Page 1

auction n°1 — summer 2015

Auction N°1 25th Nov 2015

1


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BRUCE BARBER: PERFORMANCE SCORES Curated by Stephen Cleland A d a m A r t G a l l e r y 3 O c t o b e r – 18 D e c e m b e r 2 0 15

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RITA ANGUS · BILLY APPLE · DANIEL BUREN · FIONA CONNOR · JULIAN DASHPER COLIN MCCAHON · DANE MITCHELL · MILAN MRKUSICH · JOHN NIXON JOHN REYNOLDS · PETER ROBINSON · MARIE SHANNON · IMANTS TILLERS PETER TYNDALL · JAN VAN DER PLOEG · GORDON WALTERS

5 DECEMBER 2015 – 25 APRIL 2016

Julian Dashper The Colin McCahons 1992, Chartwell Collection, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki.


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Australia’s art magazine of record since 1987 Issue 285 / November 2015

ART MONTHLY AU ST R A L I A

Lisa Reihana 8th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art New Zealand focus issue artmonthly.org.au

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ART DIRECTION


28 Nov 2015 –––— 28 Mar 2016 Free Entry

Stella Corkery Smoke and Butterfly 2015 courtesy of the artist and Michael Lett


Art Series #1

An evening for art lovers

Proudly supported by Bowerbank Ninow

Browse amazing contemporary New Zealand art works at Bowerbank Ninow's exclusive fundraiser for Braveheart Youth Trust.

312 Karangahape Road Thursday 19 November 6.30 – 8.30 pm

Wine and canapĂŠs will be served as Charles Ninow speaks about key works and demonstrates the auction process.

tickets: bookings & info: enquiries:

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Auction N°1 25th Nov 2015 Viewing times Opening

Wednesday 18 November 2015 6pm Viewing

Thursday 19 – Tuesday 24 November 2015 10am – 5pm Wednesday 25 November 2015 10am – 1pm Auction

Wednesday 25 November 2015 6.30pm

Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will pay the artist a voluntary resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Bowerbank Ninow are the first and only auction house in New Zealand to pay resale royalties to artists. buyer's premium A buyer’s premium of 15% will be charged on all items listed in this catalogue. GST (15%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

colophon Bowerbank Ninow Auction N°1 November 25th, 2015 Catalogue of works Edition of 2000 Design Editor Photography Research

DDMMYY Andrew Clark Samuel Hartnett, Paul Nathan Hannah Daly, Kate Lee

312 Karangahape Rd. Newton Auckland 1010 New Zealand +64 9 307 8870 info@bowerbankninow.com bowerbankninow.com Simon Bowerbank +64 21 045 1464 simon@bowerbankninow.com Charles Ninow +64 21 053 6504 charles@bowerbankninow.com


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Contents Plates Index Essays Peter Peryer dan munn David Cauchi andrew clark John Ward Knox FRANCIS MCWHANNELL Mark Adams ADAM GIFFORD Don Driver JOHN HURRELL Yvonne Todd MARTIN PATRICK Rohan Wealleans EMIL MCAVOY Gretchen Albrecht JAMES ROSS Yvonne Todd MEGAN DUNN Allen Maddox ANDREW PAUL WOOD Charles Tole PETER SIMPSON Michael Parekowhai ANDREW CLARK Bill Hammond PRISCILLA PITTS Colin McCahon PETER SIMPSON Jude Rae VALERIE ROSE Heather Straka FRANCES CLARK Grahame Sydney CHARLES NINOW Gordon Walters ANDREW PAUL WOOD et al. ANDREW CLARK Séraphine Pick RACHEL KLEINSMEN Shane Cotton JESSICA MIO Colin McCahon CHARLES NINOW

18 76 80 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 104

Ralph Hotere CHARLES NINOW Bill Hammond JENNIFER HAY Bill Hammond JULIAN MCKINNON Edward Bullmore RUTH WATSON How to participate in the Auction Conditions of Sale

105 106 108 109 112 113


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auction n°1 — summer 2015


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auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 1 p.82

Peter Peryer The Wind at Whenuapai gelatin silver print, edition of 10 signed Peter Peryer, dated 1998 and inscribed The Wind at Whenuapai in graphite verso; inscribed Peter Peryer, The Wind at Whenuapai, 1998, signed at Mt Pleasant Rd, 14 July 99 in another hand verso 103mm × 148mm

est

$1,500 – $2,500

21


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Lot 2 p.00

Andrew McLeod Doomsday Divinity Mother acrylic and ink on paper signed Andrew McLeod and inscribed Joseph's Hybernation in brushpoint lower right; inscribed Joseph's Hybernation in ink lower edge; signed Andrew McLeod and dated 2004 in ink verso 295mm Ă— 420mm

est

$2,000 – $3,000

22


auction n°1 — summer 2015

23


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Lot 3 p.00

David Cauchi Self Portrait acrylic on canvas signed Cauchi and dated MMXI in brushpoint upper right 350mm × 280mm

est

$1,500 – $2,500

24


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 4 p.84

John Ward Knox X (Life. Still. Baby) oil on calico signed John Ward Knox, dated 2010 and inscribed X (Life. Still. Baby) in graphite verso 650mm × 600mm

est

$1,500 – $2,500

25


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Lot 5 p.85

Mark Adams Tattooing Tony Fomison, Pio Taofinu'u (solo) gelatin silver print 465mm × 310mm

est

$2,000 – $3,000

Lot 6 p.85

Mark Adams Tattooing Tony Fomison, Pio Taofinu'u (solo) gelatin silver print 465mm × 310mm

est

$2,000 – $3,000

26


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 7 p.85

Mark Adams Tattooing Tony Fomison, Sese Lemamea (solo) gelatin silver print 310mm × 465mm

est

$2,000 – $3,000

27


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Lot 8

Stephen Bambury CHINA (XLV) 23k gold and resin on aluminium on timber panel signed S. Bambury, dated 05. and inscribed China (XLV), Stephen Bambury 2005 23K gold and resin on aluminium on timber panel in ink verso 170mm Ă— 340mm

est

$5,000 – $8,000

28


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 9 p.86

Don Driver Music While you Work found bill hook, rope, plastic tubing, tarpaulin and disassembled cassette player signed D. Driver, dated 1997 and inscribed "MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK" in ink on wood panel verso 1000mm × 275mm

est

$2,500 – $3,500

29


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Lot 10 p.87

Yvonne Todd Mauve Structure C-type print on dibond mount, edition of 3 + 1 artist's proof signed Yvonne Todd, dated September 2010 and inscribed "Mauve Structure", 1/3 in ink verso 560mm Ă— 452mm

est

$3,500 – $4,500

30


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 11 p.88

Rohan Wealleans Black Panther acrylic on found comic book, paper and polystyerine in perspex 350mm × 270mm × 105mm

est

$1,500 – $2,500

31


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Lot 12 p.88

Rohan Wealleans The Thing acrylic on found comic book, paper and polystyerine in perspex 350mm × 270mm × 105mm

est

$1,500 – $2,500

Lot 13 p.89

Gretchen Albrecht Geomorphology watercolour on paper signed Albrecht and dated 74 in ink lower right; Barry Lett Galleries label affixed verso 1110mm × 735mm

est

$15,000 – $20,000

32


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Lot 14 p.90

Yvonne Todd Werta C-type print, edition of 3 + 1 artist's proof signed Yvonne Todd and inscribed "Werta" photo taken July 2005 this print 2009, 3/3 in ink verso 1060mm Ă— 830mm

est

$8,000 – $12,000

34


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 15 p.91

Allen Maddox Untitled acrylic on loose canvas signed AM and dated 78 in ink lower left 1270mm × 1485mm

est

$20,000 – $30,000

35


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Lot 16 p.92

Charles Tole Untitled oil on board signed Charles Tole and dated 68 in brushpoint lower left 350mm Ă— 530mm

est

$15,000 – $20,000

36


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 17

Max Gimblett The Gentle Beast gesso, acrylic, vinyl polymers, epoxy, aqua size, swiss gold leaf, Japanese aqua colour silver leaf on canvas signed C Max Gimblett, dated 2014 and inscribed "The Gentle Beast." in brushpoint verso 380mm × 380mm

est

$10,000 – $15,000

37


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lot 18 p.93

Michael Parekowhai Ed Brown C-type print, edition of 10 1070mm × 1265mm

est

$15,000 – $20,000

lot 19 p.94

Bill Hammond Zoomorphic Detail acrylic on canvas signed W.D. Hammond, dated 1999 and inscribed Zoomorphic Detail in brushpoint upper edge 595mm × 395mm

est

$70,000 – $90,000

38


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40


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 20 p.95

Colin McCahon Tangi. Muriwai synthetic polymer paint on Steinbach on board signed McCahon, dated sept. oct. 72 and inscribed Tangi. Muriwai. in brushpoint lower edge 720mm × 1110mm

est

$200,000 – $300,000

41


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Lot 21 p.96

Jude Rae Still Life 5 oil on canvas signed J Rae, dated 98 and inscribed Still Life 5 in graphite verso 670mm Ă— 700mm

est

$12,000 – $16,000

44


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 22 p.97

Heather Straka International Rescue oil on cotton mounted to board signed Heather Straka, dated 2006 and inscribed International Rescue in graphite verso 1300mm × 800mm

est

$12,000 – $16,000

45


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Lot 23 p.98

est

Grahame Sydney Finising Post, Vincent egg tempera and gesso on sized muslin on board signed Grahame C Sydney and dated 1976 in brushpoint lower right; signed Grahame C Sydney, dated December 1976, Mt Pisa Cottage and inscribed “Finishing Post, Vincent” and Egg Tempera on sized, muslin, gesso chipboard. in ink verso 380mm × 445mm $45,000 – $55,000

46


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 24 p.99

Gordon Walters Untitled gouache and graphite on paper signed Gordon Walters, dated 66-73 and inscribed 66/Revised 78.7.73 in graphite upper edge 330mm × 230mm

est

$50,000 – $60,000

47


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Lot 25 p.100

et al.

est

$9,000 – $12,000

Mule Table (On the difficult problem in the phenomenal world) acrylic on found book, music stand, potentiomiter and table. Found amplifier, mp3 player and microphone, 2-channel audio dimensions variable

48


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 26 p.101

est

Séraphine Pick untitled oil on canvas, diptych signed Pick, dated 1994 – 1995 in coloured pencil bottom right of left panel; signed Pick and dated 94-95 in brushpoint lower right of right panel; signed Seraphine Pick and dated 1995 in graphite verso on left panel; signed Séraphine Pick and dated 1995 in graphite verso on right panel 1680mm × 1215mm; 1680mm × 1215mm $55,000 – $75,000

49


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Lot 27

Gretchen Albrecht Of Cloud and Sky acrylic and oil on linen signed Albrecht, dated 05 and inscribed 'Of Cloud and Sky' in ink verso; artist's label affixed verso 940mm × 1830mm

est

$25,000 – $30,000

52


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 28 p.102

Shane Cotton R.A.U.K acrylic on canvas Hamish McKay Gallery stamp applied to stretcher verso (each panel) 1400mm × 2800mm

est

$60,000 – $70,000

53


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Lot 29 p.104

Colin McCahon Northland Drawing ink on paper signed McCahon, dated April '59 and inscribed Northland in ink lower edge 630mm Ă— 550mm

est

$35,000 – $45,000

56


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 30 p.105

Ralph Hotere Kyrie Eleison No. 5 oil on canvas signed Hotere, dated Port Chalmers 74 and inscribed Kyrie Eleison 5 (Requiem Series) in brushpoint verso; inscribed BLG Cat 10 in brushpoint on stretcher verso 1070mm × 1065mm

est

$60,000 – $80,000

57


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Lot 31 p.106

est

Bill Hammond Walter Buller Blind acrylic on loose canvas, three peices signed W.D Hammond, dated 1994 and inscribed Walter Buller Blind One in brush point upper edge on left panel; signed W.D Hammond, dated 1994 and inscribed Walter Buller Blind Two in brush point upper edge on middle panel; signed W.D Hammond, dated 1994 and inscribed Walter Buller Blind Three in brush point upper edge on right panel 1070mm × 595mm; 890mm × 660mm; 1030mm × 880mm $160,000 – $190,000

58


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auction n°1 — summer 2015

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Lot 32 p.102

Shane Cotton Patterns in 2 Lord's Prayers acrylic on canvas signed SWC, dated 2002 and inscribed Pattern in 2 Lord's Prayers in brushpoint lower right; signed Shane W Cotton, dated 2002 and inscribed 'Pattern in 2 Lord's Prayers verso 1400mm Ă— 1400mm

est

$30,000 – $40,000

62


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 33 p.108

Bill Hammond And I'm in the Kitchen with the Tombstone Blues acrylic on board signed W.D. Hammond, dated 1983 and inscribed And I'm in the Kitchen with the Tombstone Blues, Part II, B. Dylan in brushpoint lower right 570mm × 730mm

est

$12,000 – $15,000

63


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Lot 34

Bill Hammond Dyskick Dancehall enamel on copper panel inscribed Dyskick Dancehall, The Fall in brushpoint upper left 300mm Ă— 400mm

est

$18,000 – $24,000

64


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 35 p.102

Shane Cotton Where ya from man? acrylic on canvas signed S.Cotton, dated 2011 and inscribed 'where ya from man?' in brushpoint lower right; dated 2011 and inscribed where ya from man in ink verso 760mm × 760mm

est

$15,000 – $20,000

65


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Lot 36

Neil Pardington Airport C-type print on dibond mount, edition of 15 signed Neil Pardington, dated 2000 and inscribed Airport, 6/15 in graphite verso 1270mm Ă— 1760mm

est

$4,000 – $5,000

66


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 37

Neil Pardington Travelator C-type print on dibond mount, edition of 15 signed Neil Pardington, dated 2002 and inscribed Travelator, 4/15 in graphite verso 1270mm × 1760mm

est

$4,000 – $5,000

67


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Lot 38

Pat Hanly Hope Vessel watercolour and graphite on paper signed Hanly, dated 86 and inscribed Hope Vessel in graphite lower edge 540mm Ă— 620mm

est

$18,000 – $24,000

68


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 39

Chris Heaphy Rangitoto acrylic on canvas signed C Heaphy, dated 2005 and inscribed 'Rangitoto' in ink verso 1620mm × 1400mm

est

$10,000 – $15,000

69


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lot 40

Sally Gabori Dibirdibi Country synthetic polymer paint on linen inscribed Artist: Sally Gabori, Title: Dibirdibi Country, Catno:3196-L-SG/OOO8, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen in ink in another hand verso 1210mm Ă— 910mm

est

$8,000 - $12,000

70


auction n°1 — summer 2015

lot 41

John Walsh Toku Whanau Ataahua oil on canvas laid onto board signed J Walsh, dated 2001 and inscribed Toku Whanau Ataa Hua in graphite verso 510mm × 610mm

est

$8,000 - $12,000

71


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lot 42 p.109

Edward Bullmore Transition No. 4 oil on board signed EB in graphite lower right 595mm Ă— 765mm

est

$25,000 – $35,000

72


auction n°1 — summer 2015

lot 43 p.109

Edward Bullmore Untitled gouache, ink and pencil on card signed EB and inscribed P. 10 Colour Diagrams & Details JD Works London in graphite verso 255mm × 200mm

est

$500 – $1,000

73


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lot 44 p.109

Edward Bullmore Untitled gouache, ink and pencil on paper 210mm Ă— 250mm

est

$500 – $1,000

74


I

N

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artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

1

Peter Peryer The Wind at Whenuapai gelatin silver print, edition of 10 signed Peter Peryer, dated 1998 and inscribed The Wind at Whenuapai in graphite verso; inscribed Peter Peryer, The Wind at Whenuapai, 1998, signed at Mt Pleasant Rd, 14 July 99 in another hand verso 103mm × 148mm

Provenance Acquired from Webb's, Auckland, 25 September, 2013, lot 40. exhibited Another from the edition included in Peter Peryer – A Careful Eye, The Dowse Art Museum, 23 Aug – 23 Nov 2014. literature Peryer, Peter and Peter Simpson. Peter Peryer: Photographer. Auckland: Auckland University Press, 2008.

p.21/p.82

$1,500 – $2,500

2

Andrew McLeod Doomsday Divinity Mother acrylic and ink on paper signed Andrew McLeod and inscribed Joseph's Hybernation in brushpoint lower right; inscribed Joseph's Hybernation in ink lower edge; signed Andrew McLeod and dated 2004 in ink verso 295mm × 420mm

Provenance Acquired from Ivan Anthony Gallery, 2004. exhibited Parabiosis (with Liz Maw), Ivan Anthony Gallery, Auckland, 2004. literature McLeod, Andrew. Largess. The Physics Room Trust and Artspace, 2005.

p.22

$2,000 – $3,000

3

David Cauchi Self Portrait acrylic on canvas signed Cauchi and dated MMXI in brushpoint upper right 350mm × 280mm

Provenance Acquired from Ivan Anthony, 2011. exhibited This has to do with me, Ivan Anthony Gallery, Auckland, 2011.

p.24/p.83

$1,500 – $2,500

4

John Ward Knox X (Life. Still. Baby) oil on calico signed John Ward Knox, dated 2010 and inscribed X (Life. Still. Baby) in graphite verso 650mm × 600mm

Provenance Acquired from Tim Melville, Auckland, 2010. exhibited welcome home sun, Tim Melville, Auckland, 6 July 2010 – 30 July, 2010. literature Hurrell, John. "Drawings Made With Oil Paint". EyeContact. July 16, 2010.

p.25/p.84

$1,500 – $2,500

5

Mark Adams Tattooing Tony Fomison, Pio Taofinu'u (solo) gelatin silver print 465mm × 310mm

Provenance Acquired directly from the artist, 2004. literature Adams, Mark, Sean Mallon, Peter Brunt and Nicholas Thomas. Tatau: Samoan Tattoo, New Zealand Art, global culture. Wellington: Te Papa Press, 2010. Plate 16.

p.26/p.85

$2,000 – $3,000

6

Mark Adams Tattooing Tony Fomison, Sese Lemamea (solo) gelatin silver print 465mm × 310mm

Provenance Acquired directly from the artist, 2004. literature Ian Wedde, ed. Fomison: What Shall We Tell Them?. Wellington: City Gallery, 1994.

p.26/p.85

$2,000 – $3,000

7

Mark Adams Tattooing Tony Fomison, Sese Lemamea (solo) gelatin silver print 310mm × 465mm

Provenance Acquired directly from the artist, 2004. literature Adams, Mark, Sean Mallon, Peter Brunt and Nicholas Thomas. Tatau: Samoan Tattoo, New Zealand Art, global culture. Wellington: Te Papa Press, 2010. Plate 16.

p.27/p.85

$2,000 – $3,000

8

Stephen Bambury CHINA (XLV) 23k gold and resin on aluminium on timber panel signed S. Bambury, dated 05. and inscribed China (XLV), Stephen Bambury 2005 23K gold and resin on aluminium on timber panel in ink verso 170mm × 340mm

Provenance Acquired from Nadene Milne Gallery.

p.28

$5,000 – $8,000

9

Don Driver Music While you Work found bill hook, rope, plastic tubing, tarpaulin and disassembled cassette player signed D. Driver, dated 1997 and inscribed "MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK" in ink on wood panel verso 1000mm × 275mm

Provenance Acquired directly from the artist.

p.29/p.86

$2,500 – $3,500

10

Yvonne Todd Mauve Structure C-type print on dibond mount, edition of 3 + 1 artist's proof signed Yvonne Todd, dated September 2010 and inscribed "Mauve Structure", 1/3 in ink verso 560mm × 452mm

Provenance Acquired from Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2010. exhibited Iris Paste, Ivan Anthony, Auckland, New Zealand, 22 September – 16 October, 2010. Yvonne Todd: Creamy Psychology, City Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand, 6 December, 2014 – 15 March, 2015. literature Robert Leonard, ed. Yvonne Todd: Creamy Psychology. Wellington: Victoria University Press, 2014. Hurrell, John. "New Todd Exhibition". EyeContact. October 6, 2010.

p.30/p.87

$3,500 – $4,500


11

Rohan Wealleans Black Panther acrylic on found comic book, paper and polystyrene in perspex 350mm × 270mm × 105mm

Provenance Acquired from Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2011.

p.31/p.88

$1,500 – $2,500

12

Rohan Wealleans The Thing acrylic on found comic book, paper and polystyrene in perspex 350mm × 270mm × 105mm

Provenance Acquired from Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2011.

p.32/p.88

$1,500 – $2,500

13

Gretchen Albrecht Geomorphology watercolour on paper signed Albrecht and dated 74 in ink lower right; Barry Lett Galleries label affixed verso 1110mm × 735mm

Provenance Acquired from Barry Lett Galleries, Auckland, 1977. exhibited Barry Lett Galleries, Auckland, 1975.

p.33/p.89

$15,000 – $20,000

14

Yvonne Todd Werta C-type print, edition of 3 + 1 artist's proof signed Yvonne Todd and inscribed "Werta" photo taken July 2005 this print 2009, 3/3 in ink verso 1060mm × 830mm

Provenance Acquired from Ivan Anthony, 2009. exhibited Another from the edition included in Vagrants’ Reception Centre, Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2005. Another from the edition included in Yvonne Todd: Creamy Psychology, City Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand, 6 December, 2014 – 15 March, 2015. literature Robert Leonard, ed. Yvonne Todd: Creamy Psychology. Wellington: Victoria University Press, 2014.

p.34/p.90

$8,000 – $12,000

15

Allen Maddox Untitled acrylic on loose canvas signed AM and dated 78 in ink lower left 1270 × 1485mm

Provenance Acquired from Dunbar Sloane, Wellington, 14 February 1993, lot 37.

p.35/p.91

$20,000 – $30,000

16

Charles Tole Untitled (Landscape) oil on board signed Charles Tole and dated '68 in brushpoint lower left 350mm × 530mm

Provenance Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 2006.

p.36/p.92

$15,000 – $20,000

17

Max Gimblett The Gentle Beast gesso, acrylic, vinyl polymers, epoxy, aqua size, Swiss gold leaf, Japanese aqua colour silver leaf on canvas signed C Max Gimblett, dated 2014 and inscribed "The Gentle Beast." in brushpoint verso 380mm × 380mm

Provenance Acquired from Nadene Milne Gallery, 2014. exhibited Max Gimblett Heavenly Creatures, Nadene Milne Gallery, 2014.

p.37

$10,000 – $15,000

18

Michael Parekowhai Ed Brown C-type print, edition of 10 1070mm × 1265mm

Provenance Acquired from Jonathan Smart Gallery, 2000. exhibited The Beverly Hills Gun Club, Jonathan Smart Gallery, July 4 – 29, 2000. literature Michael Lett and Ryan Morre, eds. Michael Parekowhai. Auckland: Michael Lett Publishing, 2007.

p.38/p.93

$15,000 – $20,000

19

Bill Hammond Zoomorphic Detail acrylic on canvas signed W.D. Hammond, dated 1999 and inscribed Zoomorphic Detail in brushpoint upper edge 595mm × 395mm

Provenance Acquired from Jonathan Smart Gallery, 2000.

p.39/p.94

$70,000 – $90,000

20

Colin McCahon Tangi. Muriwai synthetic polymer paint on Steinbach on board signed McCahon, dated sept. oct. 72 and inscribed Tangi. Muriwai. in brushpoint lower edge 720mm × 1110mm

Provenance Acquired from Barry Lett Galleries, Auckland, 1977.

p.41/p.95

$200,000 – $300,000

21

Jude Rae Still Life 5 oil on canvas signed J Rae, dated 98 and inscribed Still Life 5 in graphite verso 670mm × 700mm

exhibited Still Lives, Jonathan Smart Gallery, Christchurch, New Zealand, 3 March – 28 March, 1998.

p.44/p.96

$12,000 – $16,000

22

Heather Straka International Rescue oil on cotton mounted to board signed Heather Straka, dated 2006 and inscribed International Rescue in graphite verso 1300mm × 800mm

Provenance Acquired from Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland, 2006. exhibited Emily Wolfe, Heather Straka, Gavin Hurley, Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland, 29 August – 23 September, 2006.

p.45/p.97

$12,000 – $16,000


23

Grahame Sydney Finishing Post, Vincent egg tempera and gesso on sized muslin on board signed Grahame C Sydney and dated 1976 in brushpoint lower right; signed Grahame C Sydney, dated December 1976, Mt Pisa Cottage and inscribed “Finishing Post, Vincent” and Egg Tempera on sized, muslin, gesso chipboard in ink verso 380mm × 445mm

Provenance Acquired by the previous owner directly from the artist, 1976. Purchased by the current owner privately, 2006. exhibited Grahame Sydney: Recent Works, Robert McDougall Art Gallery, Christchurch, 13 September – 13 October, 1978. Grahame Sydney: Recent Works, Dowse Art Gallery, Lower Hutt, 26 October – 26 November, 1978.

p.46/p.98

$45,000 – $55,000

24

Gordon Walters Untitled gouache and graphite on paper signed Gordon Walters, dated 66-73 and inscribed 66/Revised 78.7.73 in graphite upper edge 330mm × 230mm

Provenance Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland.

p.47/p.99

$50,000 – $60,000

25

et al.

Provenance Acquired from Starkwhite, Auckland, 2006.

p.48/p.100

$9,000 – $12,000

26

Séraphine Pick untitled oil on canvas, diptych signed Pick, dated 1994 – 1995 in coloured pencil bottom right of left panel; signed Pick and dated 94-95 in brushpoint lower right of right panel; signed Seraphine Pick and dated 1995 in graphite verso on left panel; signed Séraphine Pick and dated 1995 in graphite verso on right panel 1680mm × 1215mm; 1680mm × 1215mm

Provenance Acquired from Claybrook Gallery.

p.49/p.101

$55,000 – $75,000

27

Gretchen Albrecht Of Cloud and Sky acrylic and oil on linen signed Albrecht, dated 05 and inscribed 'Of Cloud and Sky' in ink verso; artist's label affixed verso 940mm × 1830mm

Provenance Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery.

p.52

$25,000 – $30,000

28

Shane Cotton R.A.U.K acrylic on canvas Hamish McKay Gallery stamp applied to stretcher verso (each panel) 1400mm × 2800mm

Provenance Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 2006. exhibited Shane Cotton Survey 1993-2003, City Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand, 17 June – 19 October 2003. SOFA 16: Shane Cotton paintings, University of Canterbury School of Fine Art Gallery, Christchurch, New Zealand, 25 October – 23 November 2003. Shane Cotton: Recent Paintings, Gow Langsford Gallery, Auckland, New Zealand, 19 November – 13 December 2003 literature Harris, Blair. Shane Cotton paintings. Christchurch: University of Canterbury School of Fine Art Gallery, 2003.

p.54/p.102

$60,000 – $70,000

29

Colin McCahon Northland Drawing ink on paper signed McCahon, dated April '59 and inscribed Northland in ink lower edge 630mm × 550mm

Provenance Acquired from Barry Lett Galleries, Auckland.

p.56/p.104

$35,000 – $45,000

30

Ralph Hotere Kyrie Eleison No. 5 oil on canvas signed Hotere, dated Port Chalmers 74 and inscribed Kyrie Eleison 5 (Requiem Series) in brushpoint verso; inscribed BLG Cat 10 in brushpoint on stretcher verso 1070mm × 1065mm

Provenance Acquired from Barry Lett Galleries, Auckland, 1977. exhibited Hotere: Requiem Paintings, Barry Lett Galleries, 1974.

p.57/p.105

$60,000 – $80,000

31

Bill Hammond Walter Buller Blind acrylic on loose canvas, three pieces signed W.D Hammond, dated 1994 and inscribed Walter Buller Blind One in brush point upper edge on left panel; signed W.D Hammond, dated 1994 and inscribed Walter Buller Blind Two in brush point upper edge on middle panel; signed W.D Hammond, dated 1994 and inscribed Walter Buller Blind Three in brush point upper edge on right panel 1070mm × 595mm; 890mm × 660mm; 1030mm × 880mm

Provenance Acquired from Gregory Flint Gallery, Auckland, 1994. exhibited Walter Buller Blind, Gregory Flint Gallery, Auckland, 1994. Bill Hammond: 23 Big Pictures, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin, 11 September – 14 November, 1999, Manawatu Art Gallery, Palmerston North, February – April, 2000, City Gallery, Wellington, 13 May – 13 August, 2000, Auckland Art Gallery, Auckland, 8 September – 5 November, 2000. literature Bill Hammond: 23 Big Pictures. Dunedin: Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 1999.

p.58/p.106

$160,000 – $190,000

Mule Table (On the difficult problem in the phenomenal world) acrylic on found book, music stand, potentiomiter and table. Found amplifier, mp3 player and microphone, 2-channel audio dimensions variable


32

Shane Cotton Patterns in 2 Lords Prayers acrylic on canvas signed SWC, dated 2002 and inscribed Pattern in 2 Lord's Prayers in brushpoint lower right; signed Shane W Cotton, dated 2002 and inscribed 'Pattern in 2 Lord's Prayers' in ink verso 1400mm × 1400mm

Provenance Acquired from Mori Gallery, Sydney. exhibited Shane Cotton: Birds Eyes Views, Mori Gallery, Sydney, 5 – 22 June 2002, cat. 6

p.62/p.102

$30,000 – $40,000

33

Bill Hammond And I'm in the Kitchen with the Tombstone Blues acrylic on board signed W.D. Hammond, dated 1983 and inscribed And I'm in the Kitchen with the Tombstone Blues, Part II, B. Dylan in brushpoint lower right 570mm × 730mm

Provenance Acquired from Brooke Gifford Gallery, 1983.

p.63/p.108

$12,000 – $15,000

34

Bill Hammond Dyskick Dancehall enamel on copper panel inscribed Dyskick Dancehall, The Fall in brushpoint upper left 300mm × 400mm

Provenance Acquired from Art+Object, Auckland, 26 April, 2012, lot 44.

p.64

$18,000 – $24,000

35

Shane Cotton Where ya from man? acrylic on canvas signed S.Cotton, dated 2011 and inscribed 'where ya from man?' in brushpoint lower right; dated 2011 and inscribed where ya from man in ink verso 760mm × 760mm

Provenance Acquired from Black Barn Gallery, Havelock North, 2011.

p.65/p.102

$15,000 – $20,000

36

Neil Pardington Airport C-type print on dibond mount, edition of 15 signed Neil Pardington, dated 2000 and inscribed Airport, 6/15 in graphite verso 1270mm × 1760mm

Provenance Acquired directly from the artist, 2007. exhibited Another from the edition included in Skylight, Sargeant Gallery Te Whare o Rehua, Whanganui, 2001. Skylight, Jonathan Smart Gallery, Christchurch, 2001.

p.66

$4,000 – $5,000

37

Neil Pardington Travelator C-type print on dibond mount, edition of 15 signed Neil Pardington, dated 2002 and inscribed Travelator, 4/15 in graphite verso 1270mm × 1760mm

Provenance Acquired directly from the artist, 2007. exhibited Hikoi, Jonathan Smart Gallery, Christchurch, 2003. Another from the edition included in Suite Summer Series 2015, Suite Gallery, 4 December – 14 February 2015.

p.67

$4,000 – $5,000

38

Pat Hanly Hope Vessel watercolour and graphite on paper signed Hanly, dated 86 and inscribed Hope Vessel in graphite lower edge 540mm × 620mm

Provenance Aquired from Milford Gallery, Queenstown, 2007.

p.68

$18,000 – $24,000

39

Chris Heaphy Rangitoto acrylic on canvas signed C Heaphy, dated 2005 and inscribed 'Rangitoto' in ink verso 1620mm × 1400mm

Provenance Acquired directly from the artist, 2005.

p.69

$10,000 – $15,000

40

Sally Gabori Dibirdibi Country synthetic polymer paint on linen inscribed Artist: Sally Gabori, Title: Dibirdibi Country, Catno:3196-L-SG/OOO8, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen in ink in another hand verso 1210mm × 910mm

Provenance Acquired from Tim Melville Gallery.

p.70

$8,000 - $12,000

41

John Walsh Toku Whanau Ataahua oil on canvas laid onto board signed J Walsh, dated 2001 and inscribed Toku Whanau Ataa Hua in graphite verso 510mm × 610mm

Provenance Acquired from John Leech Gallery.

p.71

$8,000 - $12,000

42

Edward Bullmore Transition No. 4 oil on board signed EB in graphite lower right 595mm × 765mm

Provenance Acquired from Canterbury Gallery, Christchurch.

p.72/p.108

$25,000 – $35,000

43

Edward Bullmore Untitled gouache, ink and pencil on card signed EB and inscribed P. 10 Colour Diagrams & Details 3D Works London in graphite verso 255mm × 200mm

Provenance Acquired from Canterbury Gallery, Christchurch.

p.73/p.109

$500 – $1,000

44

Edward Bullmore Untitled gouache, ink and pencil on paper 210mm × 250mm

Provenance Acquired from Canterbury Gallery, Christchurch.

p.74/p.109

$500 – $1,000


E

S Peter Peryer dan munn David Cauchi andrew clark John Ward Knox FRANCIS MCWHANNELL Mark Adams ADAM GIFFORD Don Driver JOHN HURRELL Yvonne Todd MARTIN PATRICK Rohan Wealleans EMIL MCAVOY Gretchen Albrecht JAMES ROSS Yvonne Todd MEGAN DUNN Allen Maddox ANDREW PAUL WOOD Charles Tole PETER SIMPSON Michael Parekowhai ANDREW CLARK Bill Hammond PRISCILLA PITTS Colin McCahon PETER SIMPSON Jude Rae VALERIE ROSE Heather Straka FRANCES CLARK Grahame Sydney CHARLES NINOW Gordon Walters ANDREW PAUL WOOD et al. ANDREW CLARK

S

bowerbank ninow

82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100

A

Y

Séraphine Pick RACHEL KLEINSMEN Shane Cotton JESSICA MIO Colin McCahon CHARLES NINOW Ralph Hotere CHARLES NINOW Bill Hammond JENNIFER HAY Bill Hammond JULIAN MCKINNON Edward Bullmore RUTH WATSON

S 101 102 104 105 106 108 109


auction n°1 — summer 2015


bowerbank ninow

Lot 1

Peter Peryer The Wind at Whenuapai gelatin silver print, edition of 10 signed Peter Peryer, dated 1998 and inscribed The Wind at Whenuapai in graphite verso; inscribed Peter Peryer, The Wind at Whenuapai, 1998, signed at Mt Pleasant Rd, 14 July 99 in another hand verso 103mm × 148mm off. I was able to take this photograph just by shooting though the open driver’s window, without getting out of the car. Ten minutes later I was back in bed. I am now keen to take another version of this image, this time with no wind at all.” Peryer’s artistic production is also driven by an ever-growing set of formal templates, incorporating aspects of composition but also sensitive to an object’s material qualities and history. He introduces the 2007 work Windsock at Te Anau, as “a newer version” of The Wind at Whenuapai.⁴ Peryer observes that this windsock, standing “hard up against the vast wilderness of Fiordland National Park,” points in the opposite direction to that of The Wind at Whenuapai, and muses on how the direction the viewer reads a page (e.g. left-to-right) might affect the way he or she perceives each image. Its is sustained enquiries into formal matters such as these that make up Peryer’s rich vocabulary, through which he brings a fresh perspective to both everyday scenes and well-worn iconographies. The conical subject of these two images is in some ways repeated in the abandoned soft-serve cone drooping from the side of a bus shelter in Ice cream, also from 2007. Peryer’s anecdotal accounts of his photographs allow the viewer room to consider the image’s multiple lives. Though sometimes detailing formal concerns, they are never dry or grandiose. Though often personal, they are never strictly biographical. While the windsock in The Wind at Whenuapai allows a trained eye to ‘read’ the wind in a rather straightforward fashion, the work itself flutters back and forth, meandering on the eddies.

p.21

Located on the end of the runway at Whenuapai Airbase, the windsock pictured here tells the pilots of incoming planes what wind speed and direction they can expect on approach. These instruments are manufactured and calibrated so as to have a certain amount of ‘hang’ until the wind reaches a specific speed, usually 15 knots, at which point they blow arrow-straight. Peter Peryer has stated that he doesn’t “get up in the morning and think ‘I’m going to take a photograph on a particular theme,'”¹ and has even suggested that the practice of encouraging students to write artistic statements might “interfere with the welling up of an artwork in one’s consciousness.”² Instead, he sees his work as being nourished by a wide range of interests, reflected in the artist’s other images from 1998, which include carved tiki bookends (Tahi Rua), a buddhist statue (The Buddha at Kaukapakapa) and historic European facades (Fachwerk, Germany).³ At the time when this photograph was taken, Peryer lived just off the end of the airbase on Herald Island, and became familiar with many of the planes that flew past his house. Going so far as to learn their dates of commission, model numbers and specifications, he described them as “a constant source of pleasure.” Several have made their way into his images over the years including the 1998 work Hercules over Herald Island. The following is an excerpt from an account by the artist in The Left Hand Raised: Peter Peryer, 2001 (Courtesy the artist and Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth). “Every day I look at this windsock and marvel at what they do and how they work. I particularly wanted to photograph it on a very windy day. On this particular occasion, the weather was right but I was struck down by a bad flu. I struggled out of bed, put on my dressing gown over my pyjamas, and drove

DAN MUNN

82

1

A Talk with Peter Peryer at Hamish McKay Gallery, 2010, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8g06ycCiqIM

2

What is your intention?, 2008, http://peryer.blogspot.co.uk/2008/10/what-is-yourintention-today-i-want-to.html

3

1998 was also a pivotal year for the artist, in that from this year onward he began to use digital photography and also displayed a growing interest in producing colour images.

4

Windsock at Te Anau, 2007, peryer.blogspot.co.uk/2007/10/ windsock-at-te-anau-heres-photo-thats.html


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 3

David Cauchi Self Portrait acrylic on canvas signed Cauchi and dated MMXI in brushpoint upper right 350mm × 280mm

Barthes—dead he may be, but down he isn’t. Self Portrait is a more nuanced representation of the artist, aware of his own flaws and inadequacies, but nevertheless willing to put himself on display, to engage with both the viewer and his own work in a way which is reciprocal and reflexive. Cauchi glances downwards, his eyes almost completely obscured by the dark black wash of his sunglasses. His facial expression is ambiguous—lips pursed in annoyance, or contrition, or perhaps even the beginnings of a wry smile. The bright red fez he wears dominates the image, representing either some bizarre act of penance or a defiant gesture of individualism. His “ridiculous” status can be read as a comment on the place of the artist in relation to his work, subject to judgement and ridicule, but it is also indicative of an understanding that the creation of an artistic persona, like the practice of art-making itself, is a process which cannot ever be completely free from irony or self-doubt. “People sometimes ask me why I make my hair ‘ginger’ in self-portraits. I usually answer that people’s skin isn’t yellow either,”² Cauchi states, indicating that he views his paintings not as faithful representations of external phenomena, but as a mediated counterpoint, neither portraiture nor caricature, but something in between. Cauchi’s paintings are about capturing the essence of an idea or a mood in a diagrammatic style, designed with the intent of conveying its subject with clarity and concision. It would also be missing the point not to mention that Cauchi’s work is wickedly funny, often darkly ironic, and possessed of an infectious energy which pulses through every squiggly line.

p.24

Anne Collins Goodyear, writing on the subject of self-portraiture in the twentieth century, suggests that the dominant trend has been towards an eliding or subverting of the primary status of the artist, in line with Roland Barthes’ concept of the “death of the author.” For Goodyear, this tendency can be seen in the playfully metamorphic self-portraits of Marcel Duchamp and Jasper Johns, and in the anti-portraiture stance of Chuck Close.¹ In this context, David Cauchi’s Self Portrait represents a conundrum. What are we to make of this close-up image of the artist, rakishly sporting a fez and sunglasses, labelled unambiguously as “ridiculous,” like a specimen in a museum or a figure in an instructional manual? Cauchi’s work sits in the uncomfortable space between cartooning and painting, in the way he accompanies his line-and-wash images with cryptic messages, somewhat reminiscent in tone of the art-comics of David Shrigley. However, he is also determined to locate his practice in relation to art history, as indicated by works such as Cauchi contra mundum (2011), which consists of multiple canvasses arranged in the form of a Renaissance altarpiece, the central panel being a pastiche of Pierro Della Francesca’s Resurrection. That painting is also a self-portrait, with Cauchi himself in the position of the risen Christ, draped in a leather jacket and flashing a defiant two-fingered salute to both the viewer and Roland

ANDREW CLARK

83

1

Anne Collins Goodyear, “Repetition as Reputation: Repositioning the self-portrait in the 1960s and beyond” in W. W. Reaves, Reflections/refractions: Self-portraiture in the Twentieth Century (Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press; Lanham, 2009).

2

David Cauchi, “The common-sense nihilist guide to art parahistory: An introduction,” Pointless and Absurd, 28 July 2011, http://pointlessandabsurd.blogspot.co.nz/2011/07/ perspective-painting-proves-nothing.html


bowerbank ninow

Lot 4

John Ward Knox X (life, still. Baby) Oil on calico signed John Ward Knox and dated 2010 in graphite verso and inscribed X (Life. Still. Baby) in graphite verso 650mm × 600mm

p.25

x (life, still. Baby) is one of a small number of similar works that made up John Ward Knox’s 2010 exhibition welcome home sun (Tim Melville Gallery, Auckland). Likened by the artist to cover versions of songs, the pieces in the show were ostensibly based on photographs, some on images of famous sculptures, such as Gian Lorenzo Bernini’s Rape of Proserpina (1621–2), which became Ward Knox’s x (still, life. Hold), others on photos famous in their own right, like Alvin Langdon Coburn’s Broadway at Night (1913), which became x (life, still. Street). The work being discussed derives from pioneering photographic artist Julia Margaret Cameron’s Prayer and Praise (1865), a moody image generally understood to refer to the Holy Family. Another artist might have chosen such source material ironically, to burlesque the classical or spiritual, but Ward Knox’s reinterpretations are respectful, even reverent. I imagine him haunting the library or second-hand bookshop, pulling out dusty Phaidon-published volumes on Italian sculpture, and marvelling at the potency not only of the original artworks, but also of their monochromatic reproductions. His works are not so far from academic studies of the sort made on-site in major art institutions— opportunities for Ward Knox to absorb the lessons of the past, as well as to exercise his considerable skills as a draughtsman. It is as if he is reminding us that the old ways can still be good ones. In the short introduction to welcome home sun, Ward Knox confirms his allegiance to his

sources, and outlines some of his ambitions for his versions, noting, “I have tried to borrow good things and to do so little to them and with such great economy that all I am adding is an absence of light.” In the case of x (life, still. Baby), this added absence translates into a reduction in contrast, a softening. In fact, Ward Knox has introduced radiance, both by using a pale support, which shows through the thinly applied pigment, and by surrounding the painted portion of the piece with a wide unpainted margin, through which light passes, bouncing off the wall and illuminating the work from behind. The use of a relatively dry brush on apparently un-primed calico adds a grainy quality to the image (the effect, as others have noted, is not dissimilar to that of a Seurat conté work). This visual noise, together with the relative paleness of Ward Knox’s version, and his slight cropping of Cameron’s original—emphasising the eponymous baby and the girl at left—lends the work an enigmatic quality, making the piece less immediately legible as a familial scene and more immediately unsettling. The materiality of the work marks it out both as a distinct creative entity, and as a distinctly hand-made one. Ward Knox shows himself to be adept at craft and concept—not merely imitating established masterworks, but reforming them into new ones. It is a virtuoso performance of uncommon subtlety. FRANCIS MCWHANNELL

84


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 5, 6 & 7

Mark Adams Tattooing Tony Fomison, Pio Taofinu'u (solo) gelatin silver print 465mm × 310mm Tattooing Tony Fomison, Sese Lemamea (solo) gelatin silver print 465mm × 310mm Tattooing Tony Fomison, Sese Lemamea (solo) gelatin silver print 310mm × 465mm Aotearoa New Zealand and to give shape to his psychological landscape. That engagement had become problematic with the increasing assertion by Maori of ownership of their stories. He now set out to engage with his Samoan neighbours. While his contemporaries were contriving ceremonies and rituals through performance art, Fomison stepped out of the art world into a fully formed cultural space. If this was appropriation, the entry was paid in blood. It was also paid in respect. Sulu’ape was a proud man, and needed convincing that Fomison was serious about Samoan customs and culture. Fomison’s frame was slight in contrast to the burly young factory workers who usually came under Sulu’ape’s chisels, and the marathon sessions took a physical toll on the artist. At times, he was forced to wear oversized trousers with wire around the belt loops in order to hold the fabric away from his inflamed skin. Adams’ tatau photographs function not as ethnological records but as constructs where overlapping and confliciting cultural narratives can be read. The sequence involving Fomison’s pe’a goes even further, recording a bond between two, or rather three, artists. By the time the creation of Fomison’s pe’a started, Adams had been photographing Sulu’ape for several months, coming down from his home in Whangarei for the marathon weekend sessions. He had worked out some of the technical problems of making large-format images in cramped interior situations, often with a lot of people moving around. The images of Fomison are tense, with jarring expressionist diagonals bisecting the space. The artist lies on the floor, arms flung out like Christ taken from the cross in his darkest hour. This is a theatre of pain. The tatau was also a right of passage and an entry into a community. For the following decade, until his death in 1980, Fomison built and maintained relations with Samoan families, resisting until almost the end the chiefly titles he was offered, because he understood the extra obligations that they would bring.

p.26

In late 1978, painter Tony Fomison started getting a pe’a. Earlier that year, his friend Mark Adams had taken a picture of a man with the traditional Samoan thigh tattoo for a magazine assignment, opening their eyes to the living practice of tatau occurring in suburban Auckland living rooms. A chance encounter with one of Fomison’s Freeman’s Bay neighbours led them to tufuga Su’a Sulu’ape Paulo II in Mangere. Adams stared documenting his work. Adams had been taking photographs of Fomison using large format cameras since they met in Christchurch in 1971. He was also developing a practice of long form documentary projects, often exploring cross-cultural situations and manifestations of racism. As Adams said about his first tatau picture, the magazine shot of Mr Salati Fiu in his Grey Lynn room, “the stranger in the frame was me, not him. He already knew he was in Polynesia. That is what I needed to know.” Fomison was also looking for Polynesia in Ponsonby. He had engaged with te ao Maori as part of his efforts to define a culture in

ADAM GIFFORD 85


bowerbank ninow

Lot 9

Don Driver Music While you Work found bill hook, rope, plastic tubing, tarpaulin and disassembled cassette player signed D. Driver, dated 1997 and inscribed "MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK" in ink on wood panel verso 1000mm × 275mm Driver made a number of assemblages using suspended found tools and tarpaulin dropcloths, but not so many with single implements, or without agricultural bags. In many, like the Te Papa installation Ritual (1982), the tools look conspicuously lethal, and are just as crucial as other elements like goat skulls or carts, if not more. In Music While you Work it is the curved tip of the hook that slyly invites apprehension, more than the sharp edge of the blade. That nasty tip is accentuated by the other, echoing, pointy triangles around it, such as the previously-mentioned downward directing blue pennant it is attached to and the shadowy triangle of blue strategically peeking through the upper orange canvas tarp floating next to the blade. This work is not slick, with impeccably trimmed edges to the cut fabric. As if to match the battered rusty iron blade, the orange material is ragged on the outer lefthand edge. Its frayed perimeter, and the crinkled green twine hanging down from the ‘handle’ at the top, introduces a sense of raw chance, an unanticipated roughness and an allusion to the processes of time’s unravelling, the drawn out violence of inevitable, inescapable decay. As a flag hanging on a wall, or perhaps a banner kept out of the wind, the stationary vertical pennant is also a reflection of the silent cassette player fastened to it, with its electronic ‘guts’ exposed and power disconnected. The mechanisms are all there, especially the wheels that don’t turn, held in stasis like the suspended central tool (without an arm) that no longer thrusts, hacks, slices or tears. The casette player’s circuit board reminds us of the social noise an artwork work can generate, and which can loop around to come back to the artist, if she or he is around to hear it. The discussion which follows , positive or negative, always feeds (perhaps subconsciously) into future projects, as does any speculation (like this writing) about its construction and mental impetus.

p.29

Music while you work, indeed. Looking at this knackered cassette player and creepy billhook with its scythe edge, a viewer might imagine a cassette of music chirpily playing while somebody trims a scruffy hedge, or worse, ferociously lays into a crowd with murderous, throat-slitting intent. The nature of the specified ‘work’ is the focus of this sinister assemblage, providing an invitation to think of the worst interpretative possibility, and encouraging speculation about the type of background music that would accompany said labour. Driver’s black humour is what keeps us guessing: a sound track for multiple murder. A little rhythmical impetus for a multiple slaying. Tuneful cadences for muscular action? As Drivers go this may be a comparatively small wall hanging, with a solo implement, but it is nevertheless potent and strident. It doesn’t waver in its point about its points: the acute angle at the bottom of its downward trimmed tarpaulin, and the combination of the hooked rusty blade and the small ‘echoing’ blue triangle extending from its left edge, a negative shape created by the flippedover, mutilated orange tarpaulin partially hidden by the decrepit blade itself.

JOHN HURRELL

86


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 10

Yvonne Todd Mauve Structure C-type print on dibond mount, edition of 3 + 1 artist's proof signed Yvonne Todd, dated September 2010 and inscribed "Mauve Structure", 1/3 in ink verso 560mm × 452mm

Todd presents us with a luminescent hard-edged apparition, a shell onto which we might project our own notions. Mauve Structure is a phallic monument shrewdly framed by its pastel coloration, a contemporary temple that already looks utterly dated. Isolated in some generic office park, separated from urban centrality, it is an operational outpost. A structure that you would not look at twice, had Todd’s unyielding gaze not landed there to elicit your attention, in the form of an uneasy, lingering double take; at which point you find yourself staring at something that normally would be rapidly passing by your rear view mirror. According to the artist, "Mauve Structure is an office block in Takapuna. I’m not sure if it has a name. I was compelled to photograph it as it has an appealing mauve shimmer late in the day, when the weather conditions are right."¹ One might also infer an associative link here with Todd’s photographic series Wall of Man (2009) in which the artist advertised for: “MEN AGED APPROX 65-75 required by Shore photographer to model suits/jackets. No previous experience necessary.”² Todd subsequently photographed the respondents to her classified in conservative business suits, titling the images: International Sales Director, Chief Financial Officer, Independent Marketing Director and so on. Todd knowingly riffs on the language of the conventional and authoritative head shot. Todd frequently uses such languages counterintuitively, making them work against themselves, thus creating a strange, remarkably unsettling re-contextualisation of existing tropes. Her photographs play into our fears that the corporate world might be anonymous and untrustworthy. Mauve Structure references the kind of propagandistic commercial photography that lines corporate reports and shines the best possible light upon business entities. In this regard, Todd herself was well acquainted with such formulae in her early attempts as a photographer for hire, as she recounted in her autobiographical contribution to the retrospective catalogue Creamy Psychology: "when I was trying to get regular work as an editorial and advertising photographer, I found myself doing mostly unprestigious event coverage— expos, conventions and product launches instead. This transitioned into wedding photography [...] but ultimately, I was begrudging and apathetic. [...] I seemed incapable of realising other people’s dreams and visions."³ However, one could conclude that such a self-confessed “incapability” became an instrumental factor in creating the energetic, thoroughly independent-minded works that have become indelibly Todd’s own.

p.30

At times Yvonne Todd’s photographs seem cryptic, yet alluring, as if the key to unlock them has somehow gone missing. Throughout a large number of distinctive series involving portraiture of (mostly) women, threads of the theatrically gothic, celebrity culture, and social critique are interwoven in a deft, visually captivating manner. Often this is evidenced in the period fashions Todd has used extensively throughout her work, from extravagant formal gowns to intentionally homespun apparel. However, in her “portraits” of generic, urban architectural locales, such subtexts are less readily available to the viewer. This is to say that the dressed-up but eerily vampiric child protagonists of the Vagrants Reception Centre (2005) series can perhaps be more clearly decoded than the shiny, yet equally foreboding, facades of the post-industrial corporate infrastructure referenced in Todd’s image Mauve Structure (2010). What’s going on behind the mirrored, reflective surfaces of this glass and steel sheath? Intrigues in boardrooms one might suspect, or, even less excitingly, multiple employees sitting in carpeted cubicles, personalised by their own family photos and postcards. Todd is orchestrating a psychological game involving metonymy, a part to whole relation; she highlights how inscrutable the corporate realm is with its disembodied financial transactions, passcodes and clearances, management hierarchies and targets, all of this summed up in one, holistic architectonic shrine.

MARTIN PATRICK

87

1

Yvonne Todd, e-mail correspondence, 12 October 2015.

2

Ken Hall, “Yvonne Todd: The Wall of Man,” Christchurch Art Gallery Bulletin, n. 173, Sept-Nov, 8-11.

3

Yvonne Todd, “Do I Even Like Photography?” Creamy Psychology (Wellington: Victoria University Press in Association with City Gallery, 2014) 32.


bowerbank ninow

Lot 11 & 12

Rohan Wealleans The Thing acrylic on found comic book, paper and polystyrene in perspex 350mm × 270mm × 105mm Black Panther acrylic on found comic book, paper and polystyrene in perspex 350mm × 270mm × 105mm These works continue Wealleans’ conversation with sculpture and painting, visible in his trademark layering of house paint to build forms, and his surgical incisions into their thick, flexible skin to reveal anatomical or geological looking stratifications beneath. In this case, his protrusions respond to both the formal qualities and the narratives of the comic books themselves, echoing his sustained dialogue between form and content. In both works he borrows the comic books’ titles, along with their dominant and complimentary colour palette, entangling his works, as Justin Paton suggests, in intricate fictions and back-stories often involving ‘first contact’ with alien cultures and foreign realms.² A yellow, indigo, black and white blob of solid, carved paint echoes the cracked, irradiated skin of The Thing, a recurring figure in Wealleans’ work. Black Panther features a blob of black and dark chocolate browns, with highlights of red, white, yellow and green finding colour harmonies with the skin of the ‘natives’ and the shadow cast by the title. Although the titular character in Black Panther is fictional (being the first black superhero in mainstream American comics), the title may also connote the history of the black militant political party of the same name. Ever the playful provocateur, as a Pakeha man Wealleans delights in engaging subject matter that he isn’t ‘supposed to’ engage with, whether that be the sexualised representation of female bodies, or problematic representations of non-Western cultures. Wealleans’ biomorphic blobs appear to be at once creations of the fantasy worlds of comic books, and entities which are alien to them. He activates and animates their surfaces, adding mutations to their mutations, which in turn double, echo and mirror their apparent hosts. It is as if they emerge from a parallel universe in which everything is made of paint.³

p.31

The amplified fears and desires of fantasy fictions materialise in Rohan Wealleans’ comic book works. Vivid, colourful explosions puncture the surface of two-dimensional illustrations and burst into the three-dimensional world. Black Panther and The Thing offer an encounter with space-invading beings from other dimensions. Wealleans’ comic book series began during a 2008 residency at McCahon House in Titirangi, when he found a number of used comics at a local West Auckland store. Their covers bear the markings of a life well lived: inks bleached by sunlight, scuffing and rounded corners, a smear of purple paint. One bears a fifty cent price tag obscuring part of the title, a constant reminder of its status as pulp fiction—how cheap the past always appears in the present. Yet their custom perspex cases frame and preserve these fleshy forms as collectibles, like comics in plastic sleeves or items of unopened fan merchandise in their original boxes. The comic book series grew out of a cross-pollination of two earlier strands of work. The first was his ‘birth paintings’ which emerged from what have been referred to as his ‘vagina paintings.’ The birth paintings feature Wealleans’ ‘blob’ motif as the spawn of new imaginary life forms. The second strand is ‘Horrorgami’, which he describes as “the ancient art of paper slashing.”¹ The artist has gone on to slash science fiction and horror movie posters, along with other ephemera.

EMIL MCAVOY

1

Emil McAvoy, Interview with Rohan Wealleans, 21 October 2015.

2

Justin Paton, “Rohan Wealleans,” in Speculation, ed. Brian Butler (Aotearoa New Zealand: Venice Project and JRP|Ringier, on the occasion of the 52nd Biennale di Venezia, 2007), 212. Justin Paton, “An appointment with the thing,” How to Look at a Painting (Wellington, New Zealand: Awa Press, 2005), 30.

3

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auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 13

Gretchen Albrecht Geomorphology Watercolour on paper signed Albrecht and dated 74 in ink lower right; Barry Lett Galleries label affixed verso 1110mm × 735mm determined, perhaps even discovered, in the very final stages of the work’s creation by a vigorous cropping, something Albrecht has always eschewed. As the title indicates, Geomorphology consists of a series of energetic bands that suggest a geologic or natural origin, such as cloud layers, weather fronts, seasonal changes, or distant landscape elements, as well as the more obvious geologic strata. Indeed, Albrecht’s watercolour titles from this period refer to all of these things: Black & Red Cloud Bands, Winter Grey and Red, and more prosaically and abstractly, Crimson Bands, Grey/ Red Above and Peach Centre. However, it is the immediacy of these works that initially attracts the attention of the viewer. Swathes of colour energetically wash across the surface, contrasting and jostling for attention, sometimes aggressively (and fortuitously) blending into one another, chance effects which provide moments of unexpected detail. The multiple horizons that make up the main compositional device evoke many moods and atmospheres and help clarify the suggestive complexities of meaning that arise out of viewing the work. The dark, rather melancholic tones suggest a rather more direct genesis for the work.  At the time it was painted, Albrecht was living with her family in Titirangi and had easy access (albeit via metalled roads) to the black sand beaches on Auckland’s West Coast. At the beach, working on small pads, Albrecht would quickly lay down ideas for paintings in watercolour. One such early visit was the touchstone experience for much of her work from the early ‘70s. A particularly dramatic sunset reflected in the shiny wet sand of low tide suggested to Albrecht new compositions and an invigorated colour range. There are suggestions in this work of the fading sunset, and memories of reflections on wet black sand—evocations that are both particular and general. Most importantly, it provided her with a colour palette that was based not on an arbitrary formal scheme, but on a real world experience, and therein lies the power and affective quality of her paintings.

p.33

This large, elegaic watercolour is from a series of fifteen or so that utilized two joined sheets of watercolour paper in order to achieve a new, bolder scale better suited to the ideas that were evolving out of Albrecht’s paintings. Albrecht had already been working with liquid acrylic paint applied directly onto raw, unprimed canvas for three years, and these watercolours represent a continuation of her interest in the brushy manipulation of thin paint. The taller ‘portrait’ format provides a dramatic new arena for the stacked forms depicted in this work, allowing for a vertical, scroll-like reading. This use of thinned down paint, as many commentators have noted, is a direct response to the work of the American colour-field painters: Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland and Helen Frankenthaler, the latter providing Albrecht with the most clues as to how to handle this new medium. The important distinction between Albrecht and these painters (which has been less widely commented on) is Albrecht’s reliance on nature-based imagery, constructed and compositionally centered on the canvas as it was being worked, as opposed to Frankenthaler’s more Surrealist process. Frankenthaler’s works are characterized by an unconscious, automatic approach to imagemaking, in which the composition is finally

JAMES ROSS

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bowerbank ninow

Lot 14

Yvonne Todd Werta C-type print, edition of 3 + 1 artist's proof signed Yvonne Todd and inscribed "Werta" photo taken July 2005 this print 2009, 3/3 in ink verso 1060mm × 830mm

Reluctant performers, like organ-grinder monkeys.” Todd purchased Werta’s Victorian costume (circa 1895) online from a Texan dealer. “I was drawn to the bold black-and-white print and the strange lace banner that goes across the front, like a beauty queen’s sash.” The dress is a product of the industrial revolution and might have been produced by child labour. Werta is seen and not heard, but what has Werta seen and heard? The Victorian era witnessed dramatic changes to the place of children in society. The emergence of a ‘Cult of Childhood’ marked it out as a time of innocence, and children’s literature came into it’s own as a genre, yet many poor children were also abused and exploited in the workplace. In the early 1800s the first factory laws were passed regulating the hours of work, and ensuring the welfare of, children employed in cotton and textile mills. Charles Dickens’ novel Oliver Twist may have been inspired in part by the story of Robert Blincoe, an orphan whose account of working as a child labourer in a cotton mill was widely read in the 1830s. Werta, like Oliver, seems to implore: Please sir, can I have some more? But it’s unclear what she’s asking for. Todd’s vagrants inhabit a nether zone between sentimentality and sexuality. Her wanton waifs are Dickensian dolls—Werta is at once prim and tart. Her frosted lipstick, fake tan and big hair belongs to the modern era of daytime soaps and Sports Illustrated swimsuit calendars. She’s old before her time. Her image is an indictment on the treachery of adulthood. Who is waiting in the reception centre to receive Todd’s vagrants? Why, the grown-ups, of course. JonBenét’s parents were the original suspects in her murder. In December 2003, forensic investigators extracted enough material from a blood sample on her underwear to establish a DNA profile of her killer. The DNA belonged to an unidentified male. Her parents were finally cleared of her murder, but the damage was already done. Todd’s Werta is a flight of fancy, a high-end product on display, an adult’s fantasy of childhood built to attract the DNA of an unidentified male near you.

p.34

The spectre of JonBenét Ramsey haunts the maudlin Werta. Is Yvonne Todd’s subject another moribund child beauty queen? Werta’s blue banner, orange pallor and backcombed hair foster a sense of misplaced pageantry. Her demure eyes meet the viewer’s gaze. Werta is for sale—but who will buy her? On December 26, 1996, JonBenét Ramsey was found dead in the wine cellar of her Colorado family home, her body covered in her special white blanket, her mouth bound with duct tape. The details of her death became as famous as her glamour shots: a stagey ransom note, a pageant mother, a rich father and a botched crime scene. JonBenét died at just six years old. Her blonde bouffant forever frames her face like a halo. Her murder remains unresolved but the verdict is out—child beauty pageants are suspect. Unlike JonBenét, Werta is an amateur. Todd chose to photograph children with no prior modeling experience for her 2005 exhibition The Vagrants’ Reception Centre. Werta was first shown alongside her ‘sisters’ Fervin, Ethyln, Limpet, Mordene, Romanian Orphan and a diabolical photograph of a dripping Wet Sock. Todd says, “The series was based on ideas of supplication, of children being cast as somehow wretched and downtrodden, but forced into big hair and elaborate clothing.

MEGAN DUNN

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auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 15

Allen Maddox Untitled acrylic on loose canvas signed AM and dated 78 in ink lower left 1270mm × 1485mm

p.35

Born in Liverpool as Britain recovered from the Second World War, Allen Maddox (1948-2000) arrived in Napier, New Zealand as a teenager. He studied at the University of Canterbury School of Fine Arts in Christchurch under Rudi Gopas until 1968. Along with his Gopas-taught contemporaries Philip Clairmont and Tony Fomison, he formed part of a generation of complex, difficult, brilliant, troubled and often doomed expressionist painters. Maddox was certainly that in spades: quixotic and quarrelsome on a hair trigger, living larger than life in the Romantic tradition, an outsider frustrating to and stigmatised by the mainstream, a diagnosed schizophrenic, an alcoholic, a dabbler in various drugs, and a genius very much ahead of his time in an artistic milieu that was still clinging to the landscapes of previous generations. Unlike most of his contemporaries, Maddox would go on to pursue a purist form of abstract expressionism—still too narrow a category to adequately describe him—almost exclusively. Around 1975-6 he adopted his instantly recognisable ‘X’ motif. This began as an act of negation of error, the crossing out of whatever wasn’t going right in the painting. Eventually these Xs pleased him enough to be worth retaining in their own right, and grew to fill the whole canvas or assembled themselves into grids. The fugue of Xs reasserted themselves as the dominant feature of his painting again in the 1990s in far looser compositions. With repetition, they gained emphasis and authority. They

can be read simply as a basic geographic form, although others have suggested they allude to the Greek letter chi (the initial letter of Christ) and Maddox’s religious faith. X the unknown. X the signature of the illiterate on a contract. X marks the spot. More than likely, however, X blots out and defiles the pristine void of the painting’s surface. Maddox rarely reworked his paintings. His markmaking was as spontaneous as the Xs he doodled on cigarette packets and matchboxes, but every bit as deliberate as the flies he crafted to go fishing. There were no preliminary drawings, as he tackled the raw canvas immediately. Later in his career the works are made up of tactile, dribbling strata of paint, whereby the artist started with a thinly-painted, loosely elastic grid of Xs and proceeded to paint over them repeatedly, allowing the colours and forms of the previous layer to peep through in flamboyant counterpoint and echo. These paintings are hybrids of two different directions in abstraction; each stroke shouts with a barely restrained Dionysian energy given order by the grid of late modernism. They stand out in the history of New Zealand painting as something quite exceptional and unique. As art historian Tony Green observed in Art New Zealand in 1979, “…every stroke stood up, for itself and nothing else, no symbol, no metaphor, a physical piece of action, not mistakable for anything else.” ANDREW PAUL WOOD

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Lot 16

Charles Tole Untitled (Landscape) oil on board signed Charles Tole and dated '68 in brushpoint lower left 350mm × 530mm his retirement in 1965 when his output increased considerably. Tole is most strongly identified with studies of the built and industrial landscape— power stations, factories, wharves, ships, lighthouses, cranes, oil tanks, warehouses, quarries, fertilizer buildings, railway sheds and the like, treated in a modified Cubist manner, somewhat analogous to the American modernists Charles Sheeler and Charles Demuth. He also worked in other modes including still life, collage, and, as here, landscape. Although sometimes his landscapes have particular locations—Waikato Landscape (1945), Near Taumaranui (1964) — more often they have more generic titles,for example, Landscape 1 (1973) or Landscape with Mountain (1973). He once said: “I find it necessary to eschew the ‘pretty scenic effects’ and visualise the underlying skeleton formation of the hills and valleys.”¹ This interest is apparent in the present work, which is dominated by a massive coastal landform. If it is not Lion Rock at Piha, it is inspired by some similarly imposing natural object located within a marine landscape, the central rock being placed within a context of multi-coloured bands of sky, sea, surrounding hills, sand and estuarine foreground, depicted with rich and various colour, all the way from pale blue to touches of bright red and yellow. This central landform is handled in a virtuoso manner. Unlike his industrial subjects, where straight lines and right angles lend themselves to Cubist treatment, here Tole’s effects are more painterly. While the external outline of the rock is clear-cut, its internal configurations are organic in shape and delineated entirely by colour: blacks, browns, purples, violets, greens, ochres, oranges, and yellows are all are brought into play in this striking and satisfying work.

p.36

Charles Tole (1903-86) flies somewhat under the radar as a painter, though he has, and has always had, keen admirers. You won’t find much more than passing mention of him in the standard reference books, but he is surprisingly well represented in major metropolitan collections—the Hocken Collections, Christchurch Art Gallery, Te Papa Tongarewa, the Auckland Art Gallery, the Fletcher Trust, the BNZ and university collections at Victoria and Auckland. His smallish, intelligent, beautifully composed and finished paintings are an undervalued treasure of New Zealand art. Tole, a life-long Aucklander, studied at Sacred Heart College and Auckland University and became a public servant. He began painting around 1940 in his late thirties, without formal training. The main influences on his development were his older brother John Tole (1890-1967) and the Cubist-trained artist and teacher John Weeks (1888-1965). The Toles, who often exhibited together, once wrote: “We have always been intensely interested in modern developments in style and technique, yet we think these elements should not be arbitrarily or consciously striven for but should emerge and flow freely from the subject matter and from the artist’s creative intuition towards the expression and communication of his message.” They shared a locally inflected version of modernism with other near contemporaries such as Rita Angus and Doris Lusk. Charles Tole exhibited with the Auckland Society of Arts, with the mildly experimental Rutland and Thornhill Groups in Auckland, and sometimes further afield. He showed with the Christchurch Group in 1948 and exhibited with his brother at the Architectural Centre Gallery in Wellington in 1957. Peter McLeavey exhibited his work in Wellington in the 1980s. He was mainly a weekend and occasional painter until

PETER SIMPSON

1

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Ron Brownson, Art Toi: New Zealand Art at Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tamaki (Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki, 2011), 109.


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 18

Michael Parekowhai Ed Brown C-type print, edition of 10 1070mm × 1265mm

and privilege. A small amount of internet research reveals that some of these names belong to people who could plausibly belong to such a club: Elmer Keith was the name of an American gun enthusiast who developed a new type of ammunition for revolvers, while Ed Brown appears to be the name of a firearms manufacturer, with a possible reference to Edwin Brown, a nineteenth-century English naturalist and taxidermy collector. Jimmy Rae is more opaque, possibly referring to either an American NFL player, a Scottish footballer, or the name of a song by Canadian singer Corey Hart, although none of these solutions seems completely satisfactory. Larry Vickers is an ex-US Army Delta Force operative who works in the firearms industry as a consultant, and Lou Lombardi is a television actor who played an FBI agent in The Sopranos. There is an element of wry humour in ascribing these masculine, aggressive-sounding names to small, apparently inoffensive creatures such as rabbits and sparrows, more evocative of the anthropomorphic tales of Beatrix Potter than of gun-club patrons. However, in the context of New Zealand’s native ecosystem, species such as rabbits, sparrows, possums and deer may as well have come equipped with an arsenal of weaponry, for all the destruction their introduction has caused. These attractive, quirky portraits are equally readable as mugshots of aggressive invaders, simultaneously cataloguing their crimes and perhaps offering them a backhanded notoriety otherwise denied such lowly creatures. Lastly, of course, the positioning of these European-sounding names behind the visages of invasive pest species speaks eloquently about the colonial history of New Zealand, a topic itself buried beneath layers of guilt, political narrative, wilful ignorance and historical revisionism. Parekowhai offers a reminder that the British colonial project was a multifaceted, aggressive operation, seeking to elide or eradicate both the people and the ecology of colonised places. The ubiquity of introduced species such as rabbits and sparrows, and the extent to which they are considered normal, almost invisible parts of New Zealand’s landscape, shows how pervasive colonialism is as an ecological and cultural force. The reference to Beverly Hills adds an additional layer of meaning to the work, suggesting that the multinational nature of American popular culture represents itself a further wave of colonisation.

p.38

This image is part of a series entitled The Beverly Hills Gun Club, which consists of a number of works involving taxidermy specimens of sparrows and rabbits. Some of these works take the form of close-up photographs of said specimens, all shot against the same vivid orange-red background. The crisp, immaculate nature of this photo, where each feather and glinting glass eye is captured in perfect focus, suggests an advertisement or magazine spread, as does the vividly coloured backdrop, with its sense of placeless, nervous energy. Adding to the aura of artificiality which surrounds the work is the fact that this is a photograph of another representation. The object depicted is not an animal, but a carefully prepared example of taxidermy, using the skin and feathers of a real creature to create a representative simulacrum of it, devoid of life or substance but retaining an appearance of vitality which is at once disturbing and oddly appealing. These are images which are thoroughly curated, chosen and presented as part of a coherent strategy, a completely mediated experience. But what exactly is being represented, and why? The title of the series, as well as the title of each individual photograph, has a great deal of bearing on this question. As with many of Parekowhai’s works, language plays a key role in the encoding and decoding of meaning— the image itself is only a part of the puzzle. Each rabbit and sparrow photographed has been given a name: Elmer Keith, Ed Brown, Jimmy Rae, Larry Vickers, and Lou Lombardi. These are not the type of names associated with animals, but oddly specific human names, names which suggest something about their owners. The title of the series implies that these human-sounding animals are part of the eponymous club, a cadre of heavily armed creatures hailing from a location intimately associated with wealth

ANDREW CLARK

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Lot 19

Bill Hammond Zoomorphic Detail acrylic on canvas signed W.D. Hammond, dated 1999 and inscribed Zoomorphic Detail in brushpoint upper edge 595mm × 395mm For all this, the image is disquieting. The verdigris background, familiar from many of Hammond’s paintings of this period, seeps and drips, a swampy life-generating ooze. The figures are a murky, unhealthy grey. There is something creepy about the way the bird-humans’ legs dwindle flabbily away to vestigial claws or melt into thin air. Unnerving too is the way the left-hand bird-human’s back is encircled by the monkey’s tail, which curls like a seeking tentacle, and an attenuated, snaking sinew with a tiny animal’s head. And what of the ectoplasmic humanoid facial features on the knee of one birdhuman, or on the bicep of the other? Are they tattoos? Masks? Faces made in flesh, wrongly located, coming into being as part of a change from one form to another? Hybridity and metamorphosis have featured largely in Hammond’s work from the outset, and make a crucial contribution to the uneasy feel of so many of his images. In the mythology of shapeshifters, the transformation of beast to beast (human to wolf, seal, cat…) is seen as at best disturbing, at worst terrifying, or, as with the Egyptian bird- and wolf-headed deities, as awe-inspiring and transcendent. These transformations always signal an unhinging of the natural order of things. In Hammond’s idiosyncratic bestiary, it’s never clear whether the greater danger lies with the human or the animal form—or something in between. Hammond’s works almost always carry a sense of narrative, however elusive or inexplicable they may be. So what’s the story here? Is the tale Hammond spins a form of creation myth, in which these creatures exist in a pre-lapsarian condition, when all are innocent and guileless? Does he propose a glimpse of an as-yet-unforeseen form of evolution, perhaps some hideous, post-nuclear state, seething with unsettling mutations? Or are we witnesses to a nascent divinity? The fascination and the beauty of Hammond’s world is that we will never really know.

p.39

Zoomorphic Detail is one of a handful of works with this title, painted by Bill Hammond in the late 1990s. In one, a solitary, winged bird-human seated on a tree stump seems lost in thought; in another particularly macabre image a gnarly-taloned bird-human and two skull-headed creatures seem inextricably melded together in a deathly embrace. Like Hammond’s other ‘birdland’ works of this period, Zoomorphic Detail lies somewhere between the throbbingly discordant images of the 1980s and early 1990s and his later, more intricately elegant, paintings. This work is dominated by two unnaturally elongated seated humanoid figures with birds’ heads. They are alike but different. The ramrod posture of the figure on the left is familiar from many of Hammond’s ‘birdland’ works, while the sinuous curves of the right-hand figure echo those of the posturing creatures in All Along the Heaphy Highway (1998) and Brick Waltz, from the same year. There’s a kind of familial tenderness—a rare commodity in Hammond’s imagery—in the close snuggle of the two figures on the left and the way one small figure piggy backs on the plump shoulders of the right-hand birdhuman. Though they face away from one another, the bird-humans’ shoulders touch, and the figures seem somehow akin, a group. An air of eerie calm prevails.

PRISCILLA PITTS

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auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 20

Colin McCahon Tangi. Muriwai synthetic polymer paint on Steinbach on board signed McCahon, dated sept. oct. 72 and inscribed Tangi. Muriwai. in brushpoint lower edge 720mm × 1100mm “When I was a child, no person died without first asking about the state of the tide, whether it was full or low. People always liked to die at low tide because the tide had to be completely out to enable them to reach Te Reinga Wairua, ‘The Leaping Place of Spirits’, in the Far North…. When the tide is full, the hole is under water and covered with masses of seaweed” (p. 74). These words suggest the wider meaning of this group of works. McCahon is meditating on the Maori concept of death, and in particular the belief that departing spirits travelled up the West Coast beaches—Muriwai, Ahipara, Ninety Mile Beach—to the leaping off point at Cape Reinga. If Tangi. Muriwai is a ‘high tide’ rather than a ‘low tide’ painting, the symbolic meaning of the work is moved in the direction of recovery or resurrection rather than death, a suggestion reinforced by the unusual presence of the moon. One chapter in The Tail of the Fish has an epigraph: “Me tangi, kapa ko te mate e te marama,” translated as ”Let us weep, for his is not the death of the moon,” a saying McCahon incorporated into several works, including several crayon textual drawings, which read: “Ours is as the life of the moon/ One generation falls/ as another rises/ Ours is the life of the moon.” In other words, the moon, with its perpetual changes, is for McCahon a symbol of death and renewal, consistent with both Maori and Christian belief. This tangi, then, is not without hope. Perhaps the exquisitely subtle touch of pink on the waves hints at a more positive outcome.

p.41

Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, So do our minutes hasten to their end; Each changing place with that which goes before, In sequent toil all forwards do contend. —William Shakespeare, “Sonnet 60” Some such sentiment as expressed in the opening to Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 60” seems to lie behind Colin McCahon’s superb nocturne of moonlit waves hurrying towards Muriwai beach, with the merest sliver of setting sun visible along the horizon. An unusually descriptive painting for this phase of his career, the sombre atmosphere is heightened by the overwhelming blackness of the night sky, relieved only by the presence of a large pale moon—unprecedented in McCahon’s work so far as I can recall—hanging in the sky. This work is best understood within the context of a group of paintings completed between August-October 1972, which consists of two works entitled Seaweed on the Beach and two entitled Low Tide, Muriwai. What all five works have in common is the Muriwai beach setting and the notion of tangi, the Maori ritual of mourning. The other four works all have the words “taitimu (low tide), tangi, Muriwai” written along the bottom edge in ‘seaweed’ writing; the absence of taitumu in Tangi. Muriwai suggests that it is a scene of high tide, not low tide, a fact which subtly alters the symbolic implications of the work. An important source of McCahon’s understanding of such Maori matters was Matire Kereama’s The Tail of the Fish: Maori Memories of the Far North, a book from which he derived numerous paintings utilising Maori texts, such as The lark’s song, On going out with the tide and O let us weep (all 1969). By 1972, he was most preoccupied with Chapter 24, ”Going Out with the Tide,” which begins:

PETER SIMPSON

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bowerbank ninow

Lot 21

Jude Rae Still Life 5 Oil on canvas signed J Rae, dated 98 and inscribed Still Life 5 in graphite verso 670mm × 700mm Rae’s focus on contemporary subject matter in the form of recognisable vessels also speaks of a deeply networked set of attachments and relations between human and non human entities. Rae’s painted vessels— fire extinguishers, mass-produced bowls and water bottles—are made from oils, refined earths and minerals, and evoke the homogenised materials coursing through the veins of the global economy. The seemingly impersonal but familiar objects that Rae depicts are the things that work for us and through us, the items that unwittingly touch a life. Her still lives may then also capture the simultaneous effects of intimacy and alienation that characterise our era—the strange contrast between the lived everyday and the inconceivable vastness of the anthropocene. Here in Rae’s paintings domestic interiors and intimate items unfold into the flattened space-time of the global, in which a plastic drink bottle might evoke the unthinkable lifespan of a landfill, e-waste dump or open pit mine. Why paint a still life, then, if not to make visible the irreconcilable scales and temporalities of our era? To paint a still life is to speak of an unfathomable everyday—an everyday that almost always exceeds our descriptions.

p.44

Dutch still life paintings from the 17th Century once depicted a private world to be drawn into. Laced with a heavy dose of morality, the interior spaces depicted within this genre would act to seduce by proffering treasures, nested goods and peculiar artifacts to be consumed. This beckoning mode of the Dutch still life creates the feeling of being drawn into the depths of a fecund domesticity, while also retaining belief in a particularly human centered notion of privacy and earthly pleasure. Jude Rae’s contemporary still lives are sparse by contrast. Open and expansive, they speak of a vastness that exceeds human scales and temporalities. Just as the artist Robert Barry once placed an open helium canister in the desert,¹ allowing its contents to be dispersed into the air, Rae’s paintings seem to be on the brink of dissipation. Her paintings are populated with mass produced goods such as fire extinguishers, gas canisters, petrol containers and plastic water bottles, utilitarian vessels made to contain unruly materials such as oil, water and gas. In her work Still Life 5 (1998), a number of bowls are depicted in opaque yellows, bland creams, and muddy greys. When looking at the painting, the viewer’s eyes travel over the imperfect stack of bowls, and over their lips, rims and edges, creating an effect of attention wandering elsewhere. The paint is buttery, a little smeared, and there is a monochrome backdrop daubed provisionally, and then a table top or horizon line rendered more definitively. By painting within the genre of still life, Rae undertakes the difficult task of conceiving of a contemporary moment from within a contemporary moment— of attempting to still the continually reeling present, or capture the necessary incompleteness of the everyday.

VALERIE ROSE

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As part of his 1969 Inert Gas Series.


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 22

Heather Straka International Rescue oil on cotton mounted to board signed Heather Straka, dated 2006 and inscribed International Rescue in graphite verso 1300mm × 800mm in the 1920s coexist with the violently enforced military and cultural imperialism of the Japanese occupation, and the largely dispassionate Western response in the early years of the invasion. Through the lens of twentieth-century Chinese history, International Rescue presents as a confrontation between mutual, cosmopolitan cross-cultural exchange, and extreme intercultural aggression. But to the viewer more familiar with Western popular culture than East Asian history, the work’s more striking features may be its references to a particular artefact of mid-century British television: Thunderbirds. Those sensitive to this particular set of cultural cues will recognise the work’s title and the insignia pin on the figure’s qipao as belonging to the International Rescue team of the Thunderbirds puppets and their rescue craft. Some might even see an allusive connection between Thunderbirds and the distant aeroplane, which looks awfully like a WWII American ‘Thunderbird’ B-17 bomber. In a touch characteristic of Straka’s portraiture, a culturally displaced, irreverent allusion brings some levity to what might also be read as a sombre, historically specific portrait. The figure and her apparent membership of the Thunderbirds’ International Rescue team may seem disconnected in time and culture but perhaps together form an ironic jibe; in the years after the 1932 battle of Shanghai, international rescue was, like the Thunderbirds, largely fictional. With its Thunderbirds, its portrait of an imagined 1920s Shanghai perfume model, and strong allusions to war, International Rescue offers up a collision of times, cultures, fiction, history, and degrees of reverence. As much of Straka’s work does, International Rescue offers up a breadth of allusions that defy attempts to make definitive claims of authenticity or cultural belonging.

p.45

Heather Straka’s cross-cultural portraits provoke an often discomfiting array of questions as to who may lay claim to a culture and its artefacts, and what cultural transformations mean for claims of authenticity. In her project The Asian, shown at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery in 2010, and individual works such as Koru Girl (2007), Double Happyness (2008) and Cargo Girl (2011) Straka presents the same central figure: a young, beautiful, qipao-wearing Chinese woman, lifted from a specific early twentieth century Shanghai perfume advertisement.¹ In different iterations of the figure, she is adorned and situated with different objects collected from disparate cultures and times. International Rescue (2006) is from the early period of this body of work. Here, the figure is recognisable in her style and attire as the ‘new woman’ of 1920s Shanghai and its rapidly modernising and commercial culture. However, this woman has been plucked from her time and repositioned in a scene evocative of 1930s-40s China and the catastrophic Japanese invasion of that period: a smoky grey sky, a box of first aid supplies, and a plane flying ominously overhead. This apparently slight temporal shift, taking a figure from the 1920s and moving her forward in time by only a few years, has tremendous if culturally specific import. In this transposition, interactions between economic imperialism, cultural trade, modernisation, and cross-cultural borrowing

FRANCES CLARK

1

97

Aaron Kreisler, ‘Made in China’ in The Asian: Heather Straka Aaron Kreisler ed. (Dunedin Public Art Gallery: 2010) n.p.


bowerbank ninow

Lot 23

Grahame Sydney Finishing Post, Vincent egg tempera and gesso on sized muslin on board signed Graham C Sydney and dated 1976 in brushpoint lower right; signed Graham C Sydney, dated December 1976, Mt Pisa Cottage and inscribed “Finishing Post, Vincent” and Egg Tempera on sized, muslin, gesso chipboard. (sic) in ink verso 380mm × 445mm medium of egg tempera, which, while its use dates back to the 1st Century AD, is almost unheard of in the context of New Zealand art. As it is essentially egg white mixed with raw pigment, Sydney was required to mix all of his paints by hand. In the years after leaving Mt. Pisa, Sydney began to work with oil paint, which allowed him to work in a faster, more fluid manner and easily cover large areas of the picture plane. However, his earlier egg tempera paintings were crafted from layer upon layer of a minute ‘crosshatched’ technique, which produced expertly detailed images. Sydney’s paintings of the mid- to late 1970s famously depicted scenes from the immediate environment that surrounded him in Otago. This particular painting depicts a local landmark that was about a ten-minute drive away from his Mt. Pisa home, the long-since-defunct finishing post at the Cromwell horse-racing track, which is still active to this day. The term ‘Vincent’ in the title refers the old Vincent County. Once encompassing the town of Cromwell, the prominent early settler Vincent Pyke controversially named the region after himself. At this time in his career, Sydney would first draw his subject matter en plein air and then carefully consider the imagery before executing it as a fully resolved painting—a process that could take as long as three years to complete.

p.46

Finishing Post, Vincent is a product of the most important period of Graham Sydney’s career. Although Sydney had a strong interest in painting and drawing from childhood, in Holyoake-era New Zealand pursuing art making as a career was not just unconventional but almost unheard of, with the exception of artistically conservative figures like Peter McIntyre and Marcus King. As a result, Sydney’s professional life began with secondary school teaching, a vocation that allowed him the opportunity to work in Europe and the United Kingdom as a young man. Sydney’s career as a teacher, however, was very short-lived. After only a year abroad, he packed his bags and returned home to live with his parents in 1974 so that he could pursue painting as a full-time career. In the five years following this monumental decision, Sydney would go on to produce some of the most profound works of his lifetime. In 1975, Sydney held his first major solo exhibition at Auckland’s Peter Webb Galleries and, in 1976, the year in which Finishing Post, Vincent was produced, he held his second at the same gallery. Unlike the majority of the other landscape paintings by Sydney which have have been made available to the market in recent years, Finishing Post, Vincent was painted while Sydney lived in the humble surrounds of a cottage on Mt. Pisa—a far cry from the house that, as a successful artist, he would later build in Central Otago. Leaving Mt. Pisa marked the end of an era in Sydney’s career. The works made while Sydney lived at Mt Pisa were unique in that they were meticulously executed in the

CHARLES NINOW

98


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 24

Gordon Walters Untitled gouache and graphite on paper signed Gordon Walters, dated 66-73 and inscribed 66/Revised 78.7.73 in graphite upper edge 330mm ×230mm The way that these European artists used repeated formal motifs in their work led Walters, on his return to New Zealand in 1953, to go about creating his own signature motif, derived from the strong graphic qualities and formal economy of Māori visual culture. Since the 1980s, with the resurgence of a Māori voice across all aspects of New Zealand public life, this usage of the koru and pitau has been criticised from some corners as cultural appropriation,most notably by art historian Rangihīroa Panoho during the landmark Headlands exhibition that toured Australia and New Zealand in 1992. Walters himself saw no cultural associations in the forms he used. While acknowledging their origins, he affirmed that there was no “descriptive value” in them and that he used them exclusively to explore the dynamic tensions of positive and negative space. This particular work, painted in 1966 (the year of the Walters’ first exhibition, at Kees and Tina Hos’ New Vision gallery in Auckland) and revised by the artist in 1973 (leading into the richest period of his work) is an excellent representative example of type. The restful passages of monochromatic planes are punctuated by two tight clusters of koru-forms that create moderately-paced cadenzas in the otherwise adagio composition. The upper grouping—a deceptively straightforward-seeming counterpoint of positive and negative, push and pull, in black and white—is repeated lower down as a coda, distinguished by a shift in key from white to a still very neutral pale ochre. Everything about the work speaks of tranquil balance and lyrical elegance. As art historian Michael Dunn wrote of this group of Walters’ works in Art New Zealand in 1978, “collectively they form one of the most important groups of paintings made in this country since [World War II],” a statement which holds true to this day.

p.47

Wellington-born abstract painter Gordon Walters (1919-1995) is best known for his starkly geometric, hard-edged work based around an adaption of Māori koru and pitau motifs. These, in turn, originate in the furled fronds of native ferns and are a striking feature of Māori kowhaiwhai (painted rafters of the meeting house), where they represent the life force of nature and tribal genealogy. It is easily the most recognisable image in New Zealand art and has heavily influenced all aspects of New Zealand corporate, government and NGO logo design. Walters consistently explored the rhythmic, spatial and optical possibilities of this motif from the end of the 1950s onward. As a young boy, Walters spent hours studying the Polynesian collection of what was then Wellington’s Dominion Museum. The inspiration for his unique style probably originated in his friendship with the Indo-Dutch émigré artist Theo Schoon in the 1940s. Schoon was obsessed with the notion of reinvigorating what he saw as the stagnating traditional Māori arts by infusing them with the design principles of the German Bauhaus school. There is nothing to suggest that Walters had any such radical project in mind when he went to Europe in 1950. There, he was drawn to the work of geometric modernists Capogrossi, Mondrian, Vasarely and Auguste Herbin.

ANDREW PAUL WOOD

99


bowerbank ninow

Lot 25

et al. Mule Table (On the difficult problem in the phenomenal world) acrylic on found book, music stand, potentiomiter and table. Found amplifier, mp3 player and microphone. 2-channel audio. dimensions variable strange box of indeterminate function, possessed of a dial marked with the numerals 1-10 and a number of what appear to be attachment points for electrical wires, and finally a sound system consisting of amplifier, a small speaker, and a microphone. Collectively, these elements suggest a machine or system of indeterminate purpose, in the vein of et al.’s work from 2000, whilst attempting to engineer a telepathic device fig.1. These elements emanate a sense of the archaic, the lost and the obsolete, but they are also an invitation to engage with the system, whatever it might be, in order to confront the “problem” itself in a direct way. et al. has given us a set of tools; we just need to use them. However, although it strongly resists reductive readings, this work seems to fall in line with Mark Kremer’s observation about the emotional component of et al.’s work, namely that “Melancholy and euphoria dispute the terrain; melancholy for objects, thoughts and experiences that supposedly are lost; euphoria because of the undreamed possibilities to fill the gap with new meaning.”¹ Although it deploys the languages of technological obsolescence, institutional neglect and epistemological confusion, et al.’s work is hardly sterile, and even less is it emotionally detached. The difficulty and opacity of the work is a part of its emotional impact; the excitement of uncertainty and the implied invitation to explore and dwell in this interstitial space are what makes the work rewarding and challenging.

p. 48

Writing anything of substance about et al.’s work is itself a difficult problem. The sculptures, installations, texts and so on which comprise the oeuvre offer the viewer a wealth of information, often in the form of lists or tables of figures, facts and dates. Politics is implicated, as are sociology, technology and philosophy; yet none of these approaches offers a satisfactory solution to the questions posed by the work, or serves to pass through the barriers of silence, anonymity and utilitarianism which it erects. On the difficult problem in the phenomenal world exemplifies many features of et al.’s work. The text inscribed on the cover of the book resting on the table, which also serves as the work’s title, seems to offer a prescription or description of the work’s intended functionality and purpose—to serve as a kind of exegesis or commentary on the titular “problem.” However, the nature of this problem is obscured, perhaps un-knowable. The “phenomenal world” as described by Kant—that is, the world as experienced through the lens of human understanding— will, by its very nature, always interpose itself, blocking any kind of ‘direct’ access to the world of things-in-themselves. Stuck as we are in this mediated, subjective world, the best we can do is approach the problem obliquely. This work consists of a number of elements, most of which have had their original provenance and purpose obscured by an even coat of institutional grey paint. A small folding table supports a number of objects: a clipboard, a book with handwritten title, a small sculpted figure resembling a knight from a chessboard, a

ANDREW CLARK

1

100

Mark Kremer, “et al., or the shadow broker,” in Burke, Gregory., Conland, Natasha, Kremer, Mark, Barr, Jim, Barr, Mary, Creative New Zealand, and Biennale Di Venezia. Et Al. : The Fundamental Practice. 1st ed. (Wellington, N.Z.: Creative New Zealand, 2005), 76.


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 28

Séraphine Pick untitled oil on canvas, diptych Signed Pick, dated 1994 - 1995 in coloured pencil bottom right of left panel. Signed Pick and dated 94-95 in brushpoint lower right of right panel. Signed Seraphine Pick and dated 1995 in graphite verso on left panel. Signed Séraphine Pick and dated 1995 in graphite verso on right panel. 1680mm × 1215mm; 1680mm × 1215mm doxical enchantment which is present in all of Pick’s works. Whilst the presentation of lone domestic images and objects initially conveys an almost trite sense of banality, the stark arrangements which they collectively form, and the tenderly recollective manner in which they are treated, also affords them an implied weight of meaning. The suggested autonomy and isolation of each of these images is negated by their shared existence within a groundless space and collective consciousness. The image of the colander is an important example of this. Its presence as an almost absurdly mundane domestic object generates a sense of ironic solemnity, which in turn serves to reveal further layers of meaning and significance through a process of incongruous exchange. Just as the painted surface gradually reveals its own complex layering and delicacy, Pick’s maternal association with the object (a Proustian evocation) unfolds, along with explorations of memory and psychological obfuscations rendered by an interplay of light and shadow, the delicate duality of the diptych, and the necessary dialogue generated by the colander’s almost humorous co-existence with a bath. In this way, the work compels the viewer to deal with the contradictory and subjective nature of memory and consciousness.

p.49

“The remoteness of a thing is in proportion rather to the visual power of the memory that is looking at it than to the real interval of the intervening days…”¹ In his seminal work A La Recherche du Temps Perdu (Remembrance of Things Past), Marcel Proust explores the nature of involuntary memory and consciousness through the lens of remembered images. Meditating on the potency of events from his childhood and the sensory associations, emotions and responses they invoke, Proust weaves a memoir of unconscious interconnectedness, free from the constraints of form, space and time. This ability to articulate the psychological complexities of one’s formative experience in a language of dreamlike lucidity, for which Proust is so celebrated, has also been mastered by Seraphine Pick in her dreamscape paintings. Beginning in the mid-1990s, a watershed moment in Pick’s artistic development, this period of production marks the artist’s transformation of her cultivated understanding of memory and psychology into a solemn personal iconography. Thus was born Pick’s symbolic, almost Jungian method of painterly inter-consciousness, which arguably forms the quintessence of her oeuvre. The present work, in its oblique, largescale gorgeous pallor, is an extremely rare and exceptional offering from this period. Possessing a timeless and ethereal luminescence, this sublime diptych compels the viewer to partake of a semi-somnolent dialogue of image-based contradictions. In this, the work goes to the heart of the para-

RACHEL KLEINSMEN

1

101

M. Proust and C. K. Scott-Moncrieff, Remembrance of Things Past (Random House, 1932), 752.


bowerbank ninow

Lot 28, 32 & 35

Shane Cotton R.A.U.K acrylic on canvas Hamish McKay Gallery stamp applied to stretcher verso (each panel) 1400mm × 2800mm Patterns in 2 Lords Prayers acrylic on canvas signed SWC, dated 2002 and inscribed Pattern in 2 Lords Prayers in brushpoint lower right; signed Shane W Cotton, dated 2002 and inscribed 'Pattern in 2 Lords Prayers' in ink verso 1400mm × 1400mm Where ya from man? acrylic on canvas signed S.Cotton, dated 2011 and inscribed 'where ya from man?' in brushpoint lower right; dated 2011 and inscribed where ya from man in ink verso 760mm × 760mm

p.54

p.62

p.65

102


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Shane Cotton came to prominence during the 1990s with paintings characterised by an ochre colour range and a focus on the land: land stacked on shelves, land in pots, land divided up and pinned with flags. This preoccupation stemmed from Cotton’s research into New Zealand’s colonial history and his own bicultural heritage. The repercussions of two cultures meeting played out across his canvases through his distincitve use of symbolic imagery. Then, at the turn of the new millennium, Cotton shifted to paintings dominated by black and rich in the symbols and stories of his tūrangawaewae: Taiāmai of Te Tai Tokerau, Northland. By grounding the works so firmly in his ancestral homeland, Cotton asserted his identity as a member of the Ngāpuhi iwi and of the Ngāti Rangi, Ngāti Hine, and Te Uri Taniwha hapū. Christianity became a dominant presence in his work due to the huge impact that early Christian missionaries had on Northern Māori culture, from the introduction of literacy to the near total suppression of local art forms. In 1998, Cotton stated that “It made complete sense to me that if I was to develop stories from the North and develop stories around images, then I really had to look closely at aspects of the Bible, look to the word, and find a way to bring them together.”¹ Since this time, Christian prayers and Biblical verses have permeated Cotton’s paintings in both English and te reo Māori. Pattern in 2 Lord's Prayers features Te Inoi a Te Ariki (the Lord’s Prayer), written out twice in white paint. As the prayer descends from the top of the canvas, the tiny letters become increasingly separated, losing legibility until they are just specks against the expansive field of black. Standing out from the darkness is a red cell that harks back to the earliest years of Cotton’s career when microbiological forms filled his paintings. The silhouetted figure within the cell would have been sourced from a book or webpage, illustrating Cotton’s habit of taking found images and repurposing them within his artworks. The same goes for the birds, which are given a ghostly affect through their partial reproduction in thin white paint. In a departure from his earlier works, the significance of these images is unclear: they are divorced from their original contexts and left to float in a seemingly random configuration. Instead of telling narratives through words and symbols, here Cotton has shifted his focus onto the nature of text and image themselves. By scattering letters and using reproduced images, he plays with concepts of legibility and originality. This shift heralds the postmodern period of Cotton’s career, in which he favours ambiguous subject matter in order to hand over the creation of meaning to the viewer. From this point on, stories of a specific place and time fade from Cotton’s works. Instead, the imagery in paintings such as R.A.U.K. invites conjecture but denies resolution. The birds in this work could have a range of potential meanings depending on the viewer’s associations, such as freedom, nationhood, or death. The latter

relates to the story of Māui, whose demise was caused by the laughter of a pīwakawaka (fantail). Likewise, the concentric circles could be targets or references to artists such as Julian Dashper and Jasper Johns—or something else altogether. In Cotton’s postmodern works, no single interpretation is more valid than another. The images of toi moko (Māori tattooed heads) are drawn from Major-General Horatio Gordon Robley’s book, Moko; or Maori Tattooing, which was originally published in 1896 and includes photographs of preserved heads from Robley’s own collection.² Their inclusion could be a reference to the 19th Century phenomenon of Europeans buying toi moko from Māori and selling them at high prices overseas, a trade that led to many Māori being killed for this purpose. But Cotton removes the context from the images by floating them on backgrounds of black and smoky white. He has digitally altered them into flat forms and even removed the moko that made the heads so coveted in the first place. The outlines are refilled with layered colours in one and camouflage patterns in the others, inviting a whole new set of potential associations. The airbrushed background seen in R.A.U.K. took over from black as Cotton’s signature setting, developing into the dramatic night sky of Where ya from man? Here the dark cloudscape extends out past all four edges of the picture frame, perhaps infinitely. Text hangs in the air like red smoke, as indistinct and ephemeral as the background. The question posed is a quote from the 1969 film Easy Rider that Cotton has referenced in many other works—but the evocative appearance of the words is more important than what they say: “I use words like an image. I want them to operate like the birds or the clouds but at moments you can make out a word… I’m alluding to the possibilities of something else instead of demanding a literal reading.”³ A silhouetted sailing ship functions in a similar way, alluding to the idea of travel from somewhere without specifying a place or time. Its black form adds to the ominous mood of the painting, while the overall sense of depth and atmosphere is contradicted by white slashes that cut across the picture. These seem to prevent the viewer from venturing too far into the dreamlike scene by reminding us that it’s really just a few layers of paint on canvas. That’s all any painting is, after all. JESSICA MIO

103

1

Shane Cotton, quoted in William McAloon, “Stirring the Pot: Recent Paintings by Shane Cotton,” Art New Zealand, no.90, Autumn 1999, p. 72.

2

Horatio Gordon Robley, Moko; or Maori Tattooing. Papakura: Southern Reprints, 1987.

3

Shane Cotton, quoted in Justin Paton, “Shane Cotton: Stamina, Surprise and Suspense.” Christchurch Art Gallery. http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/bulletin/170/ shane-cotton-stamina-surprise-and-suspense/


bowerbank ninow

Lot 25

Colin McCahon Northland Drawing ink on paper signed McCahon, dated April '59 and inscribed Northland in ink lower edge 630mm × 550mm artist quickly unshackled himself from this European heritage and began to paint in a manner that was faster, messier and more gestural than before. McCahon’s exposure to the output of figures such as Robert Motherwell, Willem de Kooning and Franz Kline is clearly evident in the paintings that he made following the American tour. Northland, which was produced in April of 1959, is one such work. In this painting, the way the artist manipulates wet media is of as much importance as the imagery which he seeks to convey. In limiting the painting to a single medium (indian ink) which is only available in one colour (black), McCahon ensured that residual marks such as brushstrokes and paint-splatter were as obvious as the subject matter which the painting sought to depict. Northland belongs to a broader series of paintings by McCahon, all sharing the same title and all made in the same medium. This body of work was a departure from his earlier practice not only due to the manner in which it was executed but also because it was painted from memory rather than first-hand observation. In relation to the genesis of the series, McCahon explained that “my lovely Kauris became too much for me. I fled north in memory.”¹ This was a significant development for an artist whose work had previously been mostly a reflection of his immediate surroundings. When viewed in retrospect, this change of subject matter, from the immediate to the intangible, can be seen as a realisation on McCahon’s part that paintings had the potential to be much more than an illustration of a particular place or idea. The Northland series (specifically the works on paper of the very late 50s) sees McCahon recognise that meaning is conveyed equally by both pictorial content and the manner in which that content is described.

p.56

In 1958, Colin McCahon travelled to the United States of America, where the experiences and discoveries that he made during this two-month tour had a notable impact on the nature and direction of his artistic practice. Because McCahon was working as an exhibitions officer (essentially a curator, in today’s terms) at the Auckland Art Gallery during this period of his life, the trip was funded by the City Council, and it was intended as an opportunity for the artist to research the practice and protocols American museums. While McCahon was certainly able to gain first-hand experience of the workings of the country’s major collecting institutions, the trip became something of a milestone in his artistic career because it allowed him to experience contemporary American painting firsthand. Throughout his career, McCahon’s artistic strategies were often influenced by the discoveries and developments of other artists. However, prior to 1958 McCahon had, for the most part, experienced the practice of foreign painters through small reproductions that were often printed in black-and-white. Before his American tour, McCahon’s paintings had primarily been influenced by turn-of-the century European modernism. Cubism, in particular, had a major impact on the way in which he worked. Upon McCahon’s return to New Zealand, however, the

CHARLES NINOW

1

104

G. H. Brown, Colin McCahon, Artist (Reed, 1984), 95.


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Lot 30

Ralph Hotere Kyrie Eleison No. 5 oil on canvas signed Hotere, dated Port Chalmers 74 and inscribed Kyrie Eleison 5 (Requiem Series) in brushpoint verso; inscribed BLG Cat 10 in brushpoint on stretcher verso 1070mm × 1065mm The combined use of text and concrete abstraction seen in this work became a hallmark of the way in which Hotere worked throughout the 1970s and 1980. However, in the latter part of the 1970s, his use of colour became brighter and his paintwork was populated with residual markings such as splatter and drips. In the 1980s, the way in which he applied paint became more gestural and his choice of text became politically motivated. In contrast, this painting sees Hotere approach his subject matter in a manner that is both restrained and reverent. In Kyrie Eleison, he executed both the text and concrete elements in such a way that they can only be made out through careful inspection. In doing so, Hotere ensures that reading the work has the side effect of requiring a close examination of its physical properties on the part of the viewer. Hotere was born in Mitimiti and was of Maori descent. However, he would later receive a secondary school education at Auckland’s Hato Petera college, a catholic institution. Hotere’s knowledge of Catholic liturgy would certainly have been informed by this experience and thus the presence of such texts in this painting reflects his Euro-centric education. The dominant ochre tone of the painting’s background, on the other hand, speaks to Hotere’s Maori heritage. Ochres of a similar nature have been used throughout the course of 20th Century New Zealand art history in order to reference Maori decorative arts, for instance, in Gordon Walters’ gouaches of the 1950s and Shane Cotton’s oil paintings of the 1990s (which were made after this work). Kyrie Eleison is very much a reflection of Hotere’s upbringing and it is a testament to the society of which he was a product. It is a visual reflection of his turangawaewae and quite literally describes the spiritual grounding on which his identity was built.

p.57

Painted in 1973, Kyrie Eleison is the product of a period in Hotere’s career in which he revolutionized the way that he made images and established the model which would be the foundation of his future practice. Until about 1969, the pictorial content of Hotere’s paintings had primarily been abstract in nature. The artist’s highly acclaimed Barnett Newman-esque paintings in brolite lacquer on board both preceded and overlapped with the making of this Kyrie Eleison, which includes similar pictorial elements to these works. Its sonorous background and pinstripes of black and blue mirror the imagery of the brolite paintings; however, in this work they have been applied in a looser, more painterly manner. While stenciled text was a common element of Hotere’s practice in the early 70s, Kyrie Eleison is somewhat unique in the specific text that it features. More often than not, his paintings featured words borrowed from his contemporaries—particularly poets like Bill Manhire and Hone Tuwhare. This work however, uses text that is taken from various Roman Catholic liturgies. The most prominent phrase, Kyrie Eleison, which is used repeatedly to form a motif, is an ancient Greek phrase that translates as “Lord have mercy.” The hand-written text at the top of the painting—executed in both cursive and capital letters—is a rendition of the words Requiem aeternam, which can be translated, ‘Eternal rest unto them, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them. May they rest in peace. Amen.’

CHARLES NINOW

105


bowerbank ninow

Lot 31

Bill Hammond Walter Buller Blind acrylic on loose canvas, three pieces signed W.D Hammond, dated 1994 and inscribed Walter Buller Blind One in brush point upper edge on left panel; signed W.D Hammond, dated 1994 and inscribed Walter Buller Blind Two in brush point upper edge on middle panel; signed W.D Hammond, dated 1994 and inscribed Walter Buller Blind Three in brush point upper edge on right panel 1070mm × 595mm; 890mm × 660mm; 1030mm × 880mm

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106


auction n°1 — summer 2015

Walter Buller Blind, a triptych on loose canvas panels, is from W.D. Hammond’s acclaimed series of ‘Buller’ paintings from the 1990s that reference the carte blanche killing frenzy of the English ‘collector’ of exotic birds, Sir Walter Lawry Buller (1838 - 1906). Buller, a Victorian ornithologist and lawyer, traded in thousands of rare native New Zealand birds, his dark obsession driving many species to the brink of extinction. Hammond’s allegorical interpretation of these events came about as a result of a journey to the sub-Antarctic Auckland Islands in 1989. This vast and strange landscape is shaped by the elements, and the birds that inhabit the area exist in a world ruled by beak and claw. Hammond’s observations, coupled with reading Buller’s abundantly illustrated A History of the Birds of New Zealand (first published in 1873), compelled him to visualise the story of these birds in this major body of work, along with his concern for environments under threat, the vulnerability of life in a precarious world and the complex relationships between humans and nature. Pre-historic New Zealand has been an abiding interest of Hammond’s, whose works often imagine a primordial New Zealand before the arrival of humans. As he says: ”The Auckland Islands are like New Zealand before people got here. It’s birdland.”¹ Like scenes in an unfolding drama, the Buller paintings signify misdeeds conducted in a paradise lost and offer a strange interpretation of post-colonial politics. As with many of Hammond’s works, these paintings evoke a stage set and have a theatrical emphasis on costumes. Works from the same year such as Shag Pile (from the collection of the Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu) and Staten Landt (in the Alex Baird Collection, College House, Christchurch), are both painted on Victorian wall fabric, the opulent patterns mingling with the designs depicted on the birds. The gold Victorian wall fabric upon which Shag Pile is painted recalls suffocating velvet-lined parlours filled with exotic curios, a black-humour equivalent of that modern status symbol, the shag-pile rug. Other paintings dating from 1994 are painted on Kauri wood panels, metal, plywood or vinyl wallpaper. The varied media upon which Hammond paints augment and relate directly to his compositions, some recalling Oriental screens while other canvas fragments resemble flags or remnants of a message from a forgotten civilisation. Walter Buller Blind is a cynical word play on both the medium used, canvas ‘blinds’ (as if torn from a birdwatchers blind used in the field of observation), and the blindness of Buller’s folly, his inability to see his own cruelty and the far reaching consequences of his grim trophy hunting. It depicts three separate stages, like a film zooming in on its subject, in this case, Buller’s unwitting prey, who exist in an indeterminate space. In the first panel, the diagonal sequence of birds stare into the distance, in the second they are getting closer and are on the move, while the third depicts a unit of watching and waiting

birds reminiscent of the composition of Waiting for Buller, showing birds poised on precipices or scanning the horizon. Viewers can relate to the work as either the observed or observer. The raggedy canvas edges and sepia tones lend the work a melancholy aura, offset by a typically ‘Hammondian’ sense of humour and characterization of the figures. Here, tribal birds are sartorially hip; the leader in his modern day plumage, a red Adidas tracksuit, while his partner is attired in a fern embellished dress with wishful transparent wings, anticipating Hammond’s later celestial bird figures of the 2000s. Interestingly, these print dresses acknowledge the artist’s mother and aunts, who wore fern-patterned dresses in the 1950s. In his words, “the paintings started with the clothing, the dresses with ferns on them. On top of the dress, I wanted to put a passive head, a head that did not show any human qualities, any personality.”² This quiet passiveness, though, only adds to their air of dignity, and creates a sense of empathy for the birds, who seem to sense an oncoming encounter with the inevitable. Throughout the evolution of Hammond’s signature Buller paintings, and enduring into his later works of complexity and decadence, a pervading sense of unease at the passing of time remains evident. As befitting an artist who likes a “good story,” Walter Buller Blind epitomises the imagery and symbolism of this creative period, combining the visual paradox of flat perspective and infinite space in the same picture plane with the subject matter of maligned and elegant birds, unable to fly to safety. It is a testament to the provenance of these works that the three panels, each canvas being signed and dated individually, have remained together. Read together, as they should be, this sequence of paintings creates a unique whole and contributes to the greater unfolding of W. D. Hammond’s extraordinary oeuvre. JENNIFER HAY

107

1

Gregory O'Brien, Lands & deeds : profiles of contemporary New Zealand painters (Auckland, N.Z.: Auckland, N.Z. : Godwit 1996., 1996), 58.

2

Ibid., 59.


bowerbank ninow

Lot 33

Bill Hammond And I'm in the Kitchen with the Tombstone Blues acrylic on board signed W.D. Hammond, dated 1983 and inscribed And I'm in the Kitchen with the Tombstone Blues, Part II, B. Dylan in brushpoint lower right 570mm × 730mm evolution. Hammond’s famous ‘bird-people’ paintings have a spectral lightness and an otherworldly feel, yet his pre-1990s work is darker and more visceral. Decades earlier, on the other side of the globe, Francis Bacon created works which reflected the psychological scars of post-WW2 Britain, pockmarked with Nazi nerve gas and rocket attacks, and product of a culture of repression. Hammond seems to draw on that same subconscious space, but leavened by a generation’s remove and inflected with the emerging commercial giddiness of the eighties. In her essay “Sympathetic Magic,” Tessa Laird writes: “Hammond articulates our primal unease that we may become that which we destroy, a pan-global fear that murder opens up vacancies for possession by the roaming dead spirits.” In an age of planet-devouring consumerism and mass extinction, one could imagine an army of displaced spectres brimming at the edges of the noosphere, waiting to seep into the delirious visions of the disconnected humanity that disposed of them. Hammond’s bird paintings beautifully articulate that extra-dimensional purgatory in the form of a lengthy discourse. The works produced before his anthropomorphic epiphany in the Auckland Islands could be his first words spoken in the language of that realm. And I’m in the Kitchen with the Tombstone Blues not only offers an intriguing insight into the technical development of one of New Zealand’s finest painters, it also plots a point in the graph of the psycho-spiritual terrain he traverses.

p.63

Mama’s in the fact’ry She ain’t got no shoes Daddy’s in the alley He’s lookin’ for food I’m in the kitchen With the tombstone blues. —Bob Dylan, “Tombstone Blues” Perhaps Bill Hammond’s And I’m in the Kitchen with the Tombstone Blues is a macabre wisecrack. The work appears to be a view of the kitchen mentioned in the title, which nods, as many of Hammond’s titles do, to Bob Dylan. Painted in 1983, it depicts a table, a refrigerator, and a telephone in a domestic interior with a central pink morphological figure. This form could be the offspring of one of the agonised biomorphic creatures in Francis Bacon’s Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion and Casper the Friendly Ghost. Hammond’s intertwining of the horrific and the comical a notable feature of his paintings from this period, which Robert Leonard once described as “Wired, paranoid, hyped-up… junky, punky, and dystopian—juiced up with sadistic speed-freak cartoon violence.” The image looks like the aftermath of some domestic voodoo ritual, with blood on the floor and a totemic figure in the window. Or perhaps it’s an existential scream turned surrealist punch line. This painting is constructed with a draftsman’s diligence in the use of grids and perspective, yet retains a loose quality in areas of the paintwork. The iconographic sensibilities, dreamlike quality, and virtuoso technique—so evident in his later works— are present, though in an earlier stage of

JULIAN MCKINNON

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Lot 42

Edward Bullmore Transition No. 4 Oil on board Labelled verso, T   ransition No. 4, London 1961, E. A. Bullmore. 595mm × 765mm

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Bullmore’s painting Transition No. 4 is dated 1961, from the outset of his time in London. It shows a continuation of concerns he had grappled with before leaving New Zealand and possibly some of the influence from an intervening six months in Florence, where he had gone to study with Pietro Annigoni (well known for his romantic 1956 portrait of Queen Elizabeth). Annigoni was no radical, in fact the oppsosite; yet Bullmore’s desire to work under his tutorage may have derived from pre-existing fascination for tropes of the early Renaissance within Zealand art. These ranged from the iconographic, such as the rock formations in Leo Bensemann’s 1937 portrait of Rita Angus, to borrowing a daring conceit of early Renaissance artists: shifting Biblical scenes to local landscapes (such as McCahon’s setting the Crucifixion and other related scenes against New Zealand hills in the late 1940s and early 1950s). Transition No. 4 shows a large, Promethean head in profile, looking to our left, chin resting on fist in a pensive gesture. Both head and arm emerge from a desert-like landscape that also sports the unusual rock formations, flower heads, architectural ruins, sun-bleached trees (or bones?) and the silhouette of a small figure, seemingly staring back at the monumental head. The transition between the ruins and the head is covered with a red rain, not

unlike some kind of vertical clouds, occluding a partially-seen moon; the head therefore looks calmly, but still actively, towards the day. Given Bullmore’s later engagement with other current events (his 1962 Cuba Crisis series, the space age connotations of the Astroforms), Transition No. 4 could be an early comment on the post-War Europe he encountered at the turn of the decade. The thoughtful posture echoes Rodin’s famous thinker, but also harks back to Bullmore’s own astonishing Self Portrait of 1959. The painting is serene when compared to others in the series, such as Transition No. 6, which features figures tumbling from staircases and panicked, grasping hands. There is something of De Chirico here, but Bullmore allows the gaze of the giant head, directed somewhere beyond the painting’s frame to dominate the image. The work also has a sunnier outlook than much European painting of the post-War era, exhibiting a brushier, freer painting style than Bullmore had formerly employed. The work could indeed be said to be in transition to what was to come. RUTH WATSON

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Lot 43 & 44

Edward Bullmore Colour Diagrams & Details 3D Works London. Gouache, graphite and ink on paper signed EB and inscribed on verso,  P.10 COLOUR DIAGRAMS & DETAILS 3D WORKS LONDON. 250mm × 200mm Untitled Gouache and ink on paper 215mm × 250mm Ted Bullmore (1933 – 1978) lived and worked in London from 1960 until late 1969, during the heyday of British post-War exuberance. In his near decade in London he was an elected member of the London Group and was included in a variety of notable group exhibitions, including Painting Becomes Sculpture Becomes Painting at the Hayward Gallery in 1968. That title reflects key developments Bullmore was making, exploring the relationship between colour, space and form in works that stretched canvas around a variety of experimental, often curvaceous frames (that could arguably be considered a precursor to Judy Millar’s recent explorations). His works blurred inside and outside, back and front and were variously suggestive of body parts, both male and female, sometimes at the same time. The drawing Colour Diagrams & Details 3D Works London is explicitly labelled as a series of sketches or plans for the creation of Astroforms, a series Bullmore worked on while in London. The drawings are vigorous, with strong colour and clearly defined forms. One has the words “torso into fuselage” next to it, concerns shared with another London period series, titled Hikurangi. The second drawing reveals the construction alongside a sketch of the completed work. A work from the Astroform series famously appears in Stanley Kubrick’s notorious film A Clockwork Orange, gracing the entranceway of the writer’s house, and can be seen in the background of several shots, especially when the main character Alex wrecks the writer’s study. The work fits perfectly alongside the other examples of ultramodern design in the film, including Eero Saarinen furniture and the interior of the house known as Skybreak, designed by Sir Norman Foster in 1964-66. Bullmore returned to New Zealand to become an art teacher in Rotorua, never again reaching the career heights of his London phase. Local curated exhibitions of his work have generally emphasised his range of media and subjects, so his most innovative work—particularly the Astroforms and perhaps also another, related group, titled Icons—have rarely been shown in isolation. The two drawings here clearly show plans for the construction of new works, showing the deliberate fusion of body parts, the joyous colour, and the relentlessly innovative forms characteristic of his strongest work.

p.73

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How to participate in the Auction

Attending in person Auction N˚1 will take place on Wednesday 25th November 2015 at 6.30pm. Buyers will need to register with Bowerbank Ninow in order to receive a bidder’s card, which is required for participation in the auction. Buyers are able to register at any stage during the viewing period or on the evening of the auction. For those wishing to register on the night of the auction, we would advise that they arrive 15-20 minutes prior to the auction commencing. Bidding by Telephone For those who wish to participate in the auction but cannot attend in person, there are two methods by which they my do so remotely. The first of these is to bid by telephone. Telephone bidders are welcome to bid on either single or multiple lots. In order to bid by telephone, buyers are required to register with Bowerbank Ninow prior to the auction commencing. We are able to arrange telephone bidding via email, telephone or in person. Registration for telephone bidding closes an hour before the auction commences. Absentee Bids Absentee bids are an alternate method of remote participation to phone bidding. The placing of an ‘absentee bid’ entails a buyer specifying the maximum hammer price that they wish to pay for a given lot. This absentee bid will be executed by the auctioneer, who will bid on the buyer’s behalf until their maximum price is exceeded. Bowerbank Ninow will always act in good faith for absentee bidders and will endeavor to secure items on which they bid for the lowest possible price. We are able to arrange telephone bidding via email, telephone or in person. Bids Placed on Our Website Bids placed online, through bowerbankninow.com, are considered to be ‘absentee bids’ and will be treated in the manner outlined in the paragraph above. Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will pay the artist a voluntary resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Bowerbank Ninow are the first and only auction house in New Zealand to pay resale royalties to artists. Physical Condition of Artworks The artworks included in this auction range from having been made within the last decade to having been made more than forty years ago and, as such, the physical condition of each will vary. We encourage buyers to inspect the artworks in person when possible. However, we are happy to supply additional information and images of any artwork to those who cannot attend the viewing. Freighting of Artworks As per the terms and conditions, the buyer is responsible for the collection of any lots bought. This being said, Bowerbank Ninow is happy to assist with freighting and packaging where the buyer has special requirements. Any freighting or packaging will be undertaken at the buyer’s expense.

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Conditions of Sale

REGISTRATION All bidders must complete a bidding card or absentee bidding form prior to the commencement of the auction. It is required that a correct name, address, telephone number and email address be supplied.

on, or before, the day after the sale. If a 20% deposit is made instead of full payment, a payment of the balance must be made within 5 working days of the sale. Eftpos, bank cheques or cash are accepted as payment. Credit cards are also accepted but are subject to an additional charge of 2.5% for Visa and MasterCard and 4% for AMEX. All amounts specified are in New Zealand Dollars.

BIDDING In each instance, the highest bidder on a lot will be its purchaser, subject to both the bid being above the lot’s reserve and the auctioneer’s right to refuse the bid that they have placed on it. By bidding on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) the bidder acknowledges that they may become the lot’s purchaser and that they are responsible for any payments required by their purchase of it. The auctioneer has sole discretion with regards to the increments at which bidding increases. No bids that have been placed above reserve may be withdrawn by the bidder. However, the auctioneer has the right to withdraw any bids before a lot has closed or return to a previous bid in the advent of a dispute about the highest bid arising. The auctioneer also has the right to bid on behalf of the vendor up to the reserve. Any person wishing to bid on behalf of a third party must provide Bowerbank Ninow with written authority to do so prior to bidding.

FAILIURE TO MAKE PAYMENT If the purchaser fails to fulfill their obligation to make the required payment(s), Bowerbank Ninow has the right to a) cancel the sale, b) pursue the purchaser for damages from their breach of contract, c) without notice, sell the lot to another individual, either by private sale or by auction, d) store the lot, either at Bowerbank Ninow’s premises or off-site at the purchaser’s expense. The difference between any lower amount made from the re-sale of the lot (as per point c) and the amount still owed by the original purchaser, will remain owed to Bowerbank Ninow by the original purchaser. If payment has not been made after seven days, Bowerbank Ninow has the right to charge interest on any monies owed by the purchaser of an amount equal to their bank’s then current interest rate for commercial overdraft facilities. COLLECTION Purchased items must be collected, or freighted, at the purchaser’s expense within a week of payment being received by Bowerbank Ninow.

RESERVES All lots in this sale are subject to reserve and will be sold subject to bids meeting the reserve price, which is set by Bowerbank Ninow in consultation with the vendor or his/ her agent. SUBJECT BIDS When the highest bid falls below the reserve, the auctioneer will announce to the room, and the bidder who has placed the highest bid, in particular, that the lot has been sold “subject to the vendor’s consent,” or some such words to the same effect. This “subject bid” remains binding until the vendor either accepts or refuses the sale, until which time no other offers may be put to the vendor. Prior to the vendor’s acceptance of the “subject bid,” it may be withdrawn at any time by the bidder who has placed it but, once accepted by the vendor, the bidder has entered into a contract to purchase the lot at the accepted price plus the buyer’s premium. BUYERS’ PREMIUM By registering to bid at auction and then subsequently bidding on a lot, the bidder accepts that a buyers premium of 15% + GST will be charged in addition to the hammer price of any lot sold to them. SOLD LOTS It is assumed that bidders have inspected any lots that they bid on, or made sufficient enquiries into the condition and authenticity of any lots that they bid on prior to the auction. Advice about each lot is made available by Bowerbank Ninow to any prospective purchasers but it is not intended to replace the expert opinion of third-party specialists such as conservators. Any purchase is ultimately made according to the purchasers own judgment and any bids made on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) constitute an acceptance of the lot’s present condition. PAYMENT Successful bidders are required to make payment to Bowerbank Ninow on either the same day as the sale or the following day. A deposit of 20% may be made in lieu of full payment if, for any reason, full payment cannot be made

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Auction N째2 May 2016 Entries invited

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New Zealand made furniture

drooneystudio.com


Auction N˚1  

Bowerbank Ninow, Auction N˚1 Catalogue, November 2015

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