

p.31

$1,000 - $2,000

6

John Reynolds Day Light 1997 oilstick, printed paper and drawing pins on canvas 95mm x 145mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, 1998.

p.32/P.135

$250 - $350

7

Ava Seymour La Dormeuse 2005 c-type photograph signed Ava Seymour, dated 2005 and inscribed La Dormeuse in ink on Michael Lett label affixed verso 240mm x 290mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.33

$800 - $1,200

8

Ava Seymour AK 79 2004 c-type photograph 250mm x 775mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.34

$2,000 - $4,000

9

Ava Seymour Christmas Suit 1995 c-type photograph, edition of 5 495mm x 362mm

Provenance Private collection, Napier.

p.35

$2,000 - $4,000

10

Paul Cullen Models, Methods and Assumptions 2012 found book, acrylic and pencils signed Paul Cullen and dated 2012 in ink 220mm x 65mm x 145mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited The Obstinate Object: Contemporary New Zealand Sculpture, City Gallery, Wellington, 24 February - 10 June 2012.

p.36/P.132

$700 - $1,400


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

11

Paul Cullen Models, Methods and Assumptions (green cover) 2012 found book, acrylic and pencils signed Paul Cullen and dated 2012 in ink 222mm x 40mm x 147mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited The Obstinate Object: Contemporary New Zealand Sculpture, City Gallery, Wellington, 24 February - 10 June 2012.

p.37/P.132

$700 - $1,400

12

Lauren Winstone Whisky Bottle, from Iris 2002 saggar-fired ceramic 210mm x 100mm x 80mm

Provenance Private collection, Hamilton. exhibited Heralds and Harbingers, Lopdell House, Auckland, 2002. notes Originally exhibited as part of the still life grouping Iris.

p.38/P.122

$500 - $800

13

Lauren Winstone Bottle, from Iris 2002 saggar-fired ceramic 180mm x 65mm x 55mm

Provenance Private collection, Hamilton. exhibited Heralds and Harbingers, Lopdell House, Auckland, 2002. notes Originally exhibited as part of the still life grouping Iris.

p.38/P.122

$300 - $600

14

Lauren Winstone Lidded Container, from Iris 2002 saggar-fired ceramic 90mm x 65mm x 55mm

Provenance Private collection, Hamilton. exhibited Heralds and Harbingers, Lopdell House, Auckland, 2002. notes Originally exhibited as part of the still life grouping Iris.

p.38/P.122

$200 - $400

15

Michael Hight Port Waikato 2001 ink and acrylic on paper dated 23.IV.01 and inscribed PORT WAIKATO in brushpoint lower left; signed M HIGHT, dated 23.IV.01 and inscribed PORT WAIKATO in ink verso 153mm x 205mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner, 2001.

p.39

$200 - $400

16

John Reynolds That Words Are Dust 2004 paint marker and acrylic on canvas, edition 1/10 signed REYNOLDS, dated 2004 and inscribed THAT WORDS ARE DUST #1 oil paint marker on acrylic 225 x 300 in ink verso 300mm x 225mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, 2005.

p.40/P.135

$450 - $850

17

John Reynolds Study for Desert Rd. IV 2003 paint marker and acrylic on canvas signed REYNOLDS, dated 2003 and inscribed oil paint marker on Acrylic Enamel and STUDY FOR DESERT Rd. IV in paint marker verso 350mm x 275mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, 2004. exhibited Einstein Sings Nirvana, Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, 2004.

p.41/P.135

$800 - $1,300

18

John Reynolds All Truth is Crooked 1997 oilstick, acrylic, printed paper and drawing pins on canvas (diptych) 350mm x 550mm (overall)

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, 1997. exhibited 12 hours of daylight, Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, 1997.

p.42/P.135

$1,100 - $1,600

19

John Reynolds Kafka's Reflection: One must defraud no-one 1997 oilstick, acrylic, printed paper and drawing pins on canvas 335mm x 280mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, 1998. exhibited Western Springs/Bloody Angle, Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, 1998.

p.43/P.135

$900 - $1,500


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

20

Peter Robinson untitled 1990 acrylic on paper signed P Robinson in graphite lower left verso 1495mm x 970mm

Provenance Private collection, Wanaka. Acquired from Webb's, Auckland, July 2006.

p.44

$4,000 - $6,000

21

Darryn George Arawhata #2 2006 oil on canvas signed Darryn George and DW George, dated 2006 and inscribed 'Arawhata #2" in ink upper edge verso; Milford Galleries label affixed verso 1000mm x 1500mm

Provenance Private collection, Wanaka. Acquired from Milford Galleries, Queenstown, December 2006. exhibited Object, Milford Galleries, Dunedin, 22 August - 10 September 2006.

p.45

$7,000 - $12,000

22

Gavin Hurley Helen (Lona) 2003 oil on hessian 408mm x 303mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland, November 2003. exhibited Agent, Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland, 25 November - 24 December 2003.

p.46/P.140

$4,000 - $7,000

23

Gavin Hurley Dr Meyer 2003 oil on hessian 408mm x 304mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland, November 2003. exhibited Agent, Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland, 25 November - 24 December 2003.

p.47/P.140

$4,000 - $7,000

24

Gavin Hurley Jig-Map 2002 collaged found paper 190mm x 255mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland, November 2003.

p.48/P.140

$700 - $1,200

25

Gavin Hurley The Voyages of Captain Cook 2002 collaged found paper 240mm x 170mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland, November 2003.

p.49/P.140

$700 - $1,200

26

Gavin Hurley Kiwi Critic 2002 collaged found paper signed GJH, dated 2002 and inscribed Kiwi Critic in graphite lower edge verso 216mm x 138mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland, November 2003.

p.49/P.140

$700 - $1,200

27

Séraphine Pick untitled 1995 oil on canvas signed Pick and dated 95 in brushpoint lower right 380mm x 380mm

Provenance Private collection, New Plymouth.

p.50/P.125

$3,000 - $6,000

28

Séraphine Pick untitled 1995 oil on canvas signed Seraphine Pick and dated 95 in graphite lower right 380mm x 380mm

Provenance Private collection, New Plymouth.

p.51/P.125

$3,000 - $6,000

29

John Baldessari Throwing Three Balls In The Air To Get A Straight Line (Best Of Thirty-Six Attempts) 1973 photolithograph (12 panels) 175mm x 250mm (each panel)

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.52

$6,000 - $9,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

30

Paul Hartigan String-Ball 2007 argon tube light, perspex, electrical fittings signed Paul Hartigan, dated 2007 and inscribed "STRING-BALL" in paint marker verso 1020mm x 350mm x 180mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner, 2009.

p.54

$7,500 - $13,500

31

Ian Scott Small Lattice No. 238 c. 1991 acrylic on canvas signed Ian Scott and inscribed 516. 36" x 36". "SMALL LATTICE NO. 238." in ink upper edge verso; Ferner Galleries label affixed verso 920mm x 920mm

Provenance Private collection, Wanaka. Acquired from Ferner Galleries, Auckland, June 2006.

p.53

$5,000 - $7,000

32

Ray Haydon Untitled (Cube IV) 2010 mahogany 210mm x 170mm x 165mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Sanderson Contemporary, Auckland, August 2010. exhibited Superstructure, Sanderson Contemporary, Auckland, 24 August - 12 September 2010.

p.55

$1,000 - $2,000

33

Don Driver Red Pocket (with blade) 1981-2 tarpaulin, found woollen skirt, rubberised canvas, twine and sickle signed By Don Driver, dated Finished 1982 and inscribed Red Pocket (WITH BLADE) 1981 in ink verso 1085mm x 810mm

Provenance Private collection, Whangarei. Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner, 1982.

p.56/P.128

$6,000 - $9,000

34

L Budd & Lionel B Lionel's lotus bag N.1 2008 acrylic and packing tape on paper carry bag 450mm x 430mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. notes This work carries text on both its front and verso sides. The front side reads the creation of the universe is inexcusable. The verso side reads lionel's lotus bag.

p.57/P.144

$1,800 - $2,600

35

L Budd & Lionel B Lionel's lotus bag N.2 2008 acrylic and packing tape on paper carry bag 450mm x 430mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. notes This work carries text on both its front and verso sides. The front side reads the body is the tree/The mind is the clear mirror/ Incessantly wipe and polish it/Let no dust fall on it. The verso side reads nothing like a tree/Nor a clear mirror/Eventually not a thing exists/What is there then for the dust to fall on?.

p.57/P.144

$1,800 - $2,600

36

Brendon Wilkinson Basics 1999 modelling putty, oil, flocking, found can signed Brendon Wilkinson and dated 1999 AD in brushpoint underside 110mm x 75mm x 75mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington, 1999. notes This work is accompanied by an artist-made display shelf.

p.58

$800 - $1,600

37

Graham Fletcher Untitled (Head 4) 2014 acrylic on ceramic 240mm x 230mm x 300mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.59

$2,000 - $3,000

38

Graham Fletcher Untitled (Head 3) 2014 acrylic on ceramic 245mm x 230mm x 250mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.59

$2,000 - $3,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

39

Shane Cotton Tableau XII 1997 oil on canvas signed COTTON and dated '97 in brushpoint upper right; signed Shane L Cotton, dated '97 and inscribed TABLEAU XII in graphite verso 350mm x 455mm

Provenance Private collection, New Plymouth.

p.60

$8,000 - $16,000

40

Shane Cotton Tableau IX 1997 oil on canvas signed COTTON and dated '97 in brushpoint lower left; signed Shane L Cotton, dated '97 and inscribed TABLEAU IX in graphite verso 350mm x 455mm

Provenance Private collection, New Plymouth.

p.61

$8,000 - $16,000

41

Richard Killeen untitled c. 1969 ink on canvas 860mm x 830mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner, 1989.

p.62

$9,000 - $16,000

42

Robert Ellis Korowai 1968 ink, oil pastel and watercolour on paper signed Robert Ellis and dated 1968 in ink lower right 720mm x 540mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Contemporary, Foreign & Collectable Art, International Art Centre, Auckland, 7 September 2008, lot 17.

p.63

$2,000 - $4,000

43

Michael Parekowhai Kapa Haka (Maquette) 2014 automotive paint on fibreglass, edition of 100 410mm x 125mm x 100mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited The Promised Land, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Queensland, 28 March - 21 June 2015. literature Michael Parekowhai, Michael Parekowhai: The Promised Land (Brisbane: Queensland Art Gallery, 2015), 48, 88.

p.64/P.138

$8,000 - $12,000

44

Peter Robinson This Weeks Special c. 1994 oilstick and acrylic on found crate 845mm x 1000mm x 355mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.65

$10,000 - $15,000

45

Séraphine Pick Glamour Wounds 2004 oil on canvas signed S. PICK and dated 2004 in brushpoint lower right (right panel); signed S. PICK and dated 2004 in brushpoint lower right (left panel); Brooke Gifford Gallery label affixed verso (left panel) 375mm x 560mm

Provenance Private collection, Wanaka. Acquired from Brooke Gifford Gallery, Christchurch, September 2007.

p.66/P.125

$4,500 - $6,500

46

Séraphine Pick untitled 2000 oil on canvas signed Seraphine Pick and dated 00 in brushpoint lower right 455mm x 610mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Important Modern & Contemporary Paintings & Sculpture, Webb's, Auckland, 2 April 2007, lot 54.

p.67/P.125

$7,500 - $12,500

47

Carl Sydow Around 1971 perspex and plastic hose 203mm x 380mm x 380mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Sculptors Group Exhibition, C.S.A., Christchurch, 21 February - 6 March, 1971; Sydow: Tomorrow Never Knows, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna O Waiwhetu, Christchurch, 25 March - 23 July 2017.

p.68

$3,000 - $6,000

literature Peter Vangioni, Sydow: Tomorrow Never Knows (Christchurch: Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna O Waiwhetu, 2017), 35.


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

48

Milan Mrkusich Raw Umber with Blue (linear series) 1979 acrylic on board signed M. Mrkusich, dated '79 and 1979 and inscribed RAW UMBER WITH BLUE (linear series) in brushpoint verso; Peter Webb Galleries Ltd label affixed verso 1200mm x 1200mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.69

$55,000 - $75,000

49

Arnold Manaaki Wilson Hine of the Lake 1976 wood signed Manaaki Wilson, dated Remake 1976 and inscribed Hine of the Lake and and Monday March 05 in ink underside 1680mm x 455mm x 285mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.70/P.114

$8,000 - $16,000

50

Arnold Manaaki Wilson untitled (from Toki series) 1976 wood 1100mm x 155mm x 100mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.71/P.114

$4,500 - $6,500

51

Arnold Manaaki Wilson Maquette for Carving c. 1975-85 ceramic 285mm x 245mm x 150mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.72/P.114

$2,500 - $3,500

52

Arnold Manaaki Wilson Portrait of Rangitinia Wilson c. 1955-60 enamel on ciment fondu 365mm x 180mm x 260mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.72/P.114

$3,500 - $5,500

53

Laurie Steer Squirrel Trap 2014 ash glaze and iron on wild-clay ceramic 570mm x 340mm x 350mm

Provenance Private collection, Tauranga.

p.73

$2,500 - $3,500

54

Andrew McLeod untitled (diptych) 2012 acrylic on canvas signed AM in brushpoint lower right (right panel) 180mm x 255mm (overall)

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington, 2004. exhibited The neo-aesthetics - recent works, Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington, 2012.

p.74

$2,500 - $3,500

55

Gordon Walters Window II 1987 gouache on paper signed Gordon Walters and dated 87 in graphite lower left; inscribed Window II in graphite lower right 510mm x 375mm

Provenance Private collection, New Plymouth.

p.75

$9,000 - $12,000

56

Damien Hirst The Hours Spin Skulls 2009 gloss acrylic on plastic skull, compact disc in jewel case 140mm x 140mm x 210mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. notes This lot is accompanied by the original box in which it was purchased.

p.76

$12,000 - $16,000

57

Gregor Kregar Matthew 12:12 Cup Australia Large #3 2011 porcelain, edition of 20 signed GK and dated 2011 with incision underside; signed Gregor Kregar in ink on artist's label affixed underside 400 x 220 x 500mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.77

$1,500 - $2,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

58

Michael Smither In Bed 1995 oil and alkyd on board signed MDS and dated 95 in brushpoint upper right 1202mm x 962mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Contemporary & Traditional New Zealand & European Art, International Art Centre, Auckland, 27 August 2001, lot 21. literature Michael Dunn, Contemporary Painting in New Zealand (Sydney: Craftsman House, 1996), 173.

p.78

$45,000 - $65,000

59

Bill Sutton Landscape Elements 1970 oil on board signed WA Sutton and dated '70 in brushpoint lower right 595mm x 1210mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.79/P.120

$25,000 - $35,000

60

Don Driver Trouser Piece 1981 canvas, found woollen pants, found socks, denim and synthetic rope signed By Don Driver, dated 1981 and inscribed "TROUSER PIECE" in ink verso 1725mm x 2240mm

Provenance Private collection, Whangarei. Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner, 1981.

p.80/P.128

$15,000 - $20,000

61

Don Driver Time 1992-7 Xerox, magazine cuttings, canvas, tarpaulin and vinyl signed Don Driver, dated 1992/97 and inscribed "Time" in ink verso 960mm x 730mm

Provenance Private collection, Wanaka. Acquired from Gallery 33, Wanaka, October 2006.

p.81/P.128

$1,000 - $2,000

62

Denis O'Connor Anima 1997 flocked wooden oar, slate inkwell, vinyl record and brass 1680mm x 300mm x 300mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Lachrimae, Gow Langsford Gallery, Auckland, 12 - 30 August 1997.

p.82

$1,500 - $2,500

63

Michael Parekowhai Messines 2001 c-type photograph, edition of 8 1550mm x 1250mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Another from the edition included in 13th Biennale of Sydney: (The World May Be) Fantastic, Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney, 15 May - 14 July 2012; The Promised Land, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Queensland, 28 March - 21 June 2015. literature Ewen McDonald ed., 2002 Biennale of Sydney: (The World May Be) Fantastic (Sydney: Biennale of Sydney, 2002), 151.; Michael Parekowhai, Michael Parekowhai (Auckland: Michael Lett, 2012), 50-51, 303. Michael Parekowhai, Michael Parekowhai: The Promised Land (Brisbane: Queensland Art Gallery, 2015), 74. notes From the series The consolation of philosophy: Piko nei te matenga.

p.83/P.138

$16,000 - $22,000

64

Russell Clark Seated Figures 1954 cement 650mm x 600mm x 370mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Contemporary Sculpture Exhibition, Auckland City Art Gallery, Auckland, June 1955; Russell Clark 1905 - 1966: A Retrospective Exhibition, Robert McDougall Art Gallery, Christchurch, 28 April - 1 June 1975; Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin, 20 June - 9 July 1975; Aigantighe Art Gallery, Timaru, 26 July - 10 August 1975; Bishop Suter Art Gallery, Nelson, 3 September - 20 September 1975; Hawkes Bay Art Gallery & Museum, Napier, 16 December 1975 - 4 January 1976; Gisborne Art Gallery & Museum, Gisborne, 13 January - 9 February 1976; National Art Gallery, Wellington, 19 February - 10 March 1976; Manawatu Art Gallery, Palmerston North, 24 March - 16 April 1976, Sarjeant Art Gallery, Wanganui, 29 April - 13 May 1976; Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, 27 May - 13 June 1976; Waikato Museum & Art Gallery, Hamilton, 29 June - 18 July 1976; Auckland City Art Gallery, Auckland, December 1976. literature Michael Dunn, Russell Clark 1905 - 1966: A Retrospective Exhibition (Christchurch: Robert McDougall Art Gallery, 1975), 42.

p.84

$25,000 - $35,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

65

Greer Twiss Walking Victory 2011 wax, cloth, steel, plywood, perspex and lead signed Twiss, dated 11 and inscribed Walking Victory with incision 350mm x 390mm x 265mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Whitespace, Auckland, 2011. exhibited The Restoration of Victory, Whitespace, Auckland, 2011. literature Greer Twiss, Greer Twiss: Sculptor (Auckland: Ron Sang Publications), 339.

p.85

$5,000 - $8,000

66

Sean Kerr Fucked 2008 cast resin, edition of 2 215mm x 165mm x 130mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.86/P.118

$500 - $800

67

Karl Fritsch untitled 2017 shibuichi and graywacke signed KF and dated 17 with incision underside 40mm x 1000mm x 65mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.87

$1,000 - $2,000

68

Karl Fritsch untitled 2017 shibuichi and pounamu signed KF and dated 17 with incision underside 40mm x 1000mm x 65mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.87

$1,000 - $2,000

69

et. al.

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Methods of investigation 4: invalidity of hermeneutic, Museum de Paviljoens, Almere, Netherlands, 1 August - 24 October 2004.

p.88/P.144

$150 - $300

70

et. al.

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Methods of investigation 4: invalidity of hermeneutic, Museum de Paviljoens, Almere, Netherlands, 1 August - 24 October 2004.

p.88/P.144

$1,000 - $2,000

71

Ralph Hotere Kyrie Eleison No. 5 1974 oil on canvas signed Hotere, dated Port Chalmers 74 and inscribed Kyrie Eleison 5 (Requiem Series) and BLG Cat 10 in brushpoint verso 1070mm x 1065mm

Provenance Private collection, London. Acquired from Barry Lett Galleries, Auckland, 1977.

p.89

$30,000 - $60,000

72

Heather Straka They fought desperately with their paddles 2003 oil on cotton on board signed H Straka, dated 2003 and inscribed They fought desperately with their paddles/Joker in graphite verso 825mm x 540mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited The Joker, Janne Land Gallery, Wellington, 2003.

p.90

$5,500 - $7,500

73

Rohan Wealleans untitled 2004 acrylic and drawing pins on board signed Rohan Wealleans and dated 2004 in ink verso 640mm x 400mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.91

$2,500 - $3,500

74

Roger Mortimer Red Milk Bottle 2007 china paint on ceramic 240mm x 85mm x 85mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Intelligent Design, Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2007.

p.92

$2,800 - $3,600

untitled 2004 screenprint and masking tape on paper, transparent vinyl record in polythene sleeve, edition of 100 330mm x 330mm

untitled 2004 c-type print on paper, edition of 100 1180mm x 780mm


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

75

Reuben Paterson untitled (Time and Place) 2001 sequins, pins, polyurethane foam 300mm x 250mm x 150mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. exhibited Bottled Lightning, Gus Fisher Gallery, Auckland, 20 January-30 March, 2012. literature Clifford, Andrew. Reuben Paterson: Bottled Lightning (Auckland: University of Auckland, Centre for New Zealand Art Research and Discovery, 2012), 27.

p.93

$500 - $1,000

76

Richard Killeen untitled (interior) 1963 monoprint on paper signed Killeen, dated 1968 and inscribed 3043 in graphite lower edge 95mm x 120mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner, 1989.

p.94

$150 - $350

77

Séraphine Pick untitled 1998 oil on canvasboard (7 panels) 180mm x 120mm (each panel)

Provenance Private collection, New Plymouth.

p.95/P.125

$5,000 - $8,000

78

Judy Darragh Riverscape 1990 synthetic fur, paua shells, transparency and light fitting on board signed Judy Darragh, dated 1990 and inscribed "riverscape" in ink verso 825mm x 970mm x 150mm

Provenance Private collection, Dunedin. exhibited Moderno Update, Gregory Flint Gallery, Auckland, 1990.

p.96

$2,000 - $3,000

79

Simon Ingram Automata Painting No. 1 2004 acrylic and graphite on linen signed SIMON INGRAM and inscribed AUTOMATA PAINTING NO. 1, ACRYLIC, LINEN. 500 x 500 in ink lower edge verso 505mm x 505mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, 2006. exhibited Matter Thinks, Snowhite Gallery, Unitec, Auckland, 2006. literature Simon Ingram, Alan Smith, Towards a Painting that Thinks (Manukau City: ArtSchool Press, 2004), 35.

p.97

$3,500 - $5,500

80

John Reynolds Small Burial VI 1989 ink and oil stick on blackboard, artist-selected frame inscribed SMALL BURIAL VI in ink lower right; signed REYNOLDS and dated 1989 in ink upper edge verso 278mm x 278mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, 1989.

p.98/P.135

$1,000 - $1,500

81

Allen Maddox untitled c. 1976 oil on hessian 940mm x 520mm

Provenance Private collection, Wanaka. Acquired from Artis Gallery, Auckland, November 2006.

p.99

$6,000 - $8,000

82

John Reynolds Acronyms, etc. #301 2004 paint marker on canvas signed REYNOLDS, dated 2004 and inscribed ACRONYMS, ETC. #301 in ink verso 100mm x 102mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, c. 2004.

p.100/P.135

$200 - $400

83

John Reynolds Mandarin Studies #110 2014 acrylic on canvas signed REYNOLDS, dated 2014 and inscribed MANDARIN STUDIES #110 in ink verso 100mm x 103mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner.

p.100/P.135

$200 - $400


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

84

John Reynolds Story 2004 paint marker on canvas, edition 10/10 signed REYNOLDS, dated 2004 and inscribed STORY (multiple) in ink verso 103mm x 100mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, c. 2004.

p.100/P.135

$150 - $300

85

John Reynolds Big Silver Light #8 2006 spray paint on canvas signed REYNOLDS, dated 2006 and inscribed BIG SILVER LIGHT #8 in ink verso 100mm x 102mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, c. 2006.

p.100/P.135

$150 - $300

86

John Reynolds Acronyms, etc. #765 2007 acrylic and paint marker on canvas signed REYNOLDS, dated 2007 and inscribed ACRONYMS ETC #765 in ink verso 100mm x 101mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, c. 2007.

p.101/P.135

$200 - $300

87

John Reynolds Acronyms, etc. #261 2004 paint marker on canvas signed REYNOLDS, dated 2004 and inscribed ACRONYMS ETC #261 in ink verso 100mm x 102mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, c. 2004.

p.101/P.135

$200 - $300

88

John Reynolds Cheap Money #31 2008 paint marker on canvas inscribed JOHN REYNOLDS/CHEAP MONEY/2008/OIL ON CANVAS/10 x 10 CM in stamped text verso; inscribed #31 in ink verso 100mm x 102mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, c. 2014.

p.101/P.135

$100 - $250

89

John Reynolds Mandarin Studies #112 2014 acrylic on canvas signed REYNOLDS, dated 2014 and inscribed MANDARIN STUDIES #112 in ink verso 103mm x 100mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner.

p.101/P.135

$200 - $400

90

Andrew McLeod Downfall 2006 screenprint and acrylic on linen, edition 3/10 signed Andrew McLeod in paint marker lower edge 200mm x 225mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2001.

p.102

$1,000 - $2,000

91

Roger Mortimer Dear Gina somewhat shakely I write... 2000 acrylic on canvas 272mm x 317mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2003. exhibited Letterstogina, Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2003.

p.103

$800 - $1,200

92

Don Driver Fibre Glass 1996 enamel on fibreglass and polystyrene on board, artist-made frame signed BY DON DRIVER, dated "1966" and inscribed "Fibre Glass" in brushpoint verso 940mm x 1240mm

Provenance Private collection, Wanaka. Acquired from Webb's, Auckland, September 2006.

p.104/P.128

$5,000 - $8,000

93

Miranda Parkes Dreamer 2006 acrylic on canvas signed parkes, dated 06 and inscribed 'Dreamer' in ink verso 470mm x 470mm x 660mm

Provenance Private collection, Wanaka. Acquired from Gallery 33, Wanaka, 2007.

p.105

$6,000 - $9,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

94

Terry Stringer An Ancestor Speaks c. 1978 screenprint and oil on wood 155mm x 115mm x 37mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner, c. 1978.

p.106

$300 - $800

95

Gregor Kregar I Disappear (Black) 2013 ceramic, edition of 20 220mm x 605mm x 105mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.107

$2,000 - $3,000

96

Michael Smither untitled 1977 screenprint on paper signed MDS in graphite lower right; dated 1/35/77 and inscribed 170 in graphite lower left 265mm x 410mm

Provenance Private collection, Whangarei. Acquired from Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, 1980.

p.108

$300 - $600

97

Michael Smither untitled c. 1980 screenprint on paper 280mm x 610mm

Provenance Private collection, Whangarei. Acquired from Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, 1980.

p.108

$300 - $600

98

Peter Siddell Harbour 1985 screenprint on paper, edition 59/80 signed Peter Siddell and dated '85 in graphite lower right; inscribed 'Harbour' in graphite lower left 395mm x 325mm

Provenance Private collection, Whangarei.

p.109

$500 - $800

99

Agnes Martin Untitled #4 1990 lithograph on vellum, edition of 2500 304mm x 304mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Marja Bloem, Agnes Martin: Paintings and Drawings (Amsterdam: Stedelijk Museum, 1991), 37.

p.110

$500 - $800

100 Agnes Martin Untitled #2 1990 lithograph on vellum, edition of 2500 304mm x 304mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Marja Bloem, Agnes Martin: Paintings and Drawings (Amsterdam: Stedelijk Museum, 1991), 81.

p.110

$500 - $800

101 Grant Banbury Paper Parcel 15 1983 acrylic and thread on paper signed Grant Banbury in ink verso; dated 1983 and inscribed Grant Banbury, Paper Parcel 15, Mixed, image - 32 x 24.5 in ink on Denis Cohn Gallery label affixed verso 320mm x 245mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.111

$300 - $600

102 Grant Banbury Paper Parcel 17 1983 acrylic and thread on paper signed Grant Banbury in ink verso; dated 1983 and inscribed Grant Banbury, Paper Parcel 17, Mixed, image - 32 x 24.2 in ink on Denis Cohn Gallery label affixed verso 320mm x 242mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.111

$300 - $600

103 Billy Apple The Given as an Art-Political Statement: Alterations (completed 20 February, 1980) 1980 exhibition poster 595mm x 420mm

Provenance Private collection, Whangarei. Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner, 1980. notes This poster was published on the occasion of an exhibition by Billy Apple at Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth (20 February - 1979 - 16 March 1980).

p.112

$300 - $600

104 Billy Apple Alterations: The Given as an Art-Political Statement 1980 exhibition poster signed Billy Apple in ink lower right 595mm x 420mm

Provenance Private collection, Whangarei. Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner, 1980. notes This poster was published on the occasion of an exhibition by Billy Apple at Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth (20 February - 1979 - 16 March 1980).

p.112

$300 - $600

105 Billy Apple Towards the Centre: The Given as an Art-Political Statement 1980 exhibition poster 415mm x 290mm

Provenance Private collection, Whangarei. Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner, 1980. notes This poster was published on the occasion of an exhibition by Billy Apple at Sarjeant Gallery, Wanganui (20 December 1979 27 January 1980).

p.112

$300 - $600


bowerbank ninow

How to participate in the auction

Attending in person Auction N˚7 will take place on Thursday 30th November 2017 at 6.30pm. Buyers will need to register with Bowerbank Ninow in order to receive a bidder’s card, which is required for participation in the auction. Buyers are able to register at any stage during the viewing period or on the evening of the auction. For those wishing to register on the night of the auction, we would advise that they arrive 15-20 minutes prior to the auction commencing. Bidding by Telephone For those who wish to participate in the auction but cannot attend in person, there are two methods by which they may do so remotely. The first of these is to bid by telephone. Telephone bidders are welcome to bid on either single or multiple lots. In order to bid by telephone, buyers are required to register with Bowerbank Ninow prior to the auction commencing. We are able to arrange telephone bidding via email, telephone or in person. Registration for telephone bidding closes an hour before the auction commences. Absentee Bids Absentee bids are an alternate method of remote participation to phone bidding. The placing of an ‘absentee bid’ entails a buyer specifying the maximum hammer price that they wish to pay for a given lot. This absentee bid will be executed by the auctioneer, who will bid on the buyer’s behalf until their maximum price is exceeded. Bowerbank Ninow will always act in good faith for absentee bidders and will endeavor to secure items on which they bid for the lowest possible price. We are able to arrange telephone bidding via email, telephone or in person. Bids Placed on Our Website Bids placed online, through bowerbankninow.com, are considered to be ‘absentee bids’ and will be treated in the manner outlined in the paragraph above. Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will endeavour to contact the artist and pay the artist a resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. The steps taken to contact the artist will be at Bowerbank Ninow’s sole discretion and Bowerbank Ninow will under no circumstances be liable for failure to make payment to an artist under this clause. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Artists are invited to submit their contact details to Bowerbank Ninow to facilitate payment. Physical Condition of Artworks The artworks included in this auction range from having been made within the last decade to having been made more than forty years ago and, as such, the physical condition of each will vary. We encourage buyers to inspect the artworks in person when possible. However, we are happy to supply additional information and images of any artwork to those who cannot attend the viewing. Freighting of Artworks As per the terms and conditions, the buyer is responsible for the collection of any lots bought. This being said, Bowerbank Ninow is happy to assist with freighting and packaging where the buyer has special requirements. Any freighting or packaging will be undertaken at the buyer’s expense.

158


auction n°7 — November 2017

Conditions of Sale

REGISTRATION All bidders must complete a bidding card or absentee bidding form prior to the commencement of the auction. It is required that a correct name, address, telephone number and email address be supplied.

on, or before, the day after the sale. If a 20% deposit is made instead of full payment, a payment of the balance must be made within 5 working days of the sale. Eftpos, electronic transfer, bank cheques or cash are accepted as payment. Visa and MasterCard are also accepted but are subject to an additional charge of 2.5%. All amounts specified are in New Zealand Dollars.

BIDDING In each instance, the highest bidder on a lot will be its purchaser, subject to both the bid being above the lot’s reserve and the auctioneer’s right to refuse the bid that they have placed on it. By bidding on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) the bidder acknowledges that they may become the lot’s purchaser and that they are responsible for any payments required by their purchase of it. The auctioneer has sole discretion with regards to the increments at which bidding increases. No bids that have been placed above reserve may be withdrawn by the bidder. However, the auctioneer has the right to withdraw any bids before a lot has closed or return to a previous bid in the advent of a dispute about the highest bid arising. The auctioneer also has the right to bid on behalf of the vendor up to the reserve. Any person wishing to bid on behalf of a third party must provide Bowerbank Ninow with written authority to do so prior to bidding.

FAILIURE TO MAKE PAYMENT If the purchaser fails to fulfill their obligation to make the required payment(s), Bowerbank Ninow has the right to a) cancel the sale, b) pursue the purchaser for damages from their breach of contract, c) without notice, sell the lot to another individual, either by private sale or by auction, d) store the lot, either at Bowerbank Ninow’s premises or off-site at the purchaser’s expense. The difference between any lower amount made from the re-sale of the lot (as per point c) and the amount still owed by the original purchaser, will remain owed to Bowerbank Ninow by the original purchaser. If payment has not been made after seven days, Bowerbank Ninow has the right to charge interest on any monies owed by the purchaser of an amount equal to their bank’s then current interest rate for commercial overdraft facilities. If there is an unsatisfied  debt  then the applicant agrees that they be liable for and pay for all costs of recovery of the contract, which costs shall be collected by a debt collection agency. Costs payable by the applicant shall include, legal fees, commissions, fee’s and disbursements, and /or court fees and disbursements.

RESERVES All lots in this sale are subject to reserve and will be sold subject to bids meeting the reserve price, which is set by Bowerbank Ninow in consultation with the vendor or his/ her agent.

COLLECTION Purchased items must be collected, or freighted, at the purchaser’s expense within a week of payment being received by Bowerbank Ninow.

SUBJECT BIDS When the highest bid falls below the reserve, the auctioneer will announce to the room, and the bidder who has placed the highest bid, in particular, that the lot has been sold “subject to the vendor’s consent,” or some such words to the same effect. This “subject bid” remains binding until the vendor either accepts or refuses the sale, until which time no other offers may be put to the vendor. Prior to the vendor’s acceptance of the “subject bid,” it may be withdrawn at any time by the bidder who has placed it but, once accepted by the vendor, the bidder has entered into a contract to purchase the lot at the accepted price plus the buyer’s premium. BUYERS’ PREMIUM By registering to bid at auction and then subsequently bidding on a lot, the bidder accepts that a buyers premium of 17.5% + GST will be charged in addition to the hammer price of any lot sold to them. SOLD LOTS It is assumed that bidders have inspected any lots that they bid on, or made sufficient enquiries into the condition and authenticity of any lots that they bid on prior to the auction. Advice about each lot is made available by Bowerbank Ninow to any prospective purchasers but it is not intended to replace the expert opinion of third-party specialists such as conservators. Any purchase is ultimately made according to the purchasers own judgment and any bids made on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) constitute an acceptance of the lot’s present condition. PAYMENT Successful bidders are required to make payment to Bowerbank Ninow on either the same day as the sale or the following day. A deposit of 20% may be made in lieu of full payment if, for any reason, full payment cannot be made

159


Auction N°8 March 2018 Entries invited


Auction N˚7  
Auction N˚7