Page 1

Auction N°6 9th Aug 2017


Graham Wall Real Estate 2 Tole Street Ponsonby PO Box 998 Shortland St Auckland 1140 New Zealand

Graham Wall +64 21 951 368 graham@grahamwall.com

Ollie Wall +64 21 520 514 ollie@grahamwall.com

Andrew Wall +64 21 520 508 andrew@grahamwall.com


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CHRISTIAN THOMPSON

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Starkwhite presents MICHAEL ZAVROS Marge Simpson oil on canvas 140 x 90 cm Courtesy the artist and Starkwhite, Auckland


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Joanna Margaret Paul Not Nostalgia 27 September – 28 October


10 JUNE – 15 OCTOBER FREE ENTRY christchurchartgallery.org.nz #chchartgallery Kushana Bush Here We Are (detail) 2016. Gouache and pencil on paper. Collection of Art Gallery of New South Wales, purchased with funds provided by the Friends of New Zealand Art 2016

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Supported by Christchurch Art Gallery’s contemporary art partner


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bowerbank ninow

Auction N°6 9th August 2017 Opening

Wednesday 2nd August, 2017 Viewing

Thursday 3rd August – Tuesday 8th August 2017 10am – 5pm Wednesday 9th 2017 10am – 1pm

Auction

Wednesday 9th August 6.30pm

Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living New Zealand artists, Bowerbank Ninow will pay the artist a voluntary resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Bowerbank Ninow are the first and only auction house in New Zealand to pay resale royalties to buyer's premium A buyer’s premium of 17.5% will be charged on all items listed in this catalogue. GST (15%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

colophon Bowerbank Ninow Auction N°6 August 9th, 2017 Catalogue of works Edition of 3200 ISSN 2537-6594 Design Direction Editor Design Photography

DDMMYY Andrew Clark Elliot Ferguson Sam Hartnett

312 Karangahape Rd. Newton Auckland 1010 New Zealand +64 9 307 8870 info@bowerbankninow.com bowerbankninow.com Simon Bowerbank +64 21 045 1464 simon@bowerbankninow.com Charles Ninow +64 21 053 6504 charles@bowerbankninow.com


KATESYLVESTER.COM


bowerbank ninow

Auction N°2 30th March 2016 Opening

Wednesday 23 March 2016 6pm Viewing

Thursday 24 – Tuesday 29 March 2016 10am – 5pm Wednesday 30 March 2016 10am – 1pm

Auction

Wednesday 30 March 2016 6.30pm

Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will pay the artist a voluntary resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Bowerbank Ninow are the first and only auction house in New Zealand to pay resale royalties to artists. buyer's premium A buyer’s premium of 15% will be charged on all items listed in this catalogue. GST (15%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

colophon


auction n°6 — august 2017

Contents Plates

24

Essays

113

Bill Hammond Automatic Impulse

114

Robert Ellis Mapping the Terrain

118

Paul Hartigan Ghost Drawing

122

Jeffrey Harris Interviewed by Andrew Clark

126

Pat Hanly The Human Condition

130

Russell Clark Interpreting Modernism

133

Carl Sydow Logic and Symmetry

134

Philip Clairmont My Letters, My Secrets

136

Barry Linton The Truth and the Proof

140

Michael Harrison Interviewed by Serena Bentley

142

Roger Mortimer Trans-historic Bodies

146

Index

147

How to participate in the Auction

158

Conditions of Sale

159


P

L

A

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T

E

S


auction n°5 — april 2017


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28


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 1

Edward Bullmore Study for Astroform Descended 1967 graphite, ink and gouache on paper dated 1967 and inscribed Astroform No6 (struck out) Descended and height 31" width 23" in ink upper left; inscribed an assemblage of chair parts, padded, stretched and painted canvas. in ink 230mm × 173mm

est

$500 - $1,000

29


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Lot 2

Bill Hammond Dog 1980 graphite on paper signed W Hammond, dated 1980 and inscribed Dog in graphite lower edge 317mm Ă— 235mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

30


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 3

Bill Hammond untitled c. 1980-82 graphite on paper 297mm × 420mm

est

$1,500 - $2,500

Lot 4

Bill Hammond untitled c. 1980-82 graphite on paper 297mm × 420mm

est

$1,500 - $2,500

31


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Lot 5

Bill Hammond untitled c. 1980–82 graphite on paper 290mm × 420mm

est

$1,500 - $2,500

Lot 6

Bill Hammond Waiting for the Pain to Piss Off c. 1980–82 ink on paper dated 23/7/82 and inscribed WAITING FOR THE PAIN TO PISS OFF. in ink lower right; signed W Hammond and inscribed Toothache in graphite lower right 235mm × 340mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

32


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 7

Bill Hammond untitled c. 1980–82 etching 145mm × 205mm

est

$500 - $1,000

Lot 8

Bill Hammond Wednesday c. 1980–82 etching inscribed Wednesday upper left on plate 187mm × 200mm

est

$500 - $1,000

33


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Lot 9

Bill Hammond There's a brand new dance but I don't know its name c. 1980-82 ink on paper signed W Hammond, dated 1982 and inscribed 'THERES a BRAND NEW DANCE BUT I DONT KNOW iTS NAME' D. BOWIE in graphite lower edge 235mm × 435mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

34


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 10

Shane Cotton untitled 1993 oil and acrylic on paper signed Cotton and dated '93 in graphite lower right 195mm × 280mm

est

$1,200 - $1,800

35


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Lot 11

Tony De Lautour untitled 2010 coloured pencil on paper signed TDL and dated 4-8-2010 in coloured pencil lower right 296mm Ă— 210mm

est

$200 - $400

36


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 12

Tony De Lautour untitled 2003 coloured pencil on paper signed TDL and dated 2003 in coloured pencil upper left 210mm × 296mm

est

$150 - $300

37


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Lot 13

Tony De Lautour untitled 2000 graphite on paper signed TDL and dated 2000 in graphite lower left 405mm Ă— 305mm

est

$300 - $600

38


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 14

Tony De Lautour untitled 2005 graphite on paper signed TDL and dated 2005 in graphite lower right 296mm × 420mm

est

$300 - $600

39


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Lot 15

Derek Cowie untitled 1989 acrylic on record cover with enclosed paper sleeve and metal disc signed Derek Cowie and dated 1989 in paint marker on disc 310mm Ă— 310mm

est

$400 - $700

40


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 16

Andrew McLeod Downfall 2006 screenprint and acrylic on linen signed Andrew McLeod in paint marker lower edge 200mm × 225mm

est

$1,500 - $2,500

41


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Lot 17

Ralph Hotere Window in Spain 1978 graphite and oil pastel on paper signed Hotere, dated III 78 and inscribed madrid and Window in Spain in graphite lower right 316mm Ă— 230mm

est

$5,000 - $7,000

42


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 18

Ralph Hotere Black Window 1988 lithograph, 8/30 signed Hotere, dated '88 and inscribed Black Window in graphite lower edge 430mm × 295mm

est

$3,000 - $5,000

43


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Lot 19

Gavin Hurley Just Call Me Angel 2007 collaged found paper 270mm Ă— 210mm

est

$800 - $1,200

44


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 20

Dick Frizzell untitled 1990 gouache, pastel and graphite on paper signed Frizzell and dated 4/11/90 in graphite lower right 280mm × 245mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

45


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Lot 21

Jeffrey Harris The Pope 1971 graphite on paper signed J. Harris and dated 1971 in graphite lower right 255mm Ă— 200mm

est

$800 - $1,200

46


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 22

Jeffrey Harris Woman sitting at table 1971 graphite on paper signed J. Harris and dated 1971 in graphite upper right 255mm × 200mm

est

$800 - $1,200

47


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Lot 23

Jeffrey Harris Two women 1971 graphite on paper signed J. Harris and dated 1971 in graphite upper right 255mm Ă— 200mm

est

$800 - $1,200

48


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 24

Jeffrey Harris Woman in coat 1971 graphite on paper signed J. Harris and dated 1971 in graphite lower right 255mm × 200mm

est

$800 - $1,200

49


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Lot 25

Barry Linton Cover Illustration for Strips, Issue No.2 c. 1977 ink, Letratone and correction fluid on paper 455mm Ă— 302mm

est

$800 - $1,600

Lot 26

Barry Linton Dan Dog Returns to the Wound, Page 1 c. 1977 ink, Letratone and correction fluid on paper (two panels) signed BY BARRY LINTON in ink and inscribed 51% (max 9 1/4" deep) in graphite lower right 556mm Ă— 402mm (overall)

est

$800 - $1,600

50


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 27

Rohan Wealleans Thing vs. Things 2008 acrylic on found comic book, paper and polystyrene in perspex 305mm × 222mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

51


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Lot 28

Carl Sydow Drawing 5: IV 1975 Letraline on paper signed Carl Sydow and dated 1975 in ink lower right 760mm Ă— 605mm

est

$1,200 - $1,800

Lot 29

Carl Sydow Drawing 5: VI 1975 Letraline on paper signed Carl Sydow and dated 1975 in ink lower right 760mm Ă— 605mm

est

$1,200 - $1,800

52


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 30

Richard Killeen untitled 1974 oil on paper signed Killeen, dated 22.8.74 and inscribed 1815 in graphite lower edge 570mm × 250mm

est

$1,200 - $1,800

53


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Lot 31

Charles Tole Totalisator Building c. 1950 conté on paper inscribed CHARLES TOLE, ' TOTALISATOR ', ( CONTÉ ) and 9½" × 11½" in type on label affixed verso; John Leech Gallery label affixed lower right verso 275mm × 305mm

est

$800 - $1,600

54


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 32

Ian Scott untitled 1970 watercolour on paper signed Ian Scott and dated 1970 in graphite lower right 325mm × 525mm

est

$1,800 - $2,600

55


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Lot 33

Robert Ellis Motorway Junction 1968 acrylic on paper signed Robert Ellis and dated 1968 in brushpoint lower right 705mm Ă— 695mm

est

$3,500 - $5,500

56


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 34

Robert Ellis Untitled 1968 ink on paper 760mm × 560mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

57


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Lot 35

Pat Hanly Nuclear Innocents 1983 graphite on paper signed P. H., dated 83 and inscribed Nuclear Innocents in graphite lower right 345mm Ă— 372mm

est

$2,500 - $3,500

58


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 36

Pat Hanly Figure in Light 1963 ink on paper signed Hanly, dated Sept 63 and inscribed Figure in light in graphite lower right 590mm × 460mm

est

$6,000 - $9,000

59


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Lot 37

Pat Hanly Winters Day 69 1969 ink and watercolour on paper inscribed Winters day 69 in graphite upper left; signed Hanly and dated 69 in ink lower right 435mm Ă— 592mm

est

$7,000 - $12,000

60


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 38

Pat Hanly Energy 1971 ink on paper signed Hanly, dated 71 and inscribed Energy in ink lower edge 545mm × 660mm

est

$3,000 - $,6000

61


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Lot 39

Pat Hanly Girl Asleep 1964 ink monoprint and graphite on paper signed Hanly, dated 64 and inscribed girl asleep and 2/2 in coloured pencil lower left 500mm Ă— 650mm

est

$3,500 - $5,500

62


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 40

Pat Hanly Untitled 1988 ink on paper signed Hanly and dated 88 in graphite lower edge 300mm × 300mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

63


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Lot 41

Pat Hanly Who Am I 1972 watercolour on paper inscribed WHO AM I in graphite lower left; signed Hanly and dated Jan 72 in graphite lower right 535mm Ă— 380mm

est

$6,000 - $9,000

64


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 42

Alan Pearson Psyche drawing 1965 watercolour on paper signed A Pearson and dated 65 in graphite lower left 255mm × 190mm

est

$800 - $1,600

Lot 43

Alan Pearson Figures 1964 watercolour on paper signed A Pearson and dated London 64 in graphite upper right; inscribed Figures in graphite lower left 170mm x 260mm

est

$800 - $1,600

65


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Lot 44

Ralph Hotere untitled 1969 watercolour and charcoal on paper signed Hotere and dated '69 in graphite lower right 550mm Ă— 355mm

est

$7,500 - $9,500

66


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 45

Ralph Hotere untitled 1975 ink on paper signed Hotere and dated '75 in ink lower left 320mm × 320mm

est

$3,500 - $5,500

67


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Lot 46

Andrew McLeod Ruler [4th level] 2006 pigmented inkjet print, edition 1/2 signed Andrew McLeod in ink lower right 1170mm Ă— 830mm

est

$6,500 - $9,500

68


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 47

Andrew McLeod Men print in blue 2001 pigmented inkjet print, edition 1/1 signed Andrew Mcleod and dated 2001 in ink lower left 450mm × 610mm

est

$2,500 - $3,500

69


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Lot 48

Shane Cotton Ledge 2008 acrylic on paper signed Shane W Cotton, dated 2008 and inscribed 'Ledge' in graphite lower right 560mm Ă— 760mm

est

$5,000 - $7,000

Lot 49

Shane Cotton Cradle 2008 acrylic on paper signed Shane W Cotton, dated 2008 and inscribed 'Cradle' in graphite lower right 560mm Ă— 760mm

est

$5,000 - $7,000

70


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 50

Richard Killeen Geometry 1981 oil on paper signed Killeen, dated 18.2.81 and inscribed Geometry and 4345 in graphite lower edge 570mm × 250mm

est

$2,500 - $3,500

71


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Lot 51

Andrew Blythe untitled c. 2007-9 acrylic on paper 639mm Ă— 891mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

72


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 52

Andrew Blythe untitled c. 2007-9 acrylic on paper 700mm × 990mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

73


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Lot 53

Andrew Blythe untitled c. 2007-9 acrylic on paper 600mm Ă— 850mm

est

$1,500 - $2,000

74


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 54

Kim Pieters Quodlibet 2010 graphite, oil pastel and acrylic on found hardboard inscribed Quodlibet in graphite lower left; signed kf pieters and dated 2010 in graphite lower right; signed k f pieters, dated 2010 and inscribed 'Quodlibet' and the common translation of this term as 'whatever' in the sense of “it does not matter which, indifferently” is certainly correct, but in its form the Latin says exactly the opposite. Quodlibet ens is not “being, it does not matter which,” but rather “being such that it always matters” from 'the coming community' by Giorgio Agamben in graphite verso 1200mm × 1200mm

est

$3,000 - $5,000

75


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Lot 55

Richard Orjis Joseph 2006 soil on paper signed R Orjis, dated 2006 and inscribed JOSEPH in graphite lower right verso 595mm Ă— 420mm

est

$700 - $1,200

Lot 56

Richard Orjis Brad 2006 soil on paper signed R Orjis, dated 2006 and inscribed 'Brad' in graphite lower right verso 595mm Ă— 420mm

est

$700 - $1,200

76


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 57

Richard Orjis Stevie 2006 soil on paper signed R Orjis, dated 2006 and inscribed STEVIE in graphite lower right verso 595mm × 420mm

est

$700 - $1,200

Lot 58

Richard Orjis Ant 2006 soil on paper signed R Orjis, dated 2006 and inscribed ANT in graphite lower right verso 595mm × 420mm

est

$700 - $1,200

77


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Lot 59

Michael Harrison Moment of Change/Midnight 1987–94 acrylic on paper (diptych) signed Michael Harrison in graphite lower left (left panel); Vavasour Godkin Gallery label affixed verso (left panel); signed Michael Harrison in graphite lower right; Vavasour Godkin Gallery label affixed verso (right panel) 305mm × 225mm (each panel)

est

$6,000 - $9,000

78


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 60

Sean Kerr The Idiots 2010 acrylic and digital print on paper signed Sean K and dated 2010 in graphite lower right verso 296mm × 210mm

est

$300 - $600

79


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Lot 61

Ian Scott Lattice Drawing, No. 170 1985 watercolour on paper signed Ian Scott and dated 85 ink upper right verso; signed Ian Scott, dated NOVEMBER 1985. and inscribed "LATTICE DRAWING, NO. 170." verso; dated NOV. 85. and inscribed "LATTICE DRAWING, NO 170" in graphite lower edge verso 765mm × 565mm

est

$1,600 - $2,500

80


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 62

Milan Mrkusich Painting Yellow, 1981 1981 polymer and wax crayon on paper signed Mrkusich, dated '81 and inscribed Painting Yellow, 1981 (polymer + wax crayon on paper) in ink on original backing board affixed verso 550mm × 380mm

est

$7,000 - $12,000

81


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Lot 63

Colin McCahon Canterbury Plains 1948 contĂŠ on paper signed McCahon, dated '48 and inscribed Canterbury Plains Landscape in graphite lower edge; John Leech Gallery label affixed verso 198mm Ă— 252mm

est

$8,000 - $12,000

82


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 64

Colin McCahon Cashmere Hills 1948 conté on paper signed McCahon, dated '48 and inscribed Cashmere Hills in graphite lower edge; John Leech Gallery label affixed verso 197mm × 250mm

est

$8,000 - $12,000

83


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Lot 65

Philip Clairmont Untitled (Red Nude) c. 1980 oil, acrylic and graphite on paper 645mm Ă— 447mm

est

$6,500 - $8,500

84


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 66

Philip Clairmont Artist with Chair, Palette, Clock c. 1977 oil, ink and oil pastel on card 300mm × 197mm

est

$2,500 - $3,500

85


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Lot 67

Philip Clairmont Study for Portrait of Hamish Keith 1981 oil pastel and graphite on paper signed P. CT., dated 1981 and inscribed Study for Portrait of Hamish Keith in oil pastel lower right 800mm Ă— 605mm

est

$7,500 - $9,500

86


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 68

Richard Killeen untitled 1969 ink and pastel on paper signed Killeen, dated 1969 and inscribed 2041 in graphite lower left 620mm × 330mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

87


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Lot 69

Paul Hartigan London Suite No 2 1977 ink on found paper signed Hart 1 ga n., dated Dec.'77. and inscribed NO (2) in type upper left 297mm Ă— 210mm

est

$1,200 - $2,500

88


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 70

Paul Hartigan Against the Grain 1980 ink and watercolour on paper signed Hartigan, dated 1980 and inscribed 'AGAINST THE GRAIN' in graphite lower edge 600mm × 910mm

est

$3,200 - $4,600

Lot 71

Paul Hartigan 7 X's 8 O's 1979 ink on found paper inscribed 7 X's 8 O's in ink; signed HARTIGAN and dated 1979 in graphite lower right 316mm × 510mm

est

$1,500 - $2,500

89


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Lot 72

John Reynolds Personals (cont.)/Already Bored With 2008? 2008 oilstick on screenprinted paper inscribed PERSONALS (CONT.) in graphite lower left; signed REYNOLDS. and dated 2008. in graphite lower right 315mm × 245mm

est

$500 - $1,000

90


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 73

Seraphine Pick untitled 2003 watercolour on paper 780mm × 530mm

est

$3,000 - $5,000

91


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Lot 74

John Pule untitled 2005 ink on paper signed John Pule and dated 2005 in ink lower left 500mm Ă— 500mm

est

$1,500 - $2,500

92


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 75

E Mervyn Taylor Still Life 1943 graphite on paper inscribed Please mount to the the marks indicated in graphite upper right; signed E. MERVYN TAYLOR and dated 1-1-43 in graphite lower right; signed E. MERVYN TAYLOR and inscribed "STILL LIFE", £2.12.6, 71 HATTON STREET EXT, KARORI WELLINGTON W3 and c/o AEWSHQ wgton in graphite upper edge verso; inscribed 15" × 17" in graphite verso 342mm × 278mm

est

$1,500 - $2,500

93


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Lot 76

Allen Maddox untitled c. 1983 acrylic and pastel on card 230mm Ă— 275mm

est

$1,500 - $2,500

Lot 77

Allen Maddox untitled c. 1983 acrylic and pastel on paper 355mm Ă— 280mm

est

$1,500 - $2,500

94


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 78

Allen Maddox untitled c. 1991-94 acrylic on paper signed AM in graphite lower edge 354mm × 232mm

est

$2,500 - $3,500

95


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Lot 79

Richard Lewer untitled #58 2016 ink on sandpaper 280mm Ă— 230mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

96


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 80

Tony Fomison Drawing of and for Dick Lovell-Smith 1973 graphite on paper signed by and from Tony Fomison, dated 16.3.73 and inscribed drawing of and for Dick Lovell-Smith in graphite lower right 368mm × 246mm

est

$1,200 - $1,800

97


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Lot 81

Martin Poppelwell Study for red bucket, bumble + teapot 2015 oil pastel, ink, graphite, collage and oil on paper signed M P and dated 2015 in graphite lower right 500mm Ă— 640mm

est

$1,200 - $1,800

98


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 82

Dieter Roth Original Speedy Self 1980 pencil and gouache on paper signed Dieter Roth and dated 80 in graphite lower right 229mm × 330mm

est

$900 - $1,800

99


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Lot 83

Bill Hammond Fish Finder 1, 2, 3 2003 lithograph on paper (triptych), edition of 15 signed WD Hammond, dated 2003 and inscribed Fish Finder 1 in graphite lower right (left panel); signed WD Hammond, dated 2003 and inscribed Fish Finder 2 in graphite lower right (centre panel); signed WD Hammond, dated 2003 and inscribed Fish Finder 3 in graphite lower right (right panel) 575mm Ă— 445mm (each panel)

est

$10,000 - $15,000

100


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 84

Roger Mortimer Mt Misery 2012 graphite and watercolour on paper signed RJM and dated MMXI in brushpoint lower right 320mm × 490mm

est

$3,000 - $4,000

101


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Lot 85

Jeffrey Harris untitled 1988 graphite on paper signed JH and dated '88 in graphite lower left 225mm Ă— 280mm

est

$1,500 - $2,500

102


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 86

Stanley Palmer Pohutukawa 1980 charcoal on paper signed Stanley Palmer, dated 1980 and inscribed For Helen in graphite lower edge 340mm × 550mm

est

$800 - $1,200

103


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Lot 87

Louise Henderson Bush Series Sketch c. 1960s graphite on paper 410mm Ă— 570mm

est

$500 - $800

Lot 88

Russell Clark Farm Buildings c. 1950s graphite on paper 195mm Ă— 250mm

est

$800 - $1,200

104


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 89

Louise Henderson Tree Study c. 1960s graphite on paper 540mm × 380mm

est

$400 - $700

105


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Lot 90

Michael Smither Sarah Dunedin 1987 graphite on paper signed MDS in graphite lower right; inscribed Sarah Dunedin in graphite lower left verso 300mm Ă— 230mm

est

$400 - $700

106


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 91

Greer Twiss untitled 1964 conté on paper signed Twiss and dated 64 in ink upper right 230mm × 155mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 92

Greer Twiss untitled c. 1984-88 ink on paper 296mm × 210mm

est

$300 - $600

107


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Lot 93

Edward Bullmore untitled c. 1959-60 graphite and coloured pencil on paper 590mm Ă— 430mm

est

$1,200 - $1,800

108


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 94

A Lois White St. Francis of Assisi c. 1948 graphite on paper certificate of authenticity signed by Alison Disbrowe (artist's niece) affixed verso 480mm × 305mm

est

$1,200 - $1,800

109


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Lot 95

Leo Bensemann Dancing Dwarf 1945 wood engraving on paper 290mm Ă— 225mm

est

$400 - $800

110


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 96

Russell Clark Egyptian Listener illustration 1945 ink on paper 190mm × 220mm

est

$800 - $1200

111


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Lot 97

Russell Clark Maori woman carrying a sack c. 1948–50 ink on paper 255mm × 180mm

est

$800 - $1200

Lot 98

Russell Clark Maori women and children c. 1948-50 graphite on paper 430mm × 340mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

112


auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 99

Russell Clark Two heads of Maori women c. 1948-50 graphite on paper 420mm × 335mm

est

$1,200 - $1,800

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Lot 100

Martin Ball untitled (paper and sellotape) 2003 graphite on paper signed Martin Ball and dated '03 in graphite lower right 380mm Ă— 884mm

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$800 - $1,600

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auction n°6 — august 2017

Bill Hammond Automatic Impulse

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Robert Ellis Mapping the Terrain

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Paul Hartigan Ghost Drawing

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Jeffrey Harris Interviewed by Andrew Clark

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Pat Hanly The Human Condition

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Russell Clark Interpreting Modernism

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Carl Sydow Logic and Symmetry

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Philip Clairmont My Letters, My Secrets

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Barry Linton The Truth and the Proof

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Michael Harrison Interviewed by Serena Bentley

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Roger Mortimer Trans-historic Bodies

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Lots 2-9

auction n°6 — august 2017

Bill Hammond Automatic Impulse

flourished in New Zealand, later than elsewhere. There must have been something in the water, because around 1988 a clowder of young artists graduated from Canterbury University’s School of Fine Arts with a similar interest in ukiyo-e flatness, gravity-free pop-cultural bricolages If a painter should wish to unite a horse’s neck to a and a crisis of identity and influence. This human head, and spread a variety of plumageauction over n°6 — august loose2017 grouping included Tony de Lautour, limbs [of different animals] taken from every part Séraphine Pick, Peter Robinson, Grant Takle, [of nature], so that what is a beautiful woman in Chris Heaphy, Shane Cotton, and, a bit later, the upper part terminates unsightly in an ugly fish Saskia Leek. Sometimes they are called the below; could you, my friends, refrain from laughter, “Pencil Case Painters,” because of how their were you admitted to such a sight? early work resembles the way tweens decorate – Horace, Ars Poetica their school supplies with a scrappy graffiti of drawn pop-cultural references. But does laughter preclude taking something deadly seriously? Lyttelton-based artist Bill Admittedly, this is usually an externally applied category, in the sense of Ludwig Wittgenstein’s Hammond needs very little introduction, given his unassailable position among New theory (or game) of “family resemblances,” in Zealand’s blue-chip investment artists. While which you can tell a group of people are related he is popularly known for his lush, atmospheric because some will share the ears and the eyes, or canvases populated by melancholic humanthe eyes and nose, or the nose and ears, but no bird hybrids, awaiting taxidermic colonisation one possesses all the characteristics on one face. in their Edenic landscape, this has only been the dominant theme in his work since the To this rhizomatic collection in the Christchurch 1990s, inspired by a 1989 visit to the to the goldfish bowl, where everyone knows everyone bird-encrusted Auckland Islands as part of the else, we can add Hammond as a sort of older Art in the Sub-Antarctic project, and an Arts doyen figure, though he attended Canterbury Council funded visit to Japan in 1990 where he University from 1966 to 1969 (born in Christwas exposed to traditional Japanese art. church in 1947), and started painting in 1981. It was the most interesting thing that had Prior to these experiences, Hammond’s art happened in New Zealand art in years. There’s was a realm of far more chaotic, Nietzschean a bit of Christchurch art history in the mix, too: landscapes. Hammond’s ’80s works drink up the anarchic flamboyance of Philip Clairmont the caffeinated energy of punk, rock ‘n’ roll, and the frightening gothic-grotesque interisurrealism, graffiti, cartoons and other unority of Tony Fomison. By the time the young expected sources, all gleefully short-circuiting postmodernists had emerged on the scene each other, rife with conspiratorial, antic in the 1990s, Hammond had already well and paranoia and rebellion against suburban truly broken the ground for them. The “Pencil conservatism—reflecting the two sides of Case Painters” were the first “school” of artists Christchurch’s coin in the 1970s and ’80s. to emerge from Canterbury since the Rudolf Writing about this period in Hammond’s Gopas-taught generation of neoexpressionists career tends to lead to Proustian run-on that included Clairmont, Fomison, Alan Maddox, sentences, in imitation of the rolling maul Philip Trusttum, and Philippa Blair. of his compositions. Before he took up painting professionally, These drawings originate in that period. For Hammond was also a designer and maker of all the talk of the Garden City’s much-touted wooden toys, which seems to manifest quite "Englishness,” this label contains within it strongly in Dog (1980). The eponymous creature gothic, punk and grunge sensibilities (music resembles a sort of mutant Philip Guston-esque plays an important role in Hammond’s life album cover caricature of a toy from the 1950s and work), as well as a tolerance for eccentricity. (with two extra tails and a synthetic cubist twist). Where the bird-men are contemplative and Also echoing Hammond’s toymaking background solemn, pre-1990 Hammond-Land seethed is the surreal motif of the table-top landscape in and fizzed with anarchy, paradox and another untitled drawing. Is it supposed to be a protean mutability, striking sparks of scale miniature, like that a toy train might run startling originality off the alluvial gravel through, or is it a normal-sized landscape on a of Canterbury’s braided riverbeds. gigantic table, an impossible enigma à la Thomas Cole’s 1833 painting The Titan’s Goblet? Hammond’s hybrid creatures seem to be secret symbols, hinting that even when viewing the There is in the table landscape a metaphor for most everyday things, an attempt must be made making art. Drawing specifically comes to mind to familiarise ourselves with other perspectives. because, as Walter Benjamin noted, it is made He presents us with an entire iconography, while looking down onto a flat surface, rather the syntax of which seems just out of reach. than facing an easel, as is painting. Mountains Perhaps Hammond forces us to wrestle with feature heavily in Hammond’s drawing, recalling these problems as a reflection of the struggle the great South Island ranges of the Southern with identity that took place during the ’80s, as Alps, the Kaikouras, and particularly the volcanic identity politics and economic uncertainty cones and corrugations of the Banks Peninsula, 115


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that form Lyttelton’s spectacular backdrop. The landscape is a stage to enact symbolic psychodramas on, intimating splendid South Island isolation while firmly anchoring art and artist in a specific geographical context. Hammond’s drawings are fascinating for what they reveal about his painting. In their flatness and their concentration on outline rather than modelling, even the large and highly finished paintings are perhaps more accurately described as drawings with paint. The drawings are not subordinate to the paintings, it is merely that the medium has changed and the vivid colours been subtracted, though there is an immediacy and spontaneity to the graphite or pencil mark that gives them their own validity, authenticity and appeal.

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Lot 3 Bill Hammond untitled c. 1980-82 graphite on paper 297mm × 420mm

Sometimes Hammond draws on found materials, such as old wallpaper, further adding to the feeling of spontaneity, and the lack of concern with formality, that pervades his work. And yet, Hammond’s drawings are by no means unsophisticated. A drawing like Waiting for the Pain to Piss Off (1982) is chocka with signs and allusions crashed together, almost as if it were drawn by several completely different people in some kind of cadavre exquis—the parlour game much beloved by the surrealists where a piece of paper is folded up, passed around, and everyone contributes to the drawing while only being able to see the tiniest part of the rest of it to work from. The extraordinary thing is that it all comes out of one mind, admittedly a densely multi-faceted one, working intuitively to weave together a collection of frolicking fragments of pop culture and hallucinogenic figments of the id. In Waiting for the Pain to Piss Off (the title gives the impression of an ex voto image—an offering to toothache, according to the inscription—as much as a way of passing the time), the little man (presumably a surrogate for the artist) lies on what appears to be a flying carpet, supported like Baba Yaga’s house on a single human (rather than chicken) leg, and could have been lifted straight from one of Edward Lear’s illustrations of his limericks. About halfway down, the little man’s legs angle abruptly up and transform into a hybrid form combining elements of tropical flower, pennant, and the stylised suggestion of a carved Māori koruru mask. He floats in a sheet-like numinous nimbus. The bones poking out either side are both references to the artist’s bodily suffering and a kind of private joke, in Flintstones-style, about popular critical references to Hammond as an artistic “primitive.” A self-deprecating humour is very much a unifying theme in Hammond’s art, and becomes all the more poignant as the value of his work climbs.

Lot 4 Bill Hammond untitled c. 1980-82 graphite on paper 297mm × 420mm

Hammond figures always seem caught in the act of transforming from one thing to another. The writer Alfred Jarry uses the concept of the “pataphor” to describe a metaphor that uses another metaphor for its context, rather than the non-figurative world; Jarry compares these “pataphors” to a lizard’s tail that grows so

Lot 2 Bill Hammond Dog 1980 graphite on paper 317mm × 235mm

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Lot 9 Bill Hammond There's a brand new dance but I don't know its name c. 1980-82 ink on paper 235mm × 435mm

long that it breaks off and grows into another, different lizard. Something similar may be happening with Hammond’s imagery: with a nod to Ovid’s Metamorphoses, an arm may transform into a fern frond and a human into a bird, a chimney into a tree, and a line can become just about anything, but all in a single, continuous frame of reference. There are no auction n°6 — august 2017 rules, and all bets are off. This is one of the most precious qualities of Hammond’s drawings from this period: the sheer versatility and fluidity of imagination, unencumbered by the expectations of received taste, but always following their own visual logic. Regardless of how bizarre the creatures and settings are, they always make sense, as if they belong to some inverted shadow twin to our own universe that follows very different physical laws, defined only by the charcoal or pencil in the artist’s hand. Hammond’s drawing has been compared to doodling. There are certainly elements of automatic drawing to it, a core principle of surrealist art (and a few spiritualist mediums) in which the hand is permitted to move randomly across the paper as a way of tapping into the subconscious (André Masson being a particularly noteworthy practitioner). These automatic impulses provide a flexible and plastic framework on which Hammond hangs his familiar motifs: the coiled fronds, the grimaces, the sinister biomechanical forms, the bones, the oddly angled limbs almost parodying ancient Egyptian wall paintings, the mountains, fists, Hokusai waves, hot rod tailpipes, and ropes. Hammond moves effortlessly from one sign to the next without being in any sense awkward or disjointed; the drawing is less a mediation between hand and eye, than between hand and fecund imagination.

Lot 6 Bill Hammond Waiting for the Pain to Piss Off c. 1980-82 ink on paper 235mm × 340mm

The physicality of the drawn mark and the materiality of its substance, combined with drawing’s gradual assimilation into digital technologies, gives these works further levels of poignancy. When we also consider that Hammond is frequently touted as “New Zealand’s most important living artist”—a mantle pushed on to Ralph Hotere, Gordon Walters and Colin McCahon at various points, too heavy and ornate to be born comfortably—the drawings take on a “future old-master” quality. As objects, the drawings run the risk of becoming picayune relics of celebrity and a name rather than the frisky pieces of casual genius they really are. They are significant artefacts for connoisseurship, pleasure and imagination. As the ability to draw is becoming less and less an important part of contemporary art practice, or is otherwise conceptualised away, these fascinating works remind us of drawing’s immediacy, power, fluency, versatility and command. ANDREW PAUL WOOD

Lot 5 Bill Hammond untitled c. 1980-82 graphite on paper 290mm × 420mm

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Lots 33 & 34

auction n°6 — august 2017

Robert Ellis Mapping the Terrain

construction project taking place in Los Angeles during the 1950s and ’60s. In both instances, the reinvention of the urban landscape had the side-effect of carving up the city into distinct clades or territories, divided by impassable In part, the modernist project was a reaction to barriers of steel and concrete. In the case of the impact of technology on society during the Auckland, although the motorways were at first late nineteenth and early twentieth century, and fairly limited in scope, the effect they had on auction n°6 — august 2017 even perhaps to the first stirrings of the informathe inner-city suburbs was drastic; entire areas, tion age, as old certainties and informational such as Arch Hill and Grafton, essentially ceased hierarchies began to erode. Elements of this to exist, or were reduced to shadows of their approach can be seen in Robert Ellis’ practice, in former selves, phantom post-codes haunting the that it is also an emergent response to techgleaming, sun-flecked flyovers. nology, specifically the massive mechanisation Travelling through these newly-reconfigured and technical specialisation that took place city-spaces becomes not a traversal of the streets during World War Two. Whereas the 1930s had themselves, but a process of engaging with a been a decade of cautious, gradual change in New discrete technological matrix, that simultaneZealand, after the war the pace of technological progress increased rapidly. ously enables a seamless transition between districts and neighbourhoods and insulates the Robert Ellis was uniquely poised to document the driver or passenger from the intervening terrain. cusp of the technological and societal transforIn this respect, the motorway acts like a mations brewing in the middle decades of the circulatory system for the city, replacing the twentieth century. He grew up in Northampton, old, granular terrain of the traditional urban England, during the war, which became the environment with a series of binary decision background to his early life. After the armistice, trees: on-ramp/off-ramp, departure/destihe studied at the Northampton School of Art, nation, slow/fast. No more would navigating and then at the Royal College of Art in London. In the city space be a case of gradually progressing 1947, he was conscripted into the Royal Air Force, through a vertically-aligned space, that impedes where he worked as a photographer, processing our lines of sight and blocks our ability to travel, aerial composite images. This view of the but instead becomes a case of travelling through landscape from above, as a segmented, flattened channels and routes carved out in advance of space, made a lasting impression on Ellis. This our passage, pre-determined corridors that technical training inflected and synthesised with deliver us to our destination, but discourage his fine art background, resulting in a painting any orthogonal modes of travel. practice that displays a combination of the technical and the expressive. Robert Ellis moved to New Zealand in 1957, where he taught at the Elam School of Fine Arts until Just as the postwar era radically altered people’s 1994. Driving to work each day from the suburbs, relationships to technology, as the innovations in Ellis traversed Auckland’s newly-minted motormass-production and standardisation develways, and they gradually came to define the oped for the war effort were turned to civilian way he saw his adopted city. In the mid-1960s, ends, it also altered the places where they lived. Ellis began to conceive of Auckland’s terrain After the war, the way cities were navigated and as a network or skein of interconnected nodes, constructed was radically reinvented in order to with the intervening areas rigidly defined by the accommodate the booming automobile industry, motorways surging around them, like a system of which promised a future when each person blood vessels. In paintings like Cosmopolitan City would have their own car, and would travel (1965), Ellis is already beginning to represent the through an “elaborately signalled landscape,” in city in diagrammatic form, and starts to incorJ.G. Ballard’s words. porate the overhead view of the terrain that he became intimately familiar with during his time This connection—between literal and metaphoras an aerial photographer. However, as Charles ical travel and connectivity, between transport Eldredge points out, Ellis also subtly undermines and communication—is something that gives the potentially reductive aspects of the motorway Ellis’ work an ongoing relevance. The reason system (and an aerial view) by retaining the modernism has continued to have resonance horizon as a compositional element in many of into the present day, even as its search for his works, thus allowing “him and the viewer to absolutes and ideal forms has been continually see in more than one defined direction, encourundermined and eroded by the informational aging formal plays within the composition.”1 In and philosophical maelstrom of the internet, is spite of this, the majority of each canvas remains that modernism is about communication, and essentially cartographic in nature. Ellis’ work is no exception. Just as the way people thought about themselves was changing, the way Seen from this angle, the cityscape becomes they built their spaces was also about to undergo something else entirely: a map. Viewed from a massive shift. above, the chaos of the city is digested into a series of flattened linear forms, essentially New Zealand was no different; although on a becoming a symbol of itself. Mapping is a way vastly smaller scale, the construction of motorof understanding and navigating space, and ways in Auckland echoed the immense freeway by the late ’60s, in works like Motorway / City 119


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the lens of a modernist approach to surface and paint handling, drawing on a range of influences from Braque to Francis Bacon.

(1969), Ellis has transitioned almost completely into a cartographic mode, producing paintings that show the messy tangle of city streets shot through by smooth, seamless motorways, bolts of liquid energy splitting the picture plane apart into discrete, floating segments. These works flirt with abstraction, but never quite abandon bowerbank ninow their essential nature as depictions of actual objects and spaces; when the overall pattern and rhythm of the linear elements seems almost to have progressed into a rarefied space that does not allow for the possibility of representational interpretation, Ellis will introduce an element such as a cloud or a park-like area of foliage, immediately collapsing our reverie of abstraction and returning us to the matter at hand: a city, viewed from above.

However, Ellis’ engagement with Maori subject matter was not merely academic or stylistic; his marriage to Elizabeth Aroha Mountain, at Otira marae in the Bay of Islands in 1966, gave him an immediate connection to the local community, as well as a newfound relationship to the land itself. The concept of turangawaewae became an important element of Ellis' practice in the decades after his marriage. Slowly, the motorways, that enable a seamless transition between anonymous, immaterial spaces, give way in the Rakaumangamanga series of the 1980s to paintings that depict geological cross sections through the terrain, chunks of territory that speak of a deeply rooted commitment to, and love of, the land itself: truly, New Zealand had become for Ellis “a place to stand.”

There is a strong linear element to Ellis’ work from this period, and this is reflected in his drawing practice, which complements and informs much of his painted output. The works pictured here are both examples of how Ellis’ Motorway works function when reduced to a diagrammatic form—either black and white or as a colour sketch: their map-like qualities are emphasised, and the works become symbolic systems, guiding the viewer into a stylised, fantastical cityscape of endless flyovers, junctions and ramps, while on the edge of the picture plane the last remnants of the fractal sprawl of suburbia are reduced to an addendum to the new technology of mass transportation.

ANDREW CLARK

In Motorway Junction (1968) the picture plane is almost completely consumed by a mass of bold white strokes, standing out against a red background, a rushing mass channelling the energy of the twentieth century. Each “lane” is a continuous stroke of white paint, both an expressive mark and a representational element. In another, untitled 1968 work, a study for the Barry Lett Galleries Multiples series, the core components of Ellis’ Motorway formula are laid out: white strands strung out across the picture plane, providing a sweeping jumping-off point for possible explorations beyond the border of the image, while in the upper left quadrant, a complex tangle of streets and alleys, ambiguously reminiscent of both electronic circuit boards and tapa cloth, provide an organic, crumbling counterpoint to the immaculate modernism of the sweeping, linear motorway forms. Also of note in these works is the elegance with which Ellis combines his modernist influences with elements of traditional Maori art and design. In the second, untitled work, Ellis incorporates a looping form that is part-koru and part clover-leaf junction, a form that is equally decorative and functional, ancient and modern. In 1965, Ellis attended Pine Taiapa’s Whakairo and Tukutuku Residential School, an experience that would have a decisive impact on his artistic practice moving forward. In the drawings reproduced here, Ellis’ sweeping curves and interlocking grids echo traditional kowhaiwahi motifs and tukutuku panelling, but reinterpreted through

1

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Charles C. Eldredge, “Pacific Parallels, Artists and the Landscape in New Zealand,” cited in Robert Ellis, Robert Ellis (Auckland: Ron Sang Publications, 2014), 54.


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Paul Hartigan Ghost Drawing

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Photograph of Auckland University Bookshop mural Learn How to Draw by Paul Hartigan 1981, coloured chalk on blackboard-painted windows. Photograph by Gil Hanly.

Paul Hartigan’s practice represents an ongoing exploration of the possibilities of line. In much of his painting and drawing, the integrity of the line is brought into question, placed under stress, and ultimately reconfigured. This fertile avenue of inquiry is a constant in Hartigan’s work, present from the time of his art school paintings such as The Phantom through to his later neon works and his current digital explorations.

The offset “ghost drawing” that Hartigan observed in comics would become a core element of his practice. In paintings such as Myopic Blueprint (1983) the blurry boundaries of mis-registered colour separations are replicated by the coloured “halo” surrounding each black line. Conceptually, these delicate shreds of colour are an extension of the idea of the offset slipping, as is the nimbus of light cast by the neon tubes in works such as Colony (2004). The “ghost line” is ambivalent, both in nature and appearance. It is a mechanical byproduct of the commercial printing process, an unintentional machine error that, by some subterranean process of transmutation, becomes a mark of imperfection—a human mark.

Hartigan credits “not being middle class” with the freedom to consume popular culture he had as a child: “I didn’t have a mother or father—I didn’t even have a father—going ‘Hey! You’re not reading those comics!’”1 He remembers having “piles of comic books” as a child, namedropping many of the popular titles of the 1950s and ’60s: Richie Rich, Little Lotta, Dagwood, The Phantom and especially Carl Barks’ Donald Duck and Uncle Scrooge.2 For Hartigan, the crucial feature of these comics was their mechanically reproduced nature, and their use of basic offset printing to achieve colour. Hartigan remembers being fascinated by what he calls the “ghost drawing” effect produced by the mis-registration of the different plates, resulting in hazy, optically dense fields of colour that spill over the black outlines of the comic, rendering the border permeable and ambivalent.

Hartigan’s approach to mark-making emulates the mechanical line, but with the understanding that this act of replication will always be subtly imperfect. In early paintings, such as The New Flag and The Phantom (both 1973), Hartigan softens the hard outlines of his flat planes of enamel by allowing the paint to run, in what he refers to as a process of “accidental drawing” that functions to replicate the mechanistic, random nature of the misregistered print. Even the neon works, with their seemingly perfectly fabricated surfaces, are the products of improvisation and circumstance: although complex “knot” works 122


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such as Mondion (2010) are made to a design, the exigencies of bending the hot glass mean that compromises and improvisational solutions always play a part in their final form.

Lot 71 Paul Hartigan 7 X's 8 O's 1979 ink on found paper 316mm × 510mm

It is noteworthy that the international outlook that characterises Hartigan’s practice stems from a childhood experience of consuming the auction n°6 — august 2017 emerging American popular culture as it came into New Zealand, rather than from approaching these materials later, as an adult. Hartigan is, in a sense, a “native speaker” of the language of comics, advertisements, magazines and mass media, and thus it was natural that this material would form the basis of his art practice. At art school, rather than engaging with the existing New Zealand landscape tradition that, by the 1970s, was already beginning to show serious cracks, Hartigan painted what he knew: the Phantom and the STP petrol logo. Prior to Elam, Hartigan’s approach to the problem of drawing had been shaped by another crucial influence: Tom Kreisler. Kreisler was Hartigan’s art teacher at high school, where he instilled in him an understanding that a drawing “could be wrong and still be right,” and also a particular approach to mark-making that Hartigan describes as the “free line.”3 This is the line that, in Kreisler’s works, is sketched or dragged across the canvas or page, seemingly contacting the surface for only a brief moment but leaving a lasting, decisive trace that speaks of the improvisational nature of the artistic gesture. Hartigan found in Kreisler’s “free line” an echo of the fluid, expressive line drawings of Carl Barks’ Donald Duck comics that had so captivated him as a child. However, whereas Barks’ line was mediated by the mechanical processes of photolithography and commercial printing, Kreisler’s drawing was tantalisingly immediate: an unfettered, tactile approach that would have a profound effect on the young artist. Hartigan also saw in Kreisler’s work a continuation of the line-and-colour methodology seen in comics; he compares Kreisler’s use of loose colour washes, over- and under-flowing the “drawn” line, to the misregister that he observed in offset printed material—a technical and philosophical “slippage,” operating in the interstices between drawing and painting.

Lot 70 Paul Hartigan Against the Grain 1980 ink and watercolour on paper 600mm × 910mm

While seemingly opposed, the ideas of a mechanically-derived “ghost drawing” and a human, fluid “free line” are synthesised in Hartigan’s work in a way that reveals their complementary qualities, and the drawings of the London Suite exemplify this approach. This series was completed in 1977 while Hartigan was living with his friend Stephanie Gray in London, using coloured ballpoint pen on found scratch paper from Gray’s typewriter (she was a journalist working for The Financial Times). Composed of groups of forms either remembered or observed by Hartigan while travelling through Asia and Europe, these works expand on the series of glass-panel Landscapes completed two years previously, in 1975. Like the Landscapes, the London Suite draws on Hartigan’s interest in

Lot 69 Paul Hartigan London Suite No 2 1977 ink on found paper 297mm × 210mm

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surrealism, particularly the works of Max Ernst and Yves Tanguy, and their use of groupings of biomorphic, ambiguous shapes in a landscape, accentuated by a low horizon line. In the Lanscape series, Hartigan links these surrealist influences to the “stylised, cleanly depicted desert landscapes”4 he remembers from Carl Barks’ Disney comics, in which the frames are bowerbank ninow linked together by a shared horizon. Each work in the Landscape series is thus also a panel, a container for (and pointer towards) a narrative that remains opaque and unresolved.

a house painting brush and a bundle of sticks to complete an impromptu painting for a friend.7 Even in works designed using a computer, Hartigan employs these self-imposed restrictions as a way of opening the door for potential mechanistic errors: Hartigan drew some of the linear forms for Colony (2004) using a mouse, with his eyes closed.8 This technique in part derives from Breton’s definition of Surrealism as “psychic automatism in its pure state,” that is, an artistic process that bypasses “control exercised by reason” or “aesthetic and moral concerns” —a pure expression of the subconscious mind.9

However, whereas the Landscapes have only hints of figuration—a cross made of wooden boards, a magnet, pills, forms that could be trees, cacti or coral—the London Suite drawings contain some definite objects, along with their ambivalent geometric and natural forms. One drawing depicts a column of stacked stones, corralled into a precarious tower by a makeshift support of branches and rope, while another depicts a trough slopping over with yellow liquid, and a third an artificial tree, its geometric topiary immaculately rendered. The seemingly arbitrary and disparate nature of these figurative elements brings to mind Pierre Reverdy’s assertion that poetic (or painterly) imagery must arise from the “juxtaposition of two more or less distant realities,” cited by Andre Breton in his 1924 Manifesto of Surrealism.5 Reverdy went on to write that “the more the relationship between the two juxtaposed realities is distant and true, the stronger the image will be,”6 a principle that Hartigan, sitting alone in a London flat half a world away from his home, might well have found resonant.

The themes that Hartigan explores in the London Series would go on to inform his 1980s and ‘90s works, and even the later photocopy, neon and digital elements of his practice. Subsequent to the London Series, Hartigan returned to Auckland, where he took a job at the War Memorial Museum, and began to make a series of works that depict groups of objects floating in coloured fields. In this period he produced works such as Dictionary II (1981) and Goon Stones (1989), in which the horizon line, derived from Tanguy and Barks, has departed, leaving only a nebulous field of colour, a sky without a ground. In these works, the unruly assemblies of the London Suite have been resolved into collections: ordered arrangements that reflect an interest in the “cataloguing of language and shapes.”10 Here, the visual language of comics, in which each panel is a self-contained semiotic and linguistic cell, is reconfigured as a taxonomical tool: a way of compartmentalising and understanding the material world.

As well as extending and expanding on the themes of the Landscape series, these drawings speak to the idea of discovery, assembly and experimentation. They are the drawings of a maker, someone who works with their hands and comes up with solutions to mechanical problems, and part of what they are about is the making process itself. They are about trying to figure out the nuances of a problem, whether practical or artistic, and putting together an answer. In the process, the strangely constructed objects and tableaux in these drawings are stand-ins for the idea of the artistic product itself: an outcome that is comprehensible to the artist, but may remain opaque to the casual observer. The inclusion of typewritten text on these works is also significant. Typewriting is a mechanical markmaking process that strives for perfection, but that nevertheless remains subtly flawed. As a mechanical process prone to chance and slippage, typewriting is analogous to offset printing, and as such, it is not surprising to see Hartigan adopting this technology. The use of a 20-colour ballpoint pen, a decidedly non-artistic drawing tool, adds an additional element of the mechanistic to these works—an intentional complication that attempts to distance the work from the human hand (ballpoint is not able to convey subtle variations in pressure in the same way as pencil or charcoal, for example). Hartigan often places such intentional restrictions on his mark-making: he recalls, in one instance, using

Hartigan’s work is not pop art, but it speaks the language of popular culture, deploying the technical processes of commercial art and illustration to expose their flaws, revealing the human potential for chance, accident and error that is embedded in the most prosaic of reproduced images. Whether rendered in neon tubing, painted in enamel or as a vector in a piece of software, Hartigan’s work explores the interaction between the unlimited potential of a “free line” and the mechanistic serendipity of the offset “ghost drawing” that he observed in comics. Andrew Clark 1

Interview with the artist, 14 June, 2017.

2

Although Disney contributors were uncredited at the time, Carl Barks brought a unique fluency of drawing and storytelling ability to the Donald Duck titles that set him apart from his contemporaries. Near the end of his life, he began to be recognised as one of the most important and influential children’s comics artists of the 20th century.

3

Interview with the artist, 14 June, 2017.

4 Ibid. 5

Andre Breton, Manifestoes of Surrealism (University of Michigan Press: 1969), 20.

6 Ibid. 7

Interview with the artist, 14 June, 2017.

8 Ibid.

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9

Andre Breton, Manifestoes of Surrealism (University of Michigan Press: 1969), 26.

10

Don Abbot, Vivid: The Paul Hartigan Story (Auckland: RF Books, 2015), 110.


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jeffrey harris is a Dunedin-based painter, who has also worked in Christchurch, Melbourne and the United States. His 1970s works were expressionist in nature and depicted groups of figures in New Zealand landscapes, often including religious imagery, bowerbank ninow but in the subsequent decades he has also engaged with abstraction. Harris is largely self-taught, although he was mentored by the older generation of New Zealand painters, particularly Michael Smither. Harris was the winner of the Wallace Art Awards in 2003, and a retrospective exhibition of his work toured New Zealand’s major public galleries from 2004-6.

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Jeffrey Harris Interviewed by Andrew Clark AC You’ve spoken in the past (in the 1983 “Profiles” TV documentary) about how your paintings are “just a glimpse of what the whole thing is all about.” I took this to mean that your practice of thinking about and making images is an extensive, ongoing process, of which paintings are only one possible expression—how does drawing fit into this larger process of artistic engagement? JH Paintings are just one component of a whole. Drawing is another component, photography another. Film and writing are others. Each of these are basically separate activities that usually do not overlap or interact. It is just up to me as to which of these activities I wish to focus on and give my attention to, at any particular time. One component can become dominant and lead to the exclusion of other activities, sometimes for years. This has happened recently with painting. When I was very young, drawing became my way of expressing myself or my way of constructing messages or images. I became very fluent at drawing, very skilful and drawing came naturally. When I began to paint, many years later, I found this new (to me) medium difficult at times. That is why many of the major and most important works of mine from the early- to mid-seventies were drawings. Drawing in my body of work has always been separate from painting. The drawings rarely have any equivalent in painting. They stand alone as a separate way of working, a separate way of looking and as a separate body of images. In many ways, I am the opposite of McCahon, who said, “There is only one direction.” For me there are many, possibly too many, directions: too many choices, too many ways of working. It is often only through extreme discipline that I can stay on one path. In this seemingly too-short life, there seem to be only glimpses of what could be possible and of what one might achieve. AC It’s interesting that you consider your drawings from the 1970s to be amongst your major works from that period. Can you talk about what advantages and disadvantages drawing has compared to painting, and why you think these particular works were so successful? JH I consider some of my drawings from the 1970s to be major works, in so far as they are fully developed and worked out as individual finished artworks. During this period, I was more skilful and able to achieve greater detail and fineness of touch and precision in drawing than I was in painting, a medium that, at the time, I was less technically in command of. Some of the larger drawings from the early 1970s of a visionary nature, featuring floating angels, lovers and other figures (these are mainly from 1970–71, and done in Dunedin) and the drawings from the mid-seventies of family groups or self-portraits with immediate family members, that feature very detailed landscape drawing (which were done while living on Banks Peninsula), I consider amongst the most important and accomplished work I have ever done. They are often superior to my paintings of that period, because of my technical ability to convey through drawing images that have a very focused and intense presence. These major works are accompanied by many smaller drawings (mainly from 1970–71) that are often taken from photographic sources or are drawings from life (many of them of Joanna Paul), as well as crucifixions, scenes of violence, lovers, floating figures, and other visionary scenes. I consider these smaller drawings also finished works, independent and separate from the paintings I was doing at that time. Many of the smaller drawings feature the same qualities (sharpness of line, the use of space and gesture, the shading and positioning of figures), that occur in the larger works. Some of the larger drawings were worked on over a period of up to five days, often working at night. 126


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AC Although you make it clear that your drawings are to be considered as a separate body of work from the paintings, are there connections or parallels between the two? And if so, what can we learn about the paintings from the drawings (and vice versa)?

Lot 24, P.47 Jeffrey Harris Woman in coat 1971 graphite on paper 255mm × 200mm

JH I don’t know that there are many connections or parallels between the paintings and drawings. At least not from the seventies (which is auction n°6 — august 2017 what we are mainly talking about here). I think that with the abstract works of the nineties, there is more interaction, in that the drawings from that time were often forerunners or ways into the paintings. They worked more in tandem in exploring form and space, but the early works are really, I feel, two separate bodies of work, with the drawings often being ahead in achievement and clarity. The seventies paintings are often rougher and more immediate, as opposed to the drawings, which are more sophisticated and refined. AC In the past you have also discussed the idea of a “condensation of experience”—that is, the idea that human life leaves a trace on the landscape, on the city and so on. This is a lovely metaphor—it makes me think of time as a stratum, and you as an archaeologist digging through the reside of all those years. Could you talk specifically about how your painting practice relates to this idea of accumulated time? JH There is a strong element of revisiting the past in my work, which now even means encompassing my own past. The need to go back and scavenge through what has gone before and to make it new, to bring it into the present, to bring it into the light, is a strong impulse and desire. To try to make something permanent and lasting from the materials, objects and images thrown up by previous civilisations is probably foolhardy and, in the present age, probably irrational, but I have a strong desire to do so—to use painting to make something lasting. It feels as though my contribution, at the end of civilisations, is to make of their ruins and of what is left something to see and to hold on to: something constructed from the past that we can see now as fresh, vital and new. AC You say that you feel that your work takes place at the "end of civilisations." This is a striking idea—can you expand a little on what you mean? Are you speaking specifically about the civilisations of the past (ancient Egypt? Rome?), or do you see yourself as operating in some sense after (or beyond?) contemporary civilisation? JH By the end of civilisations, I mean my work comes after. It is a reflection, a commentary, a meditation on what has gone before, on civilisations that have passed and that I pay homage to, such as the Renaissance, Mannerism, the Baroque. I know these are considered art movements, but they are part of a Western civilisation that I feel has passed. So: do I think that Western civilisation is over, that painting is basically finished or has, anyway, lost its power to impact upon our lives? What is the role of painting now? It certainly plays a diminished role in contemporary art practice. Have the great moments of painting passed? Is my painting a celebration, an elegy, for what is gone? Is my work a sort of end-page? A final summation . . . of a particular type of NZ painting, or Western European painting . . . a closing statement, one of looking back in wonderment and grief? AC I’m interested in the part of your working process that involves (or involved?) the collection and arrangement of images—I love the shots in the ’83 documentary that show your studio, and the piles of photographs, newspapers, magazines, etc. How does your practice negotiate the divide between photography and painting, and what role does drawing play in negotiating this area?

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Lot 23, P.46 Jeffrey Harris Two women 1971 graphite on paper 255mm × 200mm


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Lot 22, P.45 Jeffrey Harris Woman sitting at table 1971 graphite on paper 255mm × 200mm

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JH From about 1967 onwards I began collecting many, many images. Hundreds and hundreds of photographs that I cut from magazines and newspapers. Some of these powerful images found their way into my painting. Images of war, sex, violence. Images of politicians, celebrities, artists. Images of poverty and the degradation of life. Images of artworks. I was also drawn to images of family groups and figures alone in the landscape. While most of these images, if they were used at all, were reworked into paintings, a few did end up as source material for actual finished drawings. The hunger, the need to collect all these images, was strong. For many years, they acted as a sort of encyclopaedia, a source of knowledge, a source of imagery. Over the years, the need to collect more and new images subsided, until it was only the image that was specifically going to be used in a painting that was collected. And as time went on these usually became only photographs of people, to be used most often as the basis for a portrait. Photography was always strong: photographs in their own right, and also as a source of imagery. Some did become drawings, but mainly only in the early seventies. AC You have also spoken about how in sourcing images for your paintings, what grabs you initially is a particular “gesture” of a figure. Can you discuss how drawing relates to this process of capturing and thinking about the idea of the gesture? JH Photographs, images from magazines or books, are often already constructed, composed. Some of the work has already been done. The way the light falls in a particular image. The tilt of the head, that is so evocative. The gesture of the hand. Some images are ready to be drawn. They say, “draw me.” In the drawing process, they are changed. Bits are left out. I have emphasised certain details and created spaces—places where the drawing now breathes and becomes something else. As I draw them, they become more my images and take over, and leave behind the source material. AC I like the idea you mentioned of an artwork having a meaning that is unknown, or obscure, but nevertheless being able to speak to the viewer in a very immediate, direct way. How has your practice engaged with the idea of expressing (or concealing) meaning? JH I think art is very much about concealing or about the unknowable. Once something is known or is easily decipherable, it can lose its power to hold our attention and we pass onto other things. The meaning in much of my work (especially the earlier work) is often contradictory and is not open to logical interpretation. Therefore, the symbols I have used and their juxtaposition often have no clear meaning and even I would have trouble analysing much of the work from this period. The paintings and drawings are not primarily about meaning but are meant to convey something else. Something on a much more elemental level such as emotion, calmness, or anxiety. Primal states. States of being. AC After moving to Australia, your practice also underwent a radical shift—from figuration to abstraction. As we touched on earlier, drawing played a role in this. How did moving towards abstraction affect your drawing process? JH Drawing became very important in the process towards abstraction. There are many, many drawings involved in this process. With a few exceptions, they have remained largely unseen, as have most of the drawings done in Dunedin since my return. Whereas most of the drawings from the seventies were very linear and clear, the Melbourne drawings are much darker, heavier and more physical expressions of form and space. The nineties were a great time for drawing in my work, as were the seventies. The eighties less so (with a few exceptions) and I wonder if this has something to do with the fact that I was more hidden away during those two decades. I wonder about whether drawing is a more private and inward activity. 128


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AC It's interesting to me that you come back to this idea of space and of bodies in space. Although readings and critical approaches to your work quite often take the tack of trying to relate the paintings to your biography, or trying to construct narrative through-lines that tie together multiple groups of paintings, I wonder if there's also a sense that what drives your work is this interest in representing space, and the metaphorical and emotional auction n°6 — august 2017 resonance possible in such an image? After all, it would probably be safe to say that the archetypal figure in your practice is a person standing in a landscape. What do you think of this approach to looking at the work? JH I think it is unfortunate that much of the writing about my work has been focused on its relationship to my life—on the so called autobiographical aspect, or on my biography. I have to take some responsibility for this. I did the works, but in a lifetime of painting and drawing this period only occurs in the years 1977–89. Late in 1989, I made a conscious decision to move away from this sort of subject matter and began my battle with abstraction. And when, later, I returned to figuration in about 1997, the autobiographical element had well and truly gone from my work. (There are a couple of self-portraits and that is about all from this time onwards.) In all the figurative work I have done since, there has been an absence of the hothouse, emotional, heart on the sleeve type of work that characterised the late eighties, work that in the end had become too indulgent and repetitive. It is the work of mine that I like the least and yet it is the work I am best known for. The works from 1967–76, are I find much more interesting and rewarding, dealing as they do with many other ideas and forms. The imagination, dreams, photographic sources, the studies of figures in space. The archetypal figure in a landscape is very strong in my work, but perhaps not as strong or as prominent as it is thought to be, if more of the unseen aspects of my work were widely known.

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Lot 21, P.44 Jeffrey Harris The Pope 1971 graphite on paper 255mm × 200mm


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Pat Hanly The Human Condition

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Lot 38, p.59 Pat Hanly, Energy 1971, ink on paper, 545mm × 660mm

The general tendency to associate Pat Hanly primarily with his bright, euphoric palette and expressionistic gestures has obscured the subtly of his drawing and perkiness of his line from broader appreciation. His drawings are well worthy of equal consideration with the paintings, as masterworks in their own right.

Clark prioritised good drawing technique. There, Hanly made friends with his contemporaries, the printmaker Bill Culbert and the photographer Gil Taverner, the latter of whom he married, in 1958. On his return from the obligatory European O.E. in 1962, having attended London’s Chelsea School of Art, Hanly supported his painting with a part-time lectureship in drawing at the University of Auckland’s School of Architecture. After nearly a decade away absorbing all that European modernism had to offer, Hanly was determined to reconnect with the Pacific environment. By this time, his skills had reached a high degree of refinement, as is evident from the supple confidence of every contour and form in his drawings.

It was drawing that first attracted Hanly to art. His grandfather, an amateur artist, encouraged Hanly’s drawing, unlike his teachers at school. With his first wages as an apprentice hairdresser at Bert Pratt Ltd in Palmerston North, the young Pat bought a book of Rembrandt drawings that his protective mother whisked away, lest he be defiled by the nudes. He also took night classes with the British-born landscape painter Allan Leary at the local technical college.

While Hanly is often associated with his large murals, such as the ones in Auckland’s Aotea Centre (1990) and Christchurch’s Town Hall (1971), and for his epic The Seven Ages of Man (1975) series (inspired by the “all the world’s a stage” monologue in Shakespeare’s As You Like It), he is often most compelling at his most

In 1952, Hanly enrolled as a non-Diploma student at the Canterbury College School of Art in Christchurch (forerunner of Canterbury University’s School of Fine Arts), where the traditional training under Bill Sutton and Russell 130


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intimate. Even then, this is art with a public message. Hanly’s art speaks of how important it is to be in the beauty of the now, and how we must protect this idea for future generations (reflecting his position as a prominent Greenpeace and anti-nuclear protestor, as well as a keen sailor). He is also trying to teach us how art can main-line directly into the power of love, to auction n°6 — august 2017 effect change. His work has the power to extend the innocence and hope of the 1970s (for as with all things, the Summer of Love was late to arrive in Aotearoa, down at the bottom of the world) into the present, when it is no less relevant. As Auckland critic T. J. McNamara wrote in Hanly’s obituary for the New Zealand Herald: “To express what he saw he developed a special way of working that was part action painting and part tight form. Out of this emerged beautiful paintings of gardens and still lifes where the power streamed from flowers and figure studies that were filled with energy inside severe outlines. . .” I think, though, it is the drawings that allow us to appreciate this technique more, allowing those “severe outlines” to emerge and eloquently speak for themselves. They reveal that the diagram of bones and scaffolding under the flesh of the paintings is equally elegant and moving.

Lot 40, P.61 Pat Hanly Untitled 1988 ink on paper 300mm × 300mm

Hanly’s drawings of the human figure are masterful, suggesting familiarity with both the multiple perspectives of Picasso’s synthetic cubism and the boneless fluidity of Matisse. A few lines sometimes work to encapsulate the entire composition, as in the example of Hanly’s iconic Sleeping Girl series, inspired by Gil and filtered through Francis Bacon and Marc Chagall, but more a general archetype of womanhood than a portrait of any particular individual. The figure is almost a landscape, a great hill of black hair, foliage-like eyelashes chiming with the briefest suggestion of hair at the armpit. However, Hanly could just as easily construct something far more expressive, built up from shorter, more angular lines and filled with dynamic energy. A sketch from 1988 of figures apparently dancing in bacchanalian frenzy amid a marbled wash of ink, expertly delineated in calligraphic strokes, illustrates this well. The same can be said of a reclining female figure drawn in 1963, composition centred on her callipygian buttocks, titled Figure in Light, from the series of the same name. The latter drawing is as decadent as chocolate cake, imbued with a languid eroticism that transcends the formalist abstraction of its composition. In a 1979-80 interview with Hamish Keith for Art New Zealand, Hanly said of the Figures in Light series: “That really was a bolt out of the blue idea. It was there clearly when walking along the beach and seeing it—something that was not just worthy of a picture: it was a whole condition. The nation sitting around on its bum doing nothing.”

Lot 41, P.62 Pat Hanly Who Am I 1972 watercolour on paper 535mm × 380mm

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sleepers” (to use Bill Pearson’s phrase) McCahon, Woollaston and Walters, and the drug-infused frenzy of Maddox and Clairmont, ambivalent about regionalism and the idea of a national art. Figures in Light was Hanly’s way of talking about New Zealanders, and about New Zealand as both a physical place in the Pacific and a complacent and hedonistic state of mind. bowerbank ninow

utopia, quite different from the chaotic, self-destructive, bohemian existence of a McCahon or a Fomison. Hanly’s searching for philosophical and spiritual meaning has its feet firmly planted on the ground. On the other hand, a pencil and black ink nature study from the Energy series, dated 1971, shows how clinically precise and detailed Hanly could be. Line, crosshatching and tiny flicks seemingly made by the artist stabbing at the paper combine to create a wonderfully intricate scene of trees and a grassy bank. Its obvious model is Van Gogh, in its attempt to ensnare the swirling life-force of the natural world in its scrim of lines, in a manner reminiscent of the earlier Inside the Garden series. A drawing like this is every bit as much a masterpiece as the Dutch genius’ stellar vortices and writhing cypresses of Arles. It dances and sings for the retina and suggests that Nature (with a capital “N”) was a tutelary presence in Hanly’s life and work.

In contrast to the “southern gothic” aesthetic that inflected the other artists mentioned, here was art born of Auckland’s Mediterranean climate and bright harbours, of sun, optimism and aspiration, echoing the work of Don Binney and Ian Scott. However, contrary to popular readings of the work, it also contains a critical subtext, urging the national culture to collectively get up and do something. It was this same impetus that drove Hanly to protest the destruction of the environment and the abomination of nuclear testing. The complex and multifaceted nature of this art lurks just below the bright colours and splatter, manifesting itself through the drawing. Hanly is reminiscent of the seventeenth century English poet John Donne, in that the confrontationally theatrical exuberance of the utterance is merely a vehicle to convey the significant truths of the earthly, the physical and the human, while remaining soaring and metaphysical. Even as we are dazzled by Hanly’s visual theatrics, we must gaze deeper, at the existential commentary underneath. As Hanly himself said: “An artist’s obligation is to create a graphic response to the essential truths of that artist’s intellectual and spiritual chemistry. Accepting that most “art” is illustration and craft, masters are distinguished by the realisation of the gift as having the presence of the metaphysical in their thinking and works, and it is that which others sense and seek to know. Art is in the heart.” And without getting bogged down excessively in romantic notions about art and artists, it is with his heart that Hanly painted and drew, as much as with his eye, hand and mind.

This almost animistic love of nature, life and energy should be no surprise from someone who listed his hobbies in his New Zealand Who’s Who entry as “kite-flying, sailing, Greenpeace,” and who had, at his funeral, a “No Nuclear Ships” banner displayed above the open casket. This identity is as much a part of his art as anything else: “Hanly juggled his need to express his response to matters of social conscience with his gift for creating paintings that convey great joyfulness,” wrote Elizabeth Caughey and John Gow in Contemporary New Zealand Art 2 (1999). “The resulting works were, variously, political, reflective of ‘the human condition’ or observational, particularly of family and friends.” By the time a Pacific Ikon documentary on the Hanlys screened on New Zealand television in 1998, Pat had been diagnosed with Hodgkin’s disease—a terrible cancer of the blood that first takes root in the lymphatic system. His strength and fine muscular control were failing, making it difficult for him to paint, although for all intents and purposes he had retired from painting in 1994 after completing the Bouquets series. He faced the inevitable with typical good humour, joking that he anticipated death with interest: “Some of my best friends are dead.”

An ink and crayon drawing of a landscape from 1969, executed in Hanly’s immediately recognisable colour and spatter technique, suggests that his experience at the School of Architecture exerted some influence on the artist. The complex, interlocking volumes, straight lines and Spartan, pseudo-pointillist use of dots to fill the outlines of a house (a structure that seems more Robert Venturi-domestic than Auckland-suburban), contrasts dramatically with the lurid greens, purples, blues, yellows, and lush organic forms of the garden or bush that surrounds it. This is an idea of a place, a surreal, ideal impression rather than an attempt at realistic depiction. It is a feeling, a vibe.

Hanly passed away in 2004. Without a doubt, he was one of the most important New Zealand painters of his generation, taking New Zealand art in a vibrant, joyous, life-affirming direction that has more in common with Sydney painters like Brett Whiteley, Michael Johnson and Ken Donne than with many of his New Zealand contemporaries, thus putting a nail in the coffin of all that nationalist fustian about the uniqueness of New Zealand light. The legacy he left behind is simply extraordinary, a tonic in dark times and a taonga to cherish.

This work falls somewhere between Hanly’s 1960s Molecular paintings, exploring the idea that matter is not solid at the basic level, and the Garden series, inspired by his home and backyard studio in Mount Eden. Hanly delivered compelling slices of suburban Auckland’s domestic

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Russell Clark Interpreting Modernism

Clark’s sculpture is notable in that it represents one of the first determined efforts to place modernism in the public sphere in New Zealand. In this, Clark was following the leads of not only Henry Moore, whose work became synonymous with public art in post-war Britain, but also of Barbara Hepworth and Lynn Chadwick.3 Clark seems to have felt strongly that it was necessary auction n°6 — august 2017 for New Zealanders to invest in public art, in the interests of improving the overall artistic climate, noting that if “a fraction of the amount spent on transient luxuries in New Zealand was set aside for the commission of permanent sculpture, our cities would in time lose their expression of cultural starvation.”4 The sculptural element of Clark’s practice is extremely evident in the drawings included in this catalogue. These works date from his time in the Ureweras, and show him beginning to implement Moore’s approach to rendering figures as a series of rounded, cylindrical volumes—an approach inherited in turn from Brancusi and, ultimately, derived from African and Mesoamerican sculpture. Clark’s Maori woman carrying a sack (c.1948-50) shows this approach to modelling volume well: Clark’s dense pen strokes blend together into a dark hatching that moulds the contours of the figure, almost as though Clark’s pen is a chisel, shearing through space to expose the essential forms lying within his materials. This is an approach to drawing clearly based on that of Henry Moore, who likewise used line as a tool for modelling volume in this way.

Lot 99, p.111 Russell Clark, Two heads of Maori women c. 1948-50, graphite on paper, 420mm × 335mm

Drawing was a crucial element of Russel Clark’s practice. He was employed by the New Zealand Listener as an illustrator from 1938-62, and as an official war artist during World War Two, where he further developed his skills in figure drawing and modelling volumes in space, in works such as Movies in the Rain (1945) and Walking Wounded, Mono Island (1945). After the war, as well as working for the Listener, Clark was employed to produce illustrations for the Primary School Bulletin, an educational resource documenting New Zealand topics for the social studies curriculum. A Bulletin story on the town of Ruatahuna produced a number of illustrations of Tuhoe Maori that Michael Dunne, in his 1975 text on Clark (written to accompany the Robert McDougall Gallery retrospective), calls “some of his best works.”1 Images from this series such as Ruatahuna Village or The Meeting House (both 1950) show Clark’s mastery of pen and ink illustration, producing effects of contrast and pattern reminiscent of woodblock printing.

Clark’s Maori women and children is a different type of drawing, using a soft outline and delicate shading to define the contours of the women and children’s faces. Clark’s drawing in this sketch is precise but also sensitive, showing his abilities as a draughtsman and how he transitioned his illustration practice into more serious artistic subjects. The work is perhaps a study for an element of the large watercolour The Gathering (1957), which consists of multiple figure groups like those depicted here. Again, Clark’s facility with rendering form and volume is evident, as is his skill in observing details of gesture and expression; after all, most of his early work and professional training was in cartooning and magazine illustration, of which convincing, naturalistic figure drawings were a key feature. However, in his later work, Clark began to reapply these observational skills, ultimately refining his skill at handling line and volume into the forms of his modernist sculpture.

However, Clark’s engagement with Maori subject matter did not end with this illustration commission. He continued to paint and draw images of Maori people, producing works that Dunne characterises as combining influences from Australian regionalist painter Russell Drysdale with the monolithic solidity of Henry Moore’s figures.2 Although Clark’s drawing practice stands on its own merits as an example of regionalism in the mould of Eric Lee-Johnson, it is also particularly interesting in terms of his later sculptural output, which would ultimately move yet further into modernist territory.

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1

Russel Clark, Russel Clark, 1905-1966: A Retrospective Exhibition (Christchurch: Christchurch City Council Cultural Committee, 1975), P14

2

Ibid., 14-15

3

Ibid., 16.

4

Michael Dunn, The Drawings of Russel Clark: New Zealand Artist and Illustrator (Auckland: Collins, 1976), 13.


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Carl Sydow Logic and Symmetry

milieu full of energy, optimism and hope. From the Royal College, all the way over by Hyde Park, Sydow—a small-town boy from Takapau in central Hawke’s Bay, born in 1940 and schooled in Palmerston North—saw how the New Generation had digested Caro’s formal stylistic language, derived from industrial boilers and steel I-beams, and mixed it with the lessons of Pop and Minimalism by adding bright, colourful paintjobs and incorporating materials like commercial PVC tubing, Perspex, mirror glass and fibreglass.

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Of this experience, Sydow would later write, “I was rather astounded and impressed by a lot of the work being done there: particularly that of Roland Piche and Derrick Woodham, both of whom, along with some students of Anthony Cara at St. Martins, were included in a group exhibition called the New Generation held at the Whitechapel in early 1965. . . It all constituted a great upheaval in sculpture at the time and left me in a great state of confusion.” This “confusion” led Sydow to destroy his older work—imitations of then-fashionable English sculptors Kenneth Armitage and Lynn Chadwick in plaster, terracotta and ciment fondu—and pursue sculptural constructivism.

Lot 29, p.50 Carl Sydow, Drawing 5: VI 1975, Letraline on paper, 760mm × 605mm

Among the lessons Sydow drew from the New Generation was that the old furniture of the art gallery, like plinths and velvet ropes, only got in the way of the audience’s ability to interact with the work. Therefore, he discarded these extraneous elements and put his work directly on the floor. Sydow created boxes from opaque Perspex and threaded sinuous, meandering plastic hosepipes (strongly suggestive of the influence of Annesley) through them, so that they seemed to be floating in space.

The Christchurch artist Carl Sydow was only thirty-five when he passed away, shortly after Christmas in 1975. It was sudden and unexpected, a mere two months after an important exhibition of his drawings, Works on Paper at the Brooke-Gifford Gallery. This passing cut short the career of a man rapidly on his way to becoming one of the most interesting artists in New Zealand, and yet (perhaps due to the New Zealand art establishment’s usual disregard for the provinces and his relatively brief period of activity) Sydow remains one of our least known modernist pioneers. Sydow studied at the Canterbury University School of Fine Arts from 1959 to 1961, and completed an honours degree at the Elam School of Fine Art at Auckland University in 1963. His work was first publicly exhibited in Painters and Sculptors of Promise, an exhibition held by the Auckland Society of Arts in the same year. Subsequently, Sydow was awarded a QEII Arts Council grant to travel to London on the requisite OE, where from 1964 to 1968 he worked (although he was not enrolled as a student) in the studios of the Royal College of Art.

Sydow was certainly not the only New Zealander in that heady mix. New Zealand was a peripheral dominion to London’s imperial centre, and was thus the obvious port of call for those eager to learn about the latest developments in art. Among the talented young kiwis in London at the time were three sculptors who had much in common with Sydow: John Panting, Stephen Furlonger and Leon Narbey. There were also the sculptor and pioneer moving image artist Darcy Lange, the photographer/commercial artist Ken Griffiths, photographer/sculptor Terry Powell, and names perhaps most familiar to us today, Don Peebles and Boyd Webb. Some stayed on, while others, like Sydow in 1969, returned to New Zealand.

London was at the height of the “Swinging Sixties,” and British contemporary art and design were enjoying one of their intermittent vogues on the global stage. The most interesting thing happening in London’s energised art scene was the New Generation: a group of Sir Anthony Caro’s students at St Martin’s School of Art, in Granary Square in the heart of King’s Cross. It was a sparkling pool of talent that included Phillip King, David Annesley, Michael Bolus, Tim Scott, William Tucker and Isaac Witkin. It was a

These new approaches to sculpture caused a stir back in staid and sedate Christchurch, where Sydow had taken employment, first teaching art at Papanui High School and then working as a tutor at the Christchurch Technical Institute. Teaching was not the best fit for Sydow, and he would write how “difficult and demanding” it was, and that it was “hardly the place to be rethinking and reworking one’s attitudes towards sculpture.” He regressed back to figurative models for a couple of years, until he had 134


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managed to get his head and heart around rather perceptively that one of them resembled the new ideas he had found in London. “a suspension bridge on the catenary curve of His work received serious support from a suspended chain,” but found it impossible to make the final conceptual leap, saying it was a number of establishment figures in the New Zealand art world, particularly “difficult to accept them as works of art.” Rodney Wilson, then director of the Robert McDougall Art Gallery (forerunner of ChristWithout a doubt, Sydow was at least a decade church Art Gallery), his former tutor Tom ahead of his time. In 1979, the Robert McDougall auction n°6 — august 2017 Gallery honoured Sydow with a major retroTaylor, and his Wellington dealer Peter McLeavey, as well as artist contemporaries spective in memory of the man and his work, like Barry Cleavin and Quentin MacFarlane. Carl Sydow (1940-1975): A Memorial Show. In 2017 Sydow’s use of repetition and symmetry, and Christchurch Art Gallery put on a small but his interest in the moiré patterns created comprehensive exhibition of his sculptures and by superimposing suspended sheets of zinc drawings, Sydow: Tomorrow Never Knows, curated mesh (independently resonating with Roy by Peter Vangioni, following another show, 2016’s Lichtenstein’s Ben-Day dots) had a profound Op & Pop, that grouped Sydow with Andy Warhol, influence on the sculptor Neil Dawson. Gordon Walters and Julian Dashper. Canterbury University have a sculpture of Sydow’s in their The rest of New Zealand was less enthusicollection, while the Auckland Art Gallery has a astic. When McLeavey first showed Sydow figurative, rather lurid Pop Art screenprint from in 1970, the Evening Post reported viewers 1968. Te Papa holds several important sculptures, complaining that they felt as though they had including Meander II (1971) and Construction II “just stumbled into a plumber’s workshop,” (1973), along with drawings. It can be hoped that while Arts and Community asked, “What has from these seeds, Sydow’s artistic reputation happened? Sculpture is lumps of stone or will grow into the full acknowledgement that his bronze, isn’t it? Usually on a pedestal—interprodigious talent deserves. esting shapes, tactile qualities, emotional, even merely formal, but you can walk round Sadly, few of Sydow’s sculptures have survived, it: you SHOULD walk round it, shouldn’t you? either because he recycled and reworked them, Not just stare at it lying there on this same or simply because the materials that made them carpet.” The only potential purchaser for a novel also caused them to age badly and become work, Auckland City Art Gallery, changed brittle with time. Fortunately, Sydow’s genius their mind and withdrew their offer. Firmly is still visible in his drawings, executed in pen, in support of what he knew to be groundink, Letratone and Letrafilm. These preserve breaking work, despite the lack of sales, his focussed obsession with geometry and McLeavey would show Sydow almost every symmetry with the logic of an electronic year until the latter’s death. circuit, calling to mind his 1960s London contemporaries Bridget Riley, Robyn Denny, Perhaps the best example of the direction Tess Jaray, and Jeremy Moon, but shooting off Sydow’s work would have taken is a maquette on extraordinary, entirely new trajectories. proposal for an installation commissioned What might he have come up with in our era of for Queen Elizabeth II Park to mark the computer aided design and three-dimensional occasion of Christchurch’s hosting of the 1974 printing? These two-dimensional drawings Commonwealth Games. This consisted would gestate and ultimately evolve into the of three frames supporting double “V”s sculptures, incorporating transparency, density, of zinc mesh, and would have stood at shadow, moiré and subtle kinetic rhythms. around 6 meters tall. Complementing the local modernist vocabulary of Peter It is the drawings, crystalline and precise, that Beavan’s architecture and fully aware of indicate the direction and unique vision of the international audience it would garner, Sydow’s later works, and present a frustrating it would have been a powerful statement hint at what might have been. Complex ideas of Christchurch’s ambitious vision for itself about space and visual mass are reduced and in those halcyon, pre-earthquake days—a distilled to their irreducible elements—colour, far cry from the usual depiction of a city point and line—becoming as abstract and tranoverly-invested in the past. scendental as one of Plato’s ideal solids. On the flatness of the paper, they float in a volume of The suspended works, lacking the colour space seemingly generated entirely out of their of the earlier sculptures and the drawings, own geometries. The drawings in this catalogue frequently confused critics. A piece that was were made in the last year of Sydow’s life. Their exhibited at the New Zealand Academy of relative austerity echoes the direction Sydow’s Fine Arts in Wellington, in 1972, was declared sculptures had already taken, and their interplay by one critic to be a “‘now you see it, now you between two and three dimensions, their techdon’t situation,” going on to remark, totally nical virtuosity, their play of line and colour, and oblivious to the whole point of the work, that their clear forward gaze into the future, mark “the viewer has to make up his own mind them out as something truly wonderful. about the spaces suggested by Mr Sydow.” A year later, of works shown at the Dawson Andrew Paul Wood Gallery in Dunedin, sculptor and Otago Daily Times critic John Middleditch reported 135


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Philip Clairmont My Letters, My Secrets

Verisimilitude is only one of its aims; expression is just as important, as is the clarification of the artist’s attitude to the material.

Over his years at art school Clairmont refined his “A critic at my house sees some paintings. drawing technique until he could quickly, skilGreatly perturbed, he asks for my drawings. fully and accurately reproduce convincing images My drawings! Never! They are my letters, auction n°6 — august of things in the world that interested him. He 2017 my secrets.” studied life drawing, made versions of classical —Paul Gauguin statuary and copied the works of masters, for example Ernst Kirchner’s Self Portrait as a Soldier Philip Clairmont was one of those kids who (1915) in which the artist, in uniform with a drew. Compulsively, from a young age. He was severed hand, stump oozing blood, stands before asthmatic as a child and spent a lot of time in a nude in a studio. Around this time, Clairmont made a crayon drawing, Girl Going To Meet Her bed, propped up against pillows, drawing. His Lover, that could have been by Kirchner himself. mother, Thelma, who may have encouraged a tendency towards invalidism, also encourClairmont drew a number of other self portraits aged her son to draw. And she kept the results. The earliest surviving drawings are pictures and turned some of them into paintings, as he would continue to do throughout his life. He of gunfighters shooting it out in a schematic drew his fellow students and his friends, such as OK Corral, vast synoptic scenes of battles from Tony Fomison, of whom there are several drawWorld War Two and pictures of bullfights. ings and several paintings; as there are of his wife, Viki Clairmont, and their daughter, Melissa Clairmont recalled: “I know I wanted to be (b.1969). He learned how to make wood and lino a painter or a bullfighter and nothing else. cuts: reverse drawing, cut into the matrix, that is And then I saw Goya. I don’t know in which then inked and used to print a positive. order, whether I saw Goya and decided to be a bullfighter or whether I saw reproductions of The visual component of Clairmont’s Honour’s Goya paintings of bullfights and decided to be Thesis at Ilam is a painting and a suite of thira painter. I don’t think it occurred to me that teen preparatory drawings for it. They are of the I wasn’t in Spain.” As this suggests, these early sitting room of the house at 26 Hereford Street, works, in common with kids’ drawings everyChristchurch, where he and his family lived. where, don’t distinguish between drawing The drawings are sophisticated and, to a degree, and painting. They use pencil, ink, crayon phantasmagoric. They explore the anthropoand water colour indiscriminately, and the morphic possibilities suggested by patterns in intent is to evoke a scene—not so much for the curtains, the shapes of pieces of furniture, any other audience, as for the boy himself. the way clothes lie strewn across couches, and They are acts of imaginative identification how coats hang on the backs of chairs. They are made over into pictures. He is putting down at once realistic and fantastical. The painting on paper things he wants to see, or things made after them, Interior Triptych (1970), is an he already sees in his mind. exuberant, carnivalesque parade of entities across a broad canvas. The first real Clairmont drawings I know of are hanging on a wall in the hall at the Riverside Clairmont had his first one-person show at Community at Upper Moutere, near Motueka. Several Arts in Christchurch that year: 19 Riverside was founded by Christian pacifists paintings, 39 drawings, ten prints and three in 1941. Philip and his mother stayed in a small sculptures. Many of the drawings, both in this cottage there over the summer of 1961-2 and show and the next, two years later, explore what during this period, in his thirteenth year, he he called Imaginary Heads, many of which are drew some of the residents. One pen and interpretations of his own head. These are works ink drawing shows two men playing chess: in which appearances are bent, distorted and a character study, full of suppressed tension, cajoled towards the creation of beings who are that demonstrates an awareness of Cezanne’s fictive yet existentially real. In some of these paintings of card players. Clairmont had a works he uses collage, a technique that became small book of black and white reproductions increasingly important to him. Collage, too, of Cezanne’s work, accompanied by a text in investigates the borders between the real and French, that his mother had given him. the imagined: Clairmont would lay pieces of At Nelson College there is a self portrait, done fabric onto a surface and paint over them, so that the texture and the pattern of the cloth showed in oils, and in the family collection, some pencil through the pigment. drawings for it. Together they show that, by age fifteen, when he made this work, Clairmont He also incorporated objects, such as playing was already familiar with the time-honoured method of drafting a graphic image that would cards, gloves or palette knives, into his paintings. Bodily fluids, too—blood, or so it is said—but later be used as the basis for a painting. Drawing, how would we know? Another of his habits was in this sense, is a kind of thinking. It stands in to take a work by an established artist and alter relation to subject matter the way a map does to it. A print of Hans Holbein’s Anne of Cleves (1539), a territory. It is a process of selection but also of elimination, and a declaration of intent. for example, became Clairmont’s work Queen, in 137


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which the mouthparts of a moth, including its feathery antennae, are collaged over Anne’s face, while a small self-portrait is inked out from her hands and from the rings on her fingers. Elsewhere, a photograph of Czar Alexander of Russia, on his throne with his robes, regalia and staff of office, is transformed so that four monstrous beings, like tumours bowerbank ninow (or revolutionaries), grow out of his brain. From this point on, at least until the middle of the decade, Clairmont produced a number of drawings that are not studies for paintings but finished works in themselves. They use drawing with collage, including ripped-up or sampled prints, to evoke landscapes, interiors, people and creatures that do not exist outside of the works themselves. They are explorations of alternative realities, bizarre and shocking or infinitely seductive: “somewheres” over the rainbow. Among these drawings, many of which enter mirror-worlds, are some of the finest works he made. Lot 66, P.83 Philip Clairmont Artist with Chair, Palette, Clock c. 1977 oil, ink and oil pastel on card 300mm × 197mm

The suite Imaginary War Dramas is a series of eight pen and ink drawings harking back to the artist’s early attempts to visualise the battles of World War Two, and also to the little A5 war comics that were ubiquitous in the 1950s. One work, Okraschoten (1973), is a full-frontal image of a tank under fire from artillery shells. It is in the process of disintegrating, blending into the faces of the doomed soldiers within it and into graphic representations of the obscenities they shout as they die. The title is a conundrum: it means something like “gumbo,” as if this were a visualisation of the stew of war. The culmination of Clairmont’s obsession with the landscapes of war is the series of ten collages collectively entitled War Requiem (1974), sometimes also referred to as the Degenerate Art series. Five of these are made over prints of his own 1969 woodcut Female Figure Bending, while one, Early Engravings of German Towns, is partly made from cut up illustrations of medieval or early Renaissance cities. Most of them employ, at the top of the picture, the proscenium arch shape he was so fond of, suggesting that the works are part of a theatrical show, a selection from the cavalcade of images such as might be encountered in the cinema or, equally, in dreams or nightmares. War Requiem was followed by other series of drawings. Lessons in Fright gathers together miscellaneous grotesques: the sixth “lesson” shows a celebratory figure in a bath, with a swollen head, a swastika for an eye, an anus in its brow, a tufted, waving tail and a brimming champagne glass balanced upon its head. It is roughly contemporaneous with another set of drawings of a character called “Hawknose Harlequin,” who is wheel-chair bound, like Clairmont’s friend the disabled Olympian archer Neroli Fairhall, who was injured in a motorbike accident. “Hawknose Harlequin” comes from a song of the same name on the 1972 album Carnival in Babylon by Krautrock band Amon Düül II.

Lot 65, P.82 Philip Clairmont Untitled (Red Nude) c. 1980 oil, acrylic and graphite on paper 645mm × 447mm

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These suites of drawings culminate in the Artist There are also many drawings of interiors, espeSeries of 1976-7, an indeterminate number of cially from the late 1970s and early 1980s, some of small works, usually on paper or card, that are great delicacy, evoked through just a line or two thematically related and that explore the place of and a wash of water colour. A significant proporthe artist in the contemporary world. There is a tion of these drawings are window studies, where palette-headed artist, a castrated artist, several the window frame functions like the frame of a artists metamorphosing into chairs, an artist in painting. Through the glass are seen wonderful front of a TV screen, a hanging artist, a leaping gardens, or skies in which prodigies appear, auction n°6 — august 2017 artist, an artist performing the rite of self-deor landscapes that seem to partake of some capitation and an artist destroying an image. unreachable, paradisiacal beyond. It could be said One of these works is Clairmont’s self-portrait that, in Clairmont’s personal iconography, the as Belgian artist James Ensor, depicted with a window has replaced the mirror. He was always, palette and brushes, one large bony hand resting as the title of one of his early paintings says, upon a table, while behind him a painting is looking outside from the inside. fractured by a swinging light bulb. Clairmont’s portraiture is a lesser known strand All of Clairmont’s major series of paintings— in his oeuvre. All his working life, he drew and the fireplaces of the early 1970s, the mirrors painted his intimates, but he also attempted of 1974-5, the wardrobes of 1976-7, the staircases public portraiture on occasion, or else accepted of 1977-8, the couches of 1977-81, the chairs commissions. In 1973, members of the Christfrom all points in his career—have drawings church Group made portraits of each other for associated with them. Most of these were an exhibition called Canterbury Confrontations. based on actual pieces of furniture or, if they Clairmont painted his much-loved teacher, Doris are fireplaces or staircases, on those in the Lusk, and she him. His portrait of her includes, houses where he lived. He also constructed where her third eye would be, a tiny black and sculptures out of found objects, which he white photographic image of his own face. He is, would then embellish. Afterwards, he would as it were, inside her head. place a vase of flowers somewhere near the top and paint an image of the entire thing. Later in the decade, around 1975-6, he painted sometime-supporters the curators Jim and Coincident with Clairmont’s move from Mary Barr. This work, a dual portrait that still Wellington to Auckland in 1977, his series exists, has never been shown. The Barrs, for of thematically linked drawings came to an reasons best known to themselves, sequestered end. At the same time, he became interested it away. Later still, in 1981, Clairmont completed in the human figure as a subject, and especially his portrait of art critic Hamish Keith that is in the female form. He had always used his now in the Auckland City Art Gallery. All of intimate circle as material for his art; now Clairmont’s portraits are densely worked, his new partner, Rachel Power, became a psychologically complex, and partake of a dominant presence. Her body, usually but blurring of identity between artist and sitter. not always nude, recurs over and again in Keith’s eyes, which in some of the studies the works he made over the last eight years seem blinded, could be the artist’s own. of his life. So too, after his birth in 1979, does the image of their son, Orlando. Drawing, as mentioned, is a kind of thinking. It is a way of understanding how the world might be Many of these nude drawings were prepararepresented in a form that is accessible to others tory work for paintings, like the majestic Birth and yet expresses some aspect of the artist’s own Triptych, the equally imposing Nude Triptych and sensibility, his own way of seeing. It is also, and others such as Our Lady of the Flowers and Woman necessarily so, an attempt to say how the world Washing. There are also, from this period, works is put together, how appearances might disclose Clairmont called “still life constructions.” Some the realities which lie behind it. In Clairmont’s of these exist in multiple versions: as drawings, case, this extra dimension is crucial, in that as prints made from wood or lino cuts and as he used his drawing to open up spaces that paintings. Sometimes he would also hand-comight otherwise remain clandestine, hidden, lour his prints. He would thus explore a theme or unknown. In Gauguin’s evocative words: in several different media, as if attempting to my letters, my secrets. exhaust the possibilities inherent in an image. MARTIN EDMOND Clairmont was an indefatigable draughtsman. There are studies extant for all, or almost all, of his major paintings and, in common with other prolific artists, there are many other studies that were not made into paintings. There are perhaps various reasons for this: some drawings might have seemed complete in themselves, impossible to add to or to reinterpret in another medium. Others may have been intended to form the basis for paintings there was not the time or the opportunity to complete. Clairmont was only thirty-four years old when he died. 139


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Lots 25 & 26

Barry Linton: The Truth and the Proof

As in America, the limitations of print ruled out multi-coloured images for these do-it-yourself comic makers, and the style of the times is expressed in Linton's thick lines, strong blacks and lineal tone effects that somehow succeed in being psychedelic using only black and white. The content speaks of its time, with a prominent label reading “Adults Only.” At the time of publication, comic books that were not for children were unusual. The “Adults Only” label alludes to more than just sexual content—this was a magazine that took comics seriously, and its subversive antiintellectualism was equally adult in nature.

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Just as comics were not seen as an “adult” medium in the 1970s, neither were they generally considered to be art. Perhaps more than any other item of popular culture, comics at the time represented the disposability of the reproduced image—to be appropriated and parodied in fine art, but never considered as art themselves. It was much the same for literature. Due to their visual content, comics were regarded as suitable only for the illiterate. “Mat Rata reads comics,” read the famous “graffiti” that Bob Jones had painted on the wall of a building he owned in downtown Wellington, in order to publicly denigrate his Labour Party opponents. Thus, Linton was drawing this image as the cover of a comic book, not as a piece of art or literature. It had a functional purpose to fulfil, and a design problem to resolve. How do you fit that many bodies into a single panel anyway? Where should I position the speech balloons?

Lot 25, p.48 Barry Linton, Cover Illustration for Strips, Issue No.2 c. 1977, ink, Letratone and correction fluid on paper, 455mm × 302mm

The top left corner of the image is left blank to accommodate the magazine's title banner, added later by editor Colin Wilson in the usual Roger Dean-inspired lettering that emblazoned all of the early covers. Thanks to Linton's skilful draughtsmanship, the typeface wraps around the artwork beautifully on the finished, printed image. Also missing from this original piece is the cover price, which sat in the bottom right between the “No.2” and “Adults Only” text on the printed booklet: “60 cents.” You couldn't even get a napkin today for that price!

Barry Linton’s comics from the 1970s and ’80s remain eternal. The cover of Strips No. 2 (c. 1977) provides a classic image from New Zealand’s “golden age” of underground comic book art. Like no other medium, comics are comprised of a unique combination of visual art, poetry, story, rhythm and cultural symbolism, all of which can be seen in this one image. Depicted here are a multi-cultural cast of Auckland street characters, the kind of doped-up, ripped-jeans alternative lifestyle itinerants that Linton rubbed shoulders with in the “hippy” era of 1970s urban Auckland. Dan Dogg, Beava and Spud—the unconscious one on the ground—are believable archetypes who carry the vibe of the time. The small, round, pug-faced old man peering out from the crowd in the middle of the picture is Linton's version of then-Prime Minister Robert Muldoon, who in an era of radical discourse was regularly lampooned by cartoonists. Like the underground comics that blossomed a few years prior on America's Pacific coast, the work of Linton and his fellow Strips contributors in Auckland marked the birth of a new era of local comic book production and publication. A medium of youth, comics were the perfect vehicle for the cultural and artistic revolution that was taking place in New Zealand at the time.

It should not be underestimated the extent to which music influenced Linton's art in this period. An early reggae fan, before the massive surge in the Jamaican musical style’s popularity in this country, Linton was drawing images of Rastafarians and their pot smoking island lifestyle long before reggae's popularity hit Auckland for real in 1978, when Bob Marley performed at Western Springs stadium. In 1983, Linton illustrated the cover of New Zealand reggae band Herbs' Light of the Pacific album, in his distinctive cartoony Pacific style. From the mid-70s, Linton worked in the packing house at WEA records, which was where he first hooked up with fellow Strips contributor Terence Hogan. The emergence of reggae, followed by punk, characterised the period and a new wave of local music was about to burst onto the scene. “Terry” Hogan went on to manage Chris Knox's 140


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band Toy Love, and by the early 1980s had moved to Australia with the band. It was Hogan who came up with the name of the new project: Strips.

and he also made two significant contributions to New Zealand literary magazine Landfall in the 1990s, facilitated by friend and poet Alan Brunton, that emphasise the inherent poetry of Linton's texts.

Colin Wilson was the instigator and driving force behind what then called itself a “fanzine.” Strips was modelled in style and format on a Linton continues to self-publish small runs of science fiction fanzine being produced outauction of his own comics, and his work has been exhibn°6 — august 2017 Waiheke Island by Wilson's friend Brian Thuroited in some of the country's most prestigious good. Wilson was helping Thurogood with the art galleries. His comics and illustrations have pre-press for his own ‘zine, doing layouts, and appeared in the NZ Listener and the New Zealand drawing his own brand of sci-fi comic illustraWomen's Weekly, and he is also a regular contribtions. Linton met Wilson through Hogan, who utor to international arts magazine White was his flatmate at the time. Fungus. In 2014, Pikitea Press published Lucky Aki in the New Stone Age, the first part of a comic Linton brought in other comics colleagues as epic that follows a young sailor's journey through contributors: Joe Wylie and Laurence Clark. the fictional landscape of a neolithic ocean world. Wylie, now calling himself “Flexible Shaft,” The next two parts are already completed. It's an had recently returned from a stint in Australia ambitious project, exploring fundamental quesworking for the US animation firm Hannations about the evolution of human civilisation Barbera, while Clark had already begun his and culture—as are Linton's recent raft of UFO own epic post-modern exploration of and alien comics, mostly unpublished. Not to Romance and Western genre comics called mention his naked comics! The Frame, under the nom-de-plume “Helen Cross.” Thus was formed the kernel of what Forthcoming publications include the was to become Strips—a landmark in New reissue of Linton's original Strips stories in Zealand comic book publishing. a compilation volume called Chok Chok! from Melbourne's Pikitea Press, and Tabak-Ho, While Wilson's sci-fi and fantasy art emulated a personal account of tobacco addiction, comic industry icons like Eagle's Frank Bellamy written with Arthur Baysting, out soon or Metal Hurlant's Jean Giraud (a.k.a. Moebius), from Steele-Roberts, Wellington. Linton and Wylie aspired to create something more deliberately underground, inspired by Barry Linton is a journeyman who continues the West Coast comics of Robert Crumb and to be adventurous in his art. Meaningful, Victor Moscoso. Their Strips work shared similar articulate, sexy and wild—his comics are themes: strong female protagonists, a sensual the truth, and the proof. sexuality and a socio-political sub-text gave the magazine an original identity that was modern, Tim Bollinger yet beyond the mainstream. By late 1978, Strips had produced ten issues. The original team of core artists remained intact until Wilson left that year, to pursue his drawing career in Britain and Europe. Wylie bowed out after his original artwork for the forthcoming issue was stolen from the back of a car. It was the last episode he was to ever draw of his “Kabuki” serial, and the story remained uncompleted. But Linton's contributions continued, with Kevin Jenkinson joining the team as contributing editor from issue eleven onwards. Strips continued to develop over the following years, attracting contributions from an ever-wider pool of aspiring creatives, notably the couple Grant Major and Judy Darragh (a.k.a. Blossom), who injected a new lease of life into later issues. All up, Strips ran for ten years, from 1977 to 1987, producing a total of 23 issues. A 24th “Safe Sex” issue never eventuated, although Linton had already drawn what was to be the final (unpublished) Strips cover. Following the dissolution of Strips, Linton found few avenues in New Zealand's small publishing market that offered the multiple unbroken pages required for long-form comics. Over the years his work appeared in Cornelius Stone's Razor, UFO and Family of Sex and Jonathan King's Scratch,

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auction n°6 — august 2017

Lot 59

michael harrison is an Auckland-based painter, known for his intense, emotionally charged images of people and animals, usually executed using thin washes of acrylic on paper. He often works in series, producing images that speak to ideas of desire, longing and memory while evoking a dreamlike atmosphere. An Artspace survey show of Harrison’s work, Love in the Shadows, toured the country in 2002-3, and his work was included in the 14th Sydney Biennale, in 2004.

Michael Harrison Interviewed by Serena Bentley

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SB Your work is filled with recurring symbols (cats, dogs, birds, antlers, hearts and couples). Can you elaborate on their significance? MH I’m not sure how usefully I can elaborate in words—I am interested in the way symbol systems can operate as visual language. At age 19 or 20 I got interested in tarot cards. Every pictorial element of a tarot card is intended to convey specific meanings. While “reading” the cards, they alter your feelings and thoughts by non-verbal means.

Of course, the same recurring symbols can be found in art all through history and many books have been written about symbols and their meanings. All the motifs I’ve used over the years do have personal significance—this, I think, is necessary to create convincing works of art. You always need a starting point, in any case. So most of my subject matter is more or less related to direct experience, but the creative process inevitably transmutes things.

My wish is for the viewer of my work to react in a spontaneous, personal way, but I have no control over those reactions and accept they won’t necessarily be positive. Reactions tend to depend on whatever the viewer consciously or unconsciously projects on to the art. Different people looking at my work will make different associations according to the knowledge, beliefs and feelings they bring with them. SB On the flip side, can these symbols also be employed as tools to build a composition? How do you construct your paintings?

MH If the design of an artwork is without charm, that will obviously serve to weaken the effect of any symbol used. For this reason, and simply due to aesthetic sense, I think very carefully about the formal arrangements within a picture. What exactly is giving each work a life of its own?

However I decide to arrange the pictorial elements, my decisions are intuitive. I assume this guiding intuition derives mostly from unconscious memories of all the other art I’ve ever looked at. It’s important to have an extensive picture library inside your mind devoted to art history, as well as contemporary art (at least for what I’m interested in), besides an idiosyncratic sense of what looks “good” and what doesn’t.

In terms of everyday process, most of my pictures are constructed in relation to previous works—works of mine that I’m not happy with present a persistent challenge. Can I fix this or that particular pictorial problem which has been annoying me, sometimes for years? There’s always hope. SB What are some of the most resonant memories/images in your “picture library?”

Left: Lot 55, p. Michael Harrison Moment of Change/Midnight 1987-94 acrylic on paper (diptych) 305mm × 225mm (each panel)

MH As I said before, art history plays a part in the mental library, but of course there are also memories of things such as going to the beach, playing in native forest, watching animals and just living with them around—the kinds of things most people in New Zealand used to have experience of. Then there are illustrations and photos from all the books and magazines I’ve ever looked through, plus photos of friends and family.

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I used to physically cut out pictures from newspapers and magazines, and do a lot of photocopying. Now I collect pictures from the web and take many more photographs as potential source material. The volume of all this visual information means it is really difficult to pick favourites—sometimes it is a matter of making a decision, any decision, and hoping the unconscious mind sorts things out. SB Your works sometimes have two dates reflecting the occasionally lengthy process you mention above. Can you talk about how your relationship to a work develops over time?

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MH The sometimes lengthy process has to do with quality control—how good is this particular work really? Does it deserve to survive? How confident can I be that it will remain interesting to me and other people? If I put away a work in progress—deliberately remove it from view—that means I can be more objective about how finished that work is when I next have a look. SB Does the reworking of an image occur in multiple sessions or will you leave a work well alone for years before revisiting it? MH The reworking of an image can certainly involve multiple sessions, often with minimal changes at a time and sometimes with years between sessions, which explains the dating of a lot of my pictures. SB What role does drawing play in your practice? MH Drawing is very important to me. I remember drawing before I learned to read and write, it was always a rewarding activity. It wasn’t just about mark-making, it had a lot to do with expressing my intellectual and emotional interests. Free drawing is still generally how I come up with ideas for paintings in the first place. I try to draw with an open mind in relation to previous work and just see what happens. SB One of the things I love about your work is the delicate pencil lines evident beneath washes of colour in the final image. Is the trace of the hand important to you? MH It has been important to me, I assume, since I first picked up a pencil—that is, before I can consciously remember.

These days, just as we are rarely actively called upon to write by hand for anybody else, much contemporary art does not involve drawing by hand either, which makes the trace of a hand seem that much more special. There’s something fragile, fleeting and ghostly about its continuing appearance in a technologically driven world.

The artist’s hand brings effects particular to an individual human being, traces of an often irrational life. The mind behind the hand mostly remains a mystery to both artist and viewer, even as we repeatedly attempt to divine the meaning of an artwork stemming from that mind and hand.

When making art in the first place, the hand of an artist cannot be replicated by anybody else. Forgery or mechanical reproduction can only come along later. The artist has to be fully present—highly alert to the quality of the marks—in order to achieve something worthwhile at the time. The traces of a hand can still record well a series of moments in life that would otherwise be lost to the unceasing flow of time.

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Lot 84

Roger Mortimer Trans-historic Bodies

However, the works are not of a distant land or time, they are trans-historic and function on different temporal planes at the same time, reflecting the complex here and now of contemporary New Zealand. Trans-historic documents: Michel Foucault brought the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries alive in his writings on the exclusion of the physically and mentally impaired.4 Foucault describes a situation in the late Middle ages and early Renaissance where bodies of shame (lepers, people with venereal diseases, madmen, etc.) were rejected from within the virtually impenetrable city walls and sentenced to a life adrift on water. Either at sea or in Europe’s canals, they led a life of floating errancy. La Nef des Fous, or the Ship of Fools, painted by Hieronymus Bosch between 1490 and 1500, is an illustration of these excluded and tortured souls in turbulent waters. An amateur of these dark seas, it is no surprise that Mortimer is also a keen surfer.

bowerbank ninow

Lot 84, p.99 Roger Mortimer, Mt Misery 2012, graphite and watercolour on paper, 320mm × 490mm

“La carte est plus interessante que la territoire.” (“The map is more interesting than the territory.”) -Michel Houellebecq1

Michel Foucault wrote another important book useful for thinking about the work of Roger Mortimer: his 1969 work l’Archaeologie du Savoir.5 In it, amongst other things, he talks about Europe’s transition from a classificatory methodology, based on a resemblance paradigm, to rationalism. This book is in part a re-examination of the notion of what constitutes a “document” and has been very influential on artists, historians and philosophers in the second half of the twentieth century. Mortimer’s historical method is also a reinterpretation of the “document:” Just as he provides a space to contemplate the place for the antipodean body, he also enables an entrance into the medieval imagination ripe with fantastic stories, legends and myths—is he not attempting to fill a colonial and art historical absence?

Space and place: Place is a very sensitive topic for many artists from the Antipodes and great consideration is given to this concept by Roger Mortimer. Amanda Dowd, in a recent article2 focusing on an Australian context, insists on the relation between the psyche of the person and the psyche of the place—she speaks of an existential dilemma of being and being here that the migrant body is immersed in and suggests that it needs disentangling. An analysis of this dilemma, she argues, can help in tolerating the anxiety of collapse (of a place from which to be).3 The Maori concept of tūrangawaewae in Aotearoa/New Zealand is relevant here. Literally tūranga (standing place) and waewae (feet), it is often translated as “a place to stand.” Tūrangawaewae are places where we feel especially empowered and connected. They are our foundation, our place in the world, our home. It could be argued that Mortimer is creating responses to these special places of connectedness and identity through his artworks and that they provide respite from the existential void Pakeha and colonial bodies experience, through being in an unfamiliar landscape.

Partly, this new approach to historiography is about the incorporation of micro-documents: non-official material, including sometimes-banal everyday lists, and other subjective content. When Mortimer copies letters received from the Inland Revenue Department, he is part of a conceptual art tradition that has a fascination for ordering systems, lists and categorisation, yet his chancery calligraphy and attached iconography throws the emotional desert of conceptualism out the window. Mortimer is an artist swimming in the sea of the visceral, a beach wanderer who casts his encrypted, gilded messages loose in a bottle full of insight.

The hell-bent body: The phenomenological experience of standing in the presence of a Roger Mortimer painting is gripping. The detail is painful and, while suffering and torment are recurrent themes in these orchestrations of cartographical terror, Mortimer is suggesting to us that if we look away from these phenomena, they will haunt and follow us. Having had a very special relation to pain and suffering himself, his paintings exist as insights into the circus of violent corporeal experiences.

SAM MELSER 1

2

Mortimer takes us to places where few are at ease, yet at the same time, he encourages us to investigate the myriad of references and the pictorial complexity of these images, that appear to be anchored in a specific historical landscape. 146

Michel Houellebecq, La carte et la territoire (Flammarion, 2010), 82. The principal character in this novel, Jed, shares with Roger Mortimer a fascination with, and an obscure interpretative method of, looking at maps. Amanda Dowd, Backgrounds of beauty : Explorations in the subtle geography of identity and the interrelationships between psyche and place, AJP, Vol 28, Nos 1&2, 2009.

3

Ibid, p,14.

4

Michel Foucault, Histoire de la folie a l’age Classique (Gallimard, 1972).

5

For the original French version see Michel Foucault, l’archeologie du savoir (Gallimard, 1969).


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history

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plate / essay

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X

1

Edward Bullmore Study for Astroform Descended 1967 graphite, ink and gouache on paper dated 1967 and inscribed Astroform No6 (struck out) Descended and height 31" width 23" in ink upper left; inscribed an assemblage of chair parts, padded, stretched and painted canvas. in ink 230mm × 173mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.27

$500 - $1,000

2

Bill Hammond Dog 1980 graphite on paper signed W Hammond, dated 1980 and inscribed Dog in graphite lower edge 317mm × 235mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 1982.

p.28/114

$1,000 - $2,000

3

Bill Hammond untitled c. 1980-82 graphite on paper 297mm × 420mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 1982.

p.29/114

$1,500 - $2,500

4

Bill Hammond untitled c. 1980-82 graphite on paper 297mm × 420mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 1982.

p.29/144

$1,500 - $2,500

5

Bill Hammond untitled c. 1980-82 graphite on paper 290mm × 420mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 1982.

p.30/144

$1,500 - $2,500

6

Bill Hammond Waiting for the Pain to Piss Off c. 1980-82 ink on paper dated 23/7/82 and inscribed WAITING FOR THE PAIN TO PISS OFF. in ink lower right; signed W Hammond and inscribed Toothache in graphite lower right 235mm × 340mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 1982.

p.30/144

$1,000 - $2,000

7

Bill Hammond untitled c. 1980-82 etching 145mm × 205mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 1982.

p.31/144

$500 - $1,000

8

Bill Hammond Wednesday c. 1980-82 etching inscribed Wednesday upper left on plate 187mm × 200mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 1982.

p.31/144

$500 - $1,000

9

Bill Hammond There's a brand new dance but I don't know its name c. 1980-82 ink on paper signed W Hammond, dated 1982 and inscribed 'THERES a BRAND NEW DANCE BUT I DONT KNOW iTS NAME' D. BOWIE in graphite lower edge 235mm × 435mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 1982.

p.32/144

$1,000 - $2,000


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artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

10

Shane Cotton untitled 1993 oil and acrylic on paper signed Cotton and dated '93 in graphite lower right 195mm × 280mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.33

$1,200 - $1,800

11

Tony De Lautour untitled 2010 coloured pencil on paper signed TDL and dated 4-8-2010 in coloured pencil lower right 296mm × 210mm

Provenance Private collection, Christchurch.

p.34

$200 - $400

12

Tony De Lautour untitled 2003 coloured pencil on paper signed TDL and dated 2003 in coloured pencil upper left 210mm × 296mm

Provenance Private collection, Christchurch.

p.35

$150 - $300

13

Tony De Lautour untitled 2000 graphite on paper signed TDL and dated 2000 in graphite lower left 305mm × 405mm

Provenance Private collection, Christchurch.

p.36

$300 - $600

14

Tony De Lautour untitled 2005 graphite on paper signed TDL and dated 2005 in graphite lower right 420mm × 296mm

Provenance Private collection, Christchurch.

p.37

$300 - $600

15

Derek Cowie untitled 1989 acrylic on record cover with enclosed paper sleeve and metal disc signed Derek Cowie and dated 1989 in paint marker on disc 310mm × 310mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.38

$400 - $700

16

Andrew McLeod Downfall 2006 screenprint and acrylic on linen signed Andrew McLeod in paint marker lower edge 200mm × 225mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2001.

p.39

$1,500 - $2,500

17

Ralph Hotere Window in Spain 1978 graphite and oil pastel on paper signed Hotere, dated III 78 and inscribed madrid and Window in Spain in graphite lower right 316mm × 230mm

Provenance Private collection, London.

p.40

$5,000 - $7,000

18

Ralph Hotere Black Window 1988 lithograph, 8/30 signed Hotere, dated '88 and inscribed Black Window in graphite lower edge 430mm × 295mm

Provenance Private collection, Christchurch. literature Peter Vangioni and Jillian Cassidy, Hotere: empty of shadows and making a shadow: lithographs by Ralph Hotere (Christchurch: Christchurch Art Gallery, 2005), 38.

p.41

$3,000 - $5,000


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artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

19

Gavin Hurley Just Call Me Angel 2007 collaged found paper 270mm × 210mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.42

$800 - $1,200

20

Dick Frizzell untitled 1990 gouache, pastel and graphite on paper signed Frizzell and dated 4/11/90 in graphite lower right 280mm × 245mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.43

$2,000 - $3,000

21

Jeffrey Harris The Pope 1971 graphite on paper signed J. Harris and dated 1971 in graphite lower right 255mm × 200mm

Provenance Private collection, Dunedin.

p.44/126

$800 - $1,200

22

Jeffrey Harris Woman sitting at table 1971 graphite on paper signed J. Harris and dated 1971 in graphite upper right 255mm × 200mm

Provenance Private collection, Dunedin.

p.45/126

$800 - $1,200

23

Jeffrey Harris Two women 1971 graphite on paper signed J. Harris and dated 1971 in graphite upper right 255mm × 200mm

Provenance Private collection, Dunedin.

p.46/126

$800 - $1,200

24

Jeffrey Harris Woman in coat 1971 graphite on paper signed J. Harris and dated 1971 in graphite lower right 255mm × 200mm

Provenance Private collection, Dunedin.

p.47/126

$800 - $1,200

25

Barry Linton Cover Illustration for Strips, Issue No.2 c. 1977 ink, Letratone and correction fluid on paper 455mm × 302mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Strips #2 (Auckland: Scorpion Publications, 1977), cover illus.

p.48/140

$800 - $1,600

26

Barry Linton Dan Dog Returns to the Wound, Page 1 c. 1977 ink, Letratone and correction fluid on paper (two panels) Signed BY BARRY LINTON in ink and inscribed 51% (max 9 1/4" deep) in graphite lower right 556mm × 402mm (overall)

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.48/140

$800 - $1,600

27

Rohan Wealleans Thing vs. Things 2008 acrylic on found comic book, paper and polystyrene in perspex 305mm × 222mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Ivan Anthony, Auckland. exhibited Mains, Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2008.

p.49

$1,000 - $2,000


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artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

28

Carl Sydow Drawing 5: IV 1975 Letraline on paper signed Carl Sydow and dated 1975 in ink lower right 760mm × 605mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Carl Sydow (1940-1975) Memorial Exhibition, Robert McDougall Art Gallery, May 2-31, 1979. notes Memorial Exhibition catalogue number 19.

p.50/134

$1,200 - $1,800

29

Carl Sydow Drawing 5: VI 1975 Letraline on paper signed Carl Sydow and dated 1975 in ink lower right 760mm × 605mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Carl Sydow (1940-1975) Memorial Exhibition, Robert McDougall Art Gallery, May 2-31, 1979. literature Carl Sydow, Carl Sydow (1940-75) Memorial Exhibition (Christchurch: Robert Mcdougall Art Gallery, 1979), 22. notes Memorial Exhibition catalogue number 20.

p.50/134

$1,200 - $1,800

30

Richard Killeen untitled 1974 oil on paper signed Killeen, dated 22.8.74 and inscribed 1815 in graphite lower edge 570mm × 250mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. notes Artist's catalogue number 1815.

p.51

$1,200 - $1,800

31

Charles Tole Totalisator Building c. 1950 conte on paper inscribed CHARLES TOLE, ' TOTALISATOR ', ( CONTE ) and 9½" × 11½" in type on label affixed verso; John Leech Gallery label affixed lower right verso 275mm × 305mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.52

$800 - $1,600

32

Ian Scott untitled 1970 watercolour on paper signed Ian Scott and dated 1970 in graphite lower right 325mm × 525mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Barry Lett Galleries, Auckland, 1970.

p.53

$1,800 - $2,600

33

Robert Ellis Motorway Junction 1968 acrylic on paper signed Robert Ellis and dated 1968 in brushpoint lower right 705mm × 695mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.54/118

$3,500 - $5,500

34

Robert Ellis Untitled 1968 ink on paper 760mm × 560mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. literature Robert Ellis, Robert Ellis (Auckland: Ron Sang Publications, 2014), 18. notes This work belongs to a suite of three drawings that were made as studies for a screenprint included in the Multiples portfolio, published by Barry Lett Galleries in 1968.

p.55/118

$2,000 - $3,000

35

Pat Hanly Nuclear Innocents 1983 graphite on paper signed P. H., dated 83 and inscribed Nuclear Innocents in graphite lower right 345mm × 372mm

Provenance The collection of Gil and Pat Hanly, Auckland.

p.56/130

$2,500 - $3,500

36

Pat Hanly Figure in Light 1963 ink on paper signed Hanly, dated Sept 63 and inscribed Figure in light in graphite lower right 590mm × 460mm

Provenance The collection of Gil and Pat Hanly, Auckland.

p.57/130

$6,000 - $9,000


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artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

37

Pat Hanly Winters Day 69 1969 ink and watercolour on paper inscribed Winters day 69 in graphite upper left; signed Hanly and dated 69 in ink lower right 435mm × 592mm

Provenance The collection of Gil and Pat Hanly, Auckland.

p.58/130

$7,000 - $12,000

38

Pat Hanly Energy 1971 ink on paper signed Hanly, dated 71 and inscribed Energy in ink lower edge 545mm × 660mm

Provenance The collection of Gil and Pat Hanly, Auckland.

p.59/130

$3,000 - $,6000

39

Pat Hanly Girl Asleep 1964 ink monoprint and graphite on paper signed Hanly, dated 64 and inscribed girl asleep in coloured pencil lower left 500mm × 650mm

Provenance The collection of Gil and Pat Hanly, Auckland.

p.60/130

$3,500 - $5,500

40

Pat Hanly Untitled 1988 ink on paper signed Hanly and dated 88 in graphite lower edge 300mm × 300mm

Provenance The collection of Gil and Pat Hanly, Auckland.

p.61/130

$2,000 - $3,000

41

Pat Hanly Who Am I 1972 watercolour on paper inscribed WHO AM I in graphite lower left; signed Hanly and dated Jan 72 in graphite lower right 535mm × 380mm

Provenance The collection of Gil and Pat Hanly, Auckland.

p.62/130

$6,000 - $9,000

42

Alan Pearson Psyche drawing 1965 watercolour on paper signed A Pearson and dated 65 in graphite lower left 255mm × 190mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Denys Trussell, Alan Pearson: his life and art (Christchurch: Hazard Press, 1991), 40.

p.63

$800 - $1,600

43

Alan Pearson Figures 1964 watercolour on paper signed A Pearson and dated London 64 in graphite upper right; inscribed Figures in graphite lower left 170mm × 260mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.63

$800 - $1,600

44

Ralph Hotere untitled 1969 watercolour and charcoal on paper signed Hotere and dated '69 in graphite lower right 550mm × 355mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.64

$7,500 - $9,500

45

Ralph Hotere untitled 1975 ink on paper signed Hotere and dated '75 in ink lower left 320mm × 320mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.65

$3,500 - $5,500


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artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

46

Andrew McLeod Ruler [4th level] 2006 pigmented inkjet print, edition 1/2 signed Andrew McLeod in ink lower right 1170mm × 830mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited 5 4 3 2 1 : Auckland Artist Projects, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki, 22 Jul 2006-7 Jan 2007. literature Andrew McLeod, B.M.C.T issue 6 (Auckland: Andrew McLeod, 2012), 6, 56, 58; Andrew McLeod, Artistic Conscience (Auckland: Andrew McLeod, 2006), 6.

p.66

$6,500 - $9,500

47

Andrew McLeod Men print in blue 2001 pigmented inkjet print, edition 1/1 signed Andrew Mcleod and dated 2001 in ink lower left 450mm × 610mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Andrew McLeod, Silver Arrow (Auckland: Andrew McLeod, 2003), u.p.

p.67

$2,500 - $3,500

48

Shane Cotton Ledge 2008 acrylic on paper signed Shane W Cotton, dated 2008 and inscribed 'Ledge' in graphite lower right 560mm × 760mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.68

$5,000 - $7,000

49

Shane Cotton Cradle 2008 acrylic on paper signed Shane W Cotton, dated 2008 and inscribed 'Cradle' in graphite lower right 560mm × 760mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.68

$5,000 - $7,000

50

Richard Killeen Geometry 1981 oil on paper signed Killeen, dated 18.2.81 and inscribed Geometry and 4345 in graphite lower edge 570mm × 250mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. notes Artist's catalogue number 4345.

p.69

$2,500 - $3,500

51

Andrew Blythe untitled c. 2007-9 acrylic on paper 639mm × 891mm

Provenance Private collection, New York. exhibited Outsider Art Fair, New York, 9–11 January 2009.

p.70

$2,000 - $3,000

52

Andrew Blythe untitled c. 2007-9 acrylic on paper 700mm × 990mm

Provenance Private collection, New York. exhibited Outsider Art Fair, New York, 9–11 January 2009.

p.71

$2,000 - $3,000

53

Andrew Blythe untitled c. 2007-9 acrylic on paper 600mm × 850mm

Provenance Private collection, New York. exhibited Outsider Art Fair, New York, 9–11 January 2009.

p.72

$1,500 - $2,000

54

Kim Pieters Quodlibet 2010 graphite, oil pastel and acrylic on found hardboard inscribed Quodlibet in graphite lower left; signed kf pieters and dated 2010 in graphite lower right; signed k f pieters, dated 2010 and inscribed 'Quodlibet' and the common translation of this term as 'whatever' in the sense of “it does not matter which, indifferently” is certainly correct, but in its form the Latin says exactly the opposite. Quodlibet ens is not “being, it does not matter which,” but rather “being such that it always matters” from 'the coming community' by Giorgio Agamben in graphite verso 1200mm × 1200mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.73

$3,000 - $5,000


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artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

55

Richard Orjis Joseph 2006 soil on paper signed R Orjis, dated 2006 and inscribed JOSEPH in graphite lower right verso 595mm × 420mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.74

$700 - $1,200

56

Richard Orjis Brad 2006 soil on paper signed R Orjis, dated 2006 and inscribed 'Brad' in graphite lower right verso 595mm × 420mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.74

$700 - $1,200

57

Richard Orjis Stevie 2006 soil on paper signed R Orjis, dated 2006 and inscribed STEVIE in graphite lower right verso 595mm × 420mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.75

$700 - $1,200

58

Richard Orjis Ant 2006 soil on paper signed R Orjis, dated 2006 and inscribed ANT in graphite lower right verso 595mm × 420mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.75

$700 - $1,200

59

Michael Harrison Moment of Change/Midnight 1987-94 acrylic on paper (diptych) signed Michael Harrison in graphite lower left (left panel); Vavasour Godkin Gallery label affixed verso (left panel); signed Michael Harrison in graphite lower right; Vavasour Godkin Gallery label affixed verso (right panel) 305mm × 225mm (each panel)

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Vavasour Godkin Gallery, Auckland, November 1994. exhibited Vavasour Godkin Gallery, November—January 1994.

p.76/142

$6,000 - $9,000

60

Sean Kerr The Idiots 2010 acrylic and digital print on paper signed Sean K and dated 2010 in graphite lower right verso 296mm × 210mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Sean Kerr, Sean Kerr: Bruce is in the garden; so someone is in the garden (Auckland: Clouds, 2010), 57. notes This image depicts a still from the 1998 film The Idiots, dir. Lars von Trier

p.77

$300 - $600

61

Ian Scott Lattice Drawing, No. 170 1985 watercolour on paper signed Ian Scott and dated 85 ink upper right verso; signed Ian Scott, dated NOVEMBER 1985. and inscribed "LATTICE DRAWING, NO. 170." in ink verso; dated NOV. 85. and inscribed "LATTICE DRAWING, NO 170" in graphite lower edge verso 765mm × 565mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.78

$1,600 - $2,500

62

Milan Mrkusich Painting Yellow, 1981 1981 polymer and wax crayon on paper signed Mrkusich, dated '81 and inscribed Painting Yellow, 1981 (polymer + wax crayon on paper) in ink on original backing board affixed verso 550mm × 380mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner, 1981.

p.79

$7,000 - $12,000


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artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

63

Colin McCahon Canterbury Plains 1948 conté on paper signed McCahon, dated '48 and inscribed Canterbury Plains Landscape in graphite lower edge; John Leech Gallery label affixed verso 198mm × 252mm

Provenance Private collection, London. Acquired from John Leech Gallery, Auckland, 1998. exhibited An Exhibition of Paintings from July 1947 to August 1948 by Colin McCahon, Dunedin Public Library Hall, Dunedin, September 1948. notes Colin McCahon Online Catalogue (www.mccahon.co.nz) number: cm001491

p.80

$8,000 - $12,000

64

Colin McCahon Cashmere Hills 1948 conté on paper signed McCahon, dated '48 and inscribed Cashmere Hills in graphite lower edge; John Leech Gallery label affixed verso 197mm × 250mm

Provenance Private collection, London. Acquired from John Leech Gallery, Auckland, 1998. notes Colin McCahon Online Catalogue (www.mccahon.co.nz) number: cm001490

p.81

$8,000 - $12,000

65

Philip Clairmont Untitled (Red Nude) c. 1980 oil, acrylic and graphite on paper 645mm × 447mm

Provenance The estate of Philip Clairmont, Auckland.

p.82/136

$6,500 - $8,500

66

Philip Clairmont Artist with Chair, Palette, Clock c. 1977 oil, ink and oil pastel on card 300mm × 197mm

Provenance The estate of Philip Clairmont, Auckland.

p.83/136

$2,500 - $3,500

67

Philip Clairmont Study for Portrait of Hamish Keith 1981 oil pastel and graphite on paper signed P. CT., dated 1981 and inscribed Study for Portrait of Hamish Keith in oil pastel lower right 800mm × 605mm

Provenance The estate of Philip Clairmont, Auckland. literature This work appears in the following documentary: Bruce Morrison, "Philip Clairmont." Profiles, NZ On Screen, 23:00, https://www.nzonscreen.com/title/profiles-philip-clairmont-1981 notes This work is a study for the painting Portrait (1981), which is held in the collection of Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tāmaki (acquired 1984, gift of Hamish Keith).

p.84/136

$7,500 - $9,500

68

Richard Killeen untitled 1969 ink and pastel on paper signed Killeen, dated 1969 and inscribed 2041 in graphite lower left 620mm × 330mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. notes Artist's catalogue number 2041.

p.85

$2,000 - $3,000

69

Paul Hartigan London Suite No 2 1977 ink on found paper signed Hart 1 ga n., dated Dec.'77. and inscribed NO (2) in type upper left 297mm × 210mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Don Abbott, Vivid: The Paul Hartigan Story (Auckland: RF Books, 2015), 95.

p.86/122

$1,200 - $2,500

70

Paul Hartigan Against the Grain 1980 ink and watercolour on paper signed Hartigan, dated 1980 and inscribed 'AGAINST THE GRAIN' in graphite lower edge 600mm × 910mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.87/122

$3,200 - $4,600

71

Paul Hartigan 7 X's 8 O's 1979 ink on found paper inscribed 7 X's 8 O's in ink; signed HARTIGAN and dated 1979 in graphite lower right 316mm × 510mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.87/122

$1,500 - $2,500


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

72

John Reynolds Personals (cont.)/Already Bored With 2008? 2008 oilstick on screenprinted paper inscribed PERSONALS (CONT.) in graphite lower left; signed REYNOLDS. and dated 2008. in graphite lower right 315mm × 245mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.88

$500 - $1,000

73

Seraphine Pick untitled 2003 watercolour on paper 780mm × 530mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.89

$3,000 - $5,000

74

John Pule untitled 2005 ink on paper signed John Pule and dated 2005 in ink lower left 500mm × 500mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.90

$1,500 - $2,500

75

E Mervyn Taylor Still Life 1943 graphite on paper inscribed Please mount to the the marks indicated in graphite upper right; signed E. MERVYN TAYLOR and dated 1-1-43 in graphite lower right; signed E. MERVYN TAYLOR and inscribed "STILL LIFE", £2.12.6, 71 HATTON STREET EXT, KARORI WELLINGTON W3 and c/o AEWSHQ wgton in graphite upper edge verso; inscribed 15" × 17" in graphite verso 342mm × 278mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wellington.

p.91

$1,500 - $2,500

76

Allen Maddox untitled c. 1983 acrylic and pastel on card 230mm × 275mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.92

$1,500 - $2,500

77

Allen Maddox untitled c. 1983 acrylic and pastel on paper 355mm × 280mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.92

$1,500 - $2,500

78

Allen Maddox untitled c. 1991-94 acrylic on paper signed AM in graphite lower edge 354mm × 232mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.93

$2,500 - $3,500

79

Richard Lewer untitled #58 2016 ink on sandpaper 280mm × 230mm

Provenance Private collection, Sydney.

p.94

$1,000 - $2,000

80

Tony Fomison Drawing of and for Dick Lovell-Smith 1973 graphite on paper signed by and from Tony Fomison, dated 16.3.73 and inscribed drawing of and for Dick LovellSmith in graphite lower right 368mm × 246mm

Provenance Private collection, Christchurch.

p.95

$1,200 - $1,800

81

Martin Poppelwell Study for red bucket, bumble + teapot 2015 oil pastel, ink, graphite, collage and oil on paper signed M P and dated 2015 in graphite lower right 500mm × 640mm

Provenance Private collection, Napier.

p.96

$1,200 - $1,800


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

82

Dieter Roth Original Speedy Self 1980 pencil and gouache on paper signed Dieter Roth and dated 80 in graphite lower right 229mm × 330mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Meet the Masters: From Modern to Pop, Auctionata, New York, 24 September 2015, lot 60.

p.97

$900 - $1,800

83

Bill Hammond Fish Finder 1, 2, 3 2003 lithograph on paper (triptych), edition of 15 signed WD Hammond, dated 2003 and inscribed Fish Finder 1 in graphite lower right (left panel); signed WD Hammond, dated 2003 and inscribed Fish Finder 2 in graphite lower right (centre panel); signed WD Hammond, dated 2003 and inscribed Fish Finder 3 in graphite lower right (right panel) 575mm × 445mm (each panel)

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.98

$10,000 - $15,000

84

Roger Mortimer Mt Misery 2012 graphite and watercolour on paper signed RJM and dated MMXI in brushpoint lower right 320mm × 490mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Manukau Banks, Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 6 - 30 June, 2012.

p.99/146

$3,000 - $4,000

85

Jeffrey Harris untitled 1988 graphite on paper signed JH and dated '88 in graphite lower left 225mm × 280mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.100/126

$1,500 - $2,500

86

Stanley Palmer Pohutukawa 1980 charcoal on paper signed Stanley Palmer, dated 1980 and inscribed For Helen in graphite lower edge 340mm × 550mm

Provenance Private collection, Ashburton.

p.101

$800 - $1,200

87

Louise Henderson Bush Series Sketch c. 1960s graphite on paper 410mm × 570mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.102

$500 - $800

88

Russell Clark Farm Buildings c. 1950s graphite on paper 195mm × 250mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.102/133

$800 - $1,200

89

Louise Henderson Tree Study c. 1960s graphite on paper 540mm × 380mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.103

$400 - $700

90

Michael Smither Sarah Dunedin 1987 graphite on paper signed MDS in graphite lower right; inscribed Sarah Dunedin in graphite lower left verso 300mm × 230mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.104

$400 - $700

91

Greer Twiss untitled 1964 conte on paper signed Twiss and dated 64 in ink upper right230mm × 155mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.105

$300 - $600


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

92

Greer Twiss untitled c. 1984-88 ink on paper 296mm × 210mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.105

$300 - $600

93

Edward Bullmore untitled c. 1959-60 graphite and coloured pencil on paper 590mm × 430mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.106

$1,200 - $1,800

94

A Lois White St. Francis of Assisi c. 1948 graphite on paper certificate of authenticity signed by Alison Disbrowe (artist's niece) affixed verso 480mm × 305mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired from Selected Works from the Estate of A. Lois White, Art+Object, Auckland, 20 August 2010, lot W25.

p.107

$1,200 - $1,800

95

Leo Bensemann Dancing Dwarf 1945 wood engraving on paper 290mm × 225mm

Provenance Private collection, Nelson. literature Caroline Otto, Leo Bensemann: landscapes & studies (Nelson: Nikau Press, 2006), 65. Peter Simpson, Fantastica: the world of Leo Bensemann (Auckland: Auckland University Press, 2011), 139. Notes This image was illustrated on the invitation for Leo Bensemann: Retrospective Exhibition: Paintings & Drawings, Rue Pompallier Gallery, Akaroa, 18 March–3 April, 1972.

p.108

$400 - $800

96

Russell Clark Egyptian Listener illustration 1945 ink on paper 190mm × 220mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from the artist's estate.

p.109/133

$800 - $1200

97

Russell Clark Maori woman carrying a sack c. 1948-50 ink on paper 255mm × 180mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from the artist's estate.

p.110/133

$800 - $1200

98

Russell Clark Maori women and children c. 1948-50 graphite on paper 430mm × 340mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from the artist's estate.

p.110/133

$1,000 - $2,000

99

Russell Clark Two heads of Maori women c. 1948-50 graphite on paper 420mm × 335mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from the artist's estate.

p.111/133

$1,200 - $1,800

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.112

$800 - $1,600

100 Martin Ball untitled (paper and sellotape) 2003 graphite on paper signed Martin Ball and dated '03 in graphite lower right380mm × 884mm


bowerbank ninow

How to participate in the auction

Attending in person Auction N˚6 will take place on Wednesday 9th Augustl 2017 at 6.30pm. Buyers will need to register with Bowerbank Ninow in order to receive a bidder’s card, which is required for participation in the auction. Buyers are able to register at any stage during the viewing period or on the evening of the auction. For those wishing to register on the night of the auction, we would advise that they arrive 15-20 minutes prior to the auction commencing. Bidding by Telephone For those who wish to participate in the auction but cannot attend in person, there are two methods by which they may do so remotely. The first of these is to bid by telephone. Telephone bidders are welcome to bid on either single or multiple lots. In order to bid by telephone, buyers are required to register with Bowerbank Ninow prior to the auction commencing. We are able to arrange telephone bidding via email, telephone or in person. Registration for telephone bidding closes an hour before the auction commences. Absentee Bids Absentee bids are an alternate method of remote participation to phone bidding. The placing of an ‘absentee bid’ entails a buyer specifying the maximum hammer price that they wish to pay for a given lot. This absentee bid will be executed by the auctioneer, who will bid on the buyer’s behalf until their maximum price is exceeded. Bowerbank Ninow will always act in good faith for absentee bidders and will endeavor to secure items on which they bid for the lowest possible price. We are able to arrange telephone bidding via email, telephone or in person. Bids Placed on Our Website Bids placed online, through bowerbankninow.com, are considered to be ‘absentee bids’ and will be treated in the manner outlined in the paragraph above. Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will endeavour to contact the artist and pay the artist a resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. The steps taken to contact the artist will be at Bowerbank Ninow’s sole discretion and Bowerbank Ninow will under no circumstances be liable for failure to make payment to an artist under this clause. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Artists are invited to submit their contact details to Bowerbank Ninow to facilitate payment. Physical Condition of Artworks The artworks included in this auction range from having been made within the last decade to having been made more than forty years ago and, as such, the physical condition of each will vary. We encourage buyers to inspect the artworks in person when possible. However, we are happy to supply additional information and images of any artwork to those who cannot attend the viewing. Freighting of Artworks As per the terms and conditions, the buyer is responsible for the collection of any lots bought. This being said, Bowerbank Ninow is happy to assist with freighting and packaging where the buyer has special requirements. Any freighting or packaging will be undertaken at the buyer’s expense.

158


auction n°6 — august 2017

Conditions of Sale

REGISTRATION All bidders must complete a bidding card or absentee bidding form prior to the commencement of the auction. It is required that a correct name, address, telephone number and email address be supplied.

on, or before, the day after the sale. If a 20% deposit is made instead of full payment, a payment of the balance must be made within 5 working days of the sale. Eftpos, electronic transfer, bank cheques or cash are accepted as payment. Visa and MasterCard are also accepted but are subject to an additional charge of 2.5%. All amounts specified are in New Zealand Dollars.

BIDDING In each instance, the highest bidder on a lot will be its purchaser, subject to both the bid being above the lot’s reserve and the auctioneer’s right to refuse the bid that they have placed on it. By bidding on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) the bidder acknowledges that they may become the lot’s purchaser and that they are responsible for any payments required by their purchase of it. The auctioneer has sole discretion with regards to the increments at which bidding increases. No bids that have been placed above reserve may be withdrawn by the bidder. However, the auctioneer has the right to withdraw any bids before a lot has closed or return to a previous bid in the advent of a dispute about the highest bid arising. The auctioneer also has the right to bid on behalf of the vendor up to the reserve. Any person wishing to bid on behalf of a third party must provide Bowerbank Ninow with written authority to do so prior to bidding.

FAILIURE TO MAKE PAYMENT If the purchaser fails to fulfill their obligation to make the required payment(s), Bowerbank Ninow has the right to a) cancel the sale, b) pursue the purchaser for damages from their breach of contract, c) without notice, sell the lot to another individual, either by private sale or by auction, d) store the lot, either at Bowerbank Ninow’s premises or off-site at the purchaser’s expense. The difference between any lower amount made from the re-sale of the lot (as per point c) and the amount still owed by the original purchaser, will remain owed to Bowerbank Ninow by the original purchaser. If payment has not been made after seven days, Bowerbank Ninow has the right to charge interest on any monies owed by the purchaser of an amount equal to their bank’s then current interest rate for commercial overdraft facilities. If there is an unsatisfied  debt  then the applicant agrees that they be liable for and pay for all costs of recovery of the contract, which costs shall be collected by a debt collection agency. Costs payable by the applicant shall include, legal fees, commissions, fee’s and disbursements, and /or court fees and disbursements.

RESERVES All lots in this sale are subject to reserve and will be sold subject to bids meeting the reserve price, which is set by Bowerbank Ninow in consultation with the vendor or his/ her agent.

COLLECTION Purchased items must be collected, or freighted, at the purchaser’s expense within a week of payment being received by Bowerbank Ninow.

SUBJECT BIDS When the highest bid falls below the reserve, the auctioneer will announce to the room, and the bidder who has placed the highest bid, in particular, that the lot has been sold “subject to the vendor’s consent,” or some such words to the same effect. This “subject bid” remains binding until the vendor either accepts or refuses the sale, until which time no other offers may be put to the vendor. Prior to the vendor’s acceptance of the “subject bid,” it may be withdrawn at any time by the bidder who has placed it but, once accepted by the vendor, the bidder has entered into a contract to purchase the lot at the accepted price plus the buyer’s premium. BUYERS’ PREMIUM By registering to bid at auction and then subsequently bidding on a lot, the bidder accepts that a buyers premium of 17.5% + GST will be charged in addition to the hammer price of any lot sold to them. SOLD LOTS It is assumed that bidders have inspected any lots that they bid on, or made sufficient enquiries into the condition and authenticity of any lots that they bid on prior to the auction. Advice about each lot is made available by Bowerbank Ninow to any prospective purchasers but it is not intended to replace the expert opinion of third-party specialists such as conservators. Any purchase is ultimately made according to the purchasers own judgment and any bids made on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) constitute an acceptance of the lot’s present condition. PAYMENT Successful bidders are required to make payment to Bowerbank Ninow on either the same day as the sale or the following day. A deposit of 20% may be made in lieu of full payment if, for any reason, full payment cannot be made

159


Auction N°7 November 2017 Entries invited


Auction N˚6  
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